Naval History and Heritage Command

Starting with the anniversary of the United States' entry into the war on 6 April 2017, through the anniversary of Armistice Day on 11 November 2018, the Naval History and Heritage Command will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Navy’s experiences in World War I. Throughout the commemoration, the Naval History and Heritage Command will feature documents that will allow you to see the war through the eyes of the participants. In addition to these highlights, you can learn more by exploring additional resources from the command.

 

Featured Documents

Defeat on the Western Front; unrest in Ireland; underwater mines that don’t work; a U.S. sub getting shot at by its friends— myriad issues this week.

 

14 April 1918. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Getting sucked into an expedition to Russia, Act 3.

 

15 April 1918. Memorandum of Admiral William S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations, Concerning Vessels in Naval Overseas Transportation Service. As the number of U.S. soldiers in Europe grows, so does the apparatus to support them.

 

16 April 1918. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to Admiral William S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations. Candid assessment of the situation in Europe—certainly not an optimistic read.

 

17 April 1918. Admiral William S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations, to Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. Should United States build different kinds of ships?

 

18 April 1918. Captain Nathan C. Twining, Chief of Staff, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels. Issues with mines imperil the North Sea mine barrage.

 

19 April 1918. Captain Joel R. Poinsett Pringle, Chief of Staff, Destroyer Flotilla, to Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. Troubles in Ireland because of proposed Irish conscription.

 

20 April 1918. War Diary of U. S. S. Burrows, Lieutenant Commander Harold V. McKittrick, Commanding. It doesn’t pay to be a submarine, any submarine, in World War I. 

 

21 April 1918. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. The Army needs coal carriers but arming them to Navy standards is an issue.

 

Learn More

Click the links below to access additional Naval History and Heritage Command resources on the Great War including photo and art collections, archival material, and publications.