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Adapted from "Rear Admiral Martin D. Carmody, United States Navy, Deceased"  [biography, dated 7 March 2008] in Modern Biographical Files collection, Navy Department Library.
 

Adapted from "Rear Admiral Martin D. Carmody, United States Navy, Deceased"
[biography, dated 7 March 2008] in Modern Biographical Files collection, Navy Department Library.Adapted from "Rear Admiral Martin D. Carmody, United States Navy, Deceased"
[biography, dated 7 March 2008] in Modern Biographical Files collection, Navy Department Library.

Topic
  • Operations
Document Type
  • Biography
Wars & Conflicts
  • Korean Conflict 1950-1954
  • China Service 1937-1939, 1945-1957
  • World War II 1939-1945
  • Vietnam Conflict 1962-1975
File Formats
Location of Archival Materials
  • NHHC-Library

Martin Doan Carmody

27 October 1917-7 March 2008

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Martin Doan Carmody was born at Indian Harbor, Indiana, on October 27, 1917, son of Martin Hugh and Philinda Salinia (Doan) Carmody, both now deceased. He attended San Jose (California) State College, from which he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He enlisted in the US Naval Reserve in March 1941 and, as Aviation Cadet, had flight training at the Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Texas. Completing his training there, he was designated Naval Aviator and commissioned Ensign, USNR, to date from October 14, 1941. He subsequently progressed in rank to that of Rear Admiral, to date from June 1, 1968, having transferred from the Naval Reserve to the Regular Navy on December 4, 1944.

After receiving his “Wings” in 1941, he had carrier air training at San Diego, California, and in April 1942 joined Scouting Squadron Ten, attached to USS Enterprise, to serve as Assistant Flight and Maintenance Officer. “For heroism and extraordinary achievement . . . during the engagement with enemy Japanese forces off Guadalcanal on November 14 and 15, 1942 . . .” he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. He is also entitled to the Ribbon with star, and facsimiles of the Presidential Unit Citations awarded USS Enterprise and the First Marine Division, Reinforced.

In July 1943 he reported as Executive Officer of Bombing Squadron Eight and as such participated in combat operations from March to November 1944, while attached to USS Bunker Hill. He was awarded the Air Medal and a Gold Star in lieu of the Second Distinguished Flying Cross for outstanding service during operations against enemy Japanese forces at Palau, Woleai, Hollandia, Truk and in vicinity of New Guinea, the Carolines, Marianas, Bonins, Philippines, Formosa and Rykyus. In addition he was awarded Gold Stars in lieu the Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Air Medals and a Gold Star in lieu of the Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Air Medals and a Gold Star in lieu of the Third Distinguished Flying Cross for completing thirty combat missions in the Pacific area during the period May 1 to October 14, 1944. He is also entitled to the Ribbon for, and a facsimile of the Presidential Unit Citation awarded USS Bunker Hill.

In January 1945 he joined Bombing Squadron Ninety-eight to serve as Operations and Executive Officer and in April 1946 assumed command of that squadron. From November 1946 until July 1948 he served as Assistant Operations Officer on the Staff of Commander Carrier Division Three, which operated with Task Force Fifty Eight in the Western Pacific. Following instruction at the General Line School, Newport, Rhode Island, he reported in July 1949 as Assistant Professor of Naval Science with the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps Unit at the University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky.

In July 1951 he joined Airborne Early Warning Squadron Eleven, which from December 1951 participated in combat operations in the Korean area of hostilities. In July 1952 he assumed command of Fighter Squadron One hundred twenty four and as Commanding Officer of that squadron returned to the Korean area in November 1952. For outstanding services as Commanding Officer of Fighter Squadron One hundred twenty four, during operations in the Korean area, he was awarded the Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V”, and Gold Stars in lieu of the Seventh, Eighth and Ninth Air Medals.

For two years (July 1953-July 1955), he headed the Attack Aircraft Branch, Air Warfare Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, Washington, DC.  Assigned next to Fleet Air, Alameda headquartered at the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California, he remained there until July 1957, when he assumed command of Carrier Air Group Eight. Detached in July 1958 he returned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, where he served as Head of the Fleet Air Training Section until December 1959. The next month he reported as Executive Officer of USS Oriskany (CVA-34), which was deployed to the Western Pacific.

In February 1961 he became Assistant Director of Attack Programs in the Bureau of Naval Weapons, Navy Department. He remained there until August 1962, after which he served as Director of the Air Planning Requirements Branch, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. In November 1963 he assumed command of USS Zelma (AF-49) and in June 1965 transferred to command of USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63). While commanding those vessels he participated in operations in the Vietnam area. “For exceptionally meritorious conduct . . . as Commanding Officer, USS Kitty Hawk (CVA-63) and as Commander Task Group Seventy Seven Point Six during combat operations in Southeast Asia from November 15, 1965 to June 6, 1966 . . .” he was awarded the Legion of Merit. He is also entitled to the Ribbon for, and a facsimile of the Navy Unit Commendation awarded the Kitty Hawk for action in the Vietnam Area from November 26, 1965 to May 14, 1966.

He reported in August 1966 as Project Manager, Reconnaissance Electronic Warfare Special Operations and Naval Intelligence Processing Systems Project (REWSON), Naval Material Command, Navy Department, Washington D. C. He remained there until September 1967, when he as Director of the Command Control and Electronics Division (his title was changed on November 4, 1968 to Director of the Electronic Warfare and Tactical Command Systems Division), Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. In that capacity, he also served as one of the originators and Chairman of the Navy Quick Reaction Capability Board. He was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Legion of Merit “for exceptionally meritorious service from September 1967 to September 1969 . . .” in that assignment.

In September 1969 he assumed command of Carrier Division One and in December 1970 was detached for temporary duty with the First Fleet. “For exceptionally meritorious conduct . . . as Commander Carrier Division One, Commander Task Group Seventy-seven Point Three, and for designated periods as Commander Task Group Seventy-seven Point Zero from April 1970 to October 1970 during combat operations against enemy forces in Southeast Asia . . .” he was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of the Third Legion of Merit.

In March 1971 he reported as Commander Operational Test and Evaluation Force, headquartered in Norfolk, Virginia and in June of that year was assigned additional duty as Assistant Director of Operational Test and Evaluation in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. “For exceptionally meritorious service . . . during the period March 1971 to January 1974 . . .” he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. The citation further states in part: “Through his exceptional leadership, professional competence, and able administration, Rear Admiral Carmody effectively directed the efforts of over 480 assigned projects, both Navy projects and Department of Defense joint test projects, providing both the Department of the Navy and the Department of Defense with the necessary operational information to aid the decision-making process for weapon system acquisition. . .”

Since February 1974 he has been Commandant of the Twelfth Naval District, with additional duty as Commander Naval Base, Treasure Island, San Francisco, California.

 In addition to the Distinguished Service Medal, the Legion of Merit with two Gold Stars, the Distinguished Flying Cross with two Gold Stars, the Bronze Star Medal with Combat “V”, the Air Medal with eight Gold Stars, the Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon with three stars, and the Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon, Rear Admiral Carmody has the American Defense Service Medal; American Campaign Medal; Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with two silver stars (ten operations); World War II Victory Medal; China Service Medal; National Defense Service Medal with bronze star; Korean Service Medal; United Nations Service Medal; the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (Vietnam); and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon. He also has the Korean Presidential Unit Citation Badge and the Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with Device.

He died on March 7, 2008. 

END 

Published: Thu May 28 10:23:01 EDT 2020