The Navy Department Library

Related Content
Topic
  • nhhc-topics:ranks rates and ratings
  • nhhc-topics:regulations-and-guidance
  • nhhc-topics:presidents
Document Type
  • Publication
Wars & Conflicts
File Formats
  • Image (gif, jpg, tiff)
Location of Archival Materials

Shiploading

A Picture-Dictionary of Shiploading Terms

SHIPLOADING

A Picture-Dictionary
of Shiploading Terms

U.S. Naval Supply Operational Training Center
Bayonne, New Jersey (1945)

SHIPLOADING

A Picture-Dictionary
of Shiploading Terms

NSOTC logo

Produced for the

Bureau of Supplies and Accounts

at the
U.S. Naval Supply Operational Training Center
Bayonne, New Jersey (1945)

Silhouette of ship indicating Fore and Main masts.
ABAFT - To the rear of, e.g. the mainmast is abaft the foremast.
No image - only black block.
ABURTON - [A small tackle formed by two blocks or pullies.]
Silhouette of ship with arrow pointing at aft section.
AFT - Near, toward, or in the rear or stern of a vessel.
Silhouette of ship with arrow pointing at amidships section.
AMIDSHIPS - In or toward the middle of a ship.
Silhouette of ship with arrow pointing at apron section.
APRON - The part of the pier or quay which is between the enclosed structure and the edge, upon which cargo is unloaded.
Silhouette of ship with arrow pointing across width.
ATHWARTSHIP - Across the ship, from side to side.
Silhouette of ship with arrows indicating backstays.
BACKSTAY - A rope that serves as a support to prevent the mast going forward and also contributes to its lateral support, thereby assisting the shrouds. A backstay extends from the upper part of the mast to the ship's side at some distance abaft the mast.
Silhouette of ship with arrow indicating ballast area.
BALLAST - Heavy weights packed into the bottom of a ship to give her stability. Also, water carried in ballast tanks.
Silhouette of ship with arrows indicating ballast tanks.
BALLAST TANKS - Tanks provided in various parts of a ship for introduction of water ballast when necessary to add weight to produce a change in trim or stability. They are capable of being flooded or pumped out at will.
Images showing two types of battens.
BATTEN - 1. Strip of wood or steel used in securing tarpaulins in place. 2. Cargo battens are wood planks or steel shapes that are fitted to the inside of the frames in a hold to keep the cargo away from the shell plating, also called sweat battens. 'Battens down' refers to closing the hatches for sea by covering with tarpaulins and securing them.
Silhouette of ship with arrow across the width and 2 steel beams.
BEAM - 1. The extreme width of a ship. 2. Also an athwartship or longitudinal member of the ship's structure supporting the deck.
Drawing of a beam clamp.
BEAM CLAMP - A ringed fitting that can be fastened to a beam in order to secure a block and tackle in the hold for lifting or shifting cargo.
Drawing of 2 examples of a becket.
BECKET - 1. An eye for securing one end of a line to a block. 2. A rope eye as on a cargo net.
Drawing showing 2 definitions of belay.
BELAY - 1. To fasten. (i.e., belay a line to a cleat.) 2. To stop.
Drawing of 2 lines being secured together.
BEND - The act of securing one line to another.
Drawing showing 2 ships berthed.
BERTH - Any designated place where a ship lies at anchor or ties up.
Silhouette of ship with arrow pointing to between decks section.
BETWEEN DECKS - The space between decks. Same as 'Tween decks.
Drawing of a rope with a bend.
BIGHT - A loop or bend in a rope; though, strictly considered, any part between the ends may be termed the bight. Sometimes spelled bite.
Two examples of a bilge.
BILGE - 1. The rounded portion of a vessel's shell which connects the bottom with side. 2. Also, the part of a barrel at its greatest width.
Drawing of a bitt with two posts.
BITTS - A pair of short metal or wooden posts extending up from a base plate usually fastened to a dock or deck and used for securing lines.
Drawing of a block with parts marked.
BLOCK - The name given to a pulley or sheave, or a system of pulleys or sheaves, mounted in a frame or shell and used for moving objects by means of ropes run over the pulleys or sheaves. The prefixes single, double, triple, etc., indicate the number of pulleys or sheaves in the block. The principal parts of a block are (a) the shell, or outside frame: (b) the sheave, on which the rope runs; (c) the pin, on which the sheave turns; (d) the strap, by which the hook is held in position and which provides bearing for the pin; and (e) the hook. The opening between the sheave and the shell is called the swallow, the bottom of the shell is called the breech, and the device attached to the bottom of the block opposite the hook for securing the standing part of the fall to the block is called the becket.
Drawing of a gin block.
GIN BLOCK - A steel block consisting of a sheave supported by a skeleton frame, that is, without solid sides.
Drawing of a snatch block.
SNATCH BLOCK - A single sheave block having one side of the frame hinged so that it can be opened to allow the bight of a rope to be placed on the sheave, thus avoiding the necessity of threading the end of the rope through the swallow of the block.
Drawing indicating the head, slack-line and heel blocks.
HEAD BLOCK - The block attached to the top or head of the boom, also called the cargo block, and sometimes referred to as gin block. SLACK-LINE BLOCK - Fitting attached at the midpoint of the boom to support any slack that may develop. HEEL BLOCK - The block located at the bottom or heel of the boom.
Drawing of a boat hook.
BOAT HOOK - A long pole with a hook attached to the end, used for catching, holding, and steadying small boats.
Drawing of a bo'sn's chair.
BO'SN'S CHAIR - A piece of plank hung in two straps and forming a seat on which a man may be hoisted aloft or lowered over the ship's side.
Drawing of a bollard.
BOLLARD - A short metal column extending up from a base plate which is attached to a wharf and used for securing the lines from a ship. Also applies to timber posts extending above the level of a wharf for the same purpose.
Drawings of the various types or parts of a boom, - hatch, outboard, jumbo, crutch and table.
BOOM - A long, round, heavy spar, pivoted at one end, generally used for handling cargo into and out of a ship. 1. HATCH BOOM - The boom spotted over the hatch, also called the inboard boom, amidship boom, or up-and-down boom. 2. OUTBOARD BOOM - The boom spotted over the side of the ship, also called the burton boom or yard boom. 3. JUMBO BOOM - A heavy-lift boom capable of handling weights up to fifty tons. 4. BOOM CRUTCH - A structure used to support the boom when not in use. 5. BOOM TABLE - A structure built up around a mast from the deck to support the heel bearings of the booms and to provide proper working clearances when a number of booms are installed on or around one mast. Also called mast table or tabernacle.
Drawing of a ship with a paint brush and can.
BOOT TOPPING - An outside area on a vessel's hull from bow to stern between certain waterlines, to which special air, water, and grease resisting paint is applied; also the paint applied to such areas.
Silhouette of ship with arrow indicating the bow portion.
BOW - The forward end of the ship.
Drawing of cardo stacked in a step formation.
BREAK DOWN - To put cargo in step formation.
Drawing of a man removing 1 box from the step formation stowing.
BREAK OUT - To unstow.
Drawing of a boat along-side a pier with two breasting floats.
BREASTING FLOAT - A raft-like float used to keep a vessel, while secured, away from the pier. Also called Camel.
No image, only a black box.
BREECH - See illustration of BLOCK.
Drawing showing two examples of a bridle.
BRIDLE - 1. A length of line with ends secured to a spar or another line. 2. An assembly of wire rope or chain, used as a sling.
Drawing showing the loss of space inside a ship from irregular shaped objects.
BROKEN STOWAGE - The waste and loss of space caused by irregularity in the size and shape of packages or the incidence of hold pillars, frames, deck beams and other obstructions, and the failure to utilize available space.
Drawing of a gangplank.
BROW - A gangplank, usually fitted with rollers at the end resting on the wharf to allow for the movement of the vessel with the tide.
Two drawings showing a bulkhead within a ship and a swash bulkhead.
BULKHEAD - 1. A term applied to any one of the partition walls which subdivide the interior of the ship. The various types of bulkheads are distinguished by the addition of a word explaining the location, use, etc., such as longitudinal, transverse, watertight. 2. A Swash Bulkhead is a non-tight bulkhead fitted in a tank to decrease the swashing action of the liquid contents. It's function is greatest when the tank is partially filled, for without it the action of the liquid against the sides of the tank would be severe.
Drawing showing two types of bull ropes.
BULL ROPE - 1. A rope used for 'snaking out' cargo to the square of the hatch from the 'tween deck or lower hold, or used to work the cargo into these spaces. It is used in combination with a snatch block. 2. A rope used in connection with the topping lift. One end is secured to the topping lift and the other is wound on the drum of the winch.
Drawing showing bulwarks on each side of a ship.
BULWARK - The extension of the plating of the ship's side above the weather deck. It helps to keep the deck dry and serves as a guard against losing deck cargo or men overboard. Bulwarks interfere somewhat with the rapid handling of cargo, and therefore where they are removable, that section abreast of the hatch opening should be taken out.
Silhouette of ship showing the bunker.
BUNKER - A compartment used for the stowage of coal or fuel oil.
No image, only a black box.
CAMEL - Same as BREASTING FLOAT.
No image, only a black box.
CANT HOOK - See HOOK.
Drawing of four barrels and an arrow showing the cantline.
CANTLINE - The space or groove between two fore and aft rows of casks stowed side by side. When the bilge of one cask is laid in the cantline of the tier below and resting over the heads of four other casks, it is said to be stowed 'bilge and cantline.'
Drawing of two men turning a capstan.
CAPSTAN - A revolving drum, with vertical axis, powered by hand or by machine, used for handling heavy anchor chains, hawsers, etc.
Silhouette of an inclined ship.
CAREEN - To incline a ship from the upright, as by wave action, or mechanically for the purpose of making repairs.
Drawing of a barge ferrying railroad cars.
CARFLOAT - A barge used for ferrying railroad cars.
Drawing of a platform in the water.
CATAMARAN - A platform used for work alongside a ship. It is secured to two hollow floats.
Drawing of a cat head.
CAT HEAD - An auxiliary drum usually fitted on one or both ends of a winch or windlass. Also called Drum End, Gypsyhead. It is used to haul rope or cable.
Drawing of a man with a mallet caulking.
CAULK - To fill in the seams with oakum or cotton to make watertight.
Drawing of planking fitted on top of the double-bottom in the hold of a ship.
CEILING - Planking fitted on top of the double-bottom in the hold. Also called Ceiling Floor.
No image, only a black box.
CENTER OF GRAVITY - See STABILITY.
Drawing of a block with an arrow pointing to the cheek.
CHEEK - The side of a block.
Drawing of a barrel with arrows pointing at the chimes.
CHIME - The part of the cask or barrel at the end of the staves. Also spelled Chine.
Drawing of different chocks.
CHOCK - 1. Metal casting sometimes fitted with rollers, through which hawsers and lines are passed. 2. Blocks of wood used as dunnage, and blocks in the form of a saddle used in securing cargo such as vehicles.
Drawing of two blocks drawn together.
CHOCK-A-BLOCK - Two blocks of a tackle drawn together as close as possible; this condition is also referred to as Two-blocked.
Drawing of a kinked line ina block.
CHOKED - Fouled in the block, because of a kink, or because of slipping off the sheave.
No image, only a black box.
CLAMP - See CLIP.
Drawing of metal and wooden cleats.
CLEAT - 1. Metal or wood fitting with arms or horns upon which to secure lines. 2. Wedge cleats are fittings on the hatch coaming. Wedges placed between these and the battens secure the battens in place.
Drawing of two metal clips on a wire rope.
CLIP - A metal fitting used to grip and hold wire rope. Two or more may be used to connect two ropes in lieu of a short splice or an eye splice. Also called Clamp.
Drawing of coaming.
COAMING - The side wall of a hatch projecting above the deck around the perimeter of the hatch. Forms a support for the covers, prevents water from entering the hold from the deck and is a safety feature for personnel.
Silhouette of ship with arrows pointing to the coffer dam space.
COFFER DAM - Empty space separating compartments for the purpose of insulation, or to prevent the liquid contents of one compartment from entering another in the event of leakage.
Silhouette of ship.
COLLIER - Any vessel designed for the carrying of coal.
Drawing of a man with a hammer repairing a crate.
COOPER - Originally one who made or repaired casks or barrels, but now applied to anyone who repairs cargo containers of any description.
Drawing of 4 rools of varying sizes of rope.
CORDAGE - A comprehensive term for all ropes of whatever size or kind.
Drawing of a ventilator opening.
COWL - The opening to a ventilator.
Drawing of the frayed end of a rope.
COW'S TAIL - The frayed end of a rope; also called Fag.
Drawing of a cradle.
CRADLE - A support of wood or metal shaped to fit the object which is stowed upon it, such as boat cradle, boom cradle, etc.
Drawing of a piece of line spliced on another line to form an eye
CRINGLE - A piece of line spliced on another line to form an eye.
Drawing of a hatch with a cross beam.
CROSS BEAMS - Beams that support the hatch covers. Also called Hatch Beams. Cross beams which support the center of the hatch covers are referred to as Blind, She, or Queen Beams, while those with vertical flanges to retain the ends of the covers in place are referred to as King Beams. Strongback is a term used synonymously with Cross Beam, but may also refer to a heavy girder extending force and aft of the center of some hatch openings.
Drawing of a cross tree on a ship.
CROSS TREE - Athwartship pieces fitted on a mast. They serve as a foundation for a platform and also are used to secure the blocks used in connection with the topping lift.
Silhouette of a ship with an arrow pointing to the crow's nest.
CROW'S NEST - A lookout station attached to or near the top of the mast.
Two drawings of a ship showing the difference between the two types of cubic capacity.
CUBIC CAPACITY - 1. Bale cubic capacity is the space available for cargo, in cubic feet, to the inside of the cargo battens, on the frames, and to the underside of the beams, in other words the space that can be occupied by general cargo. 2. Grain cubic capacity is the maximum space available for cargo, measured in cubic feet, the measurements being taken to the inside of the shell plating of the ship or to the outside of the frames and to the top of the beams or underside of deck plating; in other words all the space into which grain would flow.
Drawing of 2 davits holding a boat.
DAVITS - Crane-like device used to raise and lower ship's boats or other weights.
No image, only a black box.
DEADWEIGHT - See TONNAGE.
Drawing of two steel weights.
DEADWEIGHT CARGO - Cargo of such a nature that a long ton stows in less than 40 cubic feet. See also Measurement cargo.
Silhouette of a ship with cargo on the deck.
DECK LOAD - Cargo carried on deck.
Silhouette of a ship witha wavy line indicating water line.
DEEP WATERLINE - The waterline at which the vessel floats when carrying the maximum allowable load.
Silhouette of a ship loading cargo with money symbols.
DEMURRAGE - The charge made when a ship is delayed while loading or discharging cargo.
No image, only a black box.
DISPLACEMENT - See TONNAGE.
Drawing of a sheet of paper with marks.
DOCKING PLAN - The ship's plan furnishing for docking purposes all necessary information concerning the underwater hull.
Drawing of a ship's door with the dogs closed.
DOG - A short metal rod or bar fashioned to form a clamp which is used to hold watertight doors or manhole covers in place.
Drawing of a donkey engine.
DONKEY ENGINE - A small gas, steam or electric auxiliary engine set on the deck and used for lifting, etc.
Silhouette of a ship with an arrow pointing to the outer bottom.
DOUBLE BOTTOM - A watertight space between inner and outer bottom of the ship, in which fuel oil or water ballast may be carried.
Two drawings - one showing the depth of a vessel below the waterline, the other a sling load of cargo.
DRAFT - 1. The depth of the vessel below the waterline, when measured at the bow is called the forward draft, when measured at the stern, the draft aft; the average of the draft forward and the draft aft is the mean draft. 2. The term draft is also used when referring to a sling load of cargo.
No image, only a black box.
DRAFT MARKS - See PLIMSOLL mark.
Drawing of a pile of lumber with some loose boards.
DUNNAGE - Any loose material such as lumber, burlap, etc., placed in between cargo.
Drawing of a man coming up out of a small hole in the deck.
ESCAPE HOLE - Small man hole in the deck.
Drawing showing an eye with rope looped through it and a hook next to it.
EYE - A loop for insertion of a hook, pin, etc.
No image, only a black box.
FAG - See cow's tail.
Drawing of a block with a rope across if horizontially and then extending downwards.
FAIR LEAD - A fitting, usually a block, used to change the direction of a line.
Drawing of two hands laying rope down and a piece of rope in a circle.
Fake - 1. To lay a rope down in the long bights side by side in order that it will run out clear or can be easily and rapidly paid out. Chain can also be faked. 2. Also one complete circle of a coil of rope.
Drawing of a tackle with the parts marked and one of a ship with a cargo fall.
FALL - 1. The entire length of rope used in a tackle. a. The end secured to the block is called the standing part. b. The opposite end, the hauling part. 2. The cargo fall is the cargo hosting wire or rope used through blocks on booms for working cargo. a. The Burton fall, also called outboard fall, is the cargo fall suspended over the side of the ship. b. The hatch fall, also called the up and down fall, or inboard fall, is the fall suspended over the hatch.
Drawing of a pier and the open storage area near the pier entrances.
FARM - Open storage area near the pier entrances.
Drawing of a measuring stick six feet long.
FATHOM - 6 feet.
Drawing of a tug boat with a fender in front and on the sides.
FENDER - Canvas, wood or rope used over the side to protect the vessel from chafing when alongside another vessel or dock.
Drawing of a fid.
FID - A pointed hard wood tool used to open strands of manila line.
Drawing of laying a floor with dunnage inside a ship.
FLOORING OFF - Laying a floor with dunnage.
Drawing of a ship's bow with the uppermost structure highlighted.
FORECASTLE - Uppermost structure on the bow.
No image, only a black box.
FORE AND AFTERS - See hatch covers.
Drawing of a man driving a fork truck.
FORK TRUCK - A gasoline or electric powered industrial machine equipped with two extended forks used to pick up, carry and stack supplies.
Silhouette of a ship with arrows pointing to the top and bottom.
FREEBOARD - The vertical distance from the waterline to the top of the weather deck at side.
Drawing of a ship's bow with holes in the lower portion of a bulwark.
FREEING PORT - Holes in the lower portion of a bulwark which allow deckwash to drain off into the sea.
Drawing of a rope with a worn area.
FRESHEN THE NIP - To shift the rope so as to take the wear in another place.
Drawing of three ships, showing the different meanings of full and down.
FULL AND DOWN - 1. A ship is said to be 'Full and down' when its cargo spaces are full and it is down to its marks. 2. With an extremely light cargo, the vessel would be full but now down to its marks. 3. With a heavy cargo, such as ore, it will be down to its marks, but is total cargo spaces will not be filled.
Drawing of a longshoreman giving directions.
GANGWAY MAN - Longshoreman who directs the winch operators.
Drawing of a post and gantline system.
GANTLINE - A line passed through a single block aloft, used for hoisting or lowering rigging, a boatswain's chair, etc.
Drawing of an overhead structure with a crane loading a ship.
GANTRY - An overhead structure, such as is used to support a crane.
Drawing of an opened door with the gasket area highlighted.
GASKET - Seaming material such as rubber, canvas, asbestos, which insures tightness in an opening such as a door.
Drawing of a block with a hook at the bottom holding a rope.
GEAR - A general term for equipment of all types.
Drawing of a ship with a gin pole.
GIN POLE - A portable pole rigged with tackles, which is used to handle loads where a boom is not available.
No image, only a black box.
GIRTLINE - Same as GANTLINE.
Silhouette of a ship with two areas highlighted.
GLORY HOLD OR HOLE - Space forward or aft used for storage of nondescript material. Lazarette.
Drawing of a gooseneck.
GOOSENECK - A swivel fitting that connects the heel of the boom with the mast.
Drawing of a gangplank with ropes on either side.
GRAB ROPE - A line used for steadying oneself.
Drawing of a grapnel.
GRAPNEL - Consists of a hook with several prongs arranged for clutching; also known as Grappling Hook; a small anchor with several arms used for dragging.
Drawing of a grommet.
GROMMET - A ring of rope used as an eye or as a gasket.
Drawing of a ship with an anchor and chains.
GROUND TACKLE - General term used for all mooring gear.
Drawing of a boat with the gunwale section highlighted.
GUNWALE - The upper edge of the rail of a ship or boat. Pronounced Gun'-el.
Drawing of different types of guys.
GUY - A rope or cradle used to swing or steady a boom. 1. Outboard Guy. 2. Midship, Schooner or Lazy Guy.
No image, only a black box.
GYPSY - See CATHEAD.
Drawing of a ship with the halyard highlighted.
HALYARD - A light line used for hoisting a flag or sail.
Drawing of a small block and tackle.
HANDY-BILLY - A small block and tackle for use about the deck, resembling awning pulley.
Drawing of an opening in the deck.
HATCH - An opening in the deck through which cargo may be handled.
Drawing of boards fitted to rest on top of hatch beams to cover a hatch opening.
HATCHCOVERS - Boards fitted to rest on top of hatch beams to cover a hatch opening. Also called Hatchboards or Fore-and-Afters. Pontoon Hatch Covers are large hollow metal covers, and only a few are needed to cover an entire hatch.
Drawing of a large rope securing a vessel to the pier.
HAWSER - A large rope used for securing vessels to a pier, for towing, etc.
Drawing of a ship with two booms with their ends highlighed.
HEAD - Upper end, as the head of a boom.
Drawing of a ship with two booms with their bottom sections highlighted.
HEEL - 1. Lower end, as the heel of a boom. 2. See also LIST.
Drawing of a rope tied to a pole.
HITCH - Method of securing a line to a hook, ring, spar, or another line.
Silhouette of a ship with five sections highlighted to indicate holds.
HOLD - Space below decks for the stowage of cargo.
Drawing of a portland hook.
HOOKS - 1. CARGO HOOK - The general name for hooks used to hoist cargo. 2. PORTLAND HOOK - A cargo hook with no swivel.
Drawing of a liverpool hook.
3. LIVERPOOL OR NEW YORK HOOK - A cargo hook with a single swivel.
Drawing of a western hook.
4. WESTERN OR WEST COAST HOOK - A cargo hook set on a ring which is suspended by two swivels.
Drawing of a seattle hook.
5. SEATTLE HOOK - A cargo hook on a swivel, mounted on a ring which in turn is suspended by two swivels.
Drawing of a wire sling hook.
6. WIRE SLING OR PEDRO HOOK - A simple form of hook used to secure a wire rope sling to a draft of cargo, such as a box, etc.
Drawing of a lip hook.
7. LIP OR SAFETY HOOK - A cargo hook used for added safety.
Drawing of a burton hook.
8. BURTON HOOK - A hook used to connect one cargo fall with another in one of the methods of cargo handling.
Drawing of a barrell hook.
9. BARREL OR CANT HOOK - Used in pairs to grip the ends of a drum or cask when hoisting.
Drawing of a sister hook.
10. SISTER HOOK - A hook made in two parts, set facing each other in such a manner that when combined they form a link.
Drawing of a box hook.
11. BOX HOOK - A pair of pronged hooks clamped on opposite sides of a box and drawn together by the rope which lifts the box.
Drawing of a bale hook.
12. BALE HOOK - A hook something like an ice tongs, used in handling bales.
Drawing of a longshoreman's hook.
13. LONGSHOREMAN'S HAND HOOK OR COTTON HOOK - The hook carried by most longshoremen, to facilitate the handling of boxes, bales, etc.
Drawing of a plate hook.
14. PLATE HOOK - A hook used in pairs to grip and lift metal plates. The weight of the plate causes the hook to grip tightly.
Drawing of a bridle hook.
15. BRIDLE HOOK - A type of hook used in connection with wire rope bridles to secure a grip on the cargo.
Drawing of a pelican hook.
16. PELICAN HOOK - A quick releasing hook device.
Drawing of four figures, right most figure highlighted.
HEADER - Longshoreman who works in a hold and at the same time directs several others.
Drawing of a ship at the dock with a crane.
HOUSEFALL - The system of cargo handling whereby a fall is passed through a block attached high on a pier structure and used in conjunction with the fall from a boom spotted over the ship's hatch. The fall passing through the block may lead either to the winch on the ship, or to a winch on the pier. HOUSEMAST - The structure on the pier to which a block is attached when using the housefall system.
Silhouette of a ship.
HULL - The framework of a vessel including all decks, deckhouses, but not the mast rigging, engines, etc.
Drawing of two figures and arrows pointing towards the center of the ship.
INBOARD - Toward the center of the ship.
Drawing of a jeep secured with four ropes.
JACKSTAY - A general term for any rope or rod used for securing purposes.
Drawing of a man heaving goods overboard.
JETTISON - To heave goods overboard.
Drawings  of a landing pier and a breakwater.
JETTY - 1. A landing wharf or pier. 2. A breakwater.
Drawing of a jury rig.
JURY RIG - A makeshift arrangement of cargo handling gear, rigged when regular gear has broken down.
No image, only a black box.
JUMBO BOOM - see BOOM.
Silhouette of a ship with the whole bottom highlighted.
KEEL - The backbone of a ship, running from stem to stern at the bottom. Some ships also have Bilge Keels, which run the length of the ship, at the turn of the bilge and contribute to stability.
Drawing of a ship with ballast area highlighted and a piece of pig iron.
KENTLEDGE - Pig iron used as ballast, or as a weight for inclining a vessel.
Drawing of a ship with the kingposts highlighted.
KINGPOSTS - A pair of masts used to support booms. Also called Pairmasts or Samson Posts.
Drawing of a tied line and one of a ship with a marker for a nautical mile.
KNOT - 1. A tie in a line. 2. A speed of one nautical mile (6080 ft.) per hour.
Drawing of a man standing on a pier looking out to sea as a ship passes by.
LANDLUBBER - Non-seafaring.
Drawing of a ship at dock being loaded and the lanyard highlighted.
LANYARD - A heavy piece of rope attached at one end to some object, which is moving or swinging, while the other end of the rope is used for controlling purposes. Also called Tag Line, Lead Line, Guide Line.
Drawing of a crate lashed to the deck.
LASHING - Rope used to secure deck cargo, etc.
Drawing of two ropes - opposite twists
LAY - Direction of twist in a rope, as left lay, right lay.
Silhouette of a ship with lazareete sections highlighted.
LAZARETTE - Same as GLORY HOLD (used as hospital on old time sailers).
Drawing of a lazy guy.
LAZY GUY - A guy that carries very little strain.
No image, only a black box.
LEAD LINE - See LANYARD.
Drawing of a lighter.
LIGHTER - A small barge-like vessel used for loading and unloading ships from the offshore side, and for transporting cargo locally about the harbor.
Drawing of a piece of rope.
LINE - A rope.
Drawing of a cargo boom with the linkband highlighted.
LINKBAND - A band fitted around the head of a cargo boom into which is shackled the topping lift, headblock, and boom guys.
Drawing of a ship listing to the right with the cargo piled on the right side of the ship.
LIST - The inclination of a vessel to one side due to the shifting of cargo or other reason. Also called Heel.
Silhouette of a ship with a dotted line along the load line.
LOAD LINE - General term relating to the draft of a vessel under various conditions, such as the load line for Winter, North Atlantic. See PLIMSOLL MARK.
Drawing of a portion of a ship with a door opened to a storage area.
LOCKER - A storage compartment on a ship.
Drawing of a man pushing a wheel barrow.
LONGSHOREMAN - Man employed in the loading and unloading of cargo.
No image, only a black box.
LUFF TACKLE - See TACKLE.
Silhouette of a ship with a bomb in a stowage section.
MAGAZINE - Compartment used for stowage of ammunition and explosives.
Drawing of a ship with the main deck highlighted.
MAIN DECK - Highest complete deck extending from stem to stern and side to side.
Silhouette of a ship with an arrow pointing to the mainmast.
MAINMAST - Mast, second from the bow.
Drawing of a man emerging from a hole in the deck.
MANHOLE - A hole cut in the deck to provide access below.
Drawing of a sheet of paper with detailed list of the vessel's cargo.
MANIFEST - A detailed list of the vessel's cargo, showing marks, shipper and consignee.
Drawing of a rope seized by marlin.
MARLIN - Two-stranded tarred cord used for seizing.
No image, only a black box.
MARLINE HAMMER - See SERVING MALLET.
Drawing of a marlinspike.
MARLINSPIKE - A pointed iron instrument used to separate the strands in splicing wire rope.
Drawing of a ship at dock, moving cargo with the marry system.
MARRY - To join any two objects, usually falls. The Married Fall system consists of handling cargo by two connected falls. Also called Yard and Stay method, or Union Purchase method.
Drawing of a ship with the mast highlighted.
MAST - A vertical structure supporting the booms.
No image, only a black box.
MAST TABLE - Same as BOOM TABLE.
Drawing of a man pulling a large cable towards him using a messenger.
MESSENGER - A light line used for hauling a heavier rope or cable.
No image, only a black box.
METACENTER - See STABILITY. METACENTRIC HEIGHT - See STABILITY.
Drawing of two ships, showing the two uses of midship guys.
MIDSHIP GUY - 1. A tackle connecting the heads of the outboard and hatch booms, also called Schooner Guy. 2. The inboard guys for the booms, where these are used in place of a single midship guy connecting the heads of the booms.
Drawing of a breakwater with a ship docked next to it.
MOLE - A breakwater used as a loading pier.
Drawing of a block with the score highlighted.
MORTISE - A groove for the strap of a block. Also called Score.
Drawing of the end of a hook with seizing.
MOUSING - Closing the end of a hook with seizing to prevent the sling from slipping off.
Drawing of a pin passing through the head of a bollard.
NORMAN PIN - A pin passing through the head of a bollard to prevent hawsers from slipping off.
Drawing of a worn spot in a rope.
NIP - A worn spot in a rope.
Drawing of a man with a mallet using oakum as caulk material.
OAKUM - A caulking material made of old tarred hemp rope fiber.
Drawing of two men and arrows on a ship pointing from the center to the sides.
OUTBOARD - Toward the side of the ship.
Drawing of a ship at dock, unloading cargo, with the outboard boom, outboard fall and outreach sections highlighted.
OUTBOARD BOOM - 1. The boom over the side of the ship. OUTBOARD FALL - 2. The fall leading from the outboard boom. OUTREACH - 3. The horizontal distance from the end of the boom to the mast.
Drawing of blocks of tackle with a weight and arrows showing separation.
OVERHAUL - To separate the blocks of a tackle. OVERHAULING WEIGHT - A weight used to keep the rope taut when a load is not hooked on to a tackle. Also used in cargo falls to prevent slack from developing.
Drawing with a figure in a box, hands up stretched and touching the ceiling.
OVERHEAD - The term used for ceiling aboard ship.
Drawing of a padeye.
PADEYE - A metal eye attached to a deck or bulkhead through which a hook, ring or line may be passed. Also known as Lug Pads, Hoisting Pads.
No image, only a black box.
PAIR MASTS - See KING POSTS.
Drawing of a wooden pallet.
PALLET - A wooden platform on which material can be stacked and hoisted aboard.
Drawing of a piece of rope with seizing on the end.
PALM WHIPPING - A short length of seizing at the end of a rope to prevent its unlaying.
Drawing of a man pulling a lrge barrell up an incline using rope.
PARBUCKLE - A method of rolling an object, such as a drum, up an incline by means of a rope.
Drawing of a rope with tarred canvas wrapped around it.
PARCELLING - Wrapping a rope spirally with long strips of tarred canvas, overlapped, in order to shed water.
Drawing of a patent block.
PATENT BLOCK - A block having roller bearings for the pin bearing.
Drawing of a patent eye.
PATENT EYE - A metal eye or socket secured to the end of a wire rope in place of a spliced eye.
Drawing of a circular saw blade and a pawl enageged in the teeth.
PAWL - Short hinged piece of metal used to engage the teeth of gear-like mechanisms so that recoil will be prevented.
Drawing of a man paying out line.
PAY OUT - To slack out on a line.
Silhouette of a ship with peak tanks highlighted.
PEAK TANK - Compartments at the extreme fore and aft ends of the ship either left void or used for water ballast.
Drawing of a jumbo boom with the pedestal highlighted.
PEDESTAL - The fitting which takes the gooseneck of the jumbo boom.
No image, only a black box.
PELICAN HOOK - See HOOK.
Drawing of a pendant.
PENDANT - A length of wire rope with a socket or an eye splice at each end.
Drawing of a pier with a building on it.
PIER - A structure used for loading and unloading vessels, which projects into the water, usually at right angles to the shore line.
Drawing of piles in the water with a crossbeam.
PILE - A timber driven into the bottom and projecting above water; those driven at the corners of a dock are called fender piles.
Drawing of a block with the axle pin highlighted and a belaying pin.
PIN 1. The axle of a block upon which the sheeve revolves. 2. A Belaying Pin is a rod of wood or metal that is inserted in holes in a rail for belaying or making fast certain gear.
Drawing of a ship with inserts of plimsoll mark examples.
PLIMSOLL MARK - A mark painted on the sides of a vessel designating the depth to which the vessel may, under the Maritime laws, be loaded in different bodies of water during various seasons of the year.
Drawing of a pole mast.
POLE MAST - A complete mast constructed from a single spar.
Silhouette of a ship with the poop deck highlighted.
POOP - Poop deck or partial deck at the stern over the main deck.
Silhouette of a ship with the port side highlighted and a porthole.
PORT - 1. The left side of a ship when looking forward. 2. An opening in the ship's side. 3. A harbor.
No image, only a black box.
PORTLAND HOOK - See HOOK.
Drawing of a preventer line.
PREVENTER - A rope used for additional support or safety, as, a preventer guy.
Drawing of a pricker stuck through a rope.
PRICKER - A small marlinspike.
Drawing of a tackle system.
PURCHASE - 1. A tackle. 2. The mechanical advantage secured by the use of a tackle.
Drawing of a wharf along the shore line witha ship docked.
QUAY - A wharf used for the loading and unloading of cargo, which is parallel to the shore, having water on only one side.
Drawing of two parallel pieces of rope secured together with seizing.
RACKING - Joining two ropes together by seizing. Drawing of two parallel pieces of rope secured together with seizing.
Silhouette of a ship with mast, funnels, etc. highlighted.
RAKED - Fore and aft inclination of the masts, funnels, etc.
Drawing of a ship and line with a rat guard.
RAT GUARD - A circular piece of metal fitted closely on hawsers and lines to prevent rats from boarding or leaving the ship while at the wharf.
Drawing of a ratline.
RATLINE - Light rope used as rungs between shrouds, for the crew to go aloft.
Silhouette of a ship with ice.
REEFER - A ship designed for the carrying of refrigerated cargo.
Drawing of a line passing through a block.
REEVE - To pass the end of a rope through a block.
Drawing of a ship and rigging highlighted.
RIGGING - 1. A term used collectively for all the ropes and chairs required to support the masts, yards, and booms of a vessel and to operate the moveable parts. 2. The act of handling and placing heavy weights and machinery.
No image, only a black box.
RIGHTING MOMENT - See STABILITY.
Drawing of a rose box.
ROSE BOX - The enlarged terminal on the suction end of a pipe which forms a strainer to prevent the entrance of material liable to choke the bilge suction pipe. Also called Strum Box.
Drawing of two blocks being pulled together.
ROUND IN - To bring the blocks of a tackle closer together.
Drawing of round line seizing a rope.
ROUND LINE - Three-stranded rope used for fine seizings.
No image, only a black box.
RUNNER - See as FALL.
Drawing of rigging and the movable part highlighted.
RUNNING RIGGING - That part of the ship's rigging that is movable, running through blocks.
Drawing of two lines holding cargo suspended, but the line with the larger cargo has snapped.
SAFE WORKING LOAD - The maximum weight which a boom, fall, tackle, hook, etc., will safely support. Abbreviated SWL. The breaking strength divided by the SWL is known as the Safety Factor.
Drawing of a salmon board.
SALMON BOARD - The platform of a platform sling.
No image, only a black box.
SAMPSON POSTS - Same as KING POSTS.
Silhouette of a ship with a net spread from it's rail to the wharf.
SAVE-ALL - A net spread from the ship's rail to the wharf to catch any cargo falling from slings during loading and unloading operations.
Drawing of a block with the score groove highlighted.
SCORE - Groove in the cheek of some types of blocks, to take the strap.
Drawing of a ship with water coming out of the scupper.
SCUPPERS - Drains from decks to carry off accumulated rain or sea water. They connect to pipes leading overboard.
Drawing of a rope with seizing.
SEIZING - 1. Light cordage used to bind a cut or spliced rope or cable. Also used to make an eye without splicing. 2. The act of applying seizing.
Drawing of a piece of rope with seizing.
SERVING - Same as SEIZING.
Drawing of a serving mallet.
SERVING MALLET - Hammer used to serve marline. Same as Marline Hammer.
Drawing of a metal shackle.
SHACKLE - A U-shaped piece of iron or steel with eyes in the ends, closed by a shackle pin. Used as a connector for wire rope and such parts and fittings as hooks, blocks, padeyes, etc., and as a connector for chain.
Drawing of little pieces of paper and string.
SHAKINGS - Waste rope, canvas, etc.
Drawing of a sheave.
SHEAVE - The wheel of a block.
Drawing of a rope tied into a sheepshank knot.
SHEEPSHANK - A knot used to shorten a rope.
Drawing of a block casing.
SHELL - The casing of a block.
Drawing of a partial ship showing a temporary bulkhead in a hold to prevent the shifting of cargo.
SHIFTING BOARD - A temporary bulkhead in a hold to prevent the shifting of cargo.
Drawing of a temporary wooden brace.
SHORE - A temporary wooden brace or prop used to support cargo.
Drawing of chain.
SHOT - Fifteen fathoms (90 feet) of cable or anchor chain.
Drawing of a ship and mast with shrouds highlighted.
SHROUD - A rope extending from a mast head to the vessel's side to afford lateral support for the mast.
Drawing of a rope.
SISAL - Rope made of fibre of the henequin plant.
Drawing of sister blocks.
SISTER BLOCKS - A shell with two sheaves, each of which hold a line, and these lines lead in opposite directions.
No image, only a black box.
SISTER HOOK - See HOOK.
Drawing of a ship with the outside highlighted.
SKIN - The inside or outside of a ship's plating.
Drawing of a box suspended from the four corners to a hook.
SKIP BOX - Type of sling. Also called Ammunition Scow.
Drawing of a rope with some slack.
SLACK - That part of a rope hanging loosely. The opposite of taut. Also, to pay out a line.
Drawing of a pallett on runners.
SLED - A pallet on runners so that the load can be drawn along the ground.
Drawing of a crate in a rope sling.
SLING - Rope, chain, or other gear used to suspend a draft of cargo.
Drawing of two piers with space for berthing.
SLIP - The space between two piers for berthing a vessel.
Drawing of a roll of small cordage.
SMALL STUFF - Small cordage.
Drawing of a ship with cargo on the right hand side and an arrow pointing to a new location.
SHAKE OUT - To unstow specific items of cargo, particularly by dragging to the square of the hatch.
Drawing of a length of rope with eye splices at each end.
SNORTER OR SNOTTER - Length of rope with eye splices at each end, used as a cargo sling.
Drawing of a man bracing himself and holding fast a line.
SNUB - To check suddenly, as a line from running out.
Drawing of a wire rope fitting attached to the end of the rope and secured by molten metal.
SOCKET - Wire rope fitting attached to the end of the rope and secured by molten metal which has hardened. Also called speltered socket.
Drawing of a span.
SPAN - A rope with both ends secured and a purchase attached to the bight.
Drawing of a wire stay connecting two Kingposts.
SPANNER STAY - A wire stay connecting two Kingposts.
Drawing of a spar.
SPAR - A mast, boom, yard, or any wood or metal pole used for similar purposes.
No image, only a black box.
SPIDER BAND - Same as LINKBAND.
Drawing of two pieces of rope spliced together.
SPLICE - To join the ends of two lines by tucking the strands of each into the other.
Drawing of a boom and an arrow indicating a direction to swing the boom.
SPOT - To swing a boom to any desired position by means of the boom guys and topping lift. Also called Trimming.
Drawing of a crate in a sling with spreaders.
SPREADER - A horizontal iron or wooden bar used to spread the legs of a sling or bridle and to keep them that way while the cargo is suspended. The bridle is thus prevented from cutting into the upper containers in the draft.
Drawing of an open hatch and the space beneath highlighted.
SQUARE OF THE HATCH - The space directly under the hatch opening, extending from the opening itself down to the bottom of the hold.
No image, only a black box.
STABILITY - The tendency which a vessel has to return to the upright position.
Drawing of two cross sections of ships - one shows arrows pointing down and the other has aletter "G" in the center.
The following are terms relating to stability: CENTER OF GRAVITY - The point at which the combined weight of all the individual items going to make up the total weight of the vessel may be considered as concentrated.
Drawing of two cross sections of a ship with a dotted center line - one has arrows underneath pointing upwards, the other with the letter "B" in the center.
STABILITY (continued) CENTER OF BUOYANCY - The point at which the buoyant force of water on the immersed portion of the ship's hull may be considered as concentrated. The position of this point changes as the vessel is inclined.
Drawing of a crossection of a ship showing the metacenter.
METACENTER - The point where the vertical center line of a heeling vessel is intersected by the vertical line through the center of buoyancy. The position of the metacenter remains fairly constant for small angles of heel of the ship.
Drawing of a crosssection of a ship showing the metacentric height
METACENTRIC HEIGHT - The distance between the Center of Gravity (G) and the Metacenter (M), usually called (GM). The greater this distance, the greater is the tendency of the vessel to right itself from any position of heel.
No image, only a black box.
RIGHTING MOMENT - The numerical measure of the ship's tendency to right itself from a given angle of heel. This varies with the angle of heel.
Drawing of a stanchion.
STANCHION - Wooden or metal uprights used as supports.
Drawing of a pole with standing rigging.
STANDING RIGGING - Rigging that is permanently secured, as opposed to RUNNING RIGGING.
Silhouette of a ship with the starboard side highlighted
STARBOARD - The right hand side of the ship when looking from aft forward.
Drawing of a stay from a mast to the deck of a ship.
STAY - A rope or cable running fore and aft from a mast to support it. See definition of BACKSTAY.
Drawing of a ship and the mast being raised into place.
STEP - To set a mast, gin pole, etc., in place.
Silhouette of a ship with the stern area highlighted.
STERN - The rear of a vessel.
Drawing of a man in front of cargo checking a list.
STEVEDORE - A person who contracts to load or unload a vessel, and employs longshoremen for this purpose.
Drawing of a ship with a white circle below the waterline.
STIFF - A vessel is stiff when its center of gravity is low, making it careen with difficulty. It returns rapidly to the upright position, with greater force. Opposite of TENDER.
Drawing of a cross section of a ship showing the stool.
STOOL - A platform in the hold, in which cargo is landed. It may consist of planking, a heap of sacks, etc.
Drawing of a rope being winched with a stopper rope attached to it.
STOPPER - A piece of rope or chain used to hold rope under load while being transferred from drum end of the winch to a cleat or vice versa.
Silhouette of a ship with the strake section highlighted.
STRAKE - A continuous row of steel plates running the length of the ship.
Drawing with a number of yarns twisted together and being twisted into rope.
STRAND - A number of yarns or wires twisted together and which in turn may be twisted into rope.
Drawing showing different forms of a stringpiece.
STRINGPIECE - 1. The heavy square timber laying along the top of the piles forming a dock front or timber pier. 2. A small apron between the edge of the pier and the transit shed which is wide enough for passage but not for cargo operations.
No image, only a black box.
STRONGBACK - See CROSSBEAM.
No image, only a black box.
STRUM BOX - Same as ROSE BOX.
Drawing of a block with the swallow highlighted.
SWALLOW - The opening in a block in which the sheave is located.
Drawing of a tabernacle.
TABERNACLE - A watertight structure for stowing gear and housing winches. Also, a boom table.
Drawing showing four types of tackle.
TACKLE - An assembly of ropes and blocks, (pronounced take'-l). Tackles are used to secure a mechanical advantage - that is, to enable the lifting of a heavy object by the exertion of a force considerably less than the weight of the object. 1. SINGLE WHIP - Has a mechanical advantage of one (one pound force lifts one pound weight, disregarding loss due to friction). A single fixed block. 2. GUN-TACKLE PURCHASE - Has a mechanical advantage of two (one pound force lifts two pound weight, disregarding friction). A single fixed block and a single movable block. 3. LUFF-TACKLE - Has a mechanical advantage of three. A fixed block and a movable single block. 4. TWO-FOLD PURCHASE - Has a mechanical advantage of four. A fixed double block and a movable double block.
Drawing showing four more types of tackle.
TACKLE - (continued) 5. DOUBLE LUFF - Has a mechanical advantage of five. A fixed treble block and a movable double block. 6. THREE-FOLD PURCHASE - Has a mechanical advantage of six. A fixed treble block and a movable treble block. 7. RUNNER - Has a mechanical advantage of two. A single movable block. 8. WHIP AND RUNNER - Has a mechanical advantage of two. A whip hooked to the hauling part of a runner.
No image, only a black box.
TAG LINE - See LANYARD.
Drawing of an open box.
TARE - The weight of containers, strapping, etc. Net weight plus tare equals gross weight.
Drawing of a hatch with a tarpaulin.
TARPAULIN - Heavy canvas used as a protective covering over the hatches.
Drawing of a ship listing.
TENDER - A vessel is tender when its center of gravity is high, making it careen easily, i.e., it is top heavy. It returns slowly to the upright position, with relatively little force. The opposite of Stiff.
Drawing of a thimble.
THIMBLE - A pear-shaped metal ring, grooved on the outside to take rope around it. It protects the inside of an eye-splice from wearing out.
Drawing of a figure stacking boxes.
TIER - To stack. Also, a horizontal layer of cartons, cases, etc.
Drawing of cargo supported by tomming.
TOMMING - Shoring which forces cargo down against the deck.
Drawing of 2 weights.
TON - 1. The short or net ton is 2000 pounds. 2. The long ton is 2240 pounds.
Drawing of two ships - one empty the other loaded.
TONNAGE - DISPLACEMENT TONNAGE (LIGHT) - The weight of the ship itself, empty. (Long tons). DISPLACEMENT TONNAGE (LOADED) -The weight of the ship including the cargo, stores, fuel, dunnage, water, and other items necessary for use on a voyage, when the ship is loaded down to its maximum draft. This weight is equal to the weight of water displaced by the ship when in the above condition. (Long tons).
Drawing of 2 groups of cargo - one with everthing and the other separated.
DEADWEIGHT TONNAGE - The displacement loaded minus the displacement light. In other words, it is the carrying capacity of the ship. (Long tons). DEADWEIGHT TONNAGE or CARGO CAPACITY TONNAGE - The deadweight tonnage minus items which are not part of the cargo, such as fuel, water, stores, dunnage, etc. The cargo deadweight is the maximum amount of cargo, in long tons, which the ship is able to carry.
Silhouette of two ships - one showing gross tonnage, the other net tonnage.
GROSS TONNAGE - This is a measure of volume, rather than weight. The internal space of the ship, including the holds and erections on the hull but not including certain exempt spaces, is measured in terms of cubic feet; this cubic feet figure is converted to 'gross tons' on the basis of one ton for each hundred cubic feet. NET TONNAGE - This differs from gross tonnage in that certain additional spaces have been deducted, such as crew's spaces, etc.
Drawing of a boom with an arrow indicating direction of lifting up.
TOP - To raise or lift up the boom.
Drawing of a tackle attached to a boom.
TOPPING LIFT - A tackle by which a boom is raised or lowered to the desired angle and held there in place.
Drawing of an enclosed structure on pier.
TRANSIT SHED - Enclosed structure on pier or quay, protecting cargo.
Drawing of a ship in the water.
TRIM - Position in the water, relative to the horizontal place. A vessel 'Trims by the head' or 'Trims by the Stern' when it inclines forward or aft.
No image, only a black box.
TRIMMING - See SPOT.
Drawing of a turnbuckle.
TURNBUCKLE - A link with two threaded bars inserted in opposite ends. Twisting the link draws the bars together. Used for tightening purposes, such as the securing of deck cargo, or securing standing rigging to dock.
Silhouette of a ship with the 'tween decks highlighted.
'TWEEN DECKS - Space between decks, usually that space between the main deck and the lower hold. Same as Between Decks.
Drawing of a less than full cask.
ULLAGE - What a case or tank lacks of being full.
No image, only a black box.
VANG - See GUY.
Drawing of a ship near a pier with a line attached and an arrow pointing toward the pier.
WARP - To move a vessel by means of a line or anchor.
Drawing of plates on a deck.
WASH PLATE - Plates fitted fore and aft to check the rush of bilge water from side to side when the ship is rolling.
No image, only a black box.
WASH PORT - Same as FREEING PORT.
Drawing of a dry log above the wate rline and a wet log beneath the water.
WATER LOGGED - Filled or soaked with water but still afloat.
Drawing of a ship with the weather deck highlighted.
WEATHER DECK - Uppermost decks which are exposed to the weather.
Drawing of a wharf.
WHARF - Place for loading or unloading vessels.
Drawing of a pile of money.
WHARFAGE - Charge for the use of berthing space.
Drawing of a tackle lift a block.
WHIP - Any tackle used for hoisting light weights; usually only a single fixed block.
Drawing of a rope with whipping at one end.
WHIPPING - Turns of small cord wound around the end of a rope to prevent its unlaying.
Drawing of a wildcat and chain.
WILDCAT - The large toothed wheel of the windlass that catches the anchor chain and carries it over the windlass.
Drawing of a winch.
WINCH - An engine usually electric or steam driven, secured on deck, and fitted with drums on a horizontal axis which are used for hoisting or lowering cargo.
Drawing of a vertical windlass.
WINDLASS - The powered apparatus used for handling heavy anchor chains, hawsers, etc. It may be either vertical or horizontal like a winch.
Drawing of a cross section of a ship showing the wing section.
WING - The part of the hold or 'tween deck which is to port or starboard of the square of the hatch.
Drawing of a large rope with worming wrapped arounfd it.
WORMING - The laying of a small rope or worm along the lay of a larger rope to bring the surface of the rope more nearly round for the purpose of parceling or serving.
Drawing of a mast with the cross spar highlighted.
YARD - An athwartships spar attached at its midpoint to a mast.
Drawing of a yard with the outer ends highlighted.
YARDARM - Outer end of a yard.
Drawing of a rope with the end frayed showing fibers twisted into strands.
YARN - Twisted fibers which may be twisted further into strands.

[END]

Published:Tue Oct 31 08:21:53 EDT 2017