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Navy Department Communiques 301-600 and Pacific Fleet Communiques

March 6, 1943 to May 24, 1945

Cover image - Navy department Communiques 301 to 600

NAVY DEPARTMENT
COMMUNIQUÉS

301-600
And Pacific Fleet Communiques

MARCH 6, 1943
TO
MAY 24, 1945


With Other Official Statements
and Pertinent Press Releases


Office of Public Information
United States Navy


For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office
Washington, D.C.—Price $1.00

_____________

FOREWORD

This publication, Volume II of Navy Department Communiqués, contains reprints of Navy Department Communiqués 301 to 600, which were issued during the period March 6, 1943 to May 24, 1945. With them in proper chronological sequence are communiqués issued by the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, at Pearl Harbor, T. H. and other points in the Pacific. The first volume of this series, Navy Department Communiqués 1 to 300, December 7, 1941‑March 5, 1943, was published in March 1943.

Augmenting the communiqués, in chronological sequence, are official state­ments concerning important contemporary events relating to the Navy's prose­cution of the war. These include the Proclamation by the President on the Surrender of Germany, the Joint Anglo‑American statements on submarine activities and anti‑submarine operations (the first made by President Roosevelt and Prime Minister Churchill in July 1943), a statement regarding commands in the Pacific by the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and pertinent press releases issued by the Navy at Washington and in the Pacific during the period covered by Communiqués 301‑600.

The original serial numbers of both the Navy Department Communiqués and those of the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, have been retained in Volume II.

The serial numbers of press releases of the Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, are retained. Other releases carry only date of release.

With few exceptions, the statements contained in this volume were given to representatives of the press and radio for "immediate release."

HAROLD B. MILLER
Rear Admiral, U. S. Navy
Director of Public Information

June 15, 1945

ii

CONTENTS
Page
COMMUNIQUÉS, NAVY DEPARTMENT NO. 301 TO NO. 600
     (March 6, 1943 to May 24, 1945)
COMMUNIQUÉS, COMMANDER IN CHIEF, PACIFIC FLEET AND PACIFIC OCEAN AREAS, No. 11 To No. 372
     (September 8, 1943 to May 24, 1945)
PERTINENT PRESS RELEASES ISSUED BY NAVY AT WASHINGTON, D. C., AND IN THE PACIFIC
     (March 6, 1943 to May 24, 1945)
JOINT STATEMENTS, PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT AND PRIME MINISTER CHURCHILL ON SUBMARINE WARFARE
PRESIDENT TRUMAN'S PROCLAMATION ON SURRENDER OF GERMANY
     Arranged in Chronological Sequence
1‑431
MAPS
1. North Pacific and Bering Sea 440
2. Paramushiru 441
3. Central Pacific 442
4. Marianas 443
5. Bougainville Area‑Solomon Islands 444
6. New Georgia Group 445
7. New Britain 446
8. Far Pacific 447
     NOTE—Map with CINCPAC Press Release No. 707—The Allied Offensive in the Pacific. Page 319.
Index
448

ABBREVIATIONS

N. D.—Navy Department.

CINCPAC—Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas.

CINCPOA—Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, Ad­vance Headquarters.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 301, MARCH 6, 1943
South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 5:

(a) U. S. aircraft bombed Japanese positions at Munda on the island of New Georgia and at Buin on the southeast coast of Bougainville Island.
(b) During the night of March 5‑6, a U. S. task force composed of light surface units bombarded Japanese installations at Vila and at Munda in the central Solomon Islands. Light Japanese surface forces attempted to drive off our bombardment group and two large enemy destroyers were sunk during the engagement. No U. S. vessels were lost.

2. The successful completion of the convoy mission of a U. S. task force in the South Pacific now makes possible the following announcement:
On February 17, a formation of seven Japanese torpedo planes located and launched an attack against the tack force. Five of the enemy planes were shot down and no damage to U. S. vessels was suffered.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 302, MARCH 7, 1943
South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 5:

(a) U. S. aircraft bombed enemy installations at Viru Harbor on the southern coast of New Georgia Island.
(b) During the night of March 5‑6, Japanese planes raided U. S. positions on Tulagi Island, 20 miles north of Guadalcanal airfield. Two men were killed.

2. On March 6:

(a) During the early morning a large force of U. S. planes bombed and strafed Japanese positions at Munda on New Georgia Island. Results were not reported.
(b) During the morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated) bombed and started fires in the enemy‑held areas at Kahili, Buin and Ballale in the Shortland Island area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 303, MARCH 8, 1943
South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 7, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated PB4Y) attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and on Ballale Island in the Shortland Island area and bombed enemy positions at Vila on Kolombangara Island. An enemy cargo ship at Kieta on Bougainville Island was also attacked by a Liberator. Results of the above attacks were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 304, MARCH 9, 1943
North Pacific.

1. On March 7, U. S. heavy and medium bombers attacked Japanese posi­tions at Kiska. Antiaircraft fire was encountered but no enemy planes inter­cepted. All U. S. planes returned.

1

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. During the night of March 7‑8, Liberator heavy bombers carried out minor bombing attacks on Japanese installations at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area, and at Vila and Rekata Bay in the central Solomons. Results were not observed. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 305, MARCH 10, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the night of March 7‑8, a Japanese plane dropped bombs on U. S. positions on Guadalcanal Island. No casualties resulted.

2. On March 9:

(a) During the morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated) dropped bombs in the enemy areas at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area and at Munda and Vila in the central Solomons. Results were not observed. All U. S. planes returned.
(b) Later in the morning, a large force of Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas) and Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF), with Wildcat escort (Grumman F4F), attacked the airfield at Munda on New Georgia Island. Hits on supply dumps and antiaircraft positions started large fires. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 306, MARCH 11, 1943

North Pacific

1. On March 9, a force of Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25) and Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24), with Lightning escort (Lockheed P‑38), bombed Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were observed in the camp area. Antiaircraft lire was encountered but all U. S. planes returned.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 10:

(a) During the early morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consoli­dated PB4Y) carried out minor bombing attacks on Japanese positions at Kahili, on Bougainville Island, and at Munda and Vila in the central Solomons. Results were not observed.
(b) Later in the morning a large force of Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF), Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas SBD) and Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F) attacked Vila, on the southern coast of Kolom­bangara Island. Several large fires were started.
(c) During the afternoon, U. S. aircraft intercepted 10 enemy dive bombers, with an escort of 12 Zeros, northwest of Guadalcanal. One enemy bomber and three Zeros were shot down.
(d) No U. S. planes were lost during these actions.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 307, MARCH 12, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 10:

(a) During the morning, U. S. aircraft attacked Japanese positions at Kiska and scored bomb hits in the target area.

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(b) Later in the morning, a force of Liberator heavy bombers (Con­solidated B‑24), Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑26) and Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38) again attacked enemy installations at Kiska. Antiaircraft batteries were bombed and strafed at low level and hits were scored. Three buildings in the camp area were damaged by heavy bomb hits. Antiaircraft fire was encountered but all U. S. planes returned.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 11, during the early morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated PB4Y) carried out minor bombing attacks on Japanese positions at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area and at Vila in the central Solomons. Results were not observed. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 308, MARCH 13, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the night of March 11‑12, two Japanese planes dropped bombs on U. S. positions on Guadalcanal Island. No casualties or damage resulted.

2. On March 12:

(a) During the early morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) carried out minor bombing attacks on Japanese positions at Ballale, in the Shortland Island area, and at Vila and Munda in the New Georgia Group.
(b) During the night of March 12‑13, a force of Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF) attacked Japanese positions at Munda on New Georgia Island. Fires were started in the enemy area.
(c) One U. S. plane failed to return from these missions.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 309, MARCH 14, 1943

North Pacific.

1. During the afternoons of March 12 and 13, Warhawk fighters (Curtiss P‑40) bombed and strafed Japanese positions at Kiska.

South. Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. During the night of March 12‑13, Liberator heavy bombers carried out minor bombing attacks against Japanese positions at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area, and at Vila and Munda in the central Solomons. Hits in the enemy area at Ballale started a large fire.

3. During the morning of March 13, Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas) with Wildcat escort (Grumman F4F) attacked Japanese positions at Vila on Kolombangara Island. Bomb hits caused heavy explosions and smoke in the target area.

4. No U. S. planes were lost in any of the above actions.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 310, MARCH 15, 1943

North Pacific.

1. During the evening of March 13, Army Warhawks (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightnings (Lockheed P‑38) strafed Japanese installations at Kiska and dam­aged several grounded planes.

3

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 13:

(a) Army Lightnings strafed and destroyed a small Japanese vessel near Rendova Island in the New Georgia Group.
(b) Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated) carried out minor at tacks on Japanese positions in the Shortland Island area and at Munda and Vila in the central Solomons. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 311, MARCH 16, 1943

1. A conference of American, British and Canadian officers has recently been held in Washington under the chairmanship of Admiral Ernest J. King. Commander‑in‑Chief, United States Fleet, at which the anti‑U‑boat warfare was discussed.

2. This conference was one of a series of Allied conferences which have been and will continue to be held in order that all phases of the anti‑U‑boat campaign can be kept constantly under review, that information and views can be exchanged, and that anti‑U‑boat measures can be adjusted to best advantage.

3. Complete agreement was reached on the policy to be pursued in the protection of Allied shipping in the Atlantic and in the best methods of employing the Allied escort vessels, antisubmarine craft and aircraft in defeating the U‑boat menace.

4. In addition to the U. S. Naval officers concerned, the following officers headed the various Allied missions who attended the conference:

Name Representing
Vice Admiral Sir Henry R. Moore K.C.B., C.V.O., D.S.O. Admiralty
Air Vice Marshal A. Durston, C.B., A.F.C. Coastal Command, Royal Air Force
Rear Admiral V. G. Brodeur Royal Canadian Navy
Air Vice Marshal N. R. Anderson Royal Canadian Air Force
      There were also present:  
Major General C. P. Gross United States Army
Brigadier General W. T. Larson United States Army Air Force
Mr. J. E. Cushing War Shipping Administration

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 312, MARCH 16, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the evening of March 15, Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas), with Wildcat escort (Grumman F4F), bombed Japanese positions at Vila and Munda in the central Solomons. Results were not reported. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 313, MARCH 16, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) One destroyer sunk.
(b) One large cargo vessel sunk.

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(c) One large transport sunk.
(d) One medium‑sized cargo vessel sunk.
(e) One medium‑sized cargo vessel damaged.
(f) One medium‑sized tanker damaged.
(g) One small cargo vessel damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Department Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 314, MARCH 17, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 15, heavy and medium Army bombers, with Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) support, carried out six heavy bombing attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. Results were not reported.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. During the night of March 15‑16, light naval surface forces bombarded Japanese positions at Vila on the southeast coast of Kolombangara Island. Good results were reported and no casualties were suffered by our forces.

3. On March 16: .

(a) During the early morning Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) harassed enemy positions at Kahili and Buka in the Bougainville area and at Munda on New Georgia Island.
(b) Later in the morning Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas), with Wildcat escort (Grumman F4F), attacked enemy positions at Vila. Results were not reported.
(c) Later in the day Lightning fighters strafed shore positions in the vicinity of Viru Harbor on New Georgia Island.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 315, MARCH 17, 1943

North Atlantic.

1. During the latter part of February, the United States Coast Guard Cutter Campbell, while operating as a convoy escort in the North Atlantic, encountered and sank a German submarine. The Campbell sighted the submarine on the surface and a collision course was set to ram her. The Campbell bore down on the submarine and opened fire with her deck guns.

2. The submarine was hit a glancing blow by the Campbell and drifted clear of the cutter following the collision. Several rounds were fired into the submarine at point blank range and the submarine settled slowly by the stern and sank. The collision tore the side plating of the Campbell and she was left partially flooded and without power of electricity.

3. In order to lighten the Campbell as much as possible a number of her crew were transferred to the Polish destroyer Burza which had been standing by to assist. The crew members from the Campbell were provided quarters aboard the Burza until landed at an Atlantic port.

4. The Campbell has since been towed to an Atlantic port for repairs.

5

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 316, MARCH 18, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 16, U. S. Army aircraft carried out the following attacks on Japanese installations and aircraft at Kiska:

(a) During the morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25) supported by Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38) bombed the main camp area and the submarine base. Hits were observed in both target areas.
(b) During the early afternoon, eight Lightnings engaged eight enemy planes in the vicinity of Kiska. Two of the enemy planes were shot down and an additional two were probably destroyed.
(c) Later in the afternoon, Liberators, Mitchells, and Lightnings again attacked the enemy submarine base and other installations. A large fire was started in the camp area.
(d) Still later in the afternoon, a group of Mitchells again attacked and scored bomb hits on the submarine base.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. During the night of March 16‑17, Liberator heavy bombers carried out minor attacks on Japanese positions at Munda and Vila in the central Solomons and at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area. Results were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 317, MARCH 19, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 18:

(a) U. S. Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) carried out minor attacks against Japanese positions at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area and at Vila in the central Solomons. Results were not observed.
(b) In the afternoon, a force of Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas), escorted by Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F), bombed Vila in the central Solomons and started a fire.
(c) All U. S. planes returned from these operations.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 318, MARCH 20, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 18, Kiska was attacked twice by Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell (North American B‑25) bombers with Lightnings (Lockheed P‑38) as escorts. Results were not observed. All U. S. planes returned.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. A force of Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F) strafed Japanese positions on Munda, New Georgia. All planes returned.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 319, MARCH 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 19:

Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas) and Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F) attacked Vila in the Central Solomons. Fires were started.

2. On March 20:

(a) Dauntless dive bombers and Wildcat fighters again attacked Vila.
(b) Dauntless dive bombers and Wildcat fighters attacked Munda on New Georgia Island. A fire was started.
(c) On the evening of March 20 Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) and Liberators (Consolidated) attacked Japanese positions on Kahili in the Shortland Island area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 320, MARCH 22, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 21:

(a) During the afternoon, Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas), supported by Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F), attacked Munda, on New Georgia Island, and Vila, in the Central Solomons. A supply area and an enemy gun position were hit.
(b) During the evening, a force of Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) and Liberators (Consolidated B‑24) attacked Japanese positions at Kahili, in the Shortland Island area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 321, MARCH 23, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 21, two groups of Army Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25) with fighter escort attacked Japanese positions at Kiska. Except for one large fire, results were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 322, MARCH 24, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 23:

(a) A force of Army fighters (Lockheed P‑38) strafed the enemy seaplane base at Rekata Bay in the Central Solomons. Results were not reported. All U. S. planes returned.
(b) During the night of March 23‑24, a small number of Japanese planes attacked the airfield on Guadalcanal Island. There was some material damage but there were no casualties to personnel.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 323, MARCH 25, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 24:

(a) During the evening, Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) and Navy Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF) attacked Japanese positions at Kahili in the Shortland Island area. A fire was started.

7

(b) A small enemy ship in the Shortland Island area was bombed with unobserved results.
(c) All U. S. planes returned from the above attack missions.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 324, MARCH 26, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 24:

(a) During the afternoon and evening, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell (North American B‑25) bombers, escorted by fighters, carried out four attacks against Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were scored in the target area.
(b) All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 325, MARCH 27, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 25:

(a) Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell (North American B‑25) bombers, escorted by Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38), carried out three attacks against Japanese positions at Kiska. Bombs were dropped on the runway, hangar and camp area. Low flying fighters strafed Japanese personnel.
(b) A U. S. search plane bombed Abraham Harbor on the southwest coast of Attu Island.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 26:

(a) During the morning Liberator bombers attacked Japanese Installations on Nauru Island. Hits were scored on the wharf, runway, officers' quarters and barracks area. Four fires were started and several Japanese planes were damaged.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 326, MARCH 28, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 25:

(a) In the afternoon a force of Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters strafed a Japanese barge in Roviana Lagoon, Munda, on New Georgia Island.
(b) On the night of March 25‑26, Canton Island in the Phoenix Island group was bombed by two Japanese planes. Light damage was inflicted.
(c) Additional reports reveal that on the night of March 25‑26, U. S. planes carried out two bombing attacks against Japanese positions on Nauru Island, instead of one attack as previously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 325. In the first of these attacks, Navy Catalina patrol bombers (Consolidated PBY) started fires. In the second attack (previously reported) Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated) scored hits on enemy installations.

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2. On March 27:

(a) On the early morning of March 27, a total of seven Japanese planes made five attempts to bomb Guadalcanal Island. In two of these attacks bombs were dropped, killing one, injuring 13 others, and causing slight material damage.
(b) Avenger (Grumman) bombers, escorted by Airacobra (Bell P‑39) and Wildcat fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Vila, in the Central Solomons. Six fires were started.
(c) In the early afternoon, Avenger bombers, escorted by Wildcat fighters, attacked Munda on New Georgia Island. A supply dump was blown up and a fire started.
(d) On the same afternoon, Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers, escorted by Wildcat fighters, bombed and strafed Japanese positions in Ugali, on the northeast coast of Rendova Island in the New Georgia group. One building was destroyed and another was set on fire.

North Pacific.

3. On March 26, a force of Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were scored on a hangar and in the camp area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 327, MARCH 28, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 26, a detachment of our light forces patrolling to the westward of Attu Island, the westernmost end of the Aleutians, made contact with a Japanese force composed of two heavy cruisers, two light cruisers, four destroyers and two cargo ships. The enemy force was headed eastward toward the Aleutians.

2. Gunfire at long range was exchanged. When the engagement was broken oft, the Japanese forces were observed heading westward.

3. Announcement of further details will be made when such information will not be of value to the enemy.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 328, MARCH 29, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 28:

(a) During the morning, Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) attacked Japanese positions at Buin and Kahili in the Shortland Island area. Hits were scored on revetments and a runway.
(b) All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 329, MARCH 30, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On March 29:

(a) During the morning, a group of Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters attacked the Japanese seaplane base at Faisi in the Shortland Island area. Five to seven Japanese planes were set on fire.

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(b) Following the attack on Faisi, this same group of fighters carried out a low level strafing attack on a Japanese destroyer off Alu Island (southeast of Shortland Island). The attack was carried out at such low altitude that three feet of the wing of one plane was sheared off by the destroyer's mast. The destroyer was left burning.
(c) All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 330, MARCH 31, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 29:

(a) A force of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell (North American B‑25) bombers, escorted by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Kiska. The runway, camp area and gun installations were bombed and strafed. All U. S. planes returned.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 30:

(a) In the early morning, Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) attacked Japanese positions at Vila in the Central Solomons and at Kahili in the Shortland Island area. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 331, APRIL 1, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 30:

(a) During the morning, Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters attacked Japanese positions at Kiska.
(b) During the early afternoon, Army Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) and Lightning fighters attacked Japanese positions at Holtz Bay, Attu Island. All U. S. planes returned.
(c) Later in the afternoon, Army Liberator bombers and Lightning fighters attacked the main Japanese camp area at Kiska. One U. S. bomber was shot down by antiaircraft fire in this attack.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On March 30:

(a) During the afternoon, a force of Dauntless (Douglas) dive bomb­ers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese In­stallations at Munda, on New Georgia Island. Hits were scored and fires started. All U. S. planes returned.

APRIL 1, 1943

GERMAN SUBMARINE DAMAGED BY NAVY GUN CREW

Fire from the guns of a Navy Armed Guard Crew damaged a Nazi U‑boat which engaged the S. S. Columbian, 30‑year‑old United States merchant vessel, in a surface duel fought in the Atlantic.

The submarine's deck was swept clean by the Navy crew's machine guns shortly after the submarine engaged the merchantman. Then a direct hit made

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at point blank range just below the U‑boat's conning tower caused a violent explosion. The submarine was dead in the water and in a seriously damaged condition when the merchantman steamed safely away.

The Columbian, built in 1913 at W. Cramp & Sons Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was undamaged.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 332, APRIL 2, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On March 30:

In addition to the two attacks reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 331, Kiska received two more attacks. During the afternoon, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters attacked the Japanese main camp area with un­observed results.

Later in the day, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers bombed and strafed Japanese installations and personnel from an altitude below 50 feet. Heavy explosions and large fires were observed.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On April 1:

(a) During the night of March 31‑April 1, a Catalina (Consolidated) patrol bomber attacked a Japanese surface force of five destroyers and one cargo vessel southwest of Kolombangara Island. At the same time Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) bombers carried out a low altitude attack on the same force. Results were unobserved.
(b) During the morning, 30 to 40 Zero fighters were engaged by a force of Wildcat (Grumman F4F), Corsair (Vought F4U) and Lightning fighters northwest of Guadalcanal Island. Sixteen Japanese planes were shot down. Six U. S. planes were shot down but two U. S. pilots were rescued.
(c) A force of Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Suavanau Plantation (southeast coast of Rekata Bay). Results were not reported.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 333, APRIL 3, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On April 1, a force of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Mit­chell (North American B‑25) bombers, escorted by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, made four attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored on the enemy main camp area.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On April 2, Lightning and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters attacked and set on fire a small Japanese cargo vessel at anchor at Vella Lavella Island, New Georgia group.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 334, APRIL 3, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) One destroyer sunk.
(b) One large transport sunk.

11

(c) Two medium‑sized freighters sunk.
(d) One medium‑sized freighter damaged and probably sunk.
(e) One destroyer damaged.
(f) One medium‑sized freighter damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 335, APRIL 4, 1943

North Pacific.

1. (a) On April 2, formations of Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) and Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25) and Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38) made eight attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits in the target area were observed. All U. S. planes returned.

(b) On the same day a force of Liberator bombers attacked Japanese po­sitions on Attu Island.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. (a) On April 2, a U. S. reconnaissance plane encountered a Japanese seaplane west of New Georgia Island and shot it down.

(b) In Navy Department Communiqué No. 332 it was reported that 16 Japanese Zero planes were shot down by U. S. fighters northwest of Guadal­canal. Further reports reveal that a total of 18 Japanese Zeros, instead of 16, were shot down by the U. S. pilots.

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 132, APRIL 4, 1943

United States Navy and Marine Corps pilots at Guadalcanal flying Douglas Dauntless dive bombers and Grumman Avenger torpedo planes sank or dam­aged 85 Japanese ships in the period from August 25, 1942, to February 28, 1943.

In addition, the rear seat gunners aboard these planes shot down 14 Zero fighter planes and 11 floatplanes.

As of January 1 these totals included: Five destroyers, 8 transports and 3 cargo ships sunk; and 6 heavy cruisers, 8 light cruisers, 15 destroyers, 2 submarines and 12 transports damaged.

On November 14, 1942, these planes aided in the sinking of a Japanese battleship after she had been disabled by American surface forces in the night action of November 13‑14.

The dive bombers and torpedo planes scored hits on 25 enemy ships during January and February. Most of these ships were destroyers and light cruisers which maneuvered at high speed.

The above totals include only damages inflicted by the Dauntless and Avenger planes, and does not include damages by other aircraft operating in the Guadalcanal area.

The Douglas Dauntless is a two‑place, low‑winged monoplane, powered by a Wright Cyclone engine. Employed more extensively in the Pacific than any other dive bomber to date, it has figured prominently in all major naval air engagements.

The Grumman Avenger, also powered by a Wright engine, carries a tor­pedo completely enclosed in its fuselage. It first appeared in action in the Battle of Midway. Both types were developed by the Navy as standard carrier‑based airplanes.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 336, APRIL 7, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On April 5, forces of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bomb­ers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, escorted by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, carried out five attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska and one attack against Attu. Hits were scored on enemy positions. South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 2. On April 7, a group of Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas SBD) and Lightning fighters attacked Japanese positions at Vila, in the Central Solo­mons. Fires were started.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 337, APRIL 8, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 6:

(a) During the morning, a force of Dauntless .(Douglas SBD) and Avenger (Grumman TBF) dive bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese installations at Vila, in the Central Solomons. Hits were scored in the target area and a large fire was started. All U. S. planes returned.
(b) In the early evening, three Japanese planes bombed Guadalcanal Island. There were no casualties to personnel and only light damage was reported.
(c) During the night of April 6‑7, Catalina (Consolidated PBY) patrol bombers attacked Vila. At the same time Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) attacked Japanese installations at Kahili, in the Shortland Island area, and also small enemy shipping between Choiseul Island and Santa Isabel Island.

2. On April 7:

(a) During the early morning, a force of Dauntless and Avenger dive bombers, escorted by fighters, attacked Vila. Hits were scored on Japanese antiaircraft positions and the camp area. A large fire was started.
(b) In the early afternoon, a force of Avenger and Dauntless dive bombers, escorted by fighters, attacked Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. A Japanese four‑engine flying boat was destroyed. All U. S. planes re­turned.
(c) Fifty Japanese bombers, escorted by 48 Zero fighters, attacked U. S. shipping in the vicinity of Guadalcanal Island. U. S. fighters en­gaged the enemy and shot down 21 Zeros, 5 dive bombers, and 10 other enemy planes whose types were not reported. Another enemy plane was later observed to crash. U. S. planes lost were 1 Airacobra, and 6 Wildcat fighters. One U. S. pilot was rescued.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 338, APRIL 9, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 8:

Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) light bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kahili in the Shortland Island area. Due to bad weather, observation of results was not reported.

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2. In Navy Department Communiqué No. 337 it was reported that a total of 37 Japanese planes were destroyed in an enemy attack on U. S. shipping in the vicinity of Guadalcanal Island. Later reports have been received re­vealing that a total of 34 Japanese planes, instead of 37, were destroyed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 339, APRIL 9, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. Further reports of the Japanese air attack on Allied shipping in the vicinity of Guadalcanal Island on April 7 (as reported by Navy Department Communiqué No. 337) reveal that the following damage was suffered:

(a) One destroyer damaged by bombs and later sunk while being towed.
(b) One tanker sunk as result of damage by bombs.
(c) One corvette sunk as result of damage by bombs.
(d) One small fuel oil boat sunk.

2. Next of kin of all casualties will be notified by telegram as soon as possible.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 340, APRIL 11, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. More complete reports of the Japanese air attack on Allied shipping in the vicinity of Guadalcanal Island on April 7 have been received by the Navy Department, making necessary a revision of the table of losses previously an­nounced in Communiqués Nos. 337, 338 and 339. The previous communiqués were based on preliminary reports which were announced as soon as possible after being received in the Navy Department.

2. Losses sustained by Allied forces from enemy air attack are revised to stand as follows:

(a) One destroyer sunk.
(b) One tanker sunk.
(c) One corvette sunk.
(d) One small fuel oil boat damaged.
(e) A total of seven planes lost.

3. Recapitulation and additional verification establish enemy plane losses as:

(a) 25 Zero fighters shot down.
(b) 12 dive bombers shot down.
(c) 2 planes of unidentified type observed to crash in the water.

4. Of the seven U. S. pilots downed with their planes, five have been rescued.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 341, APRIL 12, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the night of April 10‑11, Catalina patrol bombers (Consolidated PBY) bombed Japanese installations at Munda on New Georgia Island, start­ing a small fire.

2. On April 11:

(a) In the early morning, Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated

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B‑24) attacked Kahili in the Shortland Island area. Hits were made on the airfield runway and adjacent antiaircraft positions.
(b) On the same morning, a force of Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF) carried out an attack on Munda. Fires and heavy explosions resulted.

North Pacific.

3. Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters twice attacked Kiska during the afternoon of April 10. Results were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 342, APRIL 13, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 11:

(a) During the evening, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters strafed Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. A num­ber of Japanese antiaircraft positions were silenced.
(b) During the night, Flying Fortress heavy bombers (Boeing B‑17) attacked Kahili in the Shortland Island area. Two Fortresses failed to return, apparently due to unfavorable weather. Results of the attack were unobserved.
(c) During the same night, a Catalina patrol bomber (Consolidated PBY) attacked Munda on New Georgia Island.

2. On April 12:

A force of Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF) and Wildcat fight­ers (Grumman F4F) bombed and strafed Vila on Kolombangara Island. Fires were started in the camp area. In this same operation Avengers attacked Ringi Cove, three miles northwest of Vila, and started a fire. No U. S. planes were lost in these two attacks.

North Pacific.

3. On April 11, formations of U. S. army planes, composed of Mitchells (North American B‑25), Warhawks (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightnings (Lock­heed P‑38), carried out four bombing attacks on Kiska. Hits were scored and fires were started in the enemy camp area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 343, APRIL 14, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the night of April 12‑13, Army Liberator heavy bombers (Con­solidated B‑24) bombed Munda, on New Georgia Island.

2. On April 13, during the morning, Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF), escorted by Corsair (Vought F4U) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fight­ers, bombed and strafed Munda. Bombs were dropped on the runway and dispersal areas, and fires were started from hits scored on an ammunition dump and in the camp area.

North Pacific.

3. On April 12, formations of Army Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25), with Corsair (Vought F4U) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, carried out six attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored on the runway, gun emplacements and the main camp area.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 344, APRIL 15, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On April 13, during the day, ten attacks were carried out against Jap­anese installations at Kiska by formations of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) light bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters. Beached enemy float planes were strafed. Many hits were scored and fires were started in the runway and main camp area.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On April 14, during the afternoon, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters bombed and strafed Japanese barges and installations in Viru Harbor, New Georgia Island. Several fires were started.

APRIL 15, 1943

ARMY BOMBER SINKS SUBMARINE IN CARIBBEAN

A heavy bomber of the U. S. Army Air Forces caught a German submarine cruising on the surface in the Caribbean Sea several months ago, and destroyed the undersea raider with depth charges. A member of the submarine's crew, who survived the attack, later was picked up by a United States destroyer.

The plane, piloted by Capt. Howard Burhanna, Jr., U. S. Army Air Corps, of 1747 Maryland Street, Philadelphia, was on a patrol flight when the sub­marine was sighted on the surface, eight miles away. Changing his course Captain Burhanna made for the sub, and in a few minutes was over his target. The sub had not had time to submerge, and was still on the surface when the plane released its depth charges.

Immediately after the attack, air and oil bubbles began rising from the water with gradually increasing intensity. Thirty‑seven minutes later the men in the bomber spotted a large volume of oil and air bubbles surging to the surface. The oil slick spread out in a large circular area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 345, APRIL 16, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 15:

(a) During the morning, Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF), escorted by Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F), bombed Japanese installa­tions at Munda, on New Georgia Island.
(b) During the afternoon, Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas), with Wildcat fighter escort, attacked Japanese installations at Vila on Kolombangara Island. A building, believed to a power generating station, was destroyed.
(c) Still later in the day, Avenger torpedo bombers, escorted by Corsair (Vought F4U) and Wildcat fighters, attacked and sank an 80‑foot Japanese vessel in Rekata Bay, on Santa Isabel Island.

North. Pacific.

2. On April 14, formations of Army Liberator heavy bombers (Consoli­dated B‑24) and Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25), supported

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by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, carried out eight attacks on Kiska. Hits were scored in the Japanese camp area, dam­aging the runway and revetment area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 346, APRIL 17, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On April 14, two additional attacks were made by Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters against Japanese in­stallations at Kiska, raising to ten the total of attacks on that date.

2. On April 15, Japanese installations at Kiska were attacked thirteen times by formations of U. S. Army planes. Liberator heavy bombers (Con­solidated B‑24), Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25), and Light­ning and Warhawk fighters carried out these raids. Many hits were scored in the main camp and on the runway and hangar areas, causing numerous fires and explosions. One heavy bomber was shot down by enemy antiaircraft fire.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 347, APRIL 17, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) One large supply ship sunk.
(b) Two medium‑sized cargo ships sunk.
(c) One large minelayer sunk.
(d) One small patrol ship sunk.
(e) One destroyer damaged.
(f) One medium‑sized transport damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 348, APRIL 18, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 18:

(a) During the night, Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17), Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) tor­pedo bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and shipping at Ballale, in the Shortland Island area. A tanker and a cargo ship were possibly damaged.
(b) During the night, two Japanese planes attacked Guadalcanal Island, resulting in light casualties to U. S. personnel and minor damage to material. It is believed that one of the Japanese planes was shot down by U. S. antiaircraft fire.

2. On April 18, a number of Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters engaged two Japanese bombers, escorted by sip Zero fighters, over Kahili in the Short­land Island area. The two bombers and three of the Zeros were shot down. Later, another Japanese bomber was encountered by the same group of Light­nings and destroyed. One U. S. fighter is missing.

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North Pacific.

3. On April 16:

(a) A formation of Army Liberator heavy bombers bombed Japanese installations on Attu Island.
(b) On the same day, formations of Army Liberator heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, escorted by Light­ning and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, carried out ten attacks against Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were scored in the vicinity of the run­way and in the main camp area. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 349, APRIL 19, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 17

(a) In the afternoon, Dauntless (Douglas) light bombers and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters bombed the Japanese dispersal and runway areas at Munda, in the Central Solomons.
(b) During the night, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers at­tacked two Japanese cargo vessels in the Shortland Island area. Five hits were scored on a large ship of about 10,000 tons which was later seen in a sinking condition. Two other cargo vessels were encountered by Avengers and two hits were scored on one ship and a number of near hits on the other vessel.
(c) The same night, formations of Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) and Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers and Avengers attacked Kahili, in the Shortland Island area. Hits were scored on the runway and dispersal areas, resulting in fires visible for 30 miles.

North Pacific.

2. On April 17:

(a) During the afternoon, a formation of Army Liberators bombed Japanese installations on Attu Island.
(b) On the same day Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, escorted by Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, carried out nine attacks on Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were observed in the camp and hangar area. One building was en­tirely destroyed, gun positions were silenced and three beached planes were strafed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 350, APRIL 20, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 18:

(a) During the night, Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Munda, in the Central Solomons. Hits were scored on the runway and a large explosion resulted.
(b) The same night, Guadalcanal Island was bombed by Japanese planes, resulting in slight casualties to U. S. personnel and very slight damage to materiel. One of the Japanese bombers was shot down.

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North Pacific.

2. On April 18, Japanese positions at Kiska were attacked nine times by formations of Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters. In these attacks a total of seventeen tons of bombs was dropped. Hits were scored in the North Head, Salmon Lagoon and main camp areas. Fires were started in the submarine base area.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 351, APRIL 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 19:

(a) Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kieta, on Bougainville Island.
(b) Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers attacked the Japanese airfield at Kahili, in the Shortland Island area.
(c) A second formation of Avengers attacked Japanese shipping at Tonolei Harbor, on Bougainville Island. A direct hit was scored on one freighter and several near hits were scored on a second freighter.

2. On April 20, a force of Avengers and Dauntless (Douglas) light bomb­ers bombed Japanese installations at Munda, in the Central Solomons. Sev­eral antiaircraft positions were silenced and a large fire was started.

North Pacific.

3. On April 19, Japanese installations at Kiska were attacked fifteen times by formations of Army planes. Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters carried out these raids. The bombing and strafing attacks were made at varying altitudes and resulted in numerous hits on the main camp area, the runway and defensive positions. Fires were also started.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 352, APRIL 22, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 20:

During the night, Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers bombed Japan­ese installations in Numa Numa Harbor, Bougainville Island. Bad weather prevented observation of results.

2. On April 21:

A large force of Army bombers carried out a daylight bombing attack on Nauru Island, in the Gilbert Island Group.

In spite of heavy antiaircraft fire and defending fighter planes much dam­age was done to Japanese installations. U. S. pilots shot down five and pos­sibly seven Zero fighters. All U. S. planes returned.

North Pacific.

3. On April 20:

Japanese installations at Kiska were attacked ten times by formations of Army planes. Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters carried out these raids. Strafing from various altitudes was carried out in conjunction with bombing. Hits were scored on the runway and camp area.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 353, APRIL 23, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are, east longitude). .

1. On April 21:

(a) A group of U. S. fighter planes strafed Japanese Positions in the Bougainville Strait area. Enemy installations near Cape Alexander, on Choiseul Island, were also bombed.
(b) During the night, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) and Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, supported by Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, attacked Poporang Island in the Shortland Island area. Two of the many fires which were started were visible for 40 miles.
(c) During the same night, Avenger torpedo bombers attacked an enemy cargo ship near Buin in the Shortland Island area. Enemy lighter interception prevented observation of results, but it is believed hits were scored on the ship. All U. S. planes returned.

2. On April 22:

During the early morning, a group of enemy bombers raided Funafuti, U. S. occupied position in the Ellice Island Group. Light casualties to personnel were suffered and minor damage was inflicted.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 354, APRIL 24, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 22:

(a) During the afternoon, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers attacked Japanese installations at Munda in the Central Solomons. Bombs were dropped on the runway and antiaircraft positions were silenced.
(b) Later the same afternoon, Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters carried out a strafing attack on Munda and set fire to three grounded enemy planes.
(c) Following the strafing of the Munda area, the Corsairs raided Vila, on Kolombangara Island in the New Georgia Group.
(d) During the night, Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers bombed Kahili in the Shortland Island area.
(e) All U. S. Planes returned from the above attack missions.

2. On April 23: During the early morning, Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers, escorted by Corsair fighters, bombed and strafed Japanese positions at Rekata Bay, on Santa Isabel Island. All U. S. planes returned.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 355, APRIL 25, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 24: During the morning Avenger torpedo bombers (Grumman TBF) and Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas) escorted by Wildcat fighters (Grumman F4F), attacked Munda on New Georgia Island. Buildings were destroyed, a large fire was started, and a heavy explosion was observed.

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North Pacific.

2. On April 24th

Despite bad weather, Army Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38) bombed and strafed Kiska during the morning. Results were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 356, APRIL 26, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 25, during the early morning, a group of four Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters strafed Japanese installations on Kolombangara Island, in the Central Solomons.

2. Later the same group of Corsairs sighted and attacked ten enemy bombers, escorted by twenty Zeros, 95 miles northwest of Lunga Point, on Guadalcanal Island. During the aerial combat which followed five Zeros were shot down. Two U. S. planes failed to return.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 357, APRIL 27, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 26, during the early morning, a group of Liberator (Consoli­dated B Z4) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kahili in the Shortland Island area.

North Pacific.

2. On April 25:

(a) During the day, Japanese installations at Kiska were attacked thirteen times by formations of Army planes. Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters participated in these raid. Although bomb hits were made on enemy positions, poor visibility pre­vented complete observation of results.
(b) On the same day, a group of Liberators attacked Attu Island and scored hits on the runway and other installations.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 358, APRIL 28, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 27:

(a) During the early morning, a group of Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area and at Vila in the Central Solomons. Fires were started at Ballale and at Vila.
(b) Later in the morning, five Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers carried out a second attack on Kahili. Poor visibility prevented observation of results.

North Pacific.

2. On April 26, formations of Army planes carried out eleven attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Liberator heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters participated in these raids. Hits were scored in the enemy main camp area, on the runway and a number of buildings were destroyed. Damage was also inflicted on North Head. Canadian pilots, flying Warhawks, executed two other attacks.

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APRIL 28, 1943

NAVY PATROL PLANE DESTROYS ENEMY SUBMARINE

Trapping an enemy submarine on the surface some months ago, a Navy Catalina patrol bomber dropped depth‑charges squarely on the undersea raider and sank her in a surprise attack.

Lt. Richard E. Schreder, USNR, 27, of 837 Wyle Avenue, Toledo, Ohio, was bringing his heavy patrol plane in from a routine flight over the Atlantic when his radioman reported that he had sighted a large enemy submarine cruising on the surface. Course was immediately changed, and preparations made for attack.

Carefully keeping the sun directly behind him to blind observers on the raider, Lt. Schreder nosed his heavy plane over in a steep dive, and reared down on the sub. As he leveled off at a low altitude, the submarine attempted to dive, but it was too late. A depth‑charge dropped by the bomber exploded just under the stern.

The sub again made an attempt to crash dive, but before she could sub­merge a second charge was released. It struck squarely on the deck and exploded in full view of the crew of the plane. Wreckage was strewn over the surface of the ocean.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 359, APRIL 29, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 23, a force of Army bombers attacked the Japanese air base at Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. Extensive damage to enemy installations was indicated. Enemy fighter opposition and antiaircraft fire was encountered, but all U. S. planes returned.

2. On April 28, Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili in the Shortland Island area and at Vila in the Central Solomons. Results were unobserved.

North Pacific.

3. On April 24, during the morning, U. S. surface units bombarded Japa­nese positions at Holtz Bay and at Chichagof Harbor, Attu Island. Several fires were started by the bombardment. No enemy gun fire was encountered. No further details have been reported.

4. On April 27, despite bad weather, Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters carried out one attack against Japanese installations at Kiska. Re­sults were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 360, APRIL 30, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 28, during the morning, a Japanese patrol of one officer and eight men, attempting to escape from Guadalcanal, was intercepted and wiped out by U. S. troops in the vicinity of Beaufort Bay, on the western coast of Guadalcanal Island.

2. On April 29:

(a) During the early morning, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers bombed the Japanese‑held area at Kahili in the Shortland Island area. Poor visibility prevented observation of results.

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(b) Later in the morning, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by Lightning (Lock­heed P‑38) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, bombed Japanese installa­tions at Gatere on the southwestern coast of Kolombangara Island in the Central Solomons. An antiaircraft position and a pier were destroyed.
(c) During the afternoon, a group of Avenger torpedo bombers and Dauntless dive bombers, with Lightning and Corsair escort, attacked Pelpeli, two miles northwest of Gatere on Kolombangara Island. A fire was started.
(d) A formation of Avenger torpedo bombers and Dauntless dive bombers, supported by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japa­nese positions at Munda in the Central Solomons. Hits were scored on the runway, on the revetment area and on an antiaircraft position.
(e) All U. S. planes returned from the above attack missions.

APRIL 30, 1943

JAPANESE SUBMARINE SUNK BY PATROL BOMBER

Blasted by two depth charges dropped from a Consolidated Catalina patrol bomber, a Japanese submarine was sunk while prowling off the Aleutian Islands.

The attack upon the underseas craft occurred some time ago, but the submarine's destruction has not previously been reported.

Machinist Leland L. Davis, USN, 26, of Hattiesburg, Miss., pilot of the bomber, was awarded the Navy Cross. Machinist Davis is listed as missing following another patrol flight made later on the day the submarine was sunk.

The Navy bomber was on a patrol mission when the Japanese submarine was sighted running on the surface eight miles away. Machinist Davis flew into the clouds to escape detection, came out one mile from the submarine as it began to submerge, and plunged downward in a bombing run.

Two depth charges were released just ahead of the wake. Almost im­mediately the submarine blew its tanks and emerged, bow first, with a large oil slick spreading from either side of its hull.

Members of the Catalina's crew opened fire with their machine guns and raked the submarine from bow to stern, but the depth charges had dealt the underseas craft a fatal blow. Within a few minutes the Japanese vessel sank stern first in a death dive.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 361, MAY 1, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 29:

(a) During the evening, a Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bomber bombed Japanese installations at Numa Numa on the northeast coast of Bougainville Island.
(b) During the night, a group of Liberator heavy bombers attacked Kieta on the northern coast of Bougainville Island. Two of the four fires which were started were visible for 50 miles.

2. On April 30:

(a) During the early morning, a group of Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers raided Japanese positions at Kahili in the Shortland Island area. A large fire was started.

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(b) Later in the morning, a formation of Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and, Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by Airacobra (Bell P‑39) and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, bombed and strafed Japanese installations at Vila in the Central Solomons.
(c) During the evening, Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters strafed the Japanese‑held area at Rekata Bay on the northern coast of Santa Isabel Island.

3. All U. S. planes returned from the above operational missions.

MAY 1, 1943

COAST GUARD CUTTER SINKS GERMAN U‑BOAT

The 165‑foot Coast Guard cutter Icarus, proceeding southward from New York on a routine run, some months ago, sank a German U‑boat and took 33 prisoners, including the submarine's commanding officer.

The cutter was alone, sailing through calm seas just off the Carolina coast, with her skipper, Lt. (now Lieutenant Commander) Maurice D. Jester, USCG, and his executive officer calmly reviewing recent patrol run experi­ences when the underseas craft was detected. The submarine was dead ahead and about 100 yards distant. General Quarters was sounded, and as the crew ran to battle stations, the Icarus flashed into action.

Speeding forward, she reached the spot over the sub, and dropped a pattern of depth charges. As she turned to come back for another attack, a terrific explosion occurred in the open sea about 200 yards off the port side.

The Icarus crossed the spot where the undersea raider was submerged, dropped another pattern of charges, and followed up with two single charges in quick succession.

Then, as the officers aboard the cutter watched, air bubbles began rising to the surface. Suddenly the crippled U‑boat shot up from below, her bow pointing skyward at a 45‑degree angle. The conning tower burst open, and submarine crew members scrambled onto the deck and made for the deck gun.

The guns of the Icarus immediately opened a withering fire, sweeping the Germans back toward the conning tower. Then, as the sub started to sink, the Germans jumped into the sea. The vessel suddenly plunged beneath the surface, and the engagement was over.

The Icarus then picked up the 33 survivors and brought them into port as prisoners of war.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 362, MAY 2, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On April 30:

During the morning Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Munda in the Central Solomons.

North Pacific.

2. On April 30, Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters carried out two attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored but bad weather prevented complete observation of results.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 363, MAY 3, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 2, during the day, a force of Avenger (Grumman TBF) tor­pedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, bombed Japanese installations at Munda in the Central Solomons. Hits were scored on the airfield, on the runway and in the revetment areas.

North Pacific.

2. On May 1, formations of Army planes carried out thirteen attacks against Japanese positions at Kiska. Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters participated in these raids. A heavy explosion was observed in the vicinity of North Head. The runway was damaged, fires were started and heavy smoke was seen in other areas.

3. On the same day, Liberator heavy bombers dropped bombs on the enemy target areas at Holtz Bay and Chichagof Harbor on Attu Island.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 364, MAY 4, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. U. S. forces are established on the Russell Islands, northwest of Guadalcanal Island. These islands were occupied without opposition in Feb­ruary sometime after enemy resistance had ceased on Guadalcanal.

2. On May 2, in the afternoon; Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, bombed Japanese installations at Munda, in the Central Solomons.

3. On May 3, a force of Avengers and Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by Wildcat, Warhawk (Curtis P‑40) and Lightning (Lock­heed P‑38) fighters, bombed and strafed Japanese installations at Rekata Bay, on Santa Isabel Island. Defense positions were hit and a large fire was started. All U. S. planes returned.

North Pacific

4. On May 2, formations of Army planes carried out eight attacks against Japanese positions at Kiska. Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bomb­ers and Warhawk and Lightning fighters participated in these raids. Hits were scored on North and South Heads. At Gertrude Cove fires were started and one building was destroyed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 365, MAY 4, 1943

North Pacific

1. Announcement may now be made of additional details of the surface engagements between a light U. S. patrol force and a Japanese force to the westward of Attu Island on March 20, 1943 (previously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 327).

2. The U. S. force, consisting of one heavy cruiser, one light cruiser and four destroyers, was patrolling in the area to the southeast of the Koman­dorski Islands when contact was made with the enemy shortly after dawn on the 26th. The Japanese force was composed of two heavy cruisers, two light

25

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 366, MAY 4, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) Two destroyers sunk.
(b) One medium‑sized tanker sunk.
(c) One medium‑sized cargo ship sunk.
(d) One medium‑sized supply ship sunk.
(e) One medium‑sized transport sunk.
(f) One large transport damaged and probably sunk.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 367, MAY 5, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 4:

(a) During the day, a force of Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters bombed and strafed Japanese positions at Van­gavanga and at Ringi Cove on Kolombangara Island in the Central Solomons. Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, with Corsair (Vought F4U) fighter escort, followed the attack with additional bombing and strafing. A fire was started at Vangavanga and smoke was observed in the Ringi Cove area. All U. S. planes returned.
(b) Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers attacked Vila in the Central Solomons and Rekata Bay on Santa Isabel Island, starting a fire at the latter area.

North Pacific.

2. On May 3, formations of Army planes carried out nine attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bomb­ers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lock­heed P‑38) and Warhawk fighters participated in these raids. Three fires were started in the enemy main camp area and hits were observed in other areas. Heavy smoke was seen at North Head.

26

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 368, MAY 6, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 4, during the afternoon, Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, supported by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, carried out a bombing and strafing attack against Japanese installations on Attu Island. Bomb hits were observed at Holtz Bay, and the Lightnings strafed Chi­chagof Harbor.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 369, MAY 7, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 6, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters strafed Japanese positions on Vella Lavella Island in the Central Solomons.

2. On May 6, during the morning, a force of Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, and New Zealand War­hawk bombers (Curtiss P‑40), escorted by Corsair and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese installations at Munda, on New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons. Numerous explosions and fires were observed.

Pacific and Far East.

3. A U. S. submarine reported the following results of operations against the enemy during a war patrol in these waters, early this year, under the command of the late Commander Howard W. Gilmore, USN:

(a) One medium‑sized cargo ship sunk.
(b) One gunboat damaged and probably sunk.
(c) One medium‑sized cargo ship damaged.

4. Commander Gilmore gave his life in the action against the gunboat listed above. As he lay on the bridge mortally wounded by enemy machine gun fire, he ordered his submarine submerged to save it from threatened destruction.

6. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

Memorandum to the Press:

In previous war patrols, the late Commander Gilmore's submarine was credited with sinking a total of 26,946 tons of enemy shipping, in addition to entering an enemy harbor on one occasion and attacking three enemy de­stroyers, sinking two of them and damaging the third. All of these results of operations have been previously announced in Navy Department Communiqués.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 370, MAY 7, 1943

North Pacific.

1. U. S. forces have established military positions, including an airfield, on Amchitka and have been in occupation of this island since January. Amchitka is an island in the Rat Island group, in which is also located the Japanese‑held island of Kiska. Previous to the occupation of Amchitka the island of Adak, in the Andreanof Islands, had been occupied by American forces. (Occupation of positions in the Andreanofs was announced in Navy

27

Department Communiqué No. 138, on October 3, 1942.) The announcement of the occupation of Amchitka has been withheld until our positions on this island were fully consolidated.

2. The occupation of Amchitka and Adak were unopposed by the enemy. In the occupation of Amchitka the weather presented the greatest obstacle, causing damage to landing craft and severe privation to personnel in the early stages of the operations. In later periods the positions were subjected to air reconnaissance by Japanese aircraft and light bombing attacks. (Reconnais­sance and bombing flights by enemy planes over U. S. positions in the Western Aleutians were reported in Navy Department Communiqués No. 268, 273, 281, and 287. )

3. On May 5, Army planes carried out six attacks against Japanese In­stallations at Kiska. Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, participated in these raids. Hits were scored in the Gertrude Cove, main camp, North and South Head, Submarine Base and beach areas. A number of fires were started in the beach section and one building was destroyed on North Head.

4. On the same day, Attu was bombed and strafed four times by Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters. Hits were scored on Japanese installations and one enemy plane was destroyed.

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 137, MAY 7, 1943

Text of remarks by Admiral C. W. Nimitz, USN, Commander‑in‑Chief, Pacific Fleet, at presentation of awards ceremony at Hickam Field, T. H., 1100 Friday, May 7, 1943:

OFFICERS AND MEN OF THE PACIFIC OCEAN AREAS

Two and a half weeks ago B‑24 Liberator bombers, led by Maj. Gen. Willis Hale, Commanding General of the Seventh Air Force, in a daylight attack, dropped thousands of pounds of bombs on phosphate plants, parked aircraft, barracks, fuel and munition storage and other valued Installa­tions on Nauru Island. The damage inflicted was considerable.

Two nights later American planes came out of the darkness over Tarawa and dropped many thousands of pounds of explosives. Again there was considerable damage.

It is my great pleasure to be here again at Hickam Field in recogni­tion of the men who led the attacks. Nauru is one of the great phosphate producing centers of the world and is important to the Japanese war machine. Tarawa is an important air base. It will take some time to repair the damages done by the men of the Seventh Bomber Command at Nauru and Tarawa.

Many of the officers and men participating in these missions were in action for the first time. The reports of your commanding officers laud your aggressive spirit and courage under fire. You have taken your place beside the men in combat with the enemy in other parts of the Pacific.

For his share in the preparation and execution of this mission great credit is due Major General Willis Hale. His courage and determination in leading both attack flights sparked the men of his command, and serve as an inspiration to all fighting men in this area.

Credit must also go to Brig. Gen. Truman H. Landon, Commanding General of the Seventh Bomber Command. Not content with the endless

28

detail of organizing the mission, General Landon also participated in the attack on Nauru.

In addition to the personnel of the Nauru and Tarawa attacks, there are here officers and men who have participated in other actions and missions.

To the squadron leaders, the navigators, the bombardiers and all the others who made these attacks successful‑Well Done!

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 371, MAY 8, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 6, during the afternoon, a U. S. plane shot down one Japanese seaplane southwest of New Georgia Island.

North Pacific.

2. On May 6:

(a) Formations of Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters carried out five attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Bombs were dropped in all the target areas and direct hits were scored on enemy positions.
(b) On the same day, formations of Army planes carried out seven attacks against Japanese positions on Attu Island. Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters participated in these raids. Hits were scored in all target areas, and several fires were started.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 372, MAY 9, 1943

South Pacific (all dates ale east longitude).

1. On the night of May 6‑7, Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers, attacked Japanese positions on Kahili, Fauro Island and Ballale Island in the Shortland Island area.

2. On May 8:

(a) During the morning a formation of Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers attacked several Japanese destroyers in the vicinity of Gizo Island in the New Georgia group. One hit with a 1,000‑pound bomb was scored on one destroyer, and several near hits were observed on two other destroyers.
(b) The same morning, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters bombed and strafed Japanese posi­tions at Munda.

MAY 10, 1943

NAVY CATALINA FLYING BOAT SINKS GERMAN SUBMARINE

A Navy Catalina flying boat sighted a fully‑surfaced German submarine eight miles distant in West Indian waters, dived on it and sank it. The action took place sometime in March.

The approach maneuver was so skillfully executed by the pilot, Lt. (j.g. ) John Edwin Dryden, Jr., USNR, 4035 Troost Street, Kansas City, Mo., that

29

the plane was able to strafe the submarine before dropping four depth charges which broke the enemy undersea craft amidships.

Approaching his target, Lt. (j.g.) Dryden took his plane down from 4,500 to 1,200 feet and, a quarter of a mile from the submarine, pushed into a 45‑degree dive. The submarine, a large type over 200 feet long, was proceeding below him at a speed of from eight to 10 knots.

So completely was the enemy surprised that two crew members were caught basking on deck. After a 100‑round machine gun burst from 300 yards, one German never rose and the other, heading for the sub's gun, threw up his hands and pitched forward on the deck.

As the plane pulled out of its dive, Pilot Dryden and Lt. (j.g.) Stetson C. Beal, USNR., Lisbon Falls, Maine, the co‑pilot, jerked the switches releasing four depth charges in salvo from an altitude of less than 100 feet.

The two port charges left their racks and hit the water 10 to 15 feet to starboard of the U‑boat and just aft of the conning tower. A few seconds later, the submarine lifted and broke in two amidships. The center sections went under water first, then the bow and stern rose in the air and submerged. Simultaneously, a terrific explosion occurred, cascading debris, smoke and water 40 feet in the air.

Immediately after the explosion, a large patch of foam‑200 feet across­ appeared and stayed on the surface for four or five minutes. Then a shining green oil slick appeared, expanding during the next hour and a half until it was a quarter of a mile wide and three‑quarters of a mile long, with whitecaps licking at its edges. Emerging from the wreckage of the submarine were eleven members of the submarine crew, who swam or clung to debris floating about the huge oil slick.

Cruising low over the struggling men, crew members of the Catalina dropped life rafts, along with emergency rations tied to life jackets. Six of the eleven Germans were seen to lose their grip on fragments of wreckage and slip beneath the oily waters. Five others were seen perched on a raft. They waved frantically for the plane to land, but rough seas prevented a rescue effort.

The Catalina crew, after cruising the area for an hour and 39 minutes, was forced by a dwindling gas supply to return to base. No survivors have been announced as rescued to date.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 373, MAY 11, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 10:

(a) During the morning, a force of Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Corsair (Vought F4U), Wildcat (Grumman F4F) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, attacked Japanese installations at Munda on New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons. Hits were scored on enemy anti‑aircraft positions and several fires were started.
(b) During the afternoon, Dauntless dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers, with Corsair escort, bombed Japanese positions at Vanga­vanga on the southwest coast of Kolombangara Island.

(c) All U. S. planes returned from the above attack missions.

30

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 374, MAY 12, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 11:

(a) During the early morning, a group of Army Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers bombed Japanese installations at Kahili on Bougainville Island and at Shortland Island. Fires were started at Kahili, but results of the attack on Shortland Island were not observed.
(b) Later in the morning, a force of Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Rekata Bay, on Santa Isabel Island. Two barges and one seaplane were strafed and the seaplane was set on fire.
(c) All U. S. planes returned from these operational attacks.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 375, MAY 13, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 11, a force of Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kiska, dropping bombs on the runway and main camp area.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On May 12

(a) During the morning, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bomb­ers bombed Japanese positions on Ballale Island in the Shortland Island area, and started a large fire.
(b) About the same time, Flying Fortresses attacked Kahili in the Shortland Island area and started a number of fires which appeared to be burning enemy aircraft.
(c) Later in the morning, Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Warhawk (Cur­tiss P‑40) and Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, attacked Japanese instal­lations at Munda on New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons.
(d) On the night of May 12‑13, U. S. light surface units bombarded Japanese positions at Vila on Kolombangara Island and at Munda.

3. The Allied naval vessels which previously were announced as sunk by Japanese air attack on Allied shipping in the vicinity of Guadalcanal on April 7, 1943, now can be named as the destroyer USS Aaron Ward, the tanker USS Kanawha, and the corvette HMNZS Moa. The next of kin of all casualties aboard these vessels have been notified. The action previously was reported in Navy Department Communiqués No. 337, 338, 339 and 340.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 376, MAY 14, 1943

North. Pacific.

1. On May 11 United States forces landed at the Island of Attu in the Aleutians and are now engaged with Japanese forces on the island. Details of the operation will be released when the situation clarifies.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 377, MAY 14, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 13

(a) In the early morning, a Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bomber attacked Japanese installations at Kahili while another Liberator bombed Ballale Island, in the Shortland Island area. Results of these attacks were not observed.
(b) In the early afternoon, U. S. fighters engaged about twenty‑five Japanese Zeros in the vicinity of the Russell Islands. Sixteen Zeros were definitely shot down and two more were probably destroyed. Corsair (Vought F4U) fighter planes accounted for fifteen of the Zeros. Five U. S. planes were lost, but two of the pilots were saved.

North Pacific.

2. On May 13:

(a) Army Liberator heavy bombers attacked the Japanese main camp area at Kiska. Results were not observed due to poor visibility.
(b) During the same day, a formation of Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed Japanese installations at Kiska.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 378, MAY 16, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 13:

(a) During the night Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and on Ballale Island, in the Shortland Island area. Large fires were started.
(b) On the same night Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo planes at­tacked Japanese shipping in the Buin area and scored two hits on a cargo vessel which was observed to explode.
(c) During the night four Japanese bombers dropped bombs on Guadal­canal Island, causing slight damage to U. S. installations. U. S. fighter planes attacked the bombers and shot down one enemy bomber and dam­aged two others.

2. On May 14:

During the night Japanese shipping in the Buin area was again attacked by Avenger torpedo planes while Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and on Ballale Island.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 379, MAY 17, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 15, during the night, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bomb­ers attacked four Japanese cargo vessels in the Buin area. One enemy ship was set on fire.

Pacific and Far East.

2. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas.

(a) One destroyer sunk.
(b) One large cargo ship sunk.

32

(c) One medium‑sized cargo ship sunk.
(d) One medium‑sized transport sunk.
(e) One small passenger‑freighter sunk.
(f) One small escort vessel sunk.
(g) One large tanker damaged.

3. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 380, MAY 17, 1943

North Pacific.

1. Operations against the Japanese on Attu Island are continuing.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 381, MAY 18, 1943

North Pacific.

1. The military situation now permits the announcement of some of the details of the landing of U. S. forces on Attu Island on May 11. (Previously announced in Navy Department Communiqué No. 376. )

2. The occupation began with scouting parties landing at Blind Cove, Holtz Bay, located at the northeastern end of Attu. Main landings of U. a. troops were effected at two points: (1) in the Holtz Bay area, and (2) at Massacre Bay, located at the southeastern end of Attu.

3. The landings were made under the cover of U. S. Naval surface forces, which bombarded enemy installations in both areas, and U. S. Army planes, which attacked enemy positions in the vicinity of Chichagof Harbor.

4. Both groups of U. S. troops advanced inland, encountering stubborn enemy resistance from numerous machine gun nests. Japanese forces on the island have entrenched themselves along a. rocky ridge.

5. In spite of unfavorable weather conditions, U. S. Army planes have carried out several bombing and strafing attacks since the initial landings were made. Our troops have established their positions on the island, and operations against the enemy are continuing.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 382, MAY 18, 1943

Central Pacific.

1. On May 15, a force of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations on Wake Island. Bad weather pre­vented observation of results. U. S. planes were engaged by 22 Japanese Zero fighters of which two were definitely destroyed and one additional was probably destroyed.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On May 16, during the morning, Navy and Marine Corps Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, escorted by Army Airacobra (Bell P‑39) and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, bombed and strafed Japanese installations at Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island.

33

North Pacific.

3. On May 17, U. S. forces on Attu Island attacked enemy positions on the high ground between the two arms of Holtz Bay. In spite of strong coun­terattacks by the enemy, our troops took possession of this area in the evening.

4. U. S. surface forces continue to bombard enemy positions and to cover advances of our ground troops.

5. In spite of the difficulties and hazards of operations on the island, U. S. casualties to date have been light.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 383, MAY 19, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 18

(a) During the morning, U. S. forces working inland from Holtz Bay on Attu Island were in possession of the high ridge southeast of Holtz Bay, and U. S. troops from the Massacre Bag area were advancing northward.
(b) During the day, the Massacre Bay force advanced up a pass toward the Holtz Bay force, and advance patrols from the two forces joined.
(c) During the afternoon, the pass was cleared of enemy troops which withdrew toward Chichagof Harbor, leaving only snipers behind.

2. Several three‑inch antiaircraft guns have been captured from the enemy and are being used by our troops.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

3. On May 17, U. S. dive bombers attacked the Japanese seaplane base at Rekata Bay on Santa Isabel Island. Results were not observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 384, MAY 20, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 18, gunfire from U. S. light surface forces assisted in clearing the Holtz Bay‑Massacre Bay pass of enemy troops.

2. On May 19:

(a) U. S. forces captured Sarana Pass leading to the Chichagof Harbor area. The contacts of the U. S. north and south forces from the Holtz Bay and Massacre Bay areas have confined Japanese resistance to the Chichagof Harbor area, except for isolated sniper activities.
(b) A force of U. S. Army bombers attacked military objectives in the Chichagof Harbor area.

3. U. S. forces are now in possession of the runway in the Holtz Bay area.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

4. On May 18, during the night, six Japanese bombers attacked U. S. positions on Guadalcanal Island and in the Russell Islands. There was no report of damage or casualties.

34

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 385, MAY 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 19‑20, during the night, eight Japanese bombers attacked Guadalcanal Island, causing minor damage. U. S. fighters shot down two of the enemy planes.

North Pacific.

2. On May 19, operations on Attu continued. Japanese forces have estab­lished positions on the high ground east of Attu Village. U. S. Army bombers attacked Japanese entrenchments in the area north of Sarana Bay.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 386, MAY 22, 1943

North Pacific.

1. The battle for Attu has entered the final phase with the defending Japanese forces split into three groups occupying positions in the following areas:

(a) Chichagof Harbor.
(b) Chichagof Valley.
(c) North side of Lake Nicholas.

2. On May 20, during the night, a strong enemy position on a ridge in the Sarana‑Massacre Bay area was neutralized. An enemy unit which suc­ceeded in penetrating our lines was subsequently wiped out.

3. On May 21:

(a) U. S. forces attacked the enemy position to the eastward of Chichagof Valley.
(b) Lightning fighters supported ground operations by strafing and bombing enemy positions from low altitudes. A fuel depot was set on fire and other fires were started. Attu Village was completely destroyed with the exception of a church and one other building.

4. On May 21, Army Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) at­tacked the Japanese main camp area on Kiska. Due to weather conditions, results were not observed.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

5. On May 20‑21, during the night, Liberator heavy bombers (Consoli­dated) attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and Ballale in the Shortland Island area. Hits were scored on the runway and enemy searchlight positions at Kahili.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 387, MAY 23, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On the afternoon of May 22, about fifteen twin‑engine Japanese bomb­ers unsuccessfully attacked two U. S. surface units operating in the Attu area.

2. There was no change in the general situation ashore.

35

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 388, MAY 24, 1943

North. Pacific.

1. On May 23:

(a) The pressure of U. S. Army forces against pockets of Japanese resistance on Attu Island continues. A number of enemy points of re­sistance have been liquidated.
(b) During the afternoon, sixteen Japanese twin‑engine bombers were attacked by six Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters over the eastern part of Attu. Five of the enemy bombers were shot down. One U. S. fighter is missing. Another fighter was shot down, but the pilot was rescued.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 389, MAY 25, 1943

North, Pacific.

1. On May 23:

(a) U. S. Army forces continued to advance and exert pressure on Japanese forces on Attu, despite sleet, snow and rain which handicapped operations.
(b) Further details received relating to the attack of six Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters on sixteen Japanese twin‑engine bomb­ers (previously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 388) reveal that five of the enemy bombers were definitely destroyed and seven addi­tional bombers were probably destroyed. The remaining four Japanese bombers fled to the west. When sighted by U. S. Army fighters, the bombers unloaded their bombs but did not attack any of the U. S. positions.
(c) U. S. Army planes bombed the Japanese main camp area at Kiska.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On May 23, three Japanese cargo vessels in the Shortland Island area were bombed by Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers. Results were not observed.

3. During the night of May 23‑24:

(a) Guadalcanal Island was attacked by three Japanese bombers. No damage was inflicted on U. S. personnel and positions.
(b) Strong formations of Liberator and Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers heavily attacked Japanese positions in the Shortland Island area and at Munda, in the Central Solomons.
(c) One Japanese plane attempted to bomb Espiritu Santo, in the New Hebrides group. The bombs fell without effect into the sea.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 390, MAY 26, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On May 23, the small U. S. auxiliary vessel Niagara was attacked by Japanese planes east of Cape Surville, San Cristobal Island. Considerable damage was inflicted ion, the vessel, which was subsequently sunk by U. S. forces after members of the crew were taken aboard accompanying naval units.

2. On May 24, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters bombed and strafed Japanese installations at Ringi Cove, west of Vila on Kolombangara Island.

36

3. On May 25, Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers, Avenger torpedo bombers and Wildcat fighters bombed and strafed Japanese installations at Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. Ammunition dumps were exploded and large fires were started.

North Pacific.

4. On May 24, U. S. Army ground troops cleared out both sides of Chichagof Valley. An assault was made by combined northern and southern forces along the ridge north of the Valley and was reported as continuing. Assisting in the assault were U. S. Army air forces consisting of Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B-25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters. These planes bombed and strafed Japanese positions in the Chichagof area and started fires.

MAY 26, 1943

NAVY PATROL PLANE SINKS ENEMY SUBMARINE

Diving his big PBY patrol. plane on a surfaced enemy submarine in the face of steady antiaircraft fire, Ensign Thurmond Edgar Robertson, USN, 136 East Columbia Avenue, Spartanburg, S. C., so crippled the enemy craft with his depth bombs that a second patrol plane, piloted by Lieutenant Gerard Bradford, Jr., USNR., 61 Williams Court, Mobile, Ala., was able to finish the job and sink the sub. The sinking took place several weeks ago.

Leaving 30 or 40 survivors on the surface, the submarine continued firing until the conning tower disappeared.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 391, MAY 27, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 25:

(a) A U. S. naval vessel bombarded Japanese, shore installations in the Chichagof area and started numerous fires.
(b) Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed the main camp area at Kiska. Hits were scored in the vicinity of gun emplacements and other installations.

2. On May 26:

(a.) All buildings in the Chichagof area have been destroyed.
(b) U. S. Army troops, after hard fighting in a coordinated attack along the ridge south of Chichagof Corridor, succeeded in gaining a foot­hold on the high ground south of Chichagof.
(c) The right flank of the U. S. Army's southern forces is opposed by a Japanese force dug in on a ridge south of Lake Cories.
(d) Air support was provided by Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers which attacked Japanese positions in the Chichagof area. Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters assisted by strafing attacks.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 392, MAY 28, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 26:

(a) U. S. Army troops gained several important points along the ridge south of Chichagof Corridor. Hard hand to hand fighting over rugged terrain continued.
(b) The U. S. Army's northern forces have penetrated a part of Fish­-Hook Ridge about one and five‑eighths miles southwest of Chichagof Har­bor. Fighting continues in order to clear the Japanese from the high peaks in the vicinity.
(c) An attack by U. S. troops to eliminate the enemy from the ridge south of Lake Cories is in progress.
(d) Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters effectively supported ground operations.

2. On May 26, Army Mitchell medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters made three attacks on Kiska, bombing the Japanese main camp area and runway. Numerous hits were observed.

3. In an attack on Kiska (reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 391) the Warhawk fighters participating were manned by Royal Canadian Air Force pilots.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 393, MAY 28, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 27, on Attu Island

(a) U. S. Army forces moved ahead and along a ridge commanding the area between Lake Cories and Lake Canirca.
(b) After artillery and mortar preparation, U. S. Army troops at­tacked the ridge extending to the east of Fish‑Hook Ridge. A Japanese position on Fish‑Hook Ridge was neutralized.
(c) U. S. Army patrols continue to probe Japanese positions on the lower ridge extending eastward from the Chichagof Valley floor.
(d) Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters supported ground operations.

2. A formation of Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed Japan­ese positions at Kiska. Due to poor visibility results were unobserved.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 394, MAY 29, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 27, on Attu Island, U. S. Army troops, in capturing the strong Japanese position on Fish‑Hook Ridge (previously reported as neutralized in Navy Department Communiqué No. 393) fought over rugged and snowy terrain and scaled sixty degree ridges in the face of strong enemy fire. The Japanese positions were entrenched above the cloud line.

2. On May 28:

(a) The strong point of Japanese defense is centered in the area formed between the north wall of Chichagof Valley, Holtz Bay Pass and Chichagof Harbor.

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(b) There is little Japanese activity in the Khlebnikof area except for one enemy position on the ridge east of the north end of Lake Cories. Other parts of the island are devoid of enemy activity.
(c) Air operations were hampered by bad weather.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

3. On May 28, a force of Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers flew in bad weather to bomb Munda on New Georgia Island in the Central Solo­mons. Hits were scored on the runway and in the revetment area. Numerous explosions were observed and fires were started.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 395, MAY 30, 1943

North Pacific (on Attu Island).

1. On May 28, U. S. Army troops cleared the Japanese from the easterly and northerly faces of Fish‑Hook Ridge.

2. On May 29:

(a) At dawn the enemy counter‑attacked the right flank of the U. S. Army forces on the Chichagof Valley floor. Except for snipers, this enemy force was annihilated. Preliminary reports indicate that the Japanese casualties were high.
(b) Unfavorable weather conditions prevented air operations.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 396, MAY 31, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 30, U. S. Army forces on Attu Island continued in the mopping up of the remaining Japanese pockets of resistance.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 397, JUNE 1, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 30, on Attu Island

(a) Three separate columns of U. S. Army troops coming in from the South, Southwest and West respectively, effected a junction on the shores of Chichagof Harbor.
(b) In the forward movement of the U. S. Army troops small Japanese groups offered weak resistance. Over 400 of the enemy were killed in the operations during the night of May 29‑30.

2. On May 30, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American 8‑25) medium bombers, and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters attacked Japanese installations at Kiska. Fires were started in Gertrude Cove, the camp area, on a beached ship and on the runway.

39

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 398, JUNE 1, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) One destroyer sunk.
(b) One large tanker sunk.
(c) One large cargo ship sunk.
(d) Two medium‑sized cargo ships sunk.
(e) One small cargo ship sunk.
(f) One medium‑sized transport sunk.
(g) One large tanker damaged and probably sunk.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Department Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 399, JUNE 2, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On May 31, on Attu Island, mopping up operations by U. S. Army troops against isolated Japanese groups continued.

2. As of midnight May 30, the Japanese casualties on Attu were estimated as follows:

Killed, 1,500; captured, 4.

3. On May 31, formations of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed and strafed Japanese positions at Kiska. Hits were scored on the runway, North Head and Gertrude Cove.

JUNE 2, 1943

COAST GUARD CUTTER, SINKS GERMAN SUB

The United States Coast Guard cutter Spencer has chalked up a definite submarine sinking to her credit.

In an engagement in the Atlantic several weeks ago, the Spencer skill­fully tracked down a U‑boat which tried to slip away under the roar of the propellers of a convoy, forced the raider to the surface with depth charges, and destroyed her in the gun battle which followed, taking many survivors prisoner.

Casualties aboard the Spencer were light, while the cutter suffered only slight damage.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 400, JUNE 3, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On June 1, on Attu Island, U. S. Army troops combed scattered areas and by noon had eliminated minor groups of Japanese troops encountered.

2. It is further reported that the known Japanese dead on Attu Island total 1,791. This figure does not include the unknown number killed by ar­tillery fire and bombs. Such casualties were either cremated or buried by the Japanese.

3. On June 1, formations of Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) and

40

Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and War­hawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed and strafed Kiska. Hits were scored on the Japanese main camp area, runway and gun emplacements. A number of Canadians piloting Warhawks participated.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

4. During the evening of May 31, Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Tinputs Harbor and Numa Numa Harbor on the northeast coast of Bougainville Island. Numerous large fires were started. In addition, two small Japanese vessels off Tinputs were bombed. One of these vessels was damaged and beached.

JUNE 3, 1943

ENEMY SUBMARINE BLOWN IN TWO BY NAVY PATROL PLANE

An enemy submarine was blown in two several months ago by depth bombs from a Navy Catalina patrol plane which surprised the undersea craft in South Atlantic waters as its crew members apparently were taking sun baths.

The submarine was blown out of the water. The plane's crew reported that as it rose it broke, and several objects which looked like long cylindrical tanks floated up among the spouting debris and wreckage. The stern of the submarine then rose vertically out of the water, to a height of 8 or 10 feet, bobbed up and down, and then plunged straight down in the rough seas.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 401, JUNE 4, 1943

North Pacific.

1. On June 1, on Attu Island, small bands of Japanese troops still roamed some areas of the island, although there was no further organized enemy re­sistance.

2. The U. S. Army casualties on Attu as of midnight, June 1, were as follows:

Killed, 342; wounded, 1,135; missing, 58.

3. In addition to the known Japanese dead of 1,791 on Attu Island (pre­viously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 400) U. S. Army troops have captured 11 prisoners.

JUNE 4, 1943

COMMAND IN THE ALEUTIANS

The conclusion of planned, operations in the capture of Attu which has been signalized by the collapse of all organized enemy resistance makes timely a summary of the military organization involved in this and in similar opera­tions. These combined operations emphasize the close integration of branches of the armed services which must be effected in present‑day warfare.

In the North Pacific area, joint military operations are under the com­mand of Rear Admiral Thomas Cassin Kinkaid, U. S. Navy, who is operating directly under Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet. Admiral Nimitz's responsibilities extend to the entire Pacific Ocean areas except for the Australian area.

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In the Pacific theater of war, operational problems involve the coordina­tion of aircraft, surface ships (including troop transports) and ground opera­tions. The operations against Attu served to illustrate the operational solution which has been devised to meet these problems. The area commander, in this case Admiral Kinkaid, has the over‑all responsibility for coordinating and implementing the various forces involved in such an operation. Under him, Rear Admiral Francis W. Rockwell, U. S. Navy, Commander Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, had the immediate responsibility of transporting troops over water to the points of attack and providing for their expeditious landing on shore. Once ashore, ground operations were under the immediate com­mand of the Army Commander, Major General Eugene M. Landrum, U. S. Army. Preliminary to the landing, during the landing, and subsequent thereto, air attack and support was provided by Army and Navy Air Forces. Army Air Forces were under the command of Major General William O. Butler. Cana­dian pilots also took part in the operations.

In all of the Aleutian operations from their inception, the closest coopera­tion has been maintained between the service commanders, including Lieuten­ant General John L. De Witt of the Western Defense Command, and Lieuten­ant General Simon B. Buckner of the Alaskan Defense Command, each com­mander functioning in his specialized field and all cooperating to a common end. It is notable that this operation, under conditions of weather in which fog and low visibility contributed to the difficulties of transport of the ground forces and the landing of a large force of men, was accomplished without the loss of a single ship or of a single man, and that casualties on share were surprisingly low. This fortunate outcome cannot always be anticipated in Amphibious opera­tions which are well known to be the most difficult and dangerous in all modern military warfare.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 402, JUNE 6, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 5:

(a) In the early morning, a formation of Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) bombed Japanese installations at Kahili, Buin area.
(b) At about noon of the same day a formation of Dauntless (Doug­las) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40), Corsair (Vought F4U) and Light­ning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, attacked a Japanese destroyer, a corvette and a cargo vessel in the Bougainville area. Several large‑calibre bomb hits were scored on the destroyer which undoubtedly sank. The corvette and the cargo vessel were set on fire.
(c) In the above action the U. S. attacking planes were engaged by a large force of Japanese Zero fighters. U. S. pilots shown down 15 Zeros and damaged 3 others. Four U. S. planes are missing.

North Pacific.

2. On June 4, formations of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers and Lightning and Warhawk fighters carried out five attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored on buildings and gun emplacements.

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JUNE 6, 1943

NEW VENTURA BOMBER SINKS ENEMY SUBMARINE

One of the Navy's new patrol bombers, a Vega Ventura (PV‑1), depth-charged and sank an enemy submarine while protecting an Atlantic convoy. The sinking occurred in April, a short time after the Navy pressed the first of the new planes into service.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 403, JUNE 7, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 6:

(a) During the morning formations of Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese installa­tions at Munda, New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons. Results of this attack were not observed. All U. S. planes returned.
(b) Later in the same day, a formation of Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑410) fighters strafed Japanese positions on Choiseul Island. Enemy gun emplacements were silenced. All U. S. planes returned.

North Pacific.

2. On June 5, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kiska. Due to a heavy overcast results of the attack could not be observed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 404, JUNE 8, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 7, during the morning approximately 40 or 50 Japanese Zeros and torpedo bombers were attacked by U. S. fighter planes in the vicinity of the Russell Islands. Nineteen Zeros were shot down and six damaged. U. S. losses were seven planes, but three of the pilots were saved.

North Pacific.

2. On June 7, an additional 8 Japanese were killed on Attu Island. Eleven more of the enemy killed themselves with grenades after being sur­rounded by U. S. Army troops in Chichagof Valley. The total known enemy dead as of June 7 is 1,826.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 405, JUNE 10, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 9, during the afternoon, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers, escorted by Warhawk (Curtis P‑40) and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, bombed Japanese positions at Munda on New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons. No U. S. losses were sustained.

North Pacific.

2. On June 9, during the day, nineteen more of the enemy were killed on Attu Island. In addition, five prisoners were taken.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 406, JUNE 11, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 10:

(a) During the morning Marine Corsairs (Vought F4U) and Army Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters intercepted and shot down four Mit­subishi bombers over the north end of Malaita Island. Three of the enemy bombers were accounted for by Marine Corsair fighters and the other by an Army Lightning fighter.

(b) During the same, day enemy positions on Vila, Kolombangara Island, were attacked by Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning fighters with un­observed results.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 407, JUNE 12, 1943

North Pacific.

1. During the night of June 8‑9, U. S. Army patrols on Attu Island killed sixty‑six Japanese and captured one in the area between Sarana Bay and Cape Khlebnikof. There is no enemy activity on other parts of the island.

2. On June 10, during the afternoon, Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters made four attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored along the run­way and on gun emplacements. Barges were strafed by the fighters.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 408, JUNE 12, 1943

1. The U. S. submarines Amberjack and Grampus have failed to return from patrol operations and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Amberjack and Grampus have been so informed.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 409, JUNE 13, 1943

North Pacific.

1. During the morning of June 11, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Light­ning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters carried out 'five attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were scored in the main camp from and on the runway. Barges in the harbor were bombed and strafed.

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

2. On June 10, during the night, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers bombed and started fires among Japanese positions in the Buin area.

3. On June 12:

(a) During the. morning a force of Navy, Marine Corps and Army fighter planes intercepted about forty or fifty Japanese fighters in the vicinity of the Russell Islands. Twenty‑five Zeros were shot down and

44

eight more probably shot down. U: S. losses were six planes with all but two of the pilots being rescued.

(b) On the same morning Army Liberator bombers encountered two Mitsubishi bombers twenty miles west of Buka Island. One enemy bomber was destroyed.

4. In Navy Department Communiqué No. 408, it was reported that U. S. fighter planes intercepted and shot down four Mitsubishi bombers over the north end of Malaita Island. A later report now reveals that five enemy bombers were shot down instead of four as previously reported.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 410, JUNE 14, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 12, during the night, Army Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) and Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kahili, Buin area. Results were not observed. No. U. S. losses were sustained.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 411, JUNE 14, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operation against the enemy in the waters of these areas:

(a) 1 Destroyer sunk.
(b) 1 Large transport sunk.
(o) 5 Medium‑sized cargo vessels sunk.
(d) 1 Large trawler sunk.
(e) 1 Patrol vessel sunk.
(f) 1 Small supply vessel sunk.
(g) 2 Small cargo vessels sunk.
(h) 1 Large tanker damaged.
(i) 1 Destroyer damaged.
(j) 1 Medium‑sized transport damaged and probably sunk.
(k) 1 Medium‑sized transport badly damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Department Communiqué.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 412, JUNE 15, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 13:

(a) During the day Navy fighter planes in the South Pacific damaged a Japanese reconnaissance bomber.

(b) During the night, Japanese bombers were over Guadalcanal Island. A small number of bombs were dropped. No personnel or material casualties occurred.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 413, JUNE 16, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. During the evenings of June 13 and 14, Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) and. Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kahili and on Shortland Island in the Buin area.

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2. On the evening of June 14, Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers escorted by Navy Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters bombed the runway and antiaircraft positions of the airfield at Vila, Kolombangara Island.

3. On June 15, in the early morning, Japanese planes dropped bombs on Guadalcanal Island. No personnel or material damage has been reported.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 414, JUNE 17, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 15, during the morning, Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese positions in western New Georgia Island. Fires were started and heavy explosions were observed.

2. On June 16, during the morning, Navy Avenger and Dauntless dive bombers, escorted by Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, attacked Japanese posi­tions on Choiseul Island. Fires were started.

North Pacific.

3. On June 15, during the afternoon, Navy Ventura (Vega PV) medium bombers attacked Kiska. Hits were scored in the main camp area, along the runway and among antiaircraft batteries.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 415, JUNE 17, 1943

South Pacific.

1. A brief report received from the South Pacific reveals that in an air battle over Guadalcanal Island on June 16, U. S. planes shot down thirty‑two Japanese bombers and forty‑five Zero fighters. Six U. S. planes are missing.

2. No further details have been received.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 416, JUNE 18, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 16, during the night, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions on Ballale Island, Shortland Island Area. Results were not observed. One U. S. bomber is missing.

2. Further details of the air battle over Guadalcanal Island (previously mentioned in Navy Department Communiqué No. 415) reveal that the Japanese air forces engaged were estimated to have been sixty bombers and sixty fighters.

One U. S. merchant ship and one landing barge were damaged. U. S. per­sonnel casualties were: Twenty‑five killed, twenty‑nine injured, and twenty-two missing afloat and ashore. The latest report confirms that six U. S. planes were lost, but the pilot of one plane was rescued.

North Pacific.

3. On June 16, three additional Japanese soldiers were captured in the Khlebnikof Area, Attu Island. The total number of enemy captured is 24.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 417, JUNE 17, 1943

The U. S. Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba, assigned to convoy duty in the North Atlantic, has been reported lost.

All hands except two enlisted men were lost with the ship. Next of kin have been notified.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 418, JUNE 19, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 16, a twin‑engine Japanese reconnaissance bomber was shot down southeast of San Cristobal Island.

2. On June 17:

(a) During the afternoon, Dauntless (Douglass SBD) dive bombers escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters attacked Japanese positions at Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. Hits were scored on enemy antiaircraft positions.

(b) During the night an unknown number of Japanese planes approached Guadalcanal Island, and dropped several bombs harmlessly into the water off Tulagi. No damage or casualties were sustained.

3. Additional reports received indicate that in the air battle over Guadal­canal Island (previously reported in Navy Department Communiqués 415 and 416) 94 Japanese planes were destroyed instead of 77. Of the additional 17, 16 were shot down by ships in the harbor and one by shore‑based antiaircraft.

The Japanese planes were met by Army and Navy fighter planes, partici­pating in approximately equal numbers. The Navy planes were manned by Navy and Marine Corps pilots. Eight of the Army planes were flown by New Zealand pilots. All U. S. planes were based on Henderson Field. Fighting plane types including Corsairs (Vought F4U), Wildcats (Grumman F4F), Lightnings (Lockheed P‑38), Airacobras (Bell P‑39), and Warhawks (Curtiss P‑40). This air victory was a striking example of coordinated battle action by the various units concerned.

The Japanese planes came in over Beaufort Bay (West coast of Guadal­canal Island) and were engaged by the U. S. planes. At about the same time, another group of Japanese planes approached from farther north and were immediately attacked. Approximately 30 enemy dive bombers maneuvered to attack U. S. cargo vessels escorted by destroyers. Subsequent contacts were made over Koli Point, Savo Island, Cape Esperance and Tulagi.

The dive bombing of U. S. surface units occurred at about 2:15 p. m. In this attack a cargo vessel and a landing craft were damaged. One other cargo vessel sustained minor damage.

In the air action, 30 Navy and Marine Corps planes shot down sixteen Zero fighters and seventeen bombers. Thirty‑six Army planes shot down twenty-­nine Zeros and ten bombers. The eight New Zealand pilots shot down five bombers.

Of the six U. S. planes shot down, two of the pilots were rescued.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 419, JUNE 20, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 18:

(a) During the night, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Kahili, Buin Area. Large fires were started.

(b) On the same night, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers attacked Ballale Island, Shortland Area.

In Wilson Strait (south of Vella Lavella Island) six Japanese barges were strafed.

The Vila runway on Kolombangara Island was also bombed by a Mitchell bomber.

2. On the night of June 18‑18, Navy Catalinas (Consolidated PBY) patrol bombers and Army Liberators attacked Japanese positions on Nauru Island. Large oil fires were started and a considerable amount of damage was caused in the dispersal area and among the living quarters.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 420, JUNE 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude).

1. On June 18‑19, during the night Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24 ) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations at Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. A number of hits were scored on the enemy positions. Although seven enemy Zero fighters were in the air over Tarawa, they did not press a determined attack against the U. S. bombers.

2. On June 19, during the night Army Liberators attacked Japanese posi­tions at Kahili, Buin area. A number of fires were started.

3. On June 20, during the morning, Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers escorted by Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Navy Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters attacked Vila, Kolombangara Island. A supply dump was hit and a fire started. Hits were also scored on the runway.

North Pacific.

4. On June 20, during the day, Navy Ventura (Vega PV) medium bombers attacked Japanese installations at Kiska. Results were not observed.

5. In all of the above operations all U. S. planes returned.

JUNE 21, 1943

MERCHANT VESSEL SURVIVES FIVE AIR ATTACKS;

SHOOTS DOWN FOUR PLANES, PROBABLY TWO MORE

The story of how an American merchant vessel last January, ran the gauntlet of five air attacks in the Eastern Atlantic. and Mediterranean, during which the Navy gun crew commanded by Lieutenant (junior grade) Robert H. McIlwaine, U. S. N. R., of 34 East 62 Street, New York City, shot down four enemy planes and accounted for two more "probables", was told when the ship arrived recently at a United States port.

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Although damaged by near misses and by a bomb which penetrated to its highly inflammable cargo but failed to explode, the vessel was able to keep position in the convoy and to discharge its cargo on schedule. Temporary repairs were made, and the vessel continued to do her job for many weeks before coming to the United States for permanent repairs.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 421, JUNE 22, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 20: 

(a) During the afternoon, three Navy Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters intercepted and shot down a Mitsubishi bomber north of Florida Island.

(b) During the evening, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kieta, Bougainville Island, and Kahili, Buin Area. Results were not observed. 

2. On June 21: 

During the afternoon, Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat fighters, attacked Japanese installations at Munda, New Georgia Island. Hits were scored on the antiaircraft positions and several were silenced. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 422, JUNE 24, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 20, during the night, a U. S. light surface unit was unsuccess­fully attacked by a Japanese plane in the vicinity of Savo Island. 

2. On June 22‑23, during the night, two U. S. patrol craft were unsuccess­fully strafed by a Japanese float plane in the vicinity of the Russell Islands. 

JUNE 25, 1943

U. S. SUBMARINE R‑12 LOST

The U. S. Submarine R‑12, while engaged in training exercises, was lost recently off the East Coast of the United States.

A number of officers and men were unable to escape from the vessel before it sank. The depth of water makes it impossible to salvage the submarine, and hope has been abandoned for recovery of the bodies of the missing personnel. The next of kin have been informed.

Information obtained from survivors indicates that the loss was probably due to accident and not enemy action, and an investigation is now in progress to determine the available facts of the case.

Announcement of this incident was withheld until attempts to locate and raise the R‑12 were discontinued, in order that enemy submarines might not be given information that would enable them to attack the salvage vessels.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 423, JUNE 26, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 24, during the afternoon, a number of Navy Wildcat (Grum­man F4F) fighters strafed a Japanese barge southeast of Vangunu Island, New Georgia Group. 

2. On June 25, during the afternoon four Japanese twin‑engine bombers unsuccessfully attacked a U. S. light surface unit in the Solomon Islands. 

North Pacific. 

3. On June 24, during the afternoon, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) and Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers carried out three attacks against Japanese installations at Kiska. Due to poor visibility results of the attack could not be observed. 

4. U. S. Army patrols have killed 15 more Japanese soldiers on Attu Island. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been released in the South Pacific: 

On 25 June 

(a) During the early morning an unknown number of enemy bombers bombed our positions on the Russell Islands. A few of the U. S. personnel suffered light wounds and some damage was caused to U. S. supply In­stallations.

(b) During the early morning a formation of Army Liberators bombed Kahili, Buin Area. A number of fires were started. At about the same time, other Army Liberators attacked Buka Island and started fires.

(c) Later in the morning, Navy Dauntless dive bombers and Avengers, escorted by Navy Wildcats, attacked Labeti Plantation, Munda Area, New Georgia. No U. S. losses were sustained. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 424, JUNE 27, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 26: 

(a) During the early morning a formation of Army Liberator (Con­solidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese positions on Ballale Island, Shortland Island area. A number of fires were started.

(b) At about the same time another formation of Army Liberators attacked Japanese positions on Poporang (south Shortland Island). Re­sults of this attack were unobserved.

(c) Later on the same morning, Navy Dauntless (Douglass SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters attacked Munda, New Georgia Island in the Central Solomons. At the same time another formation of Navy Dauntless dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers escorted by Wildcat fighters attacked Vila, Kolombangara Island. 

2. In the above operations, no U. S. planes were lost. 

50

North Pacific. 

3. On June 25, during the afternoon, Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) and Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers escorted by Lightning (Lock­heed P‑38) fighters made six attacks against Kiska. Hits were scored in the main camp area and among the enemy antiaircraft positions. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 425, JUNE 28, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 27: 

(a) During the early morning Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers bombed Kahili, Buin Area, and Munda, New Georgia, while Navy Liberator (Consolidated PB4Y) bombers carried out attacks against Ballale Island, Shortland Area. Results of these attacks were unobserved.

(b) Prior to dawn, Navy Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers bombed Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island.

(c) During the morning, Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers attacked Munda, New Georgia. Hits were scored on the runway and revetment area.

(d) At about the same time Navy Dauntless dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers attacked Vila, Kolombangara Island. Hits were scored on the runway and in the camp area. 

North Pacific. 

2. On June 26 Army Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) and Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers escorted by Lightning (Lock­heed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters bombed and strafed Kiska seven times. Hits were scored among antiaircraft emplacements and on the runway and eight fires were started in the camp area. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 426, JUNE 28, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas: 

(a) 1 Minelayer sunk.
(b) 1 Destroyer sunk.
(c) 1 Large transport sunk.
(d) 3 Medium‑sized cargo vessels sunk.
(e) 1 Small cargo vessel sunk.
(f) 1 Small schooner sunk.
(g) 1 Large transport damaged.
(h) 2 Medium‑sized cargo vessels damaged. 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué.

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 427, JUNE 29, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 28: 

(a) Early in the evening a formation of Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat (Grumman F4F) fighters, attacked Japanese positions at Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. The bombing created so much smoke and dust that observation of the results of the attack was difficult.

(b) During the evening, a formation of Dauntless dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers, escorted by Wildcat fighters, attacked Munda, New Georgia Island. A number of fires were started in the defensive posi­tion area, in ammunition dumps and in the camp section.

(c) During the night, U. S. planes bombed a small Japanese naval disposition in the Central Solomons Area. Results were not observed.

(d) All U. S. planes returned from these attacks. 

North Pacific. 

2. On June 27, during the day, Navy Ventura (Vega PV) medium bombers, Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Liberator (Con­solidated B‑24) heavy bombers carried out six attacks against Japanese in­stallations at Kiska. Hits were scored on the main camp and at the North Head area. All U. S. planes returned.

3. On June 28, Army Mitchell medium bombers and, Navy Ventura medium bombers attacked Japanese positions at Kiska and Little Kiska. Because of weather conditions, complete observation of the results of the attacks was not possible, but hits were reported on houses at Little Kiska. All U. S. planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 428, JUNE 30, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 30, during the early morning combined U. S. forces landed on Rendova Island, New Georgia Group. No details have been received. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 429, JULY 1, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On the night of June 29‑30, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers attacked the airfield, the stores and camp areas at Vila, Kolombangara Island. 

2. On June 30: 

(a) A formation of Mitchell (North American) medium bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Avenger torpedo bombers attacked Japanese defensive positions and camp area at Munda, New Georgia Island. A large fire was started.

(b) Commencing in the early forenoon and continuing until late afternoon, an estimated total of 110 Japanese planes comprising Zero fighters, Mitsubishi medium bombers, Aichi dive bombers and various other types attacked at intervals U. S. Naval forces during the landing at Rendova Island, New Georgia Group. U. S. surface units and air forces destroyed 

52

65 of the enemy planes according to an incomplete report. Seventeen U. S. planes are reported missing.

(c) The transport McCawley was attacked and disabled by Japanese torpedo planes after landing troops on Rendova. Subsequently the vessel was attacked and sunk by a Japanese submarine. Reports indicate that all personnel were removed before the vessel sank and that there was no loss of life. 

3. On July 1, Viru Harbor on New Georgia Island, was taken by joint U. S. forces. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 430, JULY 2, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 1: 

(a) Early in the afternoon, Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers attacked Japanese defensive positions at Lambeti Plantation, Munda, New Georgia Island. Fires were started.

(b) During the same afternoon, a formation of Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless dive bombers attacked Japanese defensive positions and camp sections at Vila, Kolombangara Island. 

2. Seven pilots of the 17 U. S. planes previously reported as missing in Navy Department Communiqué No. 429 have been rescued. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

(a) Lambeti Plantation is located several miles east of the airfield at Munda, New Georgia Island.

(b) Late reports on the Japanese air attack on U. S. forces during the landing at Rendova Island, New Georgia Group, on June 30, indicate that the number of Japanese planes were substantially larger than the total of 110 planes initially reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 429. It is also reported that U. S. surface and air forces destroyed 101 Japanese planes in the action. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 431, JULY 3, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 2, in the afternoon Japanese bombers, escorted by Zero fighters, attacked U. S. positions on Rendova Island. Damage was negligible.

2. On July 3, during the night, a Japanese surface force consisting of three light cruisers and four destroyers attempted to shell U. S. positions on Rendova Island. U. S. surface craft replied to the bombardment and the enemy ships retired in short order. No further details have been received.

3. In Navy Department Communiqué No. 429 it was reported that no loss of life was sustained in the sinking of the transport McCawley. A later report now reveals that several of the crew were killed in the initial torpedo attack made by the Japanese planes. The next of kin have been notified. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the South and Southwest Pacific 

(a) On July 1, in an enemy air attack at Rendova Island, New Georgia Group, twenty‑two Japanese planes were shot down. Of the eight 

53

U. S. planes lost in the engagement, five of the pilots have been rescued No damage occurred on the island.

(b) On July 2: Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bomber escorted by Navy Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, bombed and strafed a Japanese vessel in Bairoko Anchorage, Kula Gulf, New Georgia Island. The vessel caught fire and sank. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 432, JULY 4, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On June 28, at dawn, Liberator (Consolidated) heavy bombers, at­tacked Japanese installations at Nauru Island. Fourteen defending Zero fighters were in the air but only four Zeros appeared willing to press home an attack. Two Zeros were damaged. Results of the attack were unobserved. All U. S. planes returned. 

2. On July 3: 

(a) Mitchell (North American) medium bombers, escorted by Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters, attacked Japanese antiaircraft positions at Munda, New Georgia Island.

(b) Later, in the afternoon, Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo bombers and Dauntless (Douglas) dive bombers attacked the Japanese camp sector at Munda, New Georgia Island. 

North Pacific. 

3. On July 2, Ventura (Vega) and Mitchell medium bombers and Liberator heavy bombers carried out eight attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. Hits were observed on antiaircraft positions in Gertrude Cove, the camp area and North Head sections. One direct hit as made on a house. 

4. On July 3, Liberator heavy bombers attacked the central bivouac area it Kiska. Weather conditions prevented observation of the results. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the South and Southwest Pacific: 

(a) On July 2, in the early evening, just east of Rendova Island, New Georgia Group, seven U. S. Corsair fighters intercepted and engaged one formation of thirty Zeros and immediately following attacked another formation of 20 Zeros. Six Zeros were destroyed. Three Corsairs were lost, but one pilot was rescued.

(b) On July 3, shortly before 3 P. M., Lightning fighters attacked a formation of about fifty Japanese Zeros over Rendova Island, New Georgia Group. Five Zeros were destroyed. Three U. S. planes were lost. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 433, JULY 5, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 4‑5, during the night, a number of U. S. surface units bombarded Japanese installations at Vila, Kolombangara Island, and Bairoko in Kula Gulf, New Georgia Island. A number of fires were started.

2. On July 5, in the morning, a formation of Army Hudson (Lockheed A‑29) light bombers attacked Rekata Bay, Santa Isabel Island. 

54

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the South and South­west Pacific: 

 (a) On July 3, it is reported that Vura Village on Vangunu Island in the Wickham Anchorage area was captured by U. S. forces.

(b) On July 4, in the early afternoon, U. S. planes intercepted and attacked an enemy formation of 18 bombers and 20 Zero fighters over Rendova Island, New Georgia Group. Five enemy bombers and four Zeros were shot down. No U. S. losses were sustained. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 434, JULY 5, 1943

South Pacific. 

1. Brief reports from the South Pacific indicate that a naval battle is in progress in Kula Gulf, north of New Georgia Island. 

2. No details of the action have been received. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 435, JULY 6, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On the night of July 4‑5, the U. S. destroyer Strong was torpedoed and sunk while engaged in the bombardment of Japanese positions on New Georgia Island. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the Strong will be notified as soon as possible. 

2. On the evening of July 5, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations on Ballale Island, Shortland Island Area. Five fires were started. About 12 Zero fighters attempted to intercept but were driven off. No U. S. losses were sustained. 

3. On July 6, in the early morning, a United States surface task force engaged Japanese surface units in Kula Gulf off New Georgia Island. (Pre­viously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 434). Sufficient details have not been received to give the results of this engagement, but it is believed that, while some damage was suffered by the U. S. force, considerable damage was inflicted on the enemy. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 436, JULY 7, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 4, a formation of Army Flying Fortresses (Boeing B‑17) heavy bombers bombed the Bairoko Harbor Area, west coast of New Georgia Island. 

2. On the early afternoon of July 5, sixteen Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters intercepted about forty enemy Zero fighters over Rendova Island. Two Zeros were destroyed. One Warhawk was lost but the pilot was rescued. 

3. During the early morning surface engagement of July 6, when six Japanese ships were probably sunk and several damaged, the light cruiser USS Helena was sunk. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the Helena will be notified as soon as possible. 

55

4. During the evening of July 6: 

(a) A formation of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Kahili and started several fires.

(b) During the same evening, a formation of Army Liberators bombed Buka Island. A number of fires as a result of the bombing were observed. 

North Pacific. 

5. On the evening of July 6, a U. S. surface task force bombarded Kiska, Enemy shore batteries did not return the fire. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the Southwest Pacific: 

(a) On the morning of July 6, a Navy Liberator (Consolidated PB4Y) heavy bomber was attacked by five Zero fighters northeast of Kolom­bangara Island, New Georgia. Group. Two Zeros were shot down and another was probably destroyed.

(b) On the afternoon of July 6, Army Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers bombed a beached Japanese destroyer in Bambari Harbor (Southeast coast of Kolombangara Island). Three hits were scored and a number of fires accompanied by violent explosions were observed.

(c) During the evening of July 6, Army Flying Fortress heavy bombers attacked Ballale Island, New Georgia Group, and started large fires. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 437, JULY 8, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. Submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas: 

(a) 1 large transport sunk.
(b) 1 medium‑sized transport sunk.
(c) 2 medium‑sized cargo vessels sunk.
(d) 1 large tanker sunk.
(e) 1 medium‑sized tanker sunk.
(f) 1 large cargo vessel sunk.
(g) 1 medium‑sized passenger‑cargo vessel sunk.
(h) 1 small cargo vessel sunk.
(i) 1 small schooner sunk.
(j) 4 medium‑sized cargo vessels damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqués. 

JULY 9, 1943 

JOINT STATEMENT 

The following statement of antisubmarine operations for the month of June is issued jointly by the British and United States governments: 

1. In June the losses of Allied and neutral merchant ships from submarine attacks were the lowest since the U. S. A. entered the war. The losses from all forms of enemy action were the second lowest recorded since the war between Britain and Germany began. 

56

2. The number of targets offered to the antisubmarine vessels an aircraft of the United Nations was not as great in June as previously, but the sinkings of Axis submarines were substantial and satisfactory.

3. The heavy toll taken of the U‑boats in May showed its effect June in that the main trans‑Atlantic convoys were practically unmolested and the U‑boat attacks on our shipping were in widely separated area However, every opportunity was taken of attacking U‑boats leaving an returning to their bases on the west coast of France.

4. The merchant shipping tonnage of the United Nations has shown a large net increase every month this year. Antisubmarine vessels and aircraft are coming into service in considerable numbers. 

JULY 11, 1943 

GERMAN SUBMARINE SUNK IN AIR‑SURFACE ATTACK 

In a coordinated air and surface attack which took place in the South Atlantic some time ago, two U. S. Navy patrol bombers crippled a German submarine with bombs and machine guns, and two U. S. destroyers then completed the attack by sinking the enemy underwater raider by gunfire. Many German prisoners were captured.

The airplanes were two Mariner patrol bombers (Martin PBM-3C's) commanded by Lieutenant Howland S. Davis, USNR., of 215 Wendover Road Baltimore, Md., and Lieutenant (junior grade) Harold C. Carey, USN, 220 East Randall Avenue, Ocean View, Norfolk, Va.

The destroyers were the USS Jouett, commanded by Commander Jesse Sowell, USN, of Barr Street, Lancaster, S. C., and the USS Moffet, commanded by Commander Fondville L. Tedder, USN, of 503 North Washington Street, Shelby, N. C. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 438, JULY 10, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 9, during the early morning, a U. S. light surface unit boy barded the Gertrude Cove Area in Kiska for several hours. The Japanese shore batteries returned the fire but caused no damage. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 439, JULY 12, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 10, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers with Navy Catalina (Consolidated PBY) patrol bombers attacked four Japanese cargo vessels 280 miles southwest of Holtz Bay, Attu Island. One vessel was sunk, another was left in a sinking condition and the remaining two were damaged.

2. On July 11, a U. S. light surface unit bombarded Japanese positions at Gertrude Cove, Kiska, and Little Kiska Island during the morning. The enemy did not return the fire.

3. On July 11, an additional four Japanese soldiers were captured Attu Island. 

57

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 440, JULY 13, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 12, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, escorted by Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers, carried out three attacks on Japanese installations at North Head and the main camp areas at Kiska. Poor weather conditions precluded observation of the results of the bombing. 

JULY 14, 1943 

USS ALCHIBA, ONCE ANNOUNCED AS LOST, NOW SALVAGED AND BEING REPAIRED 

The USS Alchiba, announced in Navy Department Communiqué No. 218 as lost as result of enemy action in the South Pacific, has been salvaged and has returned to a United States port for final repairs.

The USS Alchiba, of 8,858 deadweight tons, participated in the initial landing operations in the Solomons Island area from August 7 to 9, 1942, and despite attacks by high altitude bombers and torpedo planes in enemy infested waters, successfully landed supplies and equipment for the U. S. Marine forces of occupation.

On its fourth trip into the Solomons area, on November 28, 1942, just after dropping anchor off Guadalcanal, the USS Alchiba was torpedoed. Through the superior seamanship of Captain (then Commander) James S. Freeman, U. S. Navy, of 1905 Florida Avenue, Jasper, Ala., the vessel's commanding officer, and Commander Howard R. Shaw, U. S. Navy, of Sandown, N. H., the executive officer, the vessel was beached despite numerous gasoline and ammunition explosions.

On December 7, 1942, after most of the cargo had been removed and the fires had been put under control, the USS Alchiba was hit by another torpedo. Her loss was announced by the Navy Department on December 11, 1942.

Within a month, however, the vessel was able to be moved from Guadal­canal to a more sheltered harbor, and subsequently it returned to the con­tinent under its own power.

Captain Freeman has been awarded the Navy Cross and Commander Shaw the Silver Star Medal for their leadership in the saving of this vessel. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 441, JULY 15, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 14, during the early morning, a U. S. light surface unit bom­barded Japanese positions in Gertrude Cove on Kiska. Enemy guns did not reply. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 442, JULY 16, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 15, during the early morning, a U. S. light surface unit bom­barded Japanese positions in Gertrude Cove on Kiska. The enemy did not return the fire. 

58

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the Southwest Pacific: 

(a) The USS Gwin, a 1630‑ton destroyer, which was damaged in the second battle of the Kula Gulf early in the morning of July 13th, sank later while being towed to an Allied base.

(b) During the afternoon of July 15, 27 Mitsubishi bombers, escorted by about 40 or 50 Zeros and other fighters, were intercepted over Rendova by 44 U. S. fighter planes. 15 Japanese bombers and 30 Zeros were shot down. 3 U. S. pilots did not return to their base. 

JULY 16, 1943 

U. S. ESCORT CARRIER "B" ATTACKS 11 SUBMARINES: 2 SURE KILLS; 4 VERY PROBABLES; 4 PROBABLES 

A U. S. "baby flat‑top" escort carrier, designated Escort Carrier "B" for the purpose of this report, recently returned to port bringing with it a thrilling story of continuous and aggressive action against Nazi submarines.

Planes of "Carrier B," by the speed and teamwork of their attacks, work­ing in close harmony with U. S. destroyers and anti-subsurface craft, chalked up the remarkable record, according to preliminary estimates, of two "certain kills" (prisoners were taken), four "very probably kills," and four "probable kills" in attacks on a total of 11 submarines. All ships in the convoys pro­tected by Escort Carrier "B" reached their destinations undamaged. It is believed that this record of defense and attack over a similar period of time has not been equaled by any other vessel in the history of antisubmarine warfare. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 443, JULY 17, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 15, a force of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers and Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) fighters carried out four attacks against Japanese installa­tions at Kiska. Several fires were observed in the vicinity of the enemy antiaircraft batteries. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The following information has been announced in the Southwest Pacific 

On July 15: 

(a) During the morning a formation of Army Mitchell medium bombers, escorted by Navy Corsair (Vought F4U) fighters, bombed and sank a small Japanese cargo vessel off the west tip of Baga Island (West of Vella Lavella). Later on the same morning another small enemy cargo vessel was attacked by the same planes and left burning on a reef at the north tip of Baga Island. On their return flight the Mitchell bombers strafed enemy positions on Vori Point (Northwest point of Ganongga Island).

(b) During the afternoon, a strong formation of Navy Dauntless (Douglas SBD) dive bombers and Avenger (Grumman TBF) torpedo planes bombed Vila, Kolombangara Island. Fires were still burning one and one‑half hours after the attack. 

59

(c) During the same afternoon another formation of Navy Dauntless dive bombers bombed and strafed Bairoko, New Georgia Island.

(d) Later in the afternoon Army Mitchell medium bombers, escorted by Lightning and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, strafed and probably sank two Japanese barges on the northeast coast of Ganongga Island. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 444, JULY 18, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. During the night of July 16, Navy Catalina (Consolidated PBY) patrol bombers bombed enemy positions on Nauru Island. Numerous fires were started. All U. S. planes returned from this mission undamaged.

2. During the night of July 16‑17, a number of enemy bombers dropped bombs on Guadalcanal Island, causing some casualties to personnel and light damage to installations. Bombs also were dropped on Savo Island with no damage. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 445, JULY 20, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 18, during the afternoon, a formation of Army Liberator (Con­solidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) and Ventura (Vega B‑34) medium bombers attacked the Japanese main camp area and Gertrude Cove on Kiska. Due to overcast, results were unobserved.

2. On July 19, during the morning, a formation of Army Liberator heavy bombers attacked Paramushiru, Kurile Islands. A number of fires were ob­served. In addition, Japanese ships in Paramushiru Straits were bombed, and a number of near hits observed. 

South  Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

3. On July 18, several Japanese planes harmlessly bombed Canton Island. No personnel casualties or material damage was sustained. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 446, JULY 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 20, during the early morning, three Japanese bombers dropped several bombs on Funafuti, Ellice Islands. No damage was reported and no personnel injuries were sustained. 

North Pacific

2. On July 20, two U. S. light surface units bombarded the Japanese main camp and the Gertrude Cove Area on Kiska. The enemy did not return the fire. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 447, JULY 22, 1943 

The U. S. Submarine Triton has failed to return from patrol operations and must be presumed to be lost. The next of kin of personnel in the Triton have been so informed.


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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 448, JULY 23, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On July 22, during the early morning, Japanese bombers attacked Funafuti, Ellice Islands. Two of the bombers were shot down. Material dam­age has not been reported, but some personnel casualties were sustained. 

North Pacific.

2. On July 21, during the afternoon, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers bombed the Japanese runway and the main camp area on Kiska. Numerous hits were scored and several fires were started.

3. On July 22, during the afternoon, United States heavy and light surface units bombarded Japanese positions on Kiska. Although the enemy returned the fire, United States ships were not damaged. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 449, JULY 24, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 22, prior to and after the surface bombardment of Kiska (Previously reported in Navy Department Communiqué No. 449) Army Libera­tor (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers, Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers, with Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, heavily bombed and strafed enemy coastal batteries, antiaircraft positions and building areas. Numerous fires were started and a large ex­plosion observed. A number of the Warhawks participating in the attacks were piloted by pilots of the Royal Canadian Air Force. One U. S. plane was shot down by antiaircraft fire, but the crew was rescued. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 450, JULY 26, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 24, formations of Army Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters car­ried out ten bombing and strafing attacks against Japanese positions on Kiska. Numerous hits were scored on the runway and among gun emplacements. One U. S. plane failed to return. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 451, JULY 27, 1943

Central Pacific. 

1. On July 24, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers at­tacked Wake Island. Thirty Zero fighters intercepted, of which nine were destroyed, four were probably destroyed, and five others were damaged.

2. The U. S. planes on closer approach to the island were met by additional fighters and heavy antiaircraft fire. In spite of this opposition, the U. 8. bombers scored many hits and caused a large explosion on the runway. One U. S. plane is missing. 

North Pacific. 

3. On July 25, Army Warhawks (Curtiss P‑40) fighters carried out ten bombing attacks on Japanese installations at Kiska. At North Head hits were scored on the runway and antiaircraft positions. The main camp, North Head 

61

and Little Kiska were also strafed. Fires were started at Little Kiska and a large explosion was observed on North Head.

4. On July 26, shortly after midnight, a U. S. Catalina (Consolidated PBY) patrol bomber attacked Gertrude Cove and the main camp section of Kiska. Fires were started in Gertrude Cove. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 452, JULY 28, 1943

Central Pacific. 

1. On July 27, Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers again attacked Japanese positions on Wake Island. Approximately 25 Zero fighters intercepted the Liberators. Seven Zeros were destroyed, five were probably destroyed and three others were damaged. In spite of heavy antiaircraft fire, bombs were placed on designated targets. All U. S. planes returned safely There were no casualties to U. S. personnel. 

North Pacific. 

2. On July 26, fights of Army Liberators, Lightning (Lockheed P‑38) and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) fighters, carried out thirteen bombing attacks against Japanese installations on Kiska. As a result of these bombings, fires were started and explosions were observed on North and South Heads, the runway, the bivouac and submarine base sections, Gertrude Cove and Little Kiska. Individual targets in these areas were also subjected to strafing. One U. S. Warhawk fighter was forced into the sea but its pilot was rescued by a Navy Catalina (Consolidated PBY) patrol bomber.

3. On July 27, various formations of Army Liberators, Warhawks and Lightnings carried out six bombing attacks on Kiska. Hits were made in the bivouac area. Spotty weather conditions precluded full observation of the results of the attack. 

JULY 28, 1943 

MORE THAN 1,500 UNITED STATES NAVAL VESSELS CARRIED INVASION FORCE TO SICILY 

More than 1,500 vessels of the United States Navy, ranging in size from cruisers to small landing craft and manned by well over 40,000 officers and men, effected the landing of United States invasion forces on Sicily.

In addition to larger combat units, the fleet included a number of anti­submarine patrol craft and a swarm of motor torpedo boats.

Under the immediate command of Vice Admiral H. K. Hewitt, U. S. Navy, Commander of U. S. Naval Forces in North African Waters, the vast invasion fleet successfully carried out, in conjunction with British Amphibious Forces, the largest amphibious operation in the history of warfare, landing and supply­ing U. S. Army troops on a hostile shore with minor loss of life and equipment. The U. S. forces were under the general operational control of Admiral Sir Andrew Browne Cunningham, Bart., G.C.B., D.S.O., who commands all Naval forces under General Eisenhower.

Naval units engaged in the landing operation were part of the United States Atlantic Fleet which, under the command of Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, U. S. Navy, has since the opening of the North African campaign eight months 

62

ago, transported several hundred thousand American troops and vast quantities of supplies across the Atlantic.

The actual landing on the Sicilian shore was only the culmination of long months of extensive preparation, of intensive training in the complex maneu­vers of amphibious warfare, of working out logistical problems, and of meticu­lous planning on a vast scale to insure that every vessel would be at the proper spot at the proper moment. The training of personnel was continued in North Africa until the last moment before shoving off.

Naval landing forces Included men specially trained in the unloading of supplies under conditions made hazardous by surf and enemy action. In beach landing operations, Naval forces are responsible not only for the transporta­tion of men and supplies across open water, but also for the safe disembarking of the troops and the unloading of supplies to points on shore.

Directing the operations under Vice Admiral Hewitt were Rear Admiral Alan G. Kirk, U. S. Navy, Rear Admiral John L. Hall, U. S. Navy, and Rear Admiral Richard L. Conolly, U. S. Navy.

The story of the invasion is, from the Naval standpoint, the story of the success of the many types of specialized landing craft, large and small, which have been developed to break down the coastal walls of the Axis' European fortress.

Operating in numbers which dotted the surface of the Mediterranean black, the vessels of every size and shape, each with a specialized job to do and making up the largest amphibious operation in history, constituted by far the greatest number of craft in the invasion fleet,

One of the initial waves of invading U. S. troops was transported across the Mediterranean entirely by landing vessels. One group of hundreds pro­ceeded to the first rendezvous accompanied only by small escorts. Against a 25‑knot wind the fleet of odd‑looking craft plunged and reared steadily and doggedly ahead. PC's and SC's escorting the group sometimes showed half their bottoms as they leaped, spray flying, over the seas. Experienced officers marveled at the seamanship of the crews‑many of whom had never seen the ocean a year before‑who drove their rearing, blunt‑nosed craft ahead at a steady pace.

As mechanical difficulties developed, special repair crews went into action until, once underway again, an additional knot or two was forced from pro­testing engines until the lost time was made up. The fleet arrived at the rendezvous on time and intact.

Part of the U. S. forces engaged in the landing had been transported across the Atlantic specifically for the job. Huge convoys took over the men and supplies, and so securely were they ringed by Naval escort vessels, includ­ing cruisers, that neither convoy was once attacked.

The actual landing of American forces on Sicily began in the early morn­ing. Since surprise was to be one of the elements of the attack, split‑second timing was demanded. Off every possible landing beach the enemy had sown mines. But due to the skillful work of Naval minesweepers, not a single con­tact with an enemy mine was reported during the entire landing operation.

Apart from the actual landing of troops and supplies, Naval combat units had three major duties: protection of landing forces from enemy surface and undersea forces; maintenance of antiaircraft barrages; and gunfire support of advancing troops on shore. Every landing group had offshore a supporting force of destroyers or cruisers or both.

Naval gunfire continued during the next few days to play an important

63

role in the movement of troops inland, blasting enemy positions even in the hills.

With the lessons of the invasion of North Africa eight months before well learned, operational losses of landing craft were extremely low. Special salvage and repair units had been set up afloat and ashore in the opening stages of the invasion, and damaged craft were speedily repaired and returned to service.

Within 48 hours, the entire fleet of landing vessels had made another round trip to Africa and returned loaded to the gunwales with men and supplies.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 453, JULY 29, 1943

Pacific and Far East.

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in the waters of these areas: 

(a) 2 large transports sunk.
(b) 2 large cargo vessels sunk.
(c) 3 medium‑sized cargo vessels sunk.
(d) 2 medium‑sized tankers sunk.
(e) 1 small cargo vessel sunk.
(f) 1 large cargo vessel damaged.
(g) 3 medium‑sized cargo vessels damaged.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqués. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 454, JULY 30, 1943

Atlantic

1. The U. S. non‑rigid airship K‑74 was lost at sea recently as the result of a gunfire attack by a surfaced enemy submarine.

2. The K‑74 was fired on while attacking the submarine, and, as the result of a hit, was forced to make a landing on the sea.

3. All except one member of the crew of the K‑74 were rescued. Next of kin of the one casualty has been notified that he is missing in action. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 455, JULY 31, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On July 29, a U. S. Army Flying Fortress (Boeing B‑17) heavy bomber attacked Japanese positions on Kiska. Due to overcast weather, results were unobserved.

2. On July 30, during the morning, U. S. light surface units bombarded Gertrude Cove and the main camp areas on Kiska. Enemy batteries did not reply. 

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AUGUST 10, 1943 

JAPANESE SUBMARINE, SCANNING U. S. CONVOY, SUNK BY PATROL CHASER 

Viciously attacking a Japanese submarine by ramming, depth charges and gun fire, a U. S. Navy submarine chaser sank the underseas raider with all hands in the Pacific 15 minutes after lookouts detected her periscopes scan­ning the convoy which the 'chaser was protecting.

The attack, carried out by the USS PC‑487 under the command of Lieu­tenant W. Gordon Cornell, USNR., Port Richmond, Staten Island, N. Y., occurred recently as the 'chaser and other escort vessels guarded a convoy headed for a United States base. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 456, AUGUST 12, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On August 12, at about 8:11 A. M. east longitude time, a formation of nine Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers attacked Japanese installations in the Kurile Islands. Numerous hits were scored in the desig­nated target areas. About forty enemy fighters intercepted of which five were shot dawn and others probably destroyed or damaged. Two of the U. S. bombers are missing. 

JOINT STATEMENT, AUGUST 14, 1943 

The President of the United States and the Prime Minister of Great Britain, after consultation with the British Admiralty, the United States Navy Department and the Canadian Department of National Defence for Naval Services, have issued the following monthly statement on the progress of the anti‑U‑Boat war: 

During the month of July very poor results were obtained by the U‑Boats from their widespread effort against the shipping of the Allies. The steady flow of trans‑Atlantic supplies on the greatest scale has con­tinued unmolested, and such sinking as have taken place in distant areas have had but an insignificant effect on the conduct of the war by the Allies. In fact, July is probably our most successful month, because the imports have been high, shipping losses moderate and U‑boat sinkings heavy.

Before the descent upon Sicily an armada of warships, troop trans­ports, supply ships and landing craft proceeded through Atlantic and Mediterranean waters with scarcely any interference from U‑boats. Large reinforcements have also been landed in that Island. Over 2,500 vessels were involved in these operations and the losses are only about 80,000 tons. On the other hand the U‑boats which attempted to interfere with these operations suffered severe losses.

Our offensive operations against Axis submarines continue to progress most favourably in all areas, and during May, June and July we have sunk at sea a total of over 90 U‑boats, which represents an average loss of nearly one U‑boat a day over the period.

The decline in the effectiveness of the U‑boats is illustrated by the following figures: 

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In the first six months of 1943, the number of ships sunk per U‑boat operating was only half that in the last six months of 1942 and only a quarter that in the first half of 1942.

The tonnage of shipping in the service of the United Nations continues to show a considerable net increase. During 1943 new ships completed by the Allies exceed all sinkings from all causes by upwards of three million tons.

In spite of this very favourable progress in the battle against the U‑boat, it must be remembered that the enemy still has large U‑boat re­serves, completed and under construction. It is necessary, therefore, to prepare for intensification of the battle both at sea and in the shipyards and to use our shipping with utmost economy to strengthen and speed the general offensive of the United Nations. But we can expect continued success only if we do not relax our efforts in any way. 

ROOSEVELT
CHURCHILL.

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 457, AUGUST 14, 1943

Pacific and Far East.  

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of seven enemy vessels and the damaging of five others in operations against the enemy in the waters of x these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 large transport
1 medium‑sized passenger freighter
2 small freighters
1 small schooner
1 medium‑sized supply ship
1 medium‑sized cargo vessel

Damaged:

1 medium‑sized freighter
1 medium‑sized tanker
1 medium‑sized cargo vessel
1 small freighter
1 small cargo vessel 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 458, AUGUST 15, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Pickerel has failed to return from patrol opera­tions and must be presumed to be lost. The next of kin of personnel in the Pickerel have been so informed. 

Mediterranean

2. The following U. S. Naval vessels have been lost in action against the enemy in operations in this area: 

(a) USS PG 496 (Submarine Chaser) sunk 4 June, 1943, as result of underwater explosion. 

66

(b) USS Redwing (Submarine Rescue. Vessel) sunk 29 June, 1943, as result of underwater explosion.

(c) USS Sentinel (Mine Sweeper) sunk 11 July, 1943, in landing operation off Sicily.

(d) USS Maddox (Destroyer) sunk 10 July, 1943, by aircraft off Sicily. 

Atlantic

3. The USS Plymouth (Gunboat) was sunk a short distance off the North Carolina coast on 5 August, 1943, as result of underwater explosion.

4. The next of kin of all casualties aboard the above named vessels have been notified. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 459, AUGUST 21, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. A Task Force of the Pacific Fleet has landed a force of United States and Canadian troops on Kiska, beginning on August 15th.

2. No Japanese have been found. There were indications of recent hasty evacuation of the Japanese garrison. Presumably, the heavy bombardments by our ships and planes that have been carried on for some time and the danger to their supply lines by our capture of Attu made the enemy positions on Kiska untenable. It is not known how the Japanese got away, but it is possible that enemy surface ships were able to reach Kiska under cover of the heavy fogs that have been prevalent.

3. Since the air and surface bombardments in the latter part of July had apparently destroyed Japanese radio equipment on Kiska, the assumption was that they were not in communication with the homeland. Consequently, no release of Allied operations against Kiska has been made since July 31, as it would have conveyed information to the enemy which he otherwise would not have had. This particularly applied to the period during which the trans­ports were in areas exposed to enemy submarine attacks and while they were unloading. 

AUGUST 21, 1943 

CHRONOLOGY OF ALEUTIAN ISLANDS CAMPAIGN 

1942 

On June 3: 

Dutch Harbor is attacked by four Japanese bombers and about 15 fighters at 6 A.M., Dutch Harbor time. The attack lasts 15 minutes. (Communiqué No. 83. )

There are few casualties as a result of the Japanese raid. Several ware­houses are set on fire, but no serious damage is suffered. (Communiqué No. 84).

At noon, Dutch Harbor time, a second wave of enemy planes files over Dutch Harbor on a reconnaissance mission. No bombs are dropped. (Communiqués Nos. 85‑86). 

On June 4: 

At about 5 P.M., 18 carrier‑based bombers and 16 fighters attack U. S. installations at Dutch Harbor, Fort Mears and Fort Glenn. No damage is 

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inflicted at Fort Glenn, minor damage is inflicted at Fort Mears, and at Dutch Harbor a warehouse and a few fuel oil tanks are set afire, and the station ship Northwestern, is sunk. (Communiqué No. 98). 

On June 12: 

Small scale landings by the Japanese on Attu Island are reported. Enemy ships are sighted in Kiska harbor (Navy Department Press Release, June 12, 1942) . Later reports reveal Japanese also occupy Agattu Island (Communiqué No. 98). 

June 15‑July 3: 

U. S. Army bombers and Navy patrol planes carry out reconnaissance and attack missions against enemy installations on Kiska and enemy shipping in adjacent waters. One transport is reported sunk and 4 cruisers, 1 destroyer, 1 gunboat and 1 transport are damaged. (Communiqués Nos. 89‑90‑94). 

July 4: 

U. S. submarines sink two destroyers and damage another off Kiska, and sink a third destroyer off Agattu. (Communiqué No. 95). 

July 5: 

A U. S. submarine torpedoes and heavily damages an enemy destroyer in the vicinity of Kiska. (Communiqué No. 96). 

July 6‑August 4: 

U. S. Army and Navy aircraft continue long range bombing of Japanese installations on Kiska.

U. S. submarines sink three more destroyers in the vicinity of Kiska. (Communiqués Nos. 99-103). 

August 8: 

A U. S. cruiser and destroyer task force heavily bombards Kiska and enemy ships in the harbor. Severe damage is inflicted on the camp area. (Communiqué No. 103). 

August 19: 

Sinking of a cruiser, or destroyer by a U. S. submarine is reported. (Communiqué No. 108). 

August 22: 

Sinking of a large enemy merchant ship by a U. S. submarine is reported. (Communiqué No. 110) . 

August 30: 

Adak Island occupied. (See October 3.) 

September 14: 

U. S. Army bombers and fighters bomb and strafe enemy ships, aircraft and shore installations at Kiska. Two minesweepers are sunk, three cargo ships are damaged, three submarines are damaged, six planes are destroyed, and 500 enemy troops are killed or wounded. (Communiqué No. 127). 

September 24‑25‑27‑28 

U. S. Army bombers and fighters attack enemy shore positions on Kiska and ships off Kiska and Attu. Attacks of September 25‑28 are carried out by strong forces. (Communiqués Nos. 133‑137). 

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October 3: 

Announcement is made that U. S. forces have occupied positions in the Andreanof group of the Aleutian Islands, without opposition. (Communiqué No. 138). Adak is the island occupied (Communiqué No. 370), and the estab­lishment of adequate airfields enables U. S. heavy bombers and fighters to operate from there in almost daily missions against the Japanese positions in the Western Aleutians. Throughout October, U. S. planes bomb and strafe the enemy ashore, and attack his shipping supply lines. (Communiqués Nos. 140‑143‑145‑150‑155‑157‑160‑161‑162‑170) Date of Adak occupation was August 30. 

November 9: 

First Japanese activity on Attu Island in more than a month is noted as U. S. Army planes discover and destroy seven float‑type "Zeros" in Holtz Bay, Attu. (Communiqué No. 188) Earlier reconnaissance had detected no signs of continued enemy activity on Attu and Agattu (Communiqués Nos. 143‑145). 

November‑December 

Routine missions are carried out by U. S. planes against shore positions on Kiska and Attu and enemy shipping off both islands. (Communiqués Nos. 205‑218‑225‑227‑232‑235). 

1943 

January 12: 

U. S. forces occupy Amchitka Island, only 63 nautical miles from Kiska, without opposition from the enemy. (Occupation of Amchitka announced in Communiqué No. 370, on May 7, 1943.) Following the occupation, an airfield is established on Amchitka with enemy opposition consisting of a few in­effectual raids by small numbers of planes (Communiqués Nos. 268‑273‑281­287). Date of Amchitka occupation was January 12. 

February: 

With completion of a close‑up base on Amchitka, U. S. planes execute nine attacks on Kiska during the month, dropping more than 1,000 bombs, No U. S. planes are lost in these operations. (Communiqué No. 298) . 

March: 

Intensification of the campaign against the Japanese in the Western Aleutians Increases. On March 15, U. S. Army heavy and medium bombers, escorted by fighters, carry out six missions against Kiska in the largest-scale attack thus far. (Communiqué No. 314). Raids on the enemy average better than one a day during the month.

On March 26, U. S. light forces patrolling to the westward of Attu Island engage a Japanese force composed of two heavy cruisers, two light cruisers, four destroyers and two cargo ships. Shell hits are scored on both of the Japanese heavy cruisers and one of the light cruisers. At least one torpedo hit is scored on an enemy heavy cruiser. U. S. vessels receive minor hits. (Communiqués Nos. 327‑365). 

April: 

The month sees Kiska subjected to air attacks on a mass basis with occasional raids on Attu. The peak day is April 19, when 15 attacks are carried out against Kiska (Communiqué No. 351). Kiska twice is bombed 13 times in a day, on April 15 and April 25. (Communiqués Nos. 346 and 357). The month's average is slightly under five missions a day.

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May: 

Air attacks on Kiska and Attu continue during the early days of the month, and then, on May 11, U. S. forces land on Attu. (Communiqué No. 376). Supported by bombardment of enemy positions by U. S. Naval surface forces, U. S. Army troops advance inland on Attu from the main landing points on the northeast and southeast ends of the island. In three weeks of fighting made difficult by Attu's rugged terrain and unfavorable weather, U. S. troops complete conquest of Attu. By June 1, all organized enemy resistance has ceased. (Communiqué No. 401). 

June: 

U. S. forces, now in possession of key positions in the Western Aleutians, concentrate attention on Kiska, and carry out bombing and strafing missions whenever the weather will permit. (Communiqués Nos. 400‑402‑403‑407‑409-­414‑420‑423‑424‑425‑427) . 

July: 

U. S. Naval surface forces Join in the assault on Kiska, bombarding enemy shore positions on July 6‑9‑11‑14‑15‑20‑22‑30. (Communiqués Nos. 436‑438­-439‑441‑442-446‑448‑455) .

Meanwhile, U. S. Army bombers and fighters continue heavy attacks on all enemy positions on the island. 

August 1‑14: 

Kiska undergoes concentrated assaults by U. S. forces both from the air and sea. (Communiqué No. 460).

On August 15, U. S. and Canadian forces landed on Kiska. (Communiqué No. 459) . 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 460, AUGUST 21, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. In the period from August 1 to August 14, inclusive, U. S. Army and Navy aircraft and heavy and light U. S. Naval surface units carried out the following previously unannounced attacks on Kiska Island and Little Kiska 

On August 1: 

Liberator heavy bombers (Consolidated B‑24) dropped bombs through solid overcast on the Kiska main camp area. 

On August 2: 

(a) In the afternoon Liberators attacked North Head on Kiska, and scored hits in the area.

(b) Immediately following the above air attack, heavy and light U. S. Naval surface units heavily bombarded the main camp, submarine base, North Head, South Head and Gertrude Cove on Kiska Island, as well as enemy posi­tions on Little Kiska. More than 2,300 rounds of large and medium caliber shells were fired at the targets, with no return fire from the enemy.

(c) Early the same evening Mitchell medium bombers (North American B‑25) and Lightning fighters (Lockheed P‑38) bombed and strafed Little Kiska. 

On August 3: 

(a) In the early morning, light Naval surface units shelled Gertrude Cove and the main camp area on Kiska. Return fire by the enemy was light and brief. 

70

(b) Four bombing and strafing attacks were carried out by Mitchell medium bombers and Warhawk (Curtiss P‑40) and Lightning fighters on North Head, South Head, the runway, seaplane hangar area and the main camp on Kiska. Little Kiska was strafed. Hits were observed in all target areas. 

On August 4: 

(a) Shortly after midnight, a Navy Catalina patrol bomber (Consolidated PBY) dropped explosive and incendiary bombs on the Kiska main camp and submarine base. Large fires resulted from the attack.

(b) During a 12‑hour period from morning to evening, 18 attack missions were carried out against North Head, South Head, the runway, main camp and submarine base on Kiska and Little Kiska. Large forces of Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell medium bombers, Army Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas A‑24), and Lightning and Warhawk fighters participated in these attacks. In addition to the bombings, cannon‑firing‑ Mitchells successfully at­tacked shore installations, while the fighter planes strafed at low altitudes. Many explosions resulted and numerous fires were started. The enemy's opposition consisted of sporadic antiaircraft fire. 

On August 5: 

In the early morning light Naval surface units shelled Gertrude Cove and the main camp on Kiska. No return fire was encountered. 

On August 6: 

Light Naval surface units again bombarded Kiska, scoring hits in the target area. There was no return fire. 

On August 8: 

The Kiska main camp and the Gertrude Cove area were the targets in a further bombardment by light Naval surface units, with no return fire. 

On August 9: 

Light Naval surface units shelled Gertrude Cove, the main camp and enemy positions on a hill North of Reynard Cove. 

On August 10: 

(a) Before dawn, Gertrude Cove and the main camp again were bom­barded by light Naval surface units.

(b) Large forces of Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell medium bombers, Army Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas A‑24), and Lightning and Warhawk fighters carried out 24 bombing and strafing missions on Kiska. Only light antiaircraft fire was encountered. Many fires were started.

(c) During the night, a Catalina patrol bomber dropped bombs on Kiska. 

On August 11: 

(a) In the early morning, light Naval surface units shelled South Head and Gertrude Cove, starting fires.

(b) Gertrude Cove, Reynard Cove, North Head and Little Kiska were the targets of 21 bombing and strafing missions carried out during the day by Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell medium bombers, Army Dauntless dive bombers (Douglas A‑24) and Lightning and Warhawk fighters. Fires were started in all areas and considerable debris was observed in enemy emplace­ments on Little Kiska.

(c) A Catalina patrol bomber dropped bombs on the main camp and Gertrude Cove during the night. 

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On August 12: 

(a) Shortly after midnight, a light Naval surface unit shelled Kiska.

(b) In the morning, heavy and light Naval surface units bombarded the south coast of Kiska. Gertrude Cove and Bukhti Point were the main targets. There was no return fire.

(c) The Kiska area was heavily bombed and thoroughly strafed during the day in 20 attacks by forces of Liberator heavy bombers, Mitchell medium bombers, Army Dauntless dive bombers, and Warhawk and Lightning fighters. Many fires were started. 

On August 13: 

(a) Light U. S. Naval surface units bombarded Kiska early in the morn­ing, drawing no return fire.

(b) During the afternoon nine bombing and strafing missions were car­ried out against Kiska by U. S. Army Liberator, Mitchell and Dauntless bombers and Lightning fighters. Buildings at Gertrude Cove and North Head were destroyed by direct hits, and fires resulted at Gertrude Cove, North Head, the main camp and north of Reynard Cove. Light antiaircraft fire was encountered. 

On August 14: 

(a) In the early morning hours a Navy Catalina three times bombed in­stallations on Kiska, with unreported results.

(b) At hourly intervals, light U. S. Naval surface units bombarded Kiska four times. No return fire was encountered.

(c) In the late afternoon U. S. Army Liberators, Mitchells and Lightnings bombed and strafed enemy positions on Kiska. Results were not reported. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 461, AUGUST 23, 1943

North. Pacific. 

1. U. S. and Canadian Troops are continuing the occupation of positions on Kiska and in the adjacent area. A landing has been made on Segula Island, about 20 miles east of Kiska, with no Japanese being found.

2. Three Japanese midget submarines, apparently damaged by demolition bombs, were found on the marine railway at the submarine base on Kiska. 

SEPTEMBER 1, 1943 

COMMENDED FOR RESCUE OF ENTIRE SHIP'S COMPANY OF STRICKEN MINESWEEPER 

Commander Alfred J. Homann, USN, 620 Menchino Avenue, Santa Rosa, Calif., has been commended for outstanding seamanship which made possible the rescue of all aboard the minesweeper, USS Wasmuth, when that vessel was so badly battered by storm and exploding depth charges that it was abandoned in the Aleutian area on December 27, 1942.

Loss of the Wasmuth, converted from a 1,190‑ton destroyer and com­manded by Lieutenant Commander Joseph Leverton, Jr., 1712 16th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C., has not been previously announced.

The Wasmuth was escorting a convoy in a raging gale 30 miles of the Aleutians when two depth charges were wrenched from their racks by the waves. The depth charges exploded under the Wasmuth's fantail and carried away a portion of the ship's after section. 

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With the damaged Wasmuth slowly, but surely sinking, Commander Homann skillfully brought the Ramapo, a tanker, alongside after a three and a half hour battle with the raging sea and took off everyone aboard the minesweeper. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 155, SEPTEMBER 5, 1943 

Admiral Ernest J. King, Commander in Chief, United States Fleet and Chief of Naval Operations, and Admiral William F. Halsey, Commander, South Pacific Force and South Pacific Area, have returned to their headquarters after conferences at Pearl Harbor, T. H., with Admiral C. W. Nimitz, Com­mander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas.

Principal members of the staffs of Admiral King, Nimitz and Halsey also participated in the conversations, which concerned plans for the Pacific campaign. 

SEPTEMBER 7, 1943 

U‑BOAT SUNK BY U. S. PATROL CHASER 

Shattered by the depth charges of USS Patrol Chaser‑565, a German submarine was sunk in the Atlantic, not long ago, as it stood in to attack a convoy which the tiny patrol boat was protecting.

The underseas raider was destroyed so swiftly that she had no oppor­tunity to fight back, plunging under in less than 10 minutes with water pour­ing through the open hatch of her conning tower.

Trapped below deck as the submarine sank was all of the ship's com­pany except her commanding officer, who swam clear and was taken prisoner. 

SEPTEMBER 8, 1943 

NAVY CARRIER‑BASED AIRCRAFT AND ESCORT SURFACE SHIP EACH DESTROYS U‑BOAT IN SINGLE DAY'S ACTIONS 

Coordinated participation of both air and surface Naval units in pro­tecting vital convoys to the Mediterranean theatre was exemplified a few weeks ago when two U‑boats were blasted to the bottom of the Atlantic and another severely damaged in one day's action.

Screening against suspected enemy submarines, miles ahead of a large convoy carrying tanks, ammunition, food and other supplies, was famed Escort Carrier "B", the "baby flat‑top" which had scored two certain kills, four very probables and four probables out of 11 attacks on a previous mis­sion, as announced by the Navy Department on July 16, 1943, and Carrier "B's" own small group of escort vessels. One of these escort ships was the USS George B. Badger, an old four‑stacker destroyer, since modernized, which was completed at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company 25 years ago. Carrier "B" and the Badger each scored a kill this day; Carrier "B" was credited with "severely damaging" another. 

73

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 11, SEPTEMBER 8, 1943 

A task force commanded by Rear Admiral Charles A. Pownall, U. S. Navy, attacked Marcus Island at dawn on 1 September, 1943, East Longitude Time. The first wave of the attack apparently caught the enemy completely by surprise. It is estimated that the attack, made in several waves through­out the day, destroyed 80 per cent of military installations on the island. Our losses totaled two fighters and one torpedo plane.

Some antiaircraft fire was encountered by the initial wave, but was eliminated by succeeding attacks. Fires started throughout the island were still burning the day following the attack.

No enemy planes left the ground. Seven twin‑motored bombers which were parked on the runway were destroyed by our fighters. Installations destroyed included hangars, fuel and ammunition storage, shops, and living quarters. The two landing strips were severely damaged by heavy bombs. A small tanker caught near the island was sunk by our bombers. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 462, SEPTEMBER 9, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of six enemy vessels and the damaging of four others in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows 

Sunk:

2 large freighters.
1 large cargo.
1 medium tanker.
1 small freighter.
1 medium cargo.  

Damaged:

1 large cargo.
2 small cargo.
1 medium freighter. 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy De­partment Communiqué. 

JOINT STATEMENT, SEPTEMBER 10, 1943 

The following statement is issued by the Office of War Information and the British Ministry of Information after consultation with the British Ad­miralty, United States Navy Department, and Canadian Department of Na­tional Defense for Naval Services 

1. August has been another successful month in U‑boat warfare. Owing perhaps to rearmament and other causes, there appear to have been fewer U‑boats at sea than in recent months, and shipping losses have continued to decrease.

2. It is significant that the enemy made virtually no attempt to attack North Atlantic shipping, and opportunities for attacking the U-boats have been relatively few. Nevertheless, U‑boats have been hunted relentlessly on all stations wherever they have appeared and a heavy toll has been taken of the enemy. In fact more U‑boats have been sunk than merchant ships. 

74

3. Surface and Air forces have both contributed to this satisfactory month's work by the efficiency of their escorts, patrols and offensive operations. Shore‑based aircraft have often had to face powerful enemy. Air opposition, and carrier‑borne aircraft have played a most important part.

4. We are ready to attack the enemy with utmost vigor should be provide the opportunity by resuming a general attack on our shipping with the very large number of U‑boats at his disposal. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 463, SEPTEMBER 13, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On September 13, (Paramushiru time) a formation of Army Liberator (Consolidated B‑24) heavy bombers and Mitchell (North American B‑25) medium bombers successfully attacked enemy shipping and ground installa­tions in the Paramushiru Island area.

2. In spite of spirited enemy opposition, in the form of heavy antiaircraft fire and fighter interception, the U. S. bombers scored numerous hits on ground installations, set on fire a transport, which was left in a sinking condition, damaged another transport, scored hits on three cargo vessels, one of which exploded, and strafed numerous small craft, setting many on fire.

3. Upwards of twenty‑five enemy fighters attacked the U. S. planes, and in a running engagement, which lasted for fifty minutes, the U. S. bombers shot down ten enemy fighters and probably three more. Four U. S. planes are known to have been lost due to enemy action, and six others failed to return. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 464, SEPTEMBER 14, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Grenadier has failed to return from patrol opera­tions and must be presumed to be lost. The next of kin of personnel in the Grenadier have been so informed. 

Mediterranean Area. 

2. On August 23, the USS Submarine Chaser 694 and the USS Submarine Chaser 696 were sunk as a result of enemy bombing. The next of kin of all casualties have been notified. 

Pacific Area (All dates are East Longitude). 

3. On September 13, during the night, fifteen Japanese planes attacked Funafuti, Ellice Island. One enemy plane was shot down by antiaircraft fire. Material damage sustained was slight. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 465, SEPTEMBER 16, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On September 13‑14, during the night Japanese planes bombed the Lunga Point Area on Guadalcanal Island. Some minor damage was sustained.

2. On the same night a Japanese bomber attacked U. S. positions on Russell Island, but caused no damage.

3. No personnel casualties resulted from either of the above raids. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 466, SEPTEMBER 17, 1943 

1. The destroyer USS Rowan was sunk as the result of an under water explosion in Italian waters on September 11, 1943.

2. The tug USS Navajo was sunk as the result of an under water ex­plosion in the South Pacific area on September 12, 1943.

3. The tug USS Nauset was sunk as a result of enemy action in the Mediterranean on September 9, 1943.

4. Next of kin of all casualties aboard the Nauset have been notified. The next of kin of casualties aboard the Rowan and the Navajo will be notified as soon as possible. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 12, SEPTEMBER 18, 1943 

Strong Pacific Ocean Area forces today conducted heavy raids on the Japanese bases at Tarawa Island, in the northern Gilbert group, and on Nauru Island, west of the Gilbert group.

These operations were carried out according to plan during the night preceding and for a good portion of the day of September 19, east longitude date.

Details of the operations are not immediately available. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 467, SEPTEMBER 19, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. During the night of September 15, a Japanese plane bombed Guadal­canal Island. Some minor damage was sustained and one man was injured. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 468, SEPTEMBER 21, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On September 19, in the early morning, several enemy planes bombed Guadalcanal Island. Slight material and personnel casualties were sustained. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 13, SEPTEMBER 22, 1943 

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas Communiqué No. 12, the following information concerning our operations against enemy installations in the Gilbert Islands region during the night preceding and throughout the day of 19 September, east longitude date, is available:

Attacks were made by carrier‑based aircraft and by land‑based Army and Navy aircraft from various bases in the Central and South Pacific areas.

More than 200 sorties were carried out by our planes against Tarawa, Makin and Apamama Islands, in the Northern Gilberts, and Nauru Island, west of the Gilbert group.

Damage to the enemy included: At Tarawa: Airdrome facilities heavily damaged, eight bombers destroyed on the runway, one small vessel sunk; At Makin: Air base damaged, three four‑engine seaplanes and one patrol plane destroyed; At Apamama : Enemy camp installations heavily hit; At Nauru: Damage to installations. 

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In addition to destroying aircraft on the ground, our forces shot down six Zeros, probably destroyed four others and damaged eight more fighters, and shot down two medium bombers.

Despite attempted interception by day and night fighters and intense antiaircraft fire encountered, our losses totaled only four planes. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 469, SEPTEMBER 23, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. On September 20, during the early morning, six Japanese planes bombed the vicinity of the air strip on Guadalcanal. Light damage to material and installations was sustained. No casualties were suffered.

2. On September 21, in the morning, about 12 or 16 enemy bombers were over Guadalcanal. Light damage and some casualties were sustained. Two of the enemy planes were shot down by one of our fighters. 

SEPTEMBER 28, 1943 

NAVY PILOT SINKS THREE U‑BOATS 

Lieutenant Robert Pershing Williams, USNR, 26‑year‑old Naval pilot of Snoqualmie, Wash., during a period of six weeks destroyed two U‑boats, bombed another into such helplessness that it was readily sent to the bottom by another plane, and possibly damaged a fourth underseas raider.

Lieutenant Williams, pilot of a Grumman Avenger bomber, is attached to one of the Navy's new escort aircraft carriers assigned to antisubmarine patrol and escort duty in the Atlantic. 

SEPTEMBER 29, 1943 

MARINE SERGEANT TELLS OF THE SINKING OF THE JOHN PENN 

Guadalcanal—(Delayed)—Although knocked across the deck and injured by a falling 12‑ton beam, Marine Captain William C. Roberts, of 501 Twenty-second Avenue, San Francisco, Calif., the son of a banker, probably saved the lives of several badly wounded men last night by tying life jackets on them and lowering them over the side of the torpedoed and sinking USS John Penn.

(The 9,000‑ton John Penn, a transport cargo ship, was formerly the Excambion of the American Export Lines. Her loss was revealed September 23, 1943, in a communiqué issued at the headquarters of General Douglas A. MacArthur, U.S.A. Next of kin of casualties have been notified by the Navy Department.)

The action was described this morning by Marine Sergeant William F. Stoddard, Jr., of 138 Quincy Road, Riverside, Ill., while Stoddard was lined up on the beach with the other survivors.

These torpedoed survivors, clothed in pajamas and cover‑alls given them by Navy Hospital Corpsmen, were answering a roll call to check the missing.

"A Jap plane put her fish right in our engine room," related Stoddard. "The bow began going under almost immediately, and the entire ship was out of sight in less than 20 minutes. 

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"Captain Roberts was injured when the explosion occurred. He was injured by a 12‑ton beam that instantly killed two men standing right next to him. He picked himself up, bleeding, and right away began to help the other wounded lying around the deck.

"He tied life jackets around the unconscious and lowered them to the water, hoping the rescue boats would pick them up. The bow was the last to go under, and when I left the ship he was still up there helping men to get aft before the whole thing went down."

"We still don't know how many men we lost," explained Stoddard.

Even while he was relating the story another alarm sounded and our interview had to be finished in a foxhole.

"It was an all‑Navy crew," he continued, "except Captain Roberts and myself, the only Marines permanently attached to the ship.

"Ever since I got ashore I've been looking for him. I was afraid he went down with the ship, but I finally located him just a little while ago. He's at one of the hospitals with a bad right shoulder and a couple of burns, but he says he's okay and should be out within a week."

The torpedoing last night was not Sergeant Stoddard's first contact with the Japs. He is a Guadalcanal veteran who landed with the first invasion troops August 7, 1942. After two months under fire he was transferred to ship duty, and since then has been serving in and out of Solomon waters. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 470, OCTOBER 1, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. During the morning of September 27, a U. S. reconnaissance plane engaged five Zero fighters in the vicinity of Nauru Island. One Zero was destroyed and one other was probably shot down. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 471, OCTOBER 1, 1943

Mediterranean Area. 

1. The mine layer, USS Skill, was sunk on the morning of September 25, 1943, as the result of an underwater explosion in the Gulf of Salerno. The next of kin of all casualties in the Skill have been notified. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 472, OCTOBER 3, 1943 

1. On the night of September 30, a U. S. reconnaissance plane engaged nine Zero fighters fifteen miles north of Nauru Island. One enemy plane was shot down. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 473, OCTOBER 6, 1943 

1. The U. S. Coast Guard patrol craft Wilcox, formerly a fishing vessel, foundered in a storm off the Atlantic coast on September 30, 1943, and was lost. One crew, member is missing and his next of kin has been notified. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 14, OCTOBER 6, 1943 

A strong Pacific Fleet task force, commanded by Rear Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery, USN, heavily attacked enemy held positions on Wake Island with carrier aircraft and ship bombardment commencing at dawn on October 5, 1943, west longitude date. Further details are not now available. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 15, OCTOBER 10, 1943 

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas Communiqué No. 14, the following information is available concerning our operations against Wake Island:

The initial heavy and protracted attack made by carrier aircraft and ship bombardment, beginning at dawn on 5 October, west longitude date, was fol­lowed late the same afternoon by an attack by a group of Navy Liberator Bombers led by Commander John T. Hayward, U. S. Navy, and on the morning of 6 October by a further carrier aircraft bombing by the force commanded by Rear Admiral Alfred E. Montgomery, U. S. Navy.

In the extended attacks our planes dropped 320 tons of bombs. An in­tensive bombardment by the ships combined to inflict considerable damage to enemy installations on Wake, Peale and Wilkes Islands. Enemy defenses were so neutralized in the initial bombardment that the heavy bombers encountered only weak and ineffective antiaircraft fire and no air opposition in their low altitude bombing attack in the late afternoon of 5 October.

Our forces destroyed 30 or more enemy planes in the air and 31 on the ground. Many fires were started in the plane dispersal areas, shops, barracks, and storage areas throughout the three Islands. Two small vessels, one loaded with gasoline, were destroyed.

Damage by enemy action to our ships and ships' personnel was negligible. We lost 13 planes in combat. 

JOINT STATEMENT, OCTOBER 10, 1943 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti­submarine operations in September is issued under the authority of the Presi­dent and the Prime Minister: 

1. Until the third week in September no Allied ship was lost by German U‑boat attack. Then, on the 19th of September, the U‑boats ended the four months' lull in the North Atlantic, and a pack of at least fifteen U‑boats concentrated on a west‑bound convoy. The combat lasted four and a half days. The loss of three escort vessels has already been announced. A small number of merchant ships were sunk, but as a result of vigorous counterattacks by the surface and air escorts a larger number of U‑boats were sunk or damaged.

2. In spite of the increase in U‑boat activity at the end of the month, the average merchant‑ship losses from all causes in September and August together are the best record of the war.

3. Nevertheless, this resumption of pack tactics is evidence of the enemy's intention to spare no efforts to turn the tide of the U‑boat war, and the utmost exertion and vigilance will be required before its menace is finally removed. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 474, OCTOBER 14, 1943

North Pacific. 

1. On October 13, ten Japanese bombers flew over Massacre Bay, Attu Island, at great height and dropped bombs without causing damage. There was no damage to the U. S. intercepting fighters or to enemy planes. 

Mediterranean Area. 

2. The USS Buck, destroyer, was sunk off Salerno on October 9, as the result of an underwater explosion.

3. The USS Bristol, destroyer, was sunk in the Mediterranean on October 13, as the result of an underwater explosion.

4. The next of kin of all casualties aboard the USS Buck and the USS Bristol will be notified by telegram immediately upon receipt of casualty re­ports. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 157, OCTOBER 15, 1943 

Navy Liberator bombers carried out a light bombing attack on Makin Island on 13 October, West Longitude Date. No damage was suffered by our forces. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 158, OCTOBER 18, 1943 

Shortly after midnight Sunday morning an unidentified airplane approach­ing from seaward was illuminated by searchlights at the Naval Air Station, Barber's Point, Oahu.

The plane, which appeared to be a small, float‑type monoplane, immedi­ately dived in an attempt to elude the lights, reversed its course, and sped out to sea, at low altitude.

The circumstances of the plane's approach would appear to indicate it was an enemy craft on a reconnaissance mission. It is considered that the mission was unsuccessful. The probability exists that the plane was launched from a submarine. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 475, OCTOBER 19, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. According to the latest available information, U. S. submarines; operat­ing over wide areas and carrying the war to the enemy's closest home waters, have sunk a total of 319 Japanese ships, have probably sunk and have damaged 105 others since December 7, 1941.

2. In previous Navy Department communiqués, the sinking of 221, the probable sinking of 31, and the damaging of 60 enemy vessels were announced. To bring the score of damage inflicted on Japanese shipping by U. S. sub­marines up to date, the following additional details of results are reported for the first time by types: 

Sunk:

6 large tankers
17 large cargo‑supply ships
45 medium‑sized cargo‑supply ships
3 large transports
2 medium‑sized tankers
5 small cargo‑supply ships
20 miscellaneous vessels
98 Total

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Probably Sunk:

5 medium‑sized cargo vessels

Damaged:

4 large tankers
2 transports
2 large cargo‑supply vessels
31 medium‑sized cargo‑supply vessels
5 miscellaneous vessels
1 small cargo‑supply vessel
45 Total 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 161, OCTOBER 21, 1943 

A small force of Navy Liberator bombers attacked Japanese held Tarawa Island, in the Gilbert Group, on 19 October, West Longitude Date. Consider­able antiaircraft opposition was encountered, but no enemy aircraft were sighted. Our forces suffered no damage. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 476, OCTOBER 24, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Dorado is overdue and must be presumed to be lost. The next of kin of personnel in the Dorado have been so informed. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 477, OCTOBER 27, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Runner is overdue and must be presumed to be lost. The next of kin of personnel in the Runner have been so informed. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 478, OCTOBER 29, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of ten enemy vessels and the damaging of four others in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 large freighter
1 large tanker
1 large transport
5 medium freighters
2 small freighters 

Damaged:

1 large freighter
2 medium freighters
1 small freighter 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 479, OCTOBER 30, 1943

South Pacific (east longitude date). 

1. A number of enemy planes ineffectively dropped bombs on Guadalcanal luring the night of October 28, 1943. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 480, NOVEMBER 4, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of ten enemy vessels and the damaging of three others in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 large tanker
1 medium tanker
1 patrol craft
4 medium freighters
1 large freighter
1 small freighter
1 large cargo transport

Damaged:

1 medium tanker
1 small freighter
1 large freighter

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

South Pacific. 

3. On the early afternoon of November 2, 1943, (East Longitude Date) a reconnaissance plane, operating under the command of Admiral Halsey, at­tacked and sank a 1,000‑ton enemy freighter 30 miles southwest of Ocean island. The plane was damaged, apparently by antiaircraft fire, and a number if her personnel were wounded. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 481, NOVEMBER 10, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. The U. S. destroyer Henley was sunk during October as the result of a torpedo explosion. The sinking took place in the early evening. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the Henley have been notified.

2. During the night engagement on October 6, off Vella LaVella, the U. S. destroyer Chevalier was severely damaged by the enemy and collided with mother destroyer in the formation. The Chevalier subsequently brake in two and sank. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the Chevalier have been notified.

3. Because of the nature of pending operations at the time, the losses of he USS Henley and USS Chevalier were not given earlier announcement. 

Atlantic

4. The destroyer USS Borie was lost in the Atlantic recently as the result of damage received by herself in ramming and sinking an enemy submarine. 

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5. The Borie, while engaged in patrol, encountered a submarine, which she sank with depth bombs. Encountering a second submarine a short time later, the Borie rammed and sank this enemy vessel also. The force of the ramming, however, opened holes in the Borie's hull below the water line. Although the Borie managed to rejoin the task force to which she was as­signed, the extent of her damage was so great that it was necessary for her personnel to abandon ship; after which the U. S. destroyer was sunk by bombs from her own group's planes.

6. The next of kin of casualties aboard the Borie will be notified by tele­gram as soon as possible. 

Memorandum to the Press: 

The night engagement referred to in paragraph 2 (loss of the USS Chevalier) was previously announced in Southwest Pacific Communiqué No. 546, on October 9, 1943, as follows

"Vella LaVella; The enemy was frustrated in an apparent attempt to evacuate the remnants of his defeated ground force. Our Naval units at night intercepted and engaged an enemy force consisting of one light cruiser and four destroyers. The cruiser and one destroyer exploded and sank as a result of our gunfire, one destroyer was sunk by torpedo action and the remaining two destroyers were damaged and fled. Two other groups of ships to the rear reversed course and retired at high speed. Our losses were moderate." 

ARMY AND NAVY JOINT STATEMENT, NOVEMBER 10, 1943 

The Army Air Forces has withdrawn from anti‑submarine operations and the United States Navy was assumed full responsibility, it was announced today by the War Department.

An outgrowth of the First Bomber Command, which since December 8, 1941, has been engaged in anti‑submarine activities, the Army Air Forces Anti­submarine Command was activated in October, 1942, under Brigadier General Westside T. Larson. Wings and Squadrons were organized for combat patrol work, assignments were made to theaters of operations, depth charges were dropped in a number of oceans and seas, with much success directed against enemy submarines.

It also was announced that the Navy has now acquired sufficient planes and trained sufficient crews to take over complete responsibility against the submarine menace.

Units which operated for the Army Air Forces will be absorbed for other combat duty by various air forces, some in theaters of operations, but an exchange of aircraft between the Army and Navy will be effected.

The Army planes were land‑based and operated in connection with several theaters of operations.

The Anti‑submarine Command discloses that millions of miles have been flown in combat operations by planes of its various wings and squadrons, con­stituting a substantial portion of the total number of miles flown since Pearl Harbor by all Allied Aircraft engaged in anti‑submarine warfare.

Operating world‑wide with a mission to seek out and destroy hostile sub­marines wherever at sea, the Anti‑submarine Command had spread out to four continents, fighting the U‑boat in three different theaters of operations. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 482, NOVEMBER 12, 1943

Mediterranean. 

1. The destroyer USS Beatty was sunk in the Mediterranean on Novem­ber 6, 1943, as a result of enemy aircraft action. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the Beatty have been notified. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 483, NOVEMBER 13, 1943

South. Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. During the night of November 11, about 12 Japanese bombers dropped bombs on Nanomea, Ellice Islands. Reports indicate one killed and two wounded. Minor material damage was sustained. One enemy plane was shot down by antiaircraft fire. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 168, NOVEMBER 13, 1943 

Early this morning (13 November west Longitude date), six Japanese bombers raided our installations on Funafuti, Ellice Islands, dropping about thirty bombs in two high‑altitude runs, causing minor material damage. Per­sonnel casualties were two wounded. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 484, NOVEMBER 14, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of seven enemy vessels and the damaging of two others in operations against the enemy in waters, of these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 plane transport
1 large freighter
1 medium cargo transport
4 medium freighters 

Damaged:

1 large freighter
1 medium freighter

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 169, NOVEMBER 15, 1943 

Army Seventh Air Force Liberators raided enemy installations on Betio Island, Tarawa atoll, Gilbert Islands, during the night of 13 November, West Longitude date.

Several large fires were started near the runways. No enemy interception was attempted. Our planes encountered intense antiaircraft fire over the target without damage or personnel casualties. 

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On 14 November Army Liberators from this force made further raids on Betio and on Mille atoll, Marshall Islands. No air opposition was encountered in either raid. Our planes and personnel suffered no damage from antiaircraft fire. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 16, NOVEMBER 18, 1943 

1. Late afternoon raids were made on enemy positions on Jaluit and Mille Atolls in the Marshall Islands and on Makin Island in the Gilberts on November 15 (West Longitude Date) by Liberator bombers of the Army's Seventh Air Force.

2. At Jaluit many fires were started by our bombs in the hangars, shops, and dump areas at the seaplane bases on Imieji and Jabor Islands. Of the five ships anchored in the lagoon one was left burning. Three others were possibly damaged. Several fires resulted from the Mille attack but cloud con­ditions prevented accurate observance of damage at Makin.

3. No air interception was encountered in any instance. Antiaircraft fire was intense at Mille, weak at Makin and at Jaluit. No damage was suffered by our planes or personnel. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 170, NOVEMBER 18, 1943 

Bombs were dropped on the airdrome area, Jaluit, Marshall Islands, on 16 November, West longitude date, by Liberators from the Seventh Air Force. Large fires were started.

One of several enemy float planes which attacked our formation was probably shot down. No damage was suffered by our planes or personnel.

At noon on 17 November, West Longitude Date, Liberators from the same force made low‑altitude bombing and strafing runs on the enemy airfield at Tarawa, Gilbert Islands. No enemy aircraft was sighted. No damage was suffered by weak antiaircraft fire from Betio Island.

About 10 enemy bombers made a medium altitude raid on our installations at Funafuti, Ellice Islands, before dawn on 17 November, West Longitude Date. Our losses were two killed and several planes damaged. 

NOVEMBER 19, 1943 

THE TENTH FLEET 

When deliveries of ships and aircraft reached sufficient proportions to warrant such a move, about six months ago, the Tenth Fleet was organized to exercise unity of control over the U. S. Navy's war against the U‑boat in the Atlantic.

In addition to his other duties, Admiral Ernest J. King, U. S. Navy, Commander in Chief, U. S. Fleet and Chief of Naval Operations, retained the immediate direction of anti‑submarine operations and is the Commander, Tenth Fleet.

Rear Admiral Francis S. Low, U. S. Navy, Assistant Chief of Staff (Anti-Submarine), U. S. Fleet, is Chief of Staff, Tenth Fleet.

The Tenth Fleet was assigned the following tasks: 

(a) Destruction of U‑boats.

(b) Protection of Allied shipping in the Sea Frontiers concerned.

(c) Support of other Anti‑Submarine Forces operating in the Atlantic

Areas. 

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(d) Control of convoys and shipping that are U. S. responsibilities.

(e) Correlation of U. S. anti‑submarine research and personnel instruction. 

To accomplish its assigned mission, the Tenth Fleet was organized into four principal divisions: Operations; Anti‑Submarine Measures (materiel, training, analysis and statistics and operational research); Convoy and Routing; and a Scientific Counsel (composed of civilian scientists).

Through this organization Tenth Fleet Headquarters makes available the latest information regarding anti‑submarine developments and intelligence and training and operating procedures to Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, U. S. Navy, Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, and the several other Fleet and Sea Frontier Commanders who direct the actual operations in that part of the Atlantic Ocean under U. S. strategic control. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 171, NOVEMBER 19, 1943 

Carrier aircraft raided Betio Island, Tarawa atoll, Gilbert Islands, on 18 November, (all dates herein West Longitude), starting large oil fires.

The following raids were made against enemy installations in the Marshall end Gilbert Islands by Liberators of the Army's Seventh Air Force: 

(a) Before dawn on 17 November, barracks, runways and oil dumps on Mille were bombed. No enemy planes were encountered. No damage was suffered by our planes or personnel from intense antiaircraft fire.

(b) At sunset on 17 November, bombs were dropped on Maloelap. Two of our planes were damaged by intercepting Zeros. There were no personnel casualties. One Zero was shot down, one was probably shot down and several were damaged.

(c) At noon on 18 November, raids were made against the Mille and Tarawa installations. There was no enemy air interception, although five Zeros were sighted over Tarawa. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 172, NOVEMBER 19, 1943 

Enemy installations on Nauru Island were heavily‑hit by carrier aircraft on 18 November, West longitude date.

Our planes dropped ninety tons of bombs in the airdrome and shop areas, starting fires and destroying several aircraft on the ground. One small ship vas set afire. Of the seven Zeros which appeared during later stages of the attack, two were shot down. Accurate antiaircraft fire was encountered. All four planes returned. One pilot was wounded. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 485, NOVEMBER 20, 1943

South Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. The small vessel reported lost in the communiqué dated November 18, 1943, issued from Allied Headquarters Southwest Pacific, was the USS McKean, destroyer transport. This vessel sank November 17, 1943, as a result of attack by enemy aircraft off the southwest coast of Bougainville Island.

2. The next of kin of the casualties will be notified as soon as possible. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 17, NOVEMBER 21, 1943 

Marine Corps and Army forces covered by powerful units of all types of the Pacific Fleet have established beachheads on Makin and Tarawa Atolls, Gilbert Islands, meeting moderate resistance at Makin and strong resistance at Tarawa. Fighting continues during these operations. Army Liberators made diversionary attacks in the Marshalls. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 18, NOVEMBER 22, 1943 

Our troops have improved their positions on Tarawa and Makin Atolls, but are still encountering considerable enemy ground resistance. We have landed on Apamama Atoll. Liberators heavily bombed the airdromes area at Nauru Island on November 20 (West Longitude Date) and on November 21 Army Liberators continued diversionary attacks in the Marshalls. The Central Pacific operations are being directed by Vice Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, U. S. Navy. The amphibious forces are under command of Rear Admiral Richmond Turner, U. S. Navy. Landings were made on Tarawa by the Second Marine Division in command of Major General Julian C. Smith, USMC; those on Makin by troops of the 27th Infantry Division, commanded by Major General Ralph Smith, U.S.A. Major General Holland McT. Smith, USMC, is in command of the landing forces. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 19, NOVEMBER 23, 1943

Central Pacific. 

1. Our forces have captured Makin. On Tarawa, the Marines have con­solidated their positions and are making good progress against enemy con­centrations on eastern end of Betio Island with capture assured. The situation on Abemama is well in hand.

2 Raids are being continued against the Marshalls by carrier aircraft and Army Seventh Air Force Liberators. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 20, NOVEMBER 24, 1943

Central Pacific. 

1. Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, was captured shortly after noon, November 23 (West Longitude Date), following a desperate enemy counterattack which was crushed by troops of the Second Marine Division.

2. Remnants of the enemy are being hunted down on Abemama, Tarawa and Makin Atolls.

3. Seventh Army Air Force Liberators continued diversionary attacks in the Marshalls. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 173, NOVEMBER 25, 1943 

One of our carrier divisions covering the Gilberts operations to 24 Novem­ber (West Longitude Date) shot down 34 enemy fighters, nine bombers and three four‑engine patrol seaplanes. Its losses in these operations total three fighters and one torpedo bomber. Seventh Air Force Liberators which raided Imieji, Jaluit atoll, on 23 November, observed three float‑fighters, airborne, 

87

which did not attempt interception. One of our planes was damaged by anti­aircraft fire.

Mopping up operations on Tarawa, Makin and Apamama are virtually complete. Few live Japanese remain in the Gilberts. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 486, NOVEMBER 26, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of nine enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows 

Sunk:

1 medium tanker
1 medium plane transport
7 medium freighters 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 177, NOVEMBER 29, 1943 

Islands in the Gilberts are being developed according to plan.

A few enemy stragglers remain in the northern end of Tarawa Atoll.

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators continue their raids against Nauru and the Marshalls. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 178, NOVEMBER 30, 1943 

Admiral C. W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, has returned to his headquarters following an inspection of the Gilbert Islands area, including Tarawa atoll. Admiral Nimitz was accompanied by Lieutenant General Robert C. Richardson, Jr., Commanding General, U. S. Army Forces, Central Pacific, and members of their staffs. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 21, DECEMBER 1, 1943 

Preliminary reports of the Gilbert operations indicate that our landing forces suffered the following approximate casualties: 

(a) At Tarawa—killed in action, 1026; wounded in action, 2557.

(b) At Makin—killed in action, 65 ; wounded in action, 121.

(c) At Abemama—killed in action, 1; wounded in action, 2. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 487, DECEMBER 2, 1943

Central Pacific (all dates are east longitude). 

1. The USS Liscome Bay (an escort carrier) was sunk as the result of being torpedoed by a submarine on November 24, 1943, in the Gilbert Islands area. This is the only ship lost in the Gilbert Islands operation.

2. The next of kin of casualties aboard the Liscome Bay will be notified as soon as possible. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 488, DECEMBER 2, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Wahoo is overdue and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Wahoo have been so informed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 181, DECEMBER 2, 1943 

Our aircraft continue raid and search operations in the Marshalls.

On the morning of 30 November, (West Longitude Date), Seventh AAF Liberators which bombed the Taroa airdrome were intercepted by 35 Zeros. Seven or more Zeros were shot down, at least four others were damaged. All of our planes returned, but several were damaged. Two men were injured.

A Navy Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two which was attacked by six Zeros near Mille on 30 November while on a search mission shot down one Zero, probably destroyed another and probably damaged two others.

On the evening of 29 November two of our destroyers in the Gilberts area repelled a prolonged attack by enemy torpedo planes. Three enemy planes were destroyed, two others were probably shot down. Neither destroyer was damaged. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 184, DECEMBER 5, 1943 

Nine enemy planes bombed the Tarawa Airdrome on the night of Decem­ber 3 (West Longitude Date), causing minor damage. Three men were slightly wounded. On the morning of December 4 an enemy plane dropped four small bombs at Makin, causing no damage.

A Navy search Liberator, of Fleet Air Wing 2, was attacked near Mille on December 3 by seven Zeros. Our plane destroyed one Zero, damaged two others.

On December 2 a South Pacific search Liberator bombed installations on Kapingamarangi Island, starting several fires. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 186, DECEMBER 5, 1943 

A force of Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Mille Atoll on December 4 (West Longitude Date). 50 tons of bombs were dropped, starting several fires and destroying one medium bomber on the ground. No enemy air interception was encountered. All of our planes returned, though five were slightly damaged by antiaircraft fire. Three men were slightly wounded.

Another group of Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force raided Nauru on December 4. An oil dump was set afire. There was no air interception, although three enemy planes departed the area as our planes arrived. All of our aircraft returned. One was slightly damaged by antiaircraft fire. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 489, DECEMBER 6, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of eleven enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 large tanker
9 medium freighters
1 small freighter

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 22, DECEMBER 6, 1943 

1. Strong carrier task forces attacked the Marshall Islands on December 4 (West Longitude Date).

2. Due to the necessity for radio silence, details are not yet available. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 23, DECEMBER 8, 1943 

1. Our carrier task forces which attacked enemy installations on Kwajalein and Wotje Atolls on December 4, 1943, (West Longitude Date) destroyed 72 planes in the air, strafed and burned an undetermined number of medium bombers on the ground, and destroyed or damaged various ground installations on Kwajalein, Ebeye, Roi and Wotje Islands.

2. At Kwajalein they sank two light cruisers, one oiler and three cargo transports and damaged one troop transport and two cargo transports.

3. At Wotje one cargo transport was damaged.

4. Our forces, under command of Rear Admiral Charles A. Pownall, USN, successfully fought off vigorous prolonged aerial and torpedo and bombing attacks. Of one group of seven torpedo planes, six were destroyed by antiaircraft fire.

5. One of our ships suffered minor damage. Our aircraft losses were light. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 188, DECEMBER 8, 1943 

1. The enemy continues nuisance air raids against our installations in the Gilberts. On the night of December 6 (West Longitude Date) a plane dropped four bombs at Makin, which landed harmlessly in the lagoon. On the night of December 5, enemy planes dropped eight bombs near Betio Island. Only one bomb landed near our installations, causing minor injuries to personnel. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 24, DECEMBER 9, 1943 

1. Strong forces of the Pacific Fleet attacked Nauru Island with carrier aircraft and ship bombardment on December 8 (West Longitude Date)­Further details are not now available. 

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2. Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force, which raided the Taroa airdrome installations on the morning of December 7, were intercepted over Maloelap by eight enemy fighters. One fighter was shot down. Our planes suffered only slight damage. A Liberator of this force also bombed Mille during the same sortie. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 189, DECEMBER 9, 1943 

Navy search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two made the following raids in the southern Marshalls on 8 December 1943 (West Longitude Date). A Ventura bomber strafed installations at Mille in the face of heavy automatic weapon fire without damage to our plane. Three Zeros attacked one of our Liberators near Mille, with no damage; another Liberator raided and strafed base facilities at Jaluit, sinking a patrol boat and probably sinking a medium freighter and two small vessels. 

JOINT STATEMENT, DECEMBER 9, 1943 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti­submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

Anti U‑Boat operations in November have been notable, for the enemy has achieved little for the great effort he has exerted. The number of merchant vessels sunk by U‑Boats in November is less than in any other month since May, 1940.

By means of aircraft operating from Azores we have been able to improve protection to our convoys and to diminish area in which enemy U‑Boats were free from attack by our forces.

The enemy has used long range aircraft to assist in concentrating U‑Boats on our convoy routes but in spite of this our escort and counter­attack has been effective.

The caution of the enemy U‑Boats has lessened the number of op­portunities presented to our forces for striking at them. Nevertheless, the number of U‑Boats sunk in November has again exceeded the number of their victims. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 190, DECEMBER 10, 1943 

1. Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force made late afternoon raids on enemy installations at Jaluit and Mille on December 8 (West Longitude Date). More than 40 tons of bombs were dropped in the target area at Jaluit. There was no enemy interception and none of our aircraft was damaged by antiaircraft fire. At Mille our planes were intercepted by 10 Zeros, two of which were probably shot down. Several of our planes received minor damage. One man was wounded. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 191 

Liberator bombers of the Army 7th Air Force which dropped more than 15 tons of bombs on Mille on 9 December (West Longitude Date) were at­tacked by approximately 20 Zeros. Four Zeros were shot down, three were 

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probably shot down, and one was damaged. We suffered only slight material damage with a few men wounded. Two Zeros dropped six aerial bombs at our planes without results. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 192, DECEMBER 12, 1943 

Our battleships and carriers which bombarded Nauru Island on Decem­ber 8 (West Longitude Date) started large fires throughout the target area and destroyed nine planes on the ground and one in the air. We lost two aircraft. One of our destroyers received one hit from enemy shore batteries suffering minor damage. A Navy search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two strafed a medium cargo transport and its escorting patrol vessel near Jaluit on December 10. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 193, DECEMBER 12, 1943 

Two Navy dive bombers collided on 7 December while engaged in training exercises near Keilii Point, Maui. Pilots of both planes parachuted safely, but their radiomen were killed.

A bomb from one of the two planes in collision fell and detonated among a force of Marines participating in field maneuvers nearby. Twenty Marines were killed and twenty‑nine were injured. A court of inquiry is investigating circumstances of the casualty. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 194, DECEMBER 14, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Imeiji Island, Jaluit Atoll, on December 12 (West Longitude Date), dropping ap­proximately 50 tons of bombs on shore installations and on a cargo transport in the lagoon.

Damage to our planes from antiaircraft fire was negligible. None of our personnel was wounded. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 195, DECEMBER 14, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the 7th Army Air Force raided enemy installa­tions on Wotje atoll on 13 December (West Longitude Date). One of our planes was damaged by antiaircraft fire. There were no personnel casualties.

Two Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two made a low altitude attack on Jaluit at dusk on 12 December. One pilot was wounded and both planes suffered some damage from machine gun fire.

The enemy made small night raids at Tarawa on 11 and 12 December. There were no casualties nor damage to our installations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 196, DECEMBER 16, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the Army 7th Air Force which bombed the enemy airdrome on Taroa Island on 14 December (West Longitude Date) started fires in the hangar area. They were intercepted by 15 fighters. One fighter was shot down, four were probably shot down and five were damaged. 

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Three of our planes were slightly damaged. Enemy bombers made nuisance raids at Tarawa on 12 and 13 December, and at Makin on 13 and 14 De­cember. No damage resulted from the Tarawa attacks. Four men were wounded at Makin by a bomb dropped in the raid on 13 December. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 197, DECEMBER 16, 1943 

Heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force struck Taroa and Wotje, in the Marshalls, on December 15 (West Longitude Date) dropping more than 40 tons of bombs, damaging installations on both islands.

At Taroa, where damage was inflicted on buildings and storage spaces our bombers were attacked by 30 enemy fighters. Two Zeros were shot down, eight were probably shot down, and eight others were damaged. One of our planes was lost and several others suffered damage. One crew member of another of our planes was killed.

At Wotje, where fires were observed as result of the bombings, none of our planes was damaged. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 490, DECEMBER 17, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of eight enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows 

Sunk:

2 large transports
2 large tankers
3 medium freighters
1 small freighter 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 198, DECEMBER 17, 1943 

Army Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force raided Wotje at dusk on December 15 (West Longitude Date) scoring numerous hits on airdrome installations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 200, DECEMBER 18, 1943 

The Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet, has received the following message from Sir Philip Mitchell, Governor of Fiji and British High Com­missioner for the Western Pacific: 

"May I express to you the warmest congratulations and most sincere gratitude of myself and people of Fiji and High Commission territories and especially of the Gilbert Islands for brilliantly planned and heroically executed operation for capture of Gilbert Islands. After personal visit to Betio I can understand the grimness of the task, the masterly way your bold blow was struck and the incomparable courage of the men who struck it. We Join you in mourning for the brave men who died. We salute a great feat of arms." 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 202, DECEMBER 19, 1943 

Army fighters and light bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force which attacked Mille during the morning of December 18 (West Longitude Date) destroyed six Zeroes on the ground and damaged three others.

Our planes encountered no air opposition. Two of our planes suffered minor damage from antiaircraft fire.

On December 16, Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two strafed a small vessel southeast of Kwajalein and attacked a ship and shore installa­tions at Ebon Atoll. On December 17, a Navy Liberator while on a search mission bombed three small transports near Jaluit, two of which were pos­sibly sunk. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 203, DECEMBER 20, 1943 

On the afternoon of December 18 (West Longitude Date) Army planes of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked airdrome installations at Mine Atoll and were intercepted by four Jap fighters. One Jap fighter was shot down, another was possibly destroyed. Several of our planes were damaged.

During the morning of December 19, Army fighters bombed and strafed Mille and destroyed one medium bomber and two Zeros on the ground. Eight Zeros attacked our formation. One was shot down. Heavy machine gun fire was encountered. We lost two planes. Army heavy bombers again raided Mille at noon on December 19, dropping about 30 tons of bombs. An intercept­ing fighter slightly damaged one of our aircraft.

During the night of December 18, a Catalina search plane of Fleet Wing Two bombed and set afire large transport at Kwajalein. Enemy planes dropped three bombs at Tarawa before dawn on December 18, causing no damage. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 204, DECEMBER 21, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, which attacked enemy installations on Maloelap Atoll on December 19 (West Longitude Date), were intercepted by 25 Japanese fighters. Seven of the enemy fighters were probably destroyed and five others were damaged. Two of our planes were damaged. Three men were wounded. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 205, DECEMBER 21, 1943 

Heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Taroa on De­cember 20 (West Longitude Date) with about 25 tons of bombs, causing many fires and explosions in hangar and storage areas. Our aircraft were attacked by 30 Zeros. Four enemy fighters were shot down; five others were probably destroyed. Three of our planes were shot down, others received minor damage from antiaircraft fire and intercepting fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 207, DECEMBER 23, 1943 

A force of Navy Hellcat fighters and Army and Navy Dauntless light bombers bombed and strafed enemy installations on Imieji Island, Jaluit Atoll, at noon on December 20 (West Longitude Date). A medium cargo ship and one small vessel in the lagoon were damaged. Heavy antiaircraft fire was encountered; we lost one plane. 

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A group of Liberators from the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kwajalein and Roi Islands, Kwajalein Atoll, on the afternoon of December 21. Our planes were intercepted by nine Japanese fighters, but sustained no damage. More than 20 enemy ships were seen in the lagoon.

On the early morning of December 20, two enemy planes dropped bombs on Tarawa from high altitude. One of our planes on the ground was slightly damaged. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 491, DECEMBER 24, 1943 

1. The U. S. Submarine Grayling is overdue and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Grayling have been so informed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 209, DECEMBER 24, 1943 

Heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Kwajalein Island on the morning of December 23 (West Longitude Date). Island Installa­tions were damaged and two cargo vessels anchored offshore were bombed. No enemy fighters were encountered. Anti‑aircraft fire did not damage our aircraft. On the afternoon of December 21 Army light bombers escorted by Army and Navy fighters struck shipping and shore installations at Mille. Several enemy fighters were encountered, one of which was shot down, an­other possibly destroyed and a third damaged. Three of our planes were slightly damaged. On the morning of December 23, Seventh Army Air Force fighters and light bombers attacked Mille. Five Zeros attacked our aircraft. Two were shot down. All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 210, DECEMBER 25, 1943 

Navy medium bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two made a low altitude attack on Nauru at dusk on Christmas Eve (East Longitude Date) setting Installa­tions on fire. One of our planes is missing.

Army Liberators of the Seventh AAF bombed Wotje on the evening of December 22 (West Longitude Date). Our planes were attacked by 35 enemy fighters, three of which were destroyed, one was probably shot down and six were damaged. Our casualties were one killed and two wounded.

Enemy bombers made five raids on Tarawa during the night of December 22 and 23, causing minor damage.

Enemy light bombers made three nuisance raids at Makin, two at night one during the day, wounding eight men. Two enemy planes were shot down by an intercepting Army fighter.

On the morning of December 24, 15 enemy fighters dropped bombs from high altitude on Makin, causing no damage. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 211, DECEMBER 26, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Wotje on December 24 (West Longitude Date). Several fires started.

Army light bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, escorted by Army Airacobras, raided Mille on December 25. Two of our bombers were slightly damaged. 

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A Navy search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two made a low altitude attack on two small transports near Kwajalein on December 24, probably sinking one transport. Another Navy Liberator, while on a search mission near Taroa on December 24, beat off twelve intercepting Zeros, without re­ceiving damage. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 492, DECEMBER 28, 1943

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of twelve enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows 

Sunk:

1 destroyer.
2 large tankers.
1 large freighter.
2 medium transports.
6 medium freighters.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 213, DECEMBER 28, 1943 

Army Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force which dropped more than 50 tons of bombs on Wotje on December 26 (West Longitude Date) were attacked by six Zeros. One Zero was destroyed. We lost two planes.

A low altitude attack was made against Jaluit and shipping there on December 26 by Ventura bombers and Hellcat fighters of Fleet Air Wing Two. All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC RELEASE NO. 214, DECEMBER 29, 1943 

Navy medium bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two which raided Nauru on the morning of December 29 (West Longitude Date) destroyed an ammunition dump and started several fires. Several of our planes suffered minor damage. One Navy Liberator while on a search mission in the Marshalls on December 27 damaged a tanker. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 215, DECEMBER 30, 1943 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Maloelap on December 28 (West Longitude Date). Our planes encountered heavy op­position by Zeros. Two Zeros were destroyed, 10 were probably destroyed. Two of our planes were shot down.

Army light bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force escorted by Army Airacobras made low altitude attacks on Mille on December 28. Several of our planes received minor damage. Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two were intercepted near Kwajalein on December 28 by 10 enemy fighters. Three planes were destroyed. We lost one plane.

Enemy bombers made high altitude evening nuisance raids at Tarawa on December 27 and again on December 28, causing no damage. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 493, JANUARY 1, 1944 

1. In the early morning of November 29, 1943, the U. S. Destroyer Perkins was sunk as the result of a collision, off the southeast coast of New Guinea.

2. During the morning of December 17, 1943, the Coastal Transport APC­-21 was sunk by enemy aircraft, oft the southern coast of New Britain Island.

3. The next of kin of the casualties in the Perkins have been notified. The next of kin of the casualties in the APC‑21 will be notified as soon as possible. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 216, JANUARY 1, 1944 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force raided Kwajalein on December 30 (West Longitude Date). No enemy interception was en­countered.

Army light bombers, escorted by Airacobra fighters, made an attack on Mille on the afternoon of December 30. There was no fighter interception. All our planes returned.

Army medium bombers raided Jabor, in the Jaluit Atoll, on December 30, bombing and strafing ground installations. None of our planes was damaged. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 494, JANUARY 3, 1944

Atlantic

1. A U. S. Destroyer was torpedoed and sunk in the Atlantic on Decem­ber 24, 1943. The next of kin of the casualties aboard the destroyer will be notified by telegram as soon as casualty reports are received. 

North Pacific. 

2. On December 31, 1943, a group of Army bombers bombed Para­mushiru. Results were not observed. All of our planes returned safely. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 218, JANUARY 4, 1944 

Heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Wotje and Taroa on January 2 (West Longitude Date). Approximately 30 enemy fighters were encountered in each strike. Our bombers shot down eight Zeros at Wotje and probably destroyed five more. At Taroa two Zeros were shot down and two more probably destroyed.

Medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force raided Jaluit Atoll on January 2. Damage and losses to our planes for the day were slight. Ten enemy planes bombed our installations on Abemama on the night of January 2 with slight damage. Two men were killed. 

JANUARY 4, 1944 

REVEAL NAMES OF TWO DESTROYERS PREVIOUSLY ANNOUNCED AS LOST 

Two U. S. destroyers which were announced yesterday as lost now may be identified as the USS Leary and the USS Turner.

The USS Leary, a 1,090‑ton destroyer completed in 1919, was announced in Navy Department Communiqué Number 494 as having been torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic on December 24, 1943. 

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The USS Turner, a 1,700‑ton destroyer commissioned April 15, 1943, ex­ploded and sank six miles off Sandy Hook, New Jersey, yesterday morning. Its loss was announced by Third Naval District Headquarters, New York City.

Commander James Ellsworth Keyes, U. S. Navy, 37, of 11621 16th Avenue, South, Seattle, Washington, was the Commanding Officer of the USS Leary.

Commander Henry Sollett Wygant, Jr., U. S. Navy, 37, of Twenty‑Sixth and Lincoln Street, Camp Hill, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, com­manded the USS Turner.

Both Commanding Officers are listed as missing in action.

Notifications have been sent by the Navy Department to the next of kin of all casualties aboard the USS Leary and the USS Turner

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 495, JANUARY 5, 1944 

1. The U. S. Submarine Pompano is overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Pompano have been so informed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 219, JANUARY 5, 1944 

Army Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Jaluit on Janu­ary 4 (West Longitude Date). All of our planes returned.

Army medium bombers scored two hits on a cargo transport at Jaluit on January 3. Army dive bombers escorted by Airacobras raided Mille on January 3. One of our fighters was shot down by antiaircraft fire.

Enemy planes dropped bombs at Tarawa, Makin and Abemama on the, night of January 3 and at Tarawa on January 4 without damage to our installations. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 496, JANUARY 8, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of ten enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in waters of these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

1 large tanker
1 large freighter
1 medium‑sized transport
5 medium‑sized freighters
2 small freighters 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy De­partment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 221, JANUARY 8, 1944 

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force struck Taroa and Wotje Islands in the Marshalls on January 6 (West Longitude Date). No fighter opposition was encountered in either attack. All of our planes re­turned without damage.

On January 6 a Navy search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed a small merchant ship near Jabor in Jaluit Atoll. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 222, JANUARY 9, 1944 

Dive bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force accompanied by Navy fighters attacked Mille Atoll in the Marshall Islands on January 7 (West Longitude Date). No fighter interception was encountered. On the evening of January 7 enemy planes dropped bombs at Tarawa without damage to our installations. 

JOINT STATEMENT, JANUARY 10, 1944 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti‑submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

1. Total merchant shipping tonnage lost by U‑boat action in De­cember was again low despite an extension of operating areas. Fewer U‑boats were destroyed during the month by our air and sea forces owing to several factors, including increased caution by enemy. Our supply routes were, however, well secured against U‑boat attack.

2. In 1943 U‑boats sank but 40% of the merchant ship tonnage that they sank in 1942. On the other hand, United Nations merchant ship ton­nage construction in 1943 approximately doubled the tonnage delivered in 1942. Nearly half of our tonnage lost for the year 1943 was during the first three months; 27% was lost during the second quarter of 1943, and only 26% was lost during the last six months. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 223, JANUARY 10, 1944 

Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kwajalein Is­land on January 9 (West Longitude Date). No enemy fighters were encoun­tered and antiaircraft fire inflicted no damage.

In the evening of January 9 heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Wotje. In a separate operation carried out the same night Navy search Liberators also attacked Wotje from low altitude sinking an auxiliary oiler and another small vessel offshore, wrecking two planes on the airfield and damaging shore installations. All of our planes returned safely.

In the morning of January 8 medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Emeiji Island in the Jaluit Atoll. One of our planes was damaged by antiaircraft fire and one crew member was wounded. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 224, JANUARY 12, 1944 

Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two made a low altitude daylight attack on shipping and shore installations at Kwajalein Island on January 11 (West Longitude Date). Six small cargo ships were bombed; two of these were sunk and the remainder damaged. Several buildings and other installations were set afire on shore, and two planes were damaged on the airfield. No fighter interception was encountered.

Army heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Taroa Island in the Maloelap Atoll on the night of January 10, setting a number of 

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fires and wrecking two planes on the ground. Another group of Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Mille Atoll in the evening of January 10.

All of our planes returned without damage.

Enemy bombers carried out nuisance raids at Tarawa in the evening of January 9, and at Makin and Abemama the night of January 10, causing no damage. 

JANUARY 13, 1944 

TWO GERMAN SUBMARINES SUNK IN SOUTH ATLANTIC 

Two more German U‑boats were sunk recently by U. S. Naval flyers operating in the South Atlantic area. U. S. Army flyers aided in one of the sinkings.

The first U‑boat was sunk in a five‑and‑a‑half hour battle, participated in by six planes, while the other submarine went down, some time later, after near disaster to the United States Naval personnel, which alone participated.

In the first sinking, seven attacks were made by Consolidated Liberators, which dropped a total of 33 depth bombs and strafed the submarine several times. In addition, two U. S. Army planes dropped a total of 10 demolition bombs.

The pilot credited with the "kill" had previously flown for more than 1,500 hours without sighting a U‑boat.

The triumphant Navy plane which actually sank the Nazi submarine exhausted its ammunition and was running low on its gas supply; returned to its base, refueled and rearmed, and moved again into combat to give the U‑boat its final death blow. The Navy plane which originally sighted the U‑boat attacked and so damaged it that it was unable to submerge, making a floating target for the flyers. Then, with its ammunition exhausted after summoning serial assistance by radio and repeatedly attacking the undersea craft, this plane hovered in the area to keep the victim in sight and to direct to the spot the U. S. Navy and Army planes that joined in the fray.

Soon after the death struggle reached its climax, an Army plane ar­rived and stood by for further assistance. Two medium altitude attacks were made by Army flyers during the course of the lengthy engagement.

There were no casualties to American personnel, but the Germans suf­fered heavily. 

JANUARY 13, 1944 

SUNKEN DESTROYER IDENTIFIED AS USS BROWNSON; NEXT OF KIN OF ST. AUGUSTINE CASUALTIES NOTIFIED 

The United States Naval vessel reported lost in the communiqué of De­cember 27, 1943, issued by Allied Headquarters for the Southwest Pacific, was the USS Brownson, destroyer.

The Brownson was sunk as a result of attack by enemy aircraft during the landings of United States troops at Cape Gloucester.

Survivors from the Brownson totaled 208. The next of kin of the cas­ualties have been notified. 

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The Navy Department also has notified the next of kin of casualties of the USS St. Augustine, gunboat, which was sunk January 6, 1944, in a col­lision with a merchant vessel off Cape May, New Jersey. Thirty members of the ship's company survived.

Loss of the St. Augustine was announced by the Commandant, Fourth Naval District, on January 7, 1944. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 225, JANUARY 13, 1944 

Bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force struck Maloelap Atoll in the Marshalls in the evening of January 11, (West Longitude Date). A small auxiliary vessel was sunk, a medium cargo ship was heavily bombed and may have been sunk, and a large destroyer was damaged. Installations on several of the Atoll's Islands were bombed. Two of six enemy fighters which attacked our planes were believed damaged. All of our planes returned safely.

Planes of the Seventh Army Air Force carried out two attacks on Mille Atoll on January 10 and 11. One of our planes was lost but the crew was saved.

In the early morning of January 12 enemy bombers attacked Tarawa, causing minor damage to installations. Our casualties were minor. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 226, JANUARY 14, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked installations on Mille Atoll in the Marshall Islands on January 12 (West Longitude Date). There was no enemy fighter opposition. All of our planes returned safely. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 227, JANUARY 15, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force planes attacked Mille Atoll in the Marshall islands in daylight January 13 (West Longitude Date). Buildings in the cantonment were set afire and planes on the ground were damaged by machinegun fire.

Wotje Atoll was raided by Seventh Army Air Force bombers in the evening of January 13. Hits were made on shore facilities and several small craft were damaged.

In the early morning of January 14, our bombers attacked Namur and Roi Islands in the Kwajalein Atoll, setting fire to several installations ashore.

Later in the morning of January 14, Army bombers made a low altitude attack on shipping at Wotje, sinking one medium cargo ship.

No enemy fighter opposition was encountered in these strikes and all of our planes returned safely. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 229, JANUARY 17, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force planes made two daylight raids on Mille Atoll in the Marshall Islands on January 18 (West Longitude Date). In the first attack, two enemy bombers were shot down over the airfield. In the second, carried out in considerable force, ground Installations were heavily machine-gunned. One of our planes was shot down.

On the afternoon of January 15, Seventh Army Air Force bombers made a low altitude attack on Maloelap Atoll. Airfield and fuel storage installa‑ 

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tions were damaged and several planes were hit on the ground. Two cargo ships were bombed and may have been sunk. Approximately 45 enemy fighters were encountered. Two of these were believed shot down. One of our bombers was lost.

Navy search planes sank a small cargo ship at Likiep Atoll and probably sank another small cargo ship at Jaluit Atoll on January 15.

Enemy bombers made three raids on Makin and two at Tarawa the night of January 15. There was no appreciable damage to our installations. Casualties were light. One enemy plane was shot down at Makin. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 231, JANUARY 19, 1944 

Navy search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked Kusaie Island, a Japanese air base southwest of the Marshall Islands, in daylight on January 17 (West Longitude Date), bombing shore facilities.

In the afternoon of January 17 bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Mille Atoll scoring hits on storage facilities and airdrome Instal­lations.

All of our planes returned safely from both operations.

Enemy bombers made a nuisance raid at Tarawa at dusk on January 17 causing no damage. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 232, JANUARY 20, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers made daylight low altitude raids on Mille Atoll in the Marshalls on January 18 and 19 (West Longitude Date).

In the first attack hits were made on gun emplacements, buildings and airdrome installations. One enemy lighter was damaged on the ground.

In the second attack five grounded planes and airdrome installations were hit. Two of our planes were lost.

Seventh Army Air Force fighters attacked shipping at Jaluit Atoll on January 19 damaging two small vessels.

On January 18 Jabor Island was attacked by Dauntless dive bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force.

Fires were started in fuel storage areas. Two of our planes were shot down. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 497, JANUARY 21, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of twelve enemy vessels In operations against the enemy in these areas, as follows 

Sunk:

1 Large Tanker
1 Medium Cargo Transport
1 Small Transport
7 Medium Freighters
2 Small Freighters 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy De­partment communiqué. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 233, JANUARY 21, 1944 

Wotje was raided on the afternoon of January 20 (West Longitude Date) by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. We lost one plane.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two made a low altitude at­tack on Imieji and Tmiet Islands during the morning of January 20. One of our planes was shot down by antiaircraft fire.

A Navy search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two damaged an enemy cargo transport near Maloelap on January 19. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 234, JANUARY 22, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force planes struck three atolls in the Marshall Is­lands on January 21 (West Longitude Date).

In the early morning heavy bombers attacked shore installations of Roi and Kwajalein Island in the Kwajalein Atoll.

At midday Mille was attacked by low flying Mitchell bombers which bombed and strafed airfield installation gun emplacements and living spaces and damaged one plane on the ground.

Tmiet and Imieji Island in the Jaluit Atoll were raided in the forenoon by Dauntless dive bombers. Shore facilities were bombed and strafed and three small vessels were damaged.

No fighter opposition was encountered on any of the missions and all of our planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 498, JANUARY 22, 1944

North Pacific. 

1. On January 21, 1944 (East Longitude Date) two groups of Navy bombers based in the Aleutians bombed Paramushiru Island. 

(a) The first group attacked enemy installations on the southern coast of the island at midnight. Antiaircraft fire was encountered and one enemy fighter ineffectively engaged one of our planes. All planes of this group returned without damage.

(b) The second group, three hours later, bombed enemy installations in the northern part of Paramushiru. No enemy planes were encountered by this group and all U. S. aircraft returned safely. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 499, JANUARY 23, 1944

North Pacific. 

1. On the early morning of January 23 (East Longitude Date) two groups of Navy bombers bombed enemy installations on the south and west coasts of Paramushiru Island. Antiaircraft fire was encountered, but no enemy planes were met. All U. S. planes returned without damage. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 235, JANUARY 24, 1944 

Planes of the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two carried out attacks on six atolls in the Marshall Islands during January 22 and 23 (West Longitude Date).

Army medium bombers at midday on January 22 raided Wotje Atoll and 

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Kaven Island in the Maloelap Atoll: At Wotje, a cargo ship and a small oiler were damaged, and airdrome installations were bombed and strafed. There was no fighter opposition, and all of our planes returned safely. At Kaven, bombing and strafing attacks were made on ground installations. Of 25 enemy fighters which intercepted our bombers, two were shot down and a third was crippled. Our losses were small.

In the afternoon of January 22, Imieji Island in the Jaluit Atoll was attacked by Liberators and Navy search Venturas. Bomb hits were scored on installations at the seaplane base, and in the cantonment. No enemy fighter planes were encountered, and all our planes returned safely.

In the evening of January 22 Army heavy bombers struck Mille Atoll and Roi Island in the Kwajalein Atoll. At Roi, airfield facilities were bombed and several grounded bombers were damaged. More than a dozen fighters attacked our planes. Our gunners shot down one and possibly de­stroyed four others. In addition, three enemy planes were damaged. We suffered no losses.

At Mille, bombs were dropped in the cantonment area. No fighter or antiaircraft opposition was encountered.

Navy search planes attacking Ailinglapalap Atoll on January 22 bombed two small vessels, one of which had apparently been beached, and returned to their base without loss.

On January 23, Navy search planes attacked a small convoy near Kwajalein, bombing and severely damaging a large cargo ship. We suffered no losses.

At midday on January 23, two groups of Army Mitchell bombers raided Taroa, in the Maloelap Atoll, bombing and machine gunning airdrome facili­ties and strafing a numbers of small craft. Approximately 25 enemy fighters attacked each group of bombers. Three fighters were shot down, two more were believed shot down, and four were damaged. Damage to our planes was slight. All planes returned to their bases. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 238, JANUARY 25, 1944 

Heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Wotje Atoll in the Marshall Islands at dusk on January 23 (West Longitude Date). Ap­proximately 50 tons of bombs were dropped. No fighter opposition was met, and all of our planes returned without damage. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 239, JANUARY 26, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two aircraft attacked four Marshall Island atolls on January 24 (West Longitude Date). Three of the atolls were raided twice during the day.

Army fighters and dive-bombers made a low altitude morning attack on Mille, striking shore installations with bombs and machine gun fire. No enemy fighters were encountered, and we lost no aircraft. A small scale attack was made on Mille in the evening by heavy bombers. We suffered no losses.

Wotje was attacked by Army Mitchell bombers in the afternoon, with bomb hits on gun emplacements, airfield facilities, and living areas. All planes returned to their base. There was no enemy fighter opposition. A

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small scale heavy bomber attack was also made on Wotje in the evening, with no fighter opposition and no losses to our forces.

Army medium bombers attacked Taroa, in the Maloelap Atoll, bombing airdrome facilities and destroying one fighter on the ground. A total of thirty enemy fighters were encountered, of which at least one was shot down. All of our planes escaped. Army heavy bombers raided Taroa in the evening, dropping over 20 tons of bombs on shore installations. This time there was no fighter opposition, and none of our planes was lost.

A Navy search Liberator encountered three small enemy warships with air cover of five fighters near Ailinglapalap, and shot down three of the fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 240, JANUARY 27, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force aircraft attacked Kwajalein, Maloelap and Mille Atolls in the Marshall Island on January 25 (West Longitude Date). Heavy bombers dropped more than 35 tons of bombs on Kwajalein in a late afternoon raid starting fires among ground installations. No enemy fighters were encountered and we lost no planes.

Medium bombers attacking Taroa in the Maloelap Atoll in mid-afternoon struck airdrome facilities and wrecked one enemy bomber on the ground. Approximately 30 fighters attacked our planes. One of these was shot down, three were possibly shot down and several more damaged. Damage to our planes was moderate and all returned. Mille was attacked by dive bombers and fighters in a mid‑morning raid which caused several fires among ground facilities. There was no fighter opposition and none of our planes was lost.

Navy search planes attacked an oiler escorted by two small ships south­east of Eniwetok Atoll. The oiler was severely damaged and may have been sunk. One of the escorting ships was sunk. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 241, JANUARY 28, 1944 

A force of nine medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Taroa Island in the Maloelap Atoll in the afternoon of January 26 (West Longitude Date). Storage buildings and airdrome facilities were bombed. Eleven of the 20 enemy fighters which attempted to intercept our planes were destroyed, a twelfth was probably shot down.

On retirement our forces were pursued by enemy planes which engaged in a running fight for fifty miles or more. During that period our bombers and fighters shot down five additional planes, including one torpedo plane, and probably destroyed five others of the enemy force. All our planes re­turned.

Medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force made a bombing and strafing attack on Imieji Island in the Jaluit Atoll in the afternoon of Janu­ary 26. We suffered no losses. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 243, JANUARY 28, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Nauru Island, west of the Gilbert group, and Wotje, Mille, and Maloelap Atolls in the Marshall islands on January 27 (West Longitude Date).

Medium bombers attacked Nauru in a daylight morning raid, bombing ground installations. We suffered no loss. 

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Wotje was attacked in the afternoon by medium bombers. Fires were started among ground facilities. Our losses were light.

Dive bombers and fighters made a late afternoon attack on Mille, bomb­ing and strafing airdrome installations and gun emplacements. One of our bombers was shot down.

Heavy bombers dropped more than 20 tons of bombs on Taroa, in the Maloelap Atoll, at dusk, causing damage in the cantonment area. All of our planes returned. No fighter opposition was encountered by our forces in these attacks. 

JANUARY 28, 1944 

GERMAN U‑BOAT SUNK IN ATLANTIC AFTER  27‑HOUR CARRIER‑PLANE‑DESTROYER BATTLE 

A German U‑boat has been sunk in the Atlantic Ocean, after a 27‑hour battle, in which planes from an escort carrier and destroyers of its Task Force played vital roles.

The undersea craft was sighted by two of the carrier's planes, and the submarine fought back vigorously during the course of the lengthy battle which ensued. More than 200 depth charges were dropped during the fight. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 25, JANUARY 29, 1944 

Pacific Fleet carrier task forces have made attacks on Marshall Island bases today, including Taroa, Wotje, and Kwajalein. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 500, JANUARY 31, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of fourteen enemy vessels in operations against the enemy in these areas, as follows: 

Sunk:

2 large transports
1 medium transport
1 medium tanker
1 medium naval auxiliary
1 small freighter
1 medium cargo transport
7 medium freighters 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Departmen­t Communiqué. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 26, JANUARY 31, 1944 

Our carrier task forces today continued their attacks on Kwajalein, Roi, Maloelap and Wotje.

During the day surface forces bombarded the same objectives while car­riers extended their operations to include bombing of Eniwetok. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 244, JANUARY 31, 1944 

During the night of January 28 and 29 (West Longitude Date) Liber­ators and Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force and search Liberators and Mariners of Fleet Air Wing Two carried out operations against Wotje, Kwajalein, Jaluit, and Maloelap Atolls.

Army heavy bombers dropped more than 27 tons on Wotje, a total of 17 tons on Roi and Kwajalein Islands and 3 tons on Jaluit.

No fighter or antiaircraft opposition was encountered.

A Navy Mariner Patrol Plane bombed Taroa during the night without opposition. A flight of Navy search planes over Taroa in the afternoon of January 28 was attacked by nearly a dozen fighters of which at least two were shot down and three others damaged. We suffered no losses.

Army medium bombers attacking Taroa the same afternoon bombed air­drome and cantonment structures, damaged 11 planes on the ground and set fire to a small craft. Six fighters attacked our planes and one fighter was damaged. Our losses were light. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 245, JANUARY 31, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two made attacks on principal Marshall Island bases during the night of January 29‑30 (West Longitude Dates). These raids were coordinated with the attacks of carrier‑based squadrons of the past two days.

In the evening of January 29, Army Mitchell bombers struck shore in­stallations and small craft at Maloelap and Wotje, while Army Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters struck Imieji Island in the Jaluit Atoll. No enemy fighters were encountered, and antiaircraft was ineffectual.

During the night Army Liberators dropped 45 tons of bombs on Kwaja­lein Atoll, and nearly 10 tons on Wotje. Liberators and Navy Catalina and Ventura search planes struck Mille and Taroa with a total of 21 tons of bombs, and a single Liberator hit Jaluit with an additional three tons. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 246, JANUARY 31, 1944 

Two squadrons of Coronado seaplanes of Fleet Air Wing Two made a strong attack on Wake Island during the night of January 30‑31 (West Longitude Date). All bombs hit in or near the target area and no planes were lost. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 27, FEBRUARY 1, 1944 

Powerful forces of all types, commanded by Vice Admiral R. A. Spruance, U. S. Navy, have begun operations the objective of which is the capture of the Marshall Islands.

Following intensive preparatory bombardment of enemy installations by carrier‑based aircraft and by battleships and light surface units, Army and Marine assault forces have initially established beachheads on islands in the vicinity of Roi and Kwajalein Islands, in Kwajalein Atoll. Installations on Wotje and Maloelap Atolls were heavily bombarded by carrier aircraft and by surface forces.

All amphibious operations are commanded by Rear Admiral R. K. Turner, 

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U. S. Navy. The assault troops are directed by Major General H. M. Smith, USMC. The landing attacks in the Roi Island area are being made by troops of the Fourth Marine Division, commanded by Major General Harry Schmidt, USMC. The landings are being effected in the Kwajalein Island area by troops of the Seventh Infantry Division, commanded by Major Gene­ral Charles H. Corlett, U. S. Army.

Strong opposition is being encountered in both assault areas. Initial information indicates that our casualties are moderate.

Supporting air attacks are being made at Kwajalein, Maloelap, Wotje, Mille, Jaluit, Eniwetok and Wake by carrier task forces commanded by Rear Admiral M. H. Mitscher, U. S. Navy, by units of the Seventh Army Air Force, commanded by Major General Willis H. Hale, U. S. Army, and by Units of Fleet Air Wing Two commanded by Rear Admiral John D. Price, J. S. Navy. All shore‑based aircraft in the Gilberts are operating under the direction of Commander Aircraft, Central Pacific Force, Rear Admiral John H. Hoover, U. S. Navy. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 247, FEBRUARY 1, 1944 

The following information supplementing that contained in Communiqués Number 25 and Number 26 is available concerning Naval air strikes in the Marshall Islands and at Wake Island on January 29 and 30 (West Longitude Date):

In the attack on Taroa Island on January 29 our carrier‑based aircraft shot down four enemy planes and destroyed or damaged 39 others on the ground. In the attack on Wotje, one enemy plane was shot down and fuel and ammunition storage leas were set on fire. Large explosions were observed in the ammunition dump. Our reported losses in the Taroa and Wotje strikes were comparatively minor. Several pilots were rescued.

On January 30 our carrier planes attacking Roi Island, shot down 18 enemy planes and machine‑gunned and bombed 51 others on the ground airdrome facilities, gasoline storage tanks, magazines, and gun positions were heavily hit. Here also our losses were minor.

Our Coronados which raided Wake on the night of January 30‑31 dropped more than 20 tons of bombs on runway and ground installations, starting large fires. Antiaircraft was light and no fighter opposition was encountered. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 248, FEBRUARY 1, 1944 

Twenty‑two planes of a squadron of 23 Marine Corsair fighters failed to reach their destination in a routine flight from Gilbert Islands to a base in the Ellice Islands on January 25 (West Longitude Date), when they ran into a severe local weather disturbance.

One plane reached base safely, one made a crash landing on another island in the Ellice group, and the remainder, as far as is known, landed at sea.

Search operations were started immediately, and all but six of the pilots are safe. One body has been recovered and five of the pilots are missing. their next of kin have been notified.

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 28, FEBRUARY 2, 1944 

Our forces have captured Roi Island.

Landings have been made on Kwajalein and Namur Islands and the action is progressing favorably. On Namur the enemy has been contained in the extreme northern portion of the island, and at Kwajalein our troops are firmly established and are pushing the enemy back.

Continuous bombardments of beaches by our warships, planes, and land-­based artillery enabled our forces to make landings on the three principal objectives with little resistance.

We have suffered no Naval losses and casualties are very moderate. It is now apparent that the attack took the enemy completely by surprise. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 29, FEBRUARY 3, 1944 

Our forces have captured Namur and several adjacent islands.

Resistance continues on Kwajalein Island, but we have landed troops and mechanized equipment in force and are proceeding with the annihilation of the enemy. 

FEBRUARY 3, 1944 

BRITISH AND AMERICAN DESTROYERS ACCOUNT FOR ANOTHER U‑BOAT 

Close cooperation between the British destroyer HMS Calpe and the United States destroyer USS Wainwright resulted in the destruction of a German U‑boat recently, in the Mediterranean.

Earlier, Allied aircraft had conducted a search for 36 hours which was credited with materially hampering the submarine's activities.

There was relative calm, after the tumult of gun battle, for at the actual sinking not a shot was fired—and the Commanding Officer of the Wainwright abandoned his plan to ram the U‑boat, when he saw that it was in its death throes.

A white sea serpent was painted on either side of the German craft's conning tower, but beyond that, there was no identification mark visible.

Commander Walter W. Strohbehn, United States Navy, 36, 904 West Sixth Street, Davenport, Iowa, Commanding Officer of the Wainwright, reported to Admiral Ernest J. King, United States Navy; Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, that 36 hours of harassing the U‑boat received from the constant air search accounted for the submarine's slow speed and sluggish evasive maneuvers. Commander Strohbehn complimented the United States Army Air Forces for its part in keeping the submarine hampered.

The Calpe made a sound contact with the submarine at 8:16 a.m. From then on the surface hunt went forward persistently, as eyes and ears were alert for the German craft.

About 2:47 p.m., the submarine surfaced, under the unremitting depth charge attacks by the British and American destroyers. The U‑boat was en­gaged by gunfire, but the battle waned when it was observed that the undersea craft was about to sink. The Commanding Officer of the American destroyer planned to ram the submarine, but abandoned this, when it was observed that the U‑boat was doomed.

The submarine sank at 3 :08 p.m.

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Commander Strohbehn wrote in his official report that it was "a pleasure to work with" the British warship. He declared: 

"She turned in a polished performance, always being in the proper place, always being ready and she was quick to grasp the intentions of this ship."

The Commander of the American Destroyer Squadron to which the at­tacking United States vessel was attached—Captain James P. Clay, United States Navy, 43, 3060 Porter Street, Northwest, Washington, D. C.—attributed the victory over the German craft to the fine teamwork between the British and American warships—despite the fact that no prior joint drills had been held.

The British Admiralty officially extended its congratulations for the sink­ing of the enemy craft. The Commanding Officer of the Calpe was Lieutenant Commander H. Kirkwood, Royal Navy.

Vice Admiral Henry K. Hewitt, United States Navy, Commander of the United States Naval Forces in Northwest African Waters, likewise compli­mented those who took part in the destruction of the U‑boat. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 501, FEBRUARY 4, 1944

North Pacific. 

On the night of February 2‑3, two Navy Catalinas from the Aleutian Islands bombed enemy installations on the southeast coast of Paramushiru. Results of the bombing were not observed. No enemy planes were encountered. Both of our planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 502, FEBRUARY 4, 1944

South Atlantic. 

1. Within the space of 48 hours early in January, three German blockade runners, heavily laden with vital war materials, were sent to the bottom of the South Atlantic by surface forces of the United States Navy operating under the command of Vice Admiral Jonas Ingram, USN.

2. The enemy ships sunk were the Burgenland, Rio Grande and Weser­land, en route from Far Eastern Japanese‑held ports. Their holds were filled with thousands of tons of rubber, tin, fats and strategic ores.

3. The blockade runners were sunk by the USS Somers, destroyer, and the light cruiser Omaha and the destroyer Jouett. A large number of prisoners were picked up following the sinkings. In two of the sinkings, Navy search planes found the enemy ships and called for the surface force to complete their destruction. The Weserland fell to the Somers alone while the other two were scuttled by their crews and their sinking hastened by gunfire from the Omaha and the Jouett.

4. Summoned by planes, the Somers found her target in the darkness of early morning and, on identifying the vessel as hostile, opened fire with her main battery of five‑inch guns. The first salvo hit the Weserland, forcing the crew to abandon ship. The destroyer then sank the vessel after internal explosions were set of by the crew as they left. Survivors were picked up at daylight.

5. A scouting plane from the Omaha and a lookout in the ship's foretop were the first to sight the Rio Grande. As the Omaha and the Jouett closed to investigate the stranger she burst into smoke and flame, the result of

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demolition charges placed by the crew. The two American warships fired six-inch and five‑inch shells into the blockade runner and she soon sank.

6. On the following day the Omaha and Jouett found the Burgenland. As the U. S. warships approached, a similar scene to that enacted by the Rio Grande took place. However, destruction was completed as in the former case by shell fire.

7. Hundreds of tons of baled rubber found floating amid the debris after the sinkings were recovered and are now on their way to the United States 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 30, FEBRUARY 4, 1944 

Operations at the Kwajalein Atoll continue satisfactorily.

Our forces have landed on Ebeye, north of Kwajalein Island. The landing was unopposed but resistance was encountered a short distance inland from the beach. We have now occupied half the island.

Two small islands between Kwajalein and Ebeye have been occupied following neutralization of moderate opposition. Gugegwe and Loi Islands, north of Ebeye, have been taken under attack by bombing and Naval gunfire, and the enemy is answering our fire.

Resistance on Kwajalein Island continues, but progress is being made. Our casualties continue to be moderate. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 31, FEBRUARY 5, 1944 

Kwajalein, Ebeye, and Loi Islands have been captured by our forces. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 253, FEBRUARY 5, 1944 

Carrier‑based aircraft attacked Eniwetok Atoll on February 3 (West Longitude Date), dropping many tons of bombs on the airfield and nearby tanks. Two enemy planes were destroyed on the ground.

Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force machine‑gunned and bombed Mille Atoll on February 3. On the same day Army Ventura medium bombers sank a small freighter and dumped bombs on Imieji Island in the Jaluit Atoll. We suffered no casualties in either raid.

Wake Island was bombed on the night of February 4‑5 by two squadrons of Coronados of Fleet Air Wing Two. None of our planes was lost. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 32, FEBRUARY 6, 1944 

Occupation of the Kwajalein Atoll is nearly complete.

Gugegwe, Bigej, and Ebler Islands have been captured after moderate resistance, and several additional undefended islands occupied. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 254, FEBRUARY 6, 1944 

Carrier‑based aircraft struck Eniwetok on February 5 (West Longitude Date). No further information is presently available.

On the same day Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force hit Jaluit, bombing and strafing ground installations. 

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On February 4 Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and Mitchell bombers dropped bombs on Wotje, starting large fires among ground facilities. Mitchells and Liberators hit airdrome installations and gun emplacements at Maloelap, and Liberators and Warhawks struck Mille.

No fighter opposition was encountered in these raids, and all of our planes returned to their bases.

On February 3, Navy search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed radio facilities and ground installations at Wotje, Ujelang and Taroa Island. None of our planes was lost. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 503, FEBRUARY 7, 1944

North Pacific. 

1. At 10:00 p.m. February 4 (Tokyo Time) U. S. Naval surface units bombarded enemy installations on the south and east coast of Paramushiru. A number of fires were started, and one unidentified enemy ship was hit and beached. Enemy coastal guns returned fire, but U. S. units sustained no damage.

2. During the same night a flight of our aircraft bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu. All U. S. planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 255, FEBRUARY 7, 1944 

The following details regarding casualties in the assault on Kwajalein Atoll have been compiled on the basis of reports received as of the evening of February 6 (West Longitude Date)

In the Southern Attack Force, which captured Kwajalein Island and adjacent objectives, our dead number 157, our wounded 712, our missing 17. In the same area the enemy dead number 4,650, enemy prisoners 173.

In the Northern Attack Force, which captured Roi and Namu Islands and adjacent objectives, our dead number 129, our wounded 436, our missing 65. In the same area the enemy dead number 3,472, enemy prisoners 91.

It is expected final figures will vary only slightly from the above. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 504, FEBRUARY 8, 1944 

1. The U. S. Submarine Cisco and the U. S. Submarine S-44, are overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Cisco and the S‑44 have been so informed. 

FEBRUARY 8, 1944 

NAVY CONSOLIDATED CATALINA SINKS GERMAN U‑BOAT. 

Struck by heavy flak from the antiaircraft guns of a Nazi submarine, while still a considerable distance from her target, a United States Navy Consolidated Catalina kept straight on her course to make a definite "kill" of the U‑boat, in the South Atlantic some months ago.

Survivors of the U‑boat sinking were subsequently rescued by the USS Siren, a converted yacht acting as a patrol vessel, after they had been adrift 

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in the ocean for some 16 days in life rafts dropped by the Naval flyers at the time of the submarine's sinking. The USS Siren is commanded by Lieuten­ant Commander Charles K. Post, USNR, 47, of Bayport, Long Island, New York. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 33, FEBRUARY 8, 1944 

1. Organized resistance on Kwajalein Atoll has ceased and its capture and occupation have been completed. 

JOINT STATEMENT, FEBRUARY 9, 1944 

The following Joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti­submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

"The year 1944 has opened with a very satisfactory first month for the Allies in their continued campaign against the U‑boat.

"In spite of the limited opportunities to attack U‑boats owing to the extreme caution now exercised by them, more were destroyed in January than in December. This has been accomplished by unrelenting offensive action of our surface and air forces.

"The amount of merchant ship tonnage sunk by U‑boats during Janu­ary 1944 is amongst the lowest monthly figures for the whole war.

"The German claims should, as usual, be ignored as they are grossly exaggerated and issued purely for propaganda purposes." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 258, FEBRUARY 9, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force, search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and warships of the Pacific Fleet continued attacks on enemy‑held atolls in the Marshall Islands on February 6 and 7 (West Longitude Date).

Several small enemy boats were sunk at Jaluit Atoll on February 6, by search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 261, FEBRUARY 9, 1944 

The USS Burns, a destroyer commanded by Lieutenant Commander Donald T. Eller, sank an entire convoy of four enemy ships in the Marshall Islands area on January 31 (West Longitude Date).

The Burns was attached to a carrier task force and was sent to rescue Navy fliers forced down at sea. Returning toward the task force, she en­countered a tanker, a medium cargo vessel, and two smaller craft, and sank all with gunfire. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 263, FEBRUARY 10, 1944 

Air attacks on enemy‑held islands in the Central Pacific continued during February 7, 8, and 9 (West Longitude Date).

On the night of February 8‑9, Coronado bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two 

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raided Wake, with bomb hits on the airdrome and barracks areas. All of our planes returned safely.

During February 7, Seventh Army Air Force Warhawk fighters and Mitchell medium bombers dropped 33 tons of bombs on enemy bases in the Marshall Islands without loss or casualties to our forces.

On February 8, Seventh Army Air Force Warhawk fighters, Dauntless dive bombers and Liberators dropped 24 tons of bombs on Marshall Islands targets.

On February 9 Army Liberators dropped a total of 57 tons of bombs on Marshall Atolls.

During the same period covered by these raids, units of the Pacific Fleet shelled two enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls while Navy search planes carried out individual bombing and strafing missions. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 505, FEBRUARY 11, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the following results of operations against the enemy in these waters: 

Sunk:

1 large auxiliary.
2 medium transports.
1 medium cargo transport.
2 large tankers.
5 medium freighters.
1 small freighter.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 266, FEBRUARY 11, 1944 

Wake Island was attacked by Coronado bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two on February 10 (West Longitude Date). This was the second attack on Wake within two days. We suffered no loss.

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators, Mitchells, Dauntless dive-bombers and Warhawk fighters continued raids against enemy‑held Marshall Islands atolls during February 10. The Liberators dropped 72 tons of bombs in the target areas, the Mitchells 13 tons and the dive‑bombers and fighters more than 15 tons, in addition to their heavy strafing. No fighter opposition was en­countered in any of these raids.

Our warships bombarded an important enemy‑held atoll in the Marshalls group without drawing return fire. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 270, FEBRUARY 14, 1944 

Pacific Fleet carrier‑based aircraft attacked Eniwetok Atoll on February 10, 11, and 12 (West Longitude Date). Airdrome and other ground Installa­tions were heavily bombed. There was no fighter opposition, and no antiair­craft fire was encountered.

Carrier planes attacked Ujae Atoll before dawn on February 12, damag­ing ground facilities. 

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On the same day, Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Airacobra fighters attacked three enemy‑held atolls in the Marshall Islands dropping bombs and strafing with machine guns and cannon. Navy search planes made small scale bombing attacks on Ujelang and Utirik Atolls.

Small force of enemy bombers raided Roi Island in the Kwajalein Atoll during the night of February 11 and 12. Our damage and casualties were moderate. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 271, FEBRUARY 16, 1944 

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Ponape in considerable force at noon February 14 (West Longitude Date). More than 55 tons of bombs were dropped, principally on shore installations. A small cargo ship was sunk in the harbor. There was no fighter opposition and all of our planes returned to base.

Liberators, Mitchells, Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force and search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two con­tinued attacks on enemy‑held bases in the Marshall Islands during February 14‑15, bombing installations on five atolls.

Gjit Island, in the eastern Marshall Islands, was attacked by a Navy search plane on February 14. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 34, FEBRUARY 17, 1944 

At daylight yesterday morning, February 16, (West Longitude Date), powerful Naval task forces of the U. S. Pacific Fleet commenced an attack on the Japanese Naval base at Truk with several hundred of our planes par­ticipating. No further details available. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 35, FEBRUARY 18, 1944 

The capture of Eniwetok Atoll has been undertaken by forces of the Pacific Ocean Areas. Army and Marine assault troops have landed and estab­lished beachheads.

The initial landings took place after strong preliminary attacks by car­rier‑based aircraft and by heavy ships of the Pacific Fleet.

The troops went ashore under the cover of battleship gunfire and with the close support of low flying Naval aircraft.

All forces participating are under the immediate command of Rear Admiral R. K. Turner. The amphibious forces are commanded by Rear Admiral H. W. Hill. The assault troops comprising the Twenty‑second Marines and elements of the One Hundred and Sixth Army Infantry are commanded by Brigadier General T. E. Watson, USMC. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 506, FEBRUARY 19, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. Two U. S. submarines recently returned from patrols deep in Japanese Empire waters report sinking 13 enemy merchant ships totaling 68,200 tons.

2. These sinkings have not been reported in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 36, FEBRUARY 19, 1944 

Our forces have captured the enemy air base at Engebi and several other Islands in the northern portion of the Eniwetok Atoll. Preliminary reports Indicate our casualties have been light.

Assaults on other portions of the atoll are proceeding according to schedule. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 273, FEBRUARY 19, 1944 

Supplementing the major attacks on Truk and Eniwetok, our forces have continued to neutralize other enemy bases in the Central Pacific Area.

On February 16 (West Longitude Date) Liberators, Dauntless dive bombers, and Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked four atolls in the Eastern Marshall Islands. At one base Warhawks blew up a fuel dump, damaged a small cargo ship, and sank three small craft. On the same day search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed ground installations at two other atolls.

On February 17, Army Liberators bombed warehouses and docks at Ponape, and harbor installations at Kusaie. Army Liberators and Warhawks attacked an Eastern Marshalls base, and Navy search planes bombed and strafed installations at two other atolls.

Between February 14‑18 our warships repeatedly shelled important enemy positions in the Eastern Marshalls. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 37, FEBRUARY 20, 1944 

The Pacific Fleet has returned at Truk the visit made by the Japanese Fleet at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, and effected a partial settlement of the debt. Initial approach was undetected.

During attacks on February 16 and 17 (West Longitude Date) our carrier planes destroyed at least 201 enemy aircraft, 127 of which were shot down in combat. More than fifty additional enemy aircraft were damaged on the ground. There was no enemy air opposition on the second day of the attack.

Enemy surface ships sunk included two light cruisers, three destroyers, one ammunition ship, one seaplane tender, two oilers, two gunboats, and eight cargo ships. Additional enemy ships probably sunk included one cruiser or large destroyer, two oilers, and four cargo ships.

Shore facilities on the principal islands, including airdrome runways and installations, were thoroughly bombed and strafed.

Our losses were 17 planes. None of our ships was lost, but one sustained moderate damage.

Admiral R. A. Spruance, U. S. Navy, was in over‑all command of the operation and Rear Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, U. S. Navy, former command­ing officer of the Hornet, directed the carrier air attack. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 274, FEBRUARY 20, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and Navy search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two continued bombing attacks on enemy positions in the Marshall and Caroline Islands during February 18 (West Longitude Date). 

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Army Liberators bombed docks and shipping at Kusaie, sinking a small ship.

Army Warhawks and Navy Ventura and Liberator search planes attacked four Marshall atolls, scoring hits on ground installations, an airfield and a radio station.

None of our planes was lost. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 38, FEBRUARY 21, 1944 

Our forces have landed on Eniwetok Island. Have possession of the west­ern half of the island. The attack is being carried out by elements of the 106th Infantry supplemented by a unit of the 22nd Marines.

Except for Parry Island, the remainder of the Atoll is in our hands.

Our casualties continue to be light. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 39, FEBRUARY 21, 1944 

Our forces have captured Eniwetok Island. Enemy resistance has been stubborn, and small pockets of troops are yet to be overcome. Parry Island is being heavily attacked by our air and surface forces.

Preliminary reports indicate that our over‑all casualties in the capture of the Eniwetok Atoll as of last night are approximately 150 dead and 350 wounded. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 275, FEBRUARY 21, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four attacked Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands in the Kuriles during the night of February 19 and 20, (West Longitude Date). More than five tons of bombs were dropped. Anti­aircraft fire was encountered at all targets, but all of our planes returned safely to base.

Army Warhawk fighters and Mitchell bombers and Navy Ventura search planes on February 19 dropped twenty‑four tons of bombs on three Marshall Atolls, damaging airfields, strafing shipping and hitting ground installations.

Ships of the Pacific Fleet bombarded enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands on February 19. 

FEBRUARY 20, 1941 

U. S. NAVAL COMMANDS NAMED 

Rear Admiral Alan Goodrich Kirk, USN, has been named Commander of the United States Task Force, operating as part of the Combined Naval Force in England.

In addition, Rear Admiral John Lesslie Hall, Jr., USN, and Rear Admiral John Wilkes, USN, have been placed in command of units of Rear Admiral Kirk's Task Force.

Admiral Harold R. Stark, USN, is the Commander of all United States Naval Forces in the United Kingdom Area. 

117

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 40, FEBRUARY 23, 1944 

1. The conquest of Eniwetok Atoll was completed on the evening of Feb­ruary 22 (West Longitude Date) with the capture of Parry Island.

The enemy garrison which defended the atoll is estimated at 3,000.

2. A strong Pacific Fleet Task Force, including several hundred carrier-based aircraft, struck Saipan and Tinian Islands in the Mariana Group, on February 22 (West Longitude Date). Further details are not now available. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 281, FEBRUARY 25, 1944 

1. The following information has been received supplementing Communiqué No. 40: 

Our task force commanded by Rear Admiral Marc A. Mitscher was de­tected approaching Tinian and Saipan in the afternoon of February 21 (West Longitude Date).

Attacks on our ships were carried out continuously during the night and the morning of February 22 by enemy land‑based torpedo planes and bombers. Fourteen of the attacking planes were shot down by our antiaircraft fire and five more were shot down by our air patrols.

In spite of the persistent and continuing attacks, our carriers launched their planes according to schedule.

Two attacks were carried out in force against the principal targets, and a smaller raid was made at Guam. A total of 29 enemy planes were shot down over the targets, and an additional 87 planes were wrecked on the ground. A total of 135 enemy aircraft was destroyed.

Few enemy ships were found; one cargo ship was sunk, another was severely damaged and apparently beached, and another was set afire. One patrol craft was blown up and seven other small ships were damaged. Small boats in the harbor areas were strafed.

Runways, seaplane aprons, and other airdrome facilities, fuel dumps and buildings were heavily bombed and strafed.

Our losses were six planes. None of our ships was sunk or damaged. 

2. On February 23 (West Longitude Date) Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed wharves, radio facilities, and the cantonment area at Kusaie. On the same day Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kusaie dock areas, sinking one ship and damaging another. In addi­tion a hit was made on an ammunition dump, which exploded.

Army Mitchell bombers, Warhawk fighters, and Navy search Venturas bombed and strafed ground installations on four enemy‑held atolls in the Western Marshall Islands. Although several planes were damaged, all re­turned to their base. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 276, FEBRUARY 23, 1944 

Enemy‑held positions in the Caroline and Marshall Islands were attacked by aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two during February 21 and 22 (West Longitude Date).

On February 21, Army Liberators dropped 30 tons of bombs on Ponape and bombed Kusaie twice with a total of 6 tons of bombs. Fires were started in the harbor areas of both targets. Nauru Island was also bombed by a Navy search Ventura.

On the same date, Army Mitchell bombers, Warhawk fighters and Navy 

118 

search planes struck five enemy‑held Marshall Atolls, hitting ground installations, airfields and shipping.

On February 22, Army Warhawk fighters twice attacked a single enemy-held atoll in the Marshall Group, strafing small vessels in the harbor and bombing the airfield.

None of our planes was lost.

On February 21 an atoll in the Eastern Marshalls, which is still occupied by the enemy was bombarded by ships of the Pacific Fleet. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 277, FEBRUARY 24, 1944 

Carrier based planes of the Pacific Fleet twice attacked an enemy‑held atoll in the Marshall Islands on February 20 (West Longitude Date).

More than thirty tons of bombs were dropped on three islands of the atoll. On the first island, fires were started in two hangars, a radio station was demolished, barracks and ammunition storage areas were hit. On the second, ground installations were bombed and strafed. On the third, dock areas, radio facilities and a power station were hit.

Although several of our planes were damaged by antiaircraft fire, none was shot down. There was no fighter interception. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 286, FEBRUARY 27, 1944 

1. A study of reconnaissance photographs of Truk has revealed total dam­age to shipping greater than was originally announced.

The photographs disclose that 23 ships were sunk, six probably sunk, and eleven damaged; earlier reports had indicated 19 sunk, seven probably sunk and none damaged.

2. On February 25 and 26 (West Longitude Date) enemy bases in the Central Pacific area were attacked by aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two.

On the 25th, Army Liberators dropped 30 tons of bombs on Ponape, scoring hits on docks, airdrome installations, a gasoline dump, and a cargo ship.

On the same day Army Mitchells and Warhawks and Navy Venturas at­tacked four enemy‑held Marshall Island bases. An Army Liberator bombed Kusaie and a Navy search plane bombed Nauru.

On the 26th Army Mitchells and Warhawks, and Navy Venturas attacked three enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 507, FEBRUARY 29, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of 14 enemy vessels in operations in these waters, as follows: 

1 large tanker
1 medium cargo transport
1 small cargo vessel
11 medium cargo vessels 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

119

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 287, FEBRUARY 29, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on February 26 and 27 (West Longitude Date) bombed and machine­-gunned Japanese‑held positions in the Caroline and Marshall Islands.

Army Liberator bombers hit Ponape with 30 tons of bombs on February 27, causing fires and explosions. Navy search planes strafed dock areas and a small ship at Kusaie on February 26.

Nearly 50 tons of bombs were dropped on seven enemy‑held atolls in the Marshall Islands on February 27 by Army Liberator and Mitchell bombers, Army Warhawk fighters, Army Dauntless dive‑bombers and Navy search Venturas.

Several of our planes were damaged by antiaircraft fire, but all returned to their base. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 290, MARCH 1, 1944 

Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and strafed installations on Wake Island on the afternoon of February 28 (West Longitude Date).

The attack was made at extremely low altitude. Airdrome installations were bombed, and six planes on the ground were destroyed or severely dam­aged. All of our planes returned safely to base.

A single Navy search plane bombed Nauru on February 28.

On the same day Mitchell bombers and Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force and Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked three enemy­-held bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 291, MARCH 2, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force continued to bomb enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands on February 29 (West Longitude Date).

Army Liberator and Mitchell bombers dropped nearly 80 tons of bombs on four airfields, while Army Warhawk fighters hit warehouses on one of the Islands.

Antiaircraft fire was negligible and none of our planes was damaged. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 292, MARCH 3, 1944 

1. A small force of Ventura bombers of Fleet Air Wing Four attacked Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands on the morning of March 2 West Longitude Date). Five tons of bombs were dropped. There was no interception, and no damage was suffered from the sporadic antiaircraft fire encountered. All planes returned to their bases.

2. Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters of he Seventh Army Air Force and Ventura bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked three enemy‑held bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands on March 1 West Longitude Date), dropping a total of 28 tons of bombs. On the same lay, Navy search planes attacked Ponape with bombs and machine‑gun fire. Our planes returned safely from all of these operations. 

120

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 293, MARCH 4, 1944 

Army Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on March 2 (West Longitude Date) dropped approximately 8 tons of bombs on runways and buildings at Ponape, and attacked shipping and dock areas at Kusaie.

Army Mitchell bombers and Navy search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two on the same date attacked two enemy‑held positions in the Eastern Marshall Islands with 17 tons of bombs, hitting airfields and starting fires.

Although some antiaircraft fire was encountered, all of our planes re­turned safely. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 294, MARCH 5, 1944 

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked Ponape and Kusaie in the Carolines on March 3 (West Longitude Date). Harbor and ground installations at Ponape were hit with 23 tons of bombs, while warehouses at Kusaie were set afire.

Navy search Venturas, Army Liberator and Mitchell bombers dropped ap­proximately 23 tons of bombs on four enemy‑held atolls in the Eastern Mar­shalls on the same date.

Several of our planes suffered minor damage from antiaircraft fire, but all returned to their bases. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 295, MARCH 6, 1944 

Aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two attacked three enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands on March 4 (West Longi­tude Date).

Army Mitchell bombers and Dauntless dive bombers, Navy Hellcat fighters and Ventura search bombers dropped approximately 35 tons of bombs and strafed ground installations. Fires were started and explosions were observed. Antiaircraft fire was encountered, but all of our planes returned safely. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 297, MARCH 7, 1944 

Seven enemy‑held positions in the Central Pacific were attacked by air­craft of the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two on March 5 (West Longitude Date).

Army Liberator bombers dropped approximately 30 tons of bombs on Ponape and Kusaie, damaging ground installations, aviation facilities and harbor areas. Heavy explosions were seen near the airfield at Ponape. Navy search Liberators also bombed Nauru.

Army Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive‑bombers, Warhawk fighters, Navy Hellcats and search Venturas bombed and strafed four enemy‑held atolls in the Eastern Marshalls with approximately 35 tons of bombs.

Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. Two Hellcats failed to return to their base. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 299, MARCH 8, 1944 

1. Navy search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Four on the evening of March 5‑6 (West Longitude Date) bombed Paramushiru. Heavy antiaircraft fire was encountered in some areas. All of our planes returned. 

121

2. Army Liberator and Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Navy search Venturas and Hellcat fighters of Fleet Air Wing Two on March 6, (West Longitude Date) dropped 31 tons of bombs on four enemy‑held positions in the eastern Marshall Islands. Airfields were hit and fires were started. Several of our planes were damaged by antiaircraft fire, but all returned to their bases. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 508, MARCH 9, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported sinking sixteen vessels in operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows: 

1 small cargo vessel
9 medium cargo vessels
2 medium transports
2 medium cargo transports
1 large tanker
1 large cargo transport 

2. These actions have not been announced by any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 301, MARCH 9, 1944 

1. On March 8, 1944, (West Longitude Date) enemy planes raided our positions in Eniwetok Atoll, causing small damage.

2. Army Liberator and Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force and Navy search Venturas and Hellcat fighters of Fleet Air Wing Two on March 7, 1944 (West Longitude Date) dropped 37 tons of bombs on five enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands. Barracks and runways were hit and fires started. A coastal vessel was bombed and five wooden barges strafed. Several of our planes were damaged by antiaircraft fire but all returned to their bases.

3. A Navy search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two shot down a Japanese naval medium bomber between Eniwetok and Truk. 

JOINT STATEMENT, MARCH 9, 1944 

ALLIED SHIP LOSSES AT A RECORD LOW 

The joint Anglo‑American statement, issued under the authority of the President and Prime Minister, follows: 

"Despite the increasing traffic of United Nations shipping in the Atlantic, February, 1944, was the lowest month as to tonnage of Allied mer­chant ship losses to enemy U‑boat action since the United States entered the war, and February was the second lowest month of the entire war.

"Again there were more U‑boats destroyed than merchant vessels sunk, so the exchange rate remains favorable to the United Nations. In actual numbers a few more U‑boats were sunk in February than in January." 

122

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 302, MARCH 10, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators attacked Ponape and Kusaie in the Caroline Islands on March 8 (West Longitude Date). Airdrome and dock facilities at Ponape were bombed, and ground installations were hit at Kusaie.

On the same day four enemy bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands were attacked by Army and Marine aircraft including Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers and Warhawk fighters, and by Ventura bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two. Airfields and gun emplacements were principal targets.

There was no fighter interception on any of these raids, and damage from antiaircraft was slight. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 304, MARCH 11, 1944 

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape and Kusaie Islands on March 9 (West Longitude Date). Explosions and fires were ob­served among ground installations at Ponape, and waterfront facilities were hit at Kusaie.

Two enemy bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands were attacked by Army and Marine aircraft, including Mitchells and Dauntless dive bombers, and another was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two.

No fighter interception was encountered in any of these attacks, and only slight damage was suffered from antiaircraft fire. All of our planes returned to base. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 305, MARCH 12, 1944 

Three enemy bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands were attacked on March 10 (West Longitude Date) by Marine and Seventh Army Air Force aircraft, including Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers, and Warhawk fighters. On the same day Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked another Eastern Marshall base. There was no fighter intercep­tion on any of these raids and despite moderate antiaircraft fire all planes returned safely to base. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 306, MARCH 12, 1944 

A small amphibious unit of the Pacific Fleet, including a detachment of the 22nd Marine Regiment, has occupied Wotho Atoll without resistance.

The occupation force, commanded by Major C. B. Lawton, USMC, was received by the native population with ceremony, including gifts of food. A proclamation was posted, establishing military government. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 307, MARCH 13, 1944 

1. Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombers and search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two attacked Wake Island on the afternoon of March 11 (West Longitude Date). Approximately 50 tons of bombs were dropped.

2. A small force of Army Liberators attacked Nauru on March 11, and Army Mitchell bombers and Navy search Venturas bombed three enemy bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands.

3. No fighter interception was encountered on any of these attacks and all of our planes returned to base. 

123

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 509, MARCH 14, 1944 

1. The U. S. submarine Corvina is overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Corvina have been so informed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 308, MARCH 14, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells bombed Kusaie on March 12 (West Longitude Date), starting several fires.

On the same day Army Liberators and Marine Dauntless dive bombers attacked four bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands. At one base bombs hit the cantonment area and the radio station; at another, an ammunition dump was blown up and gun emplacements damaged.

Search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed two enemy‑held Marshall Island bases, and damaged two enemy fighters in the air near Ponape.

Our planes returned safely from all of these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 311, MARCH 15, 1944 

Our air forces in the Central Pacific area attacked seven enemy‑held bases on March 13 (West Longitude Date).

Liberators of the Seventh and Navy search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed airdrome installations and mining facilities at Ponape.

Kusaie was bombed by Army Liberators and a beached cargo ship was hit by Navy search planes with bombs and machine gun fire.

Shore facilities and a small beached ship at Oroluk Atoll were attacked by Navy search planes.

Army Liberators and Mitchells, Marine Dauntless dive bombers and Hell­cats, and Navy search Venturas attacked four bases in the Eastern Marshalls, starting fires at all bases.

A Navy search plane shot down an enemy medium bomber 250 miles north of Truk.

We lost no planes in any of these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 313, MARCH 16, 1944 

1. Seventh Army Air Force Liberators attacked Truk before dawn on March 15 (West Longitude Date). Airdrome installations, fuel dumps, and ammunition storage areas on Eten and Dublon Islands were bombed, with ex­plosions and fires resulting. Heavy antiaircraft fire was encountered, but only one of our planes was hit, and all returned to base.

On the same day Army Liberators attacked ground installations at Ponape and Oroluk without damage to our planes.

2. Army Mitchells and Marine Dauntless dive bombers attacked two enemy bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands on March 14. The Mitchells hit the cantonment and ammunition storage areas and bombed the radio Station at one base, and the dive bombers started fires at another. One Dauntless was slightly damaged, but all planes returned to base.

3. A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Pingelap Atoll.

124 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 314, MARCH 17, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing. Two, and Dauntless dive bombers and Hellcats of the Fourth Marine Air Wing attacked three enemy‑held bases in the Eastern Marshall Islands on March 15 (West Longitude Date).

An ammunition dump was blown up by the Mitchells. The Venturas scored hits among ground installations. The dive bombers and fighters strafed and bombed small craft and shore facilities.

Navy search planes bombed Pingelap and Oroluk Atolls.

All of our planes returned safely. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 510, MARCH 18, 1944 

1. The submarines USS Capelin and USS Sculpin are overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of personnel in the Capelin and the Sculpin have been so notified. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 316, MARCH 18, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands on March 16 and again on March 17 (West Longitude Dates). No fighter opposition was encountered and antiaircraft fire was light.

On March 16 a Liberator bomber of the 11th Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa Island in the Kuriles, without opposition. Liberators bombed Shimushu on March 17.

Four enemy‑held atolls in the Eastern Marshall Islands were bombed by Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Air Wing, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on March 16. A large explosion was caused on one of the atolls, and fires were started on another. One of our planes was damaged by antiaircraft fire.

On the same day search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kusaie and Oroluk in the Caroline Islands.

We lost no planes in these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 317, MARCH 19, 1944 

Paramushiru Island in the Kuriles was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four on March 13 (West Longitude Date). Several fires were started. Light antiaircraft fire was encountered. None of our planes was damaged.

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape and Kusaie in the Caroline Islands on March 17 causing explosions and fires. Three enemy bases in the Eastern Marshalls were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberator and Mitchell bombers, Fourth Marine Air Wing, Dauntless dive bombers, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two. A dive bomber was lost in these operations. 

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N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 511, MARCH 20, 1944

Atlantic. 

1. The USS Leopold (Destroyer Escort #319), manned by Coast Guard officers and men, was sunk on March 10th as a result of an underwater ex­plosion, while on escort duty in the Atlantic.

2. The next of kin of all casualties have been notified. 

MARCH 20, 1944 

USS MACAW LOST IN PACIFIC 

The USS Macaw, an auxiliary submarine rescue vessel, after having gone aground on a coral reef in the Pacific, slid off and sank on February 13, 1944.

Next of kin of all casualties have been notified.

Lieutenant Commander Paul W. Burton, USN, was commanding officer of the Macaw. He is listed as missing. Lieutenant Commander Burton was born in Berkeley, California, on September 29, 1911, the son of Colonel Norman G. Burton, USMC, and Mrs. Burton. He was graduated from the Naval Academy in 1933. Next of kin is his wife, Mrs. Elizabeth W. Burton, 1320 Locust Drive, Asbury Park, New Jersey.

The Macaw was launched on July 12, 1942, at the Moore Dry Dock Com­pany, Oakland, California, and was commissioned on July 12, 1943.

(Memorandum to the Press: Jane's Fighting Ships lists standard displace­ment of the Macaw was 2,000 tons.) 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 319, MARCH 20, 1944 

Mille in the Eastern Marshalls was heavily shelled by battleships and bombed by carrier‑based aircraft on March 18 (West Longitude Date).

On the same day Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape, sinking a small cargo transport and starting large fires.

Five enemy‑held atolls in the Eastern Marshalls were bombed on March 18 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force. In these attacks gun em­placements, barracks, and magazines were hit. All of our planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 512, MARCH 21, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of fifteen vessels in opera­tions against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 large transport.
1 medium transport 1 large tanker.
9 medium freighters.
2 small freighters.
1 medium tanker.

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment Communiqué. 

126

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 320, MARCH 21, 1944 

Four enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed by Liberators and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on, March 19 (West Longitude Date). Thirty tons of bombs were dropped in these operations. On one atoll an ammunition dump exploded, and on another heavy explosions and fires were observed. All of our planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 513, MARCH 22, 1944 

1. The submarine USS Scorpion is overdue from patrol and must be pre­sumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of casualties of the Scorpion, have been so notified. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 322, MARCH 22, 1944 

Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Hellcat and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed four enemy posi­tions in the Marshall Islands on March 20, 1944 (West Longitude Date).

Heavy explosion was observed on one of the objectives, and several smaller explosions and fires observed on another. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moder­ate to meager. All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 323, MARCH 23, 1944 

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Ponape and Kusaie on March 21 (West Longitude Date). Large fires were started among warehouses and barracks.

Ventura search planes and Hellcat fighters of Fleet Air Wing Two, Libera­tor and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed four enemy‑held atolls in the, Marshalls. An ammunition dump was observed to explode on one atoll and fires and explosions were seen on others.

Seventy tons of bombs were dropped in all these operations. All of our planes returned. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 514, MARCH 24, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of eleven vessels as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 converted mine layer.
2 small freighters.
3 medium sized transports.
1 medium sized tanker.
3 medium sized freighters.
1 large tanker. 

2. These sinkings have not been reported in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

127

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 324, MARCH 24, 1944 

Thirty‑three tons of bombs were dropped on four enemy positions in the Marshalls by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Navy Hellcat fighters and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing on March 22 (West Longitude Date).

A large fire was set on one of the atolls and ground installations were hit on another. All of our planes returned.

On March 21 a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed facilities on it Ant Island. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 325, MARCH 25, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Wake Island on March 23 West Longitude Date). Petroleum storage tanks and barracks were hit. Anti­aircraft fire was intense.

In the Marshalls, four enemy‑held atolls were bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing.

In the Carolines, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape on March 22 and 23 (West Longitude Dates). Ant Island was bombed on March 23.

Approximately 115 tons of bombs were dropped in these operations. All of our planes returned. 

MARCH 25, 1944 

TWO UNITED STATES DESTROYERS IN MEDITERRANEAN
SINK GERMAN SUBMARINE

A German submarine was sunk, stern first, in the Mediterranean recently, after a ceaseless pounding by gunfire and depth charges from two United States destroyers. Several aircraft took part in the search for the U‑boat, with three U. S. destroyers, but the destruction was accomplished by two of the destroyers in the darkness of early night. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 326, MARCH 26, 1944 

Before dawn on March 25 (West Longitude Date) Liberator bombers of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Paramushiru and Onekotan Islands in the Kuriles, and a Ventura search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu Island. One of our planes was lost.

On March 24 (West Longitude Date) a Coronado search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and sank two small cargo vessels near Ponape, and Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed the Ponape air strip and adjacent buildings. On the same day Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and strafed three enemy positions in the Marshall Islands. All of our planes returned from these operations. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 327, MARCH 27, 1944 

Ponape Island was bombed on March 25 (West Longitude Date) by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force accompanied by Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. The attacking planes were inter­cepted by 15 Zeros. Four Zeros were shot down and one was probably shot down. Corsair fighters strafed the runways. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered. Ujelang Atoll was also strafed by these planes.

On the same day Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed four enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls. Fires were started and heavy explosions observed.

All of our planes returned from all of these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 328, MARCH 27, 1944 

Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, accompanied by Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, bombed Ponape on March 26 (West Longitude Date). Nine of 15 intercepting Zeros were shot down by our fighters, and three were probably shot down. The town of Ponape and military installations were bombed and strafed. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

Coronado search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two strafed a small vessel near Ujelang, and bombed Kusaie Island and Pingelap Atoll.

On the same day, Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, Fleet Air Wing Two Ventura search planes and Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing Dauntless bombers and Corsair fighters raided three enemy positions in the Marshall Islands. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 329, MARCH 29, 1944 

Four enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed on March 27 (West Longitude Date) by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Navy Hellcat fighters. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. None of our planes was shot down.

On the same day a Coronado search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two dropped bombs on Pakin Island. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 330, MARCH 30, 1944 

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Eten and Moen Islands in the Truk Atoll on the night of March 29 (West Longitude Date). Fires were started. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Ponape Island was bombed by a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two, starting fires in a hangar area, and gun positions and buildings on Ujelang Island were strafed by Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Air­craft Wing.

Forty‑five tons of bombs were dropped on four enemy positions in the Marshalls by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, and Marine Daunt­less bombers and Corsair fighters. Oil storage tanks were set afire on one objective, and runways damaged on another. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 331, MARCH 31, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Dublon, Param, Uman, Fefan, and Moen in the Truk Atoll at night on March 29 (West Longitude Date). On Dublon Island heavy explosions and fires were observed and on Uman and Moen Islands fires were started. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

A single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed Ponape.

On the same day four enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. Antiaircraft batteries, coast defense guns, and ammunition dumps were hit. At one atoll fires were started in a warehouse area and at another several barges were severely strafed by our fighters.

All of our planes returned from all of these operations. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 41, MARCH 30, 1944 

Strong fleet forces at dawn Wednesday, March 29 (West Longitude Date) initiated heavy attacks on the Japanese‑held Palau Islands. After discovery of approach of our forces by enemy planes searching from their bases in the Carolines and New Guinea their ships were observed fleeing the area before our units could reach attack positions. Our attacks continue. No further details are as yet available. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 515, MARCH 31, 1944

Mediterranean. 

1. As the result of operations in the Mediterranean theater during the period January 22, 1944 to this date the following ship losses were sustained due to a variety of causes:

1 motor minesweeper (YMS‑30).
1 large minesweeper (AM‑106).
8 landing craft.
1 harbor tug (YT‑198). 

2. The next of kin of casualties of the above vessels have been notified. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 332, APRIL 1, 1944 

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Dublon, Moen and Eten Islands in the Truk Atoll at night on March 30 (West Longitude Date). Hits were made on the airstrip at Moen and in barracks areas. Several delayed explosions were observed. Two enemy planes intercepted our bomb­ers, but all returned safely.

Three enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed and strafed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. A Daunt­less bomber was shot down by antiaircraft fire near one objective and its crew rescued by a destroyer. 

130

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 334, APRIL 2, 1944 

The Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, has received the report of a board of investigation convened to investigate the accidental shelling of three landing craft by one of our destroyers at Parry Island, Eniwetok Atoll, on February 22, 1944 (West Longitude Date). As a result of this tragic episode 13 men were killed and 46 wounded.

At the time the destroyer was providing fire support to the first landing wave of assault troops approaching Parry Island in landing craft through heavy smoke and dust caused by the preparatory bombardment. The primary source of error was that under difficult conditions of navigation both destroyer and landing craft were slightly out of scheduled positions, with restricted visibility as a contributing factor.

The board was instructed to conduct a thorough investigation and to make recommendations to prevent a recurrence. It is recognized, however, that in any landing operation on a hostile shore close fire support is essential to prevent heavy losses during the landing and assault, and that this involves a calculated risk that must be accepted. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 335, APRIL 2, 1944 

Dublon in the Truk Atoll was bombed by Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force before dawn on March 31 (West Longitude Date). Two enemy fighters were in the air but did not press home their attack. Medium antiair­craft fire was encountered which did no damage to our planes. Our attack started large fires.

Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force accompanied by Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Ponape. In a separate strike a single Liberator also bombed the island. Antiaircraft fire was ineffective.

Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing Dauntless bombers and Corsair fighters and Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells bombed three enemy positions in the Marshalls. In these raids antiaircraft positions were strafed, gasoline storage facilities hit, and an explosion observed in an ammunition dump.

All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 337, APRIL 3, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Dublon in the Truk Atoll on April 1 (West Longitude Date). Three fighters which attempted interception and light antiaircraft fire caused no damage to our planes.

On the same day Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force escorted by Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Ponape, start­ing fires among barracks in the area used for the servicing of planes.

In the Marshalls four enemy‑held atolls were bombed and strafed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Hits were made on runways and in storage areas.

All of our planes returned from all of these operations.

131

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 338, APRIL 3, 1944 

Eleven atolls in the Marshall Islands have been reconnoitered by our forces and U. S. sovereignty established thereon subsequent to the occupation of Kwajalein, Eniwetok and Majuro Atolls.

These are Wotho, Ujae, Lae, Lib, Namu, Ailinglapalap, Namorik, Ebon, Kill, Arno and Bikini.

Most of these atolls were taken without resistance. Light opposition en­countered on others was quickly overcome. We took some prisoners. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 516, APRIL 4, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported sinking fourteen vessels as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

2 medium tankers.
11 medium cargo vessels.
1 small cargo vessel. 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 339, APRIL 4, 1944 

Dublon and Eten in the Truk Atoll were bombed at night on April 2 (West Longitude Date) by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. Three enemy fighters attempted interception, but none of our planes was damaged. On the same day Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells bombed and strafed the airfields at Ponape, one air strip was strafed by a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two, and a single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed one of the runways.

In the Marshalls, three enemy positions were bombed and strafed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Runways were bombed and at one objective a small ship and a dock were set on fire.

All of our planes returned from all of these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 340, APRIL 5, 1944 

Ponape was bombed from low level by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force on April 3 (West Longitude Date). Moderate antiaircraft fire damaged three of our planes.

Sixty tons of bombs were dropped on four enemy positions in the Marshalls by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing Dauntless bombers and Corsair fighters, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Runways were hit, fires started, and at one objective hits were made among a group of motorized vehicles. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to meager.

Two Navy search Liberators of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and sank a small cargo vessel docked at Wake Island.

All of our planes returned from these operations. 

132

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 341, APRIL 6, 1944 

Four enemy‑held atolls in the Marshall Islands were bombed and strafed by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Air­craft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing, Two on April 4 (West Longitude Date). A Corsair fighter was shot down near one of the objectives, Wotje Atoll, and its pilot rescued by a destroyer. Shore batteries opened fire on the destroyer, scoring two hits which did minor damage. The destroyer returned the fire.

Moen and Dublon Islands in the Truk Atoll were bombed on the night of April 3‑4 (West Longitude Date) by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. On Dublon bombs were dropped on oil storage tanks, and several fires were started between the seaplane base and Dublon town. Smaller fires were set on Moen Island. One of six enemy fighters which attempted interception was shot down, and one was probably shot down. Two of our planes are missing.

A Liberator search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and probably sank a tanker near Moen Island.

Ponape Island was raided by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force escorted by Marine Corsair fighters. An airfield and adjacent buildings were hit. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 42, APRIL 7, 1944 

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas communiqué Number 41, the following information is now available concerning operations of Pacific Fleet forces under the tactical command of Admiral R. A. Spruance, U. S. Navy, against enemy installations and forces in the Western Carolines. The Palau Islands were attacked on March 29‑30 (West Longitude Date); Yap and Ulithi Islands on March 30 and Woleai Island on March 31 by planes from carrier task forces commanded by Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, U. S. Navy. Damage to enemy surface ships at Palau included: 

Sunk: Two destroyers, one unidentified combat ship, two large cargo vessels, six medium cargo vessels, eight small cargo vessels, three large oilers, one medium oiler, one small oiler, one patrol vessel.

Damaged: One destroyer.

Beached and burning: One large repair ship, one medium oiler, two small oilers, one small cargo vessel.

Burning: Two small cargo vessels.

Beached and damaged: One large cargo vessel, two medium cargo vessels, five small cargo vessels.

Beached: One small cargo vessel.

Ground installations destroyed at Palau: Forty buildings at Arakabe­san ; at seaplane base four hangars and small buildings; at Malakal, more than twenty warehouses destroyed and extensive damage to docks and numer­ous large fires; at Koror, warehouses, dumps and hangars destroyed; at Angaur, phosphate plant damaged including docks and storage buildings; at Babelthuap, ore dock damaged.

Enemy aircraft casualties at Palau: Destroyed airborne, 93; destroyed ground or water, 39. Probably destroyed or damaged airborne, 29; probably destroyed or damaged on ground or water, 20.

At Ulithi several small vessels were sunk, the dock, radio station and other buildings damaged.

At Yap airdrome facilities and buildings in the settlement were damaged.

133

At Woleai seven planes were destroyed and five probably destroyed and extensive ground installations were damaged on Mariaon and Woleai Islands, including stores, dumps, buildings, and small craft.

During the night preceding and following our attacks on Palau our car­rier aircraft shot down 17 attacking enemy planes and four were shot down by ships' antiaircraft batteries. Three small enemy ships were also sunk at sea by ships' gunfire.

During the night of March 28 (West Longitude Date) one of our sub­marines torpedoed an enemy battleship of unidentified class departing Palau under escort. Although she suffered considerable damage she was able to escape at moderate speed under protection of her destroyer escort.

Our combat losses in these operations were 25 planes and 18 aircraft per­sonnel. There was no damage to our surface ships. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 342, APRIL 7, 1944 

Forty‑four tons of bombs were dropped on Wake Island by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on the night of April 5‑6 (West Longitude Date). Large explosions were observed in storage areas and in an area devoted to repair and maintenance of aircraft.

On the same day Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape Island starting a large fire on one of the airfields.

Four enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed and strafed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Runways were hit and gun positions strafed. All of our planes returned from all of these operations. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 343, APRIL 8, 1944 

Ponape Island was bombed by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force on April 6 (West Longitude Date). Airfields and bauxite works were hit. Anti­aircraft fire was moderate.

Three enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Navy Hellcat fighters. At one objective an ammunition storage area was strafed and at another runways were heavily bombed.

All of our planes returned. 

JOINT STATEMENT, APRIL 9, 1944 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti-submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

"March was an active month in the war against the U‑Boats which operated in widely dispersed areas from the Barents Sea to the Indian Ocean.

"The enemy has persevered vainly in strenuous endeavors to disrupt our flow of supplies to Russia by the northern route. 

134

"Our merchant shipping losses were mainly incurred in far distant seas. Though a little higher than in February, they were still low and the rate of sinking U‑Boats was fully maintained.

"The Allied merchant fleet continues to improve both in quantity and quality, but the strength of the U‑Boat force remains considerable and calls for powerful efforts by surface and air forces." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 344, APRIL 9, 1944 

Operations to soften up Truk continued. Moen and Dublon Islands in the Truk Atoll were bombed by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force at night on April 7 (West Longitude Date). At Moen the air strip was bombed and at Dublon wharfs and fuel reservoirs were hit.

Single Liberators from the same force bombed alternate targets at Oroluk, Ponape and Ujelang.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force escorted by Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing also bombed and strafed Ponape on April 7 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Four enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. At one objective a large explosion was observed near hangars, and at another explosions and fires were caused among barracks, warehouses, and gun emplacements. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to meager. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 345, APRIL 10, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers escorted by Marine fighters bombed an airfield at Ponape on April 8 (West Longitude Date). On the same day 48 tons of bombs were dropped on four enemy positions in the Marshalls by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. Runways were hit and fires started.

Incendiary bombs were dropped on Oroluk Island by a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two

All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 347, APRIL 11, 1944 

Ailuk, Rongelap, Likiep and Utirik Atolls and Mejit Island in the Mar­shalls have been reconnoitered by our forces and U. S. sovereignty established thereon.

An airfield at Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on April 9 (West Longitude Date). On the same day Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters dropped 55 tons of bombs on four enemy positions in the Marshalls. Wharves, barracks, hangars, gun positions and air strips were hit in these raids.

One search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Ulul Island and another strafed two small craft near Ponape. 

135

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 349, APRIL 12, 1944 

Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa and Onekotan in the Kurile Islands on April 10 (West Longitude Date).

Moen and Dublon in the Truk Atoll were bombed by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on the same day. Fires were started at Dublon Town and a large explosion observed. Hits were obtained on the Moen air strip. Six enemy planes were seen but only one attempted interception and it did no damage. A single Liberator from this force bombed Ponape Island.

Ponape was also bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, which obtained hits on airfield runways.

Four objectives in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to meager.

The pilot of a Hellcat fighter forced down near Majuro was rescued by one of our destroyers. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 350, APRIL 12, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands on April 11 (West Longitude Date). A Liberator bomber of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa.

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed a beached ship on Oroluk Atoll, another bombed Ulul Island, and a third dropped incendiary bombs on Ponape on the same day.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force with a Corsair fighter escort of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing also bombed and strafed Ponape, hitting buildings, a storage area, air strips and small craft. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed three enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls. Gun positions and runways were hit.

All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 352, APRIL 13, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands before dawn on April 12 (West Longitude Date). Hits were obtained on airfields and fires started. Light antiaircraft fire did no damage to our planes.

Liberator bombers of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Shasukotan and Matsuwa Islands on the same day. No opposition was encountered.

All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 353, APRIL 14, 1944 

Uman, Param, Dublon, Fefan, and Moen in the Truk Atoll were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of April 12 (West Longi­tude Date). Three airborne enemy planes did not attempt to intercept our force. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. Single planes from this force bombed Ponape and Ujelang.

Ponape Island was also bombed by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air 

136

Force. An airfield and adjacent buildings were hit. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Forty‑five tons of bombs were dropped on four enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Hits were obtained on docks, warehouses, barracks and other buildings. At one objective gun positions were severely strafed. At another a large explosion was caused by a hit on an ammunition dump. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 354, APRIL 14, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru in the Kurile Islands before dawn on April 13 (West Longitude Date). Libera­tors of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa, Shasukotan, and Paramushiru on the same night. The Navy planes drew intense heavy caliber antiaircraft fire over one objective. The Army planes encountered no opposi­tion.

Ulul and Pakin Islands were bombed by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 13 (West Longitude Date).

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kusaie, hitting warehouses, gun positions, and piers.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force with a Corsair fighter escort from the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Ponape. Fires were started among buildings adjacent to an airfield. One of our fighters made a forced landing and its pilot was rescued.

Four objectives in the Marshalls were bombed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Storage tanks, barracks, runways, and an ammunition dump were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 355, APRIL 15, 1944 

Major General Willis H. Hale, U. S. Army, on 1 May will assume new duties as the Commander, Shore Based Air Force, Forward Area, Central Pacific. He will be succeeded by Brigadier General R. W. Douglas, U. S. Army, who will serve as Acting Commanding General of the Seventh Air Force.

Rear Admiral John H. Hoover, U. S. Navy, former Commander Aircraft, Central Pacific, will assume duties as Commander Forward Area, Central Pacific. Admiral Hoover will exercise command over all forces assigned to the Forward Area, including shore based air forces.

In his new command Major General Hale will coordinate the operations and logistic support of all shore‑based Army, Navy and Marine Corps combat aviation in the Forward Area, Central Pacific. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 357, APRIL 15, 1944 

Eniwetok Atoll was attacked by enemy bombers before dawn on April 14 (West Longitude Date). Night fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing intercepted the enemy force and shot down two planes and probably shot down another. All bombs landed in the water.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu and 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 359, APRIL 16, 1944 

Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force raided Matsuwa in the Kuriles on the night of April 14 (West Longitude Date).

Oroluk, Nauru, Pakin, and Ulul Islands were bombed by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 14 (West Longitude Date).

Airfields on Ponape Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on the same day. A small tanker and two escort vessels were bombed near Ant Island. The tanker was sunk and the escorts were beached on the island. Our planes pressed home their attack through heavy antiair­craft fire.

Forty‑six tons of bombs were dropped on four objectives in the Marshalls by Liberators and Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters. One of these objectives was severely strafed. Bomb hits were obtained on gun positions and barracks. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 360, APRIL 17, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators dropped thirty‑eight tons of bombs on Dublon, Fefan and Moen Islands in the Truk Atolls before dawn on April 16 (West Longitude Date). Fires and explosions were observed. One airborne enemy plane did not attempt interception. Two Liberators from this force bombed Ponape Town and an airfield on Ponape Island.

Pakin, Ulul, and Ant Islands were bombed by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 15 (West Longitude Date).

Enemy‑held atolls in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters on April 15. Gun positions and barracks were bombed and at one objective two small craft were strafed. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 517, APRIL 18, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported sinking fifteen vessels as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 large tanker
2 medium tankers
1 medium naval auxiliary (repair ship)
7 medium cargo vessels
2 medium cargo passenger vessels
1 small cargo passenger vessel
1 small cargo vessel 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué.

138

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 361, APRIL 18, 1944 

Pingelap Island was strafed and Ant, Ulul, and Pakin Islands bombed by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 16 (West Longitude Date).

On the same day forty‑five tons of bombs were dropped on enemy positions in the Marshall Islands by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force. Gun positions, barracks, and buildings were bombed and strafed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 363, APRIL 19, 1944 

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed an airfield at Ponape Island on April 17 (West Longitude Date).

On the same day 42 tons of bombs were dropped on enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Gun positions and buildings were hit. A large fire was started at one objective. The pilot and gunner of a dive bomber forced down by engine trouble were rescued by one of our destroyers.

Single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Pakin and Ulul Islands, on April 17. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 364, APRIL 20, 1944 

Forty‑six tons of bombs were dropped on Moen and Dublon Islands in the Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of April 18‑19 (West Longitude Date). Three enemy planes were in the air but did not attempt interception. Large fires were started at Dublon Town and several explosions were observed. At Moen the airstrip and barracks were hit. Anti­aircraft fire was meager.

On the night of April 18 a search Liberator of Fleet Air Wing Two ob­tained a direct hit on a medium cargo vessel south of Fefan Island in the Truk Atoll.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of April 18‑19. Several fires were started. Ponape was also bombed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and by a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 18.

A single Liberator bombed runways at Wake Island on April 18. Antiair­craft fire was intense.

On the same day 40 tons of bombs were dropped on enemy positions in the Marshall Islands by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Small craft, gun positions, barracks, and runways were bombed and strafed.

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 365, APRIL 21, 1944 

Wake Island was bombed by Liberator bombers on the evening of April 19 (West Longitude Date). Thirty tons of bombs were dropped. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

On the same day the airfield and adjacent buildings at Ponape Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers. Weak antiair­craft fire was encountered.

Fifty tons of bombs were dropped on enemy positions in the Marshall Islands by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Ventura search planes of the Fleet Air Wing Two. Barracks, gun positions, airstrips, and other facilities were hit.

Pakin, Ant, and Ujelang Islands were bombed by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 19. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 366, APRIL 22, 1944 

A group of Army and Navy heavy bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Saipan and Tinian in daylight on April 17 (West Longitude Date). One of a force of about 25 intercepting enemy fighters was shot down and one was probably shot down. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Dublon, Moen, Eten, and Mesegon in the Truk Atoll before dawn on April 19 (West Longitude Date). Two airborne enemy fighters did not attempt interception.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on April 20 (West Longitude Date). Airfields were hit and large fires started. Anti­aircraft fire was intense.

On the same day a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing bombed Ulul Island.

Sixty‑seven tons of bombs were dropped on enemy positions in the Mar­shalls by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters on April 20. Gun positions and airstrips were bombed and strafed. One large explosion was caused by a hit in a magazine area.

Erikub and Aur Atolls in the Marshall Islands have been reconnoitered by our forces and United States sovereignty established thereon. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 367, APRIL 22, 1944 

Outnumbered three to one, a carrier‑based Navy Hellcat squadron shot 12 Japanese Zeros from the sky in just two minutes, with the loss of only one American plane, during the recent Palau strike, it was revealed here today. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 368, APRIL 22, 1944 

Moen and Dublon in the Truk Atoll were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of April 20 (West Longitude Date). Several explosions were observed on a runway and fires were started in adjacent areas. 

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Three enemy night fighters were airborne but only one attempted interception. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. None of our planes was damaged.

Ulul Island and Igup, Murilo, and Ruo in the Hall Islands were attacked by single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 21 (West Longitude Date). Three small craft were destroyed at Ruo and two damaged. One small craft was destroyed at Murilo and two damaged. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 369, APRIL 23, 1944 

Ponape Island was bombed by Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force on April 21 (West Longitude Date). Runways and adjacent installations were hit. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

On the same day 60 tons of bombs were dropped on remaining enemy positions in the Marshall Islands by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two. Gun positions and coastal defense positions were bombed and strafed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 370, APRIL 24, 1944 

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Moen, Eten and Param in the Truk Atoll before dawn on April 23 (West Longitude Date). Two enemy fighters were in the air but did not attempt interception. Fires were set and explosions observed on airfields.

Ponape Island was bombed on April 22 (West Longitude Date) by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers and a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two, and before dawn on April 23 by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. Numerous fires were started.

Puluwat Island was bombed before dawn on April 23 by a single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator, and Ulul Island was bombed on April 22 by a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed on April 22 by Liberators and Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Gun posi­tions, runways, and storage tanks were bombed and strafed. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 43, APRIL 23, 1944 

Strong carrier task groups of the Pacific Fleet commenced attacks on the Japanese airdromes and troop concentrations in the Hollandia‑Humboldt Bay region on the north coast of New Guinea on April 20 (West Longitude Date) for the purpose of covering and supporting the forces of the Commander in Chief, Southwest Pacific Area. These attacks are continuing. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 372, APRIL 24, 1944 

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas communiqué Number 43, the following information is now available concerning operations of Pacific Fleet forces supporting and covering landings by forces of the Commander in Chief, South‑ 

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west Pacific Area, at Hollandia, Aitape, and Tanahmerah Bay on April 20 and 21 (West Longitude Date):

Airfields at Hollandia, Wakde Island and Sawar were struck by carrier aircraft on April 20. Thirteen airborne enemy planes were shot down over the target areas. At Hollandia, 67 planes were destroyed on the ground. Fuel storage facilities, ammunition dumps, supply areas and buildings were heavily bombed. Two small cargo ships, and several barges and small craft were sunk.

At Wakde and Sawar 21 enemy planes were destroyed on the ground and 17 damaged by our aircraft during daylight on April 20. On the night of April 20 cruisers and destroyers bombarded the Wakde‑Sawar airfields. The bom­bardment was accomplished without effective opposition. No damage was done to our surface ships. 

APRIL 25, 1944 

GERMAN SUBMARINE IS SUNK WITH LITTLE TRACE BY U. S. NAVAL
AIRMEN iIN TWO-MINUTE CONCENTRATED ATTACK 

In the face of vigorous antiaircraft fire, airmen of the United States Navy attacked a German U‑boat in the Atlantic and destroyed it in a two-minute concentrated attack last December after it had been spotted sometime earlier and kept under watch by one of the planes which took part in the final attack. 

Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, U. S. Navy, Commander in Chief of the United States Atlantic Fleet, gave decorations to the aviators for sinking the submarine.

The airmen were part of a U. S. Naval Task Force consisting of a "baby flat‑top," destroyers and planes of the escort carrier. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 373, APRIL 25, 1944 

United States forces occupied Ujelang Atoll, Marshall Islands, on April 22 and 23 (West Longitude Date). Light opposition was quickly overcome. The atoll was proclaimed to be under the military government of the Com­mander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas.

On April 23 (West Longitude Date) a small vessel at Murilo in the Hall Islands was bombed by a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 374, APRIL 25, 1944 

Taongi Atoll and other remaining enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing on April 23 (West Longitude Date). Gun emplacements, fuel storage facilities, buildings and runways were hit. At one objective a small craft was strafed and beached.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on the same day. Both airfields were hit. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 375, APRIL 26, 1944 

Shimushu and Paramushiru in the Kurile Islands were bombed by Ven­tura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four, and a single Liberator of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa on the night of April 23‑24 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire ranged from light to heavy.

Ant Island was bombed by a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 24 (West Longitude Date). Small craft at Nomwin in the Hail Islands were strafed by another search plane on the same day.

Ponape was bombed on April 24 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers. Airstrips were bombed and fires started.

Remaining enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands were bombed by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ven­tura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters. One hundred and thirty‑eight tons of bombs were dropped in these operations. At one objective Marine Corsairs fired 23,000 rounds of machine gun ammuni­tion at gun positions and fuel storage facilities. Coastal defense guns, build­ings, ammunition dumps, and runways were heavily hit by our bombers. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 376, APRIL 26, 1944 

Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands were bombed by Ven­tura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four, and Matsuwa Island was bombed by Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force at night on April 24‑25 (West Longitude Date). Heavy antiaircraft fire was encountered over Paramushiru and Shimushu. No opposition was encountered at Matsuwa.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Eten, Param, Moen, Tol and Dublon in the Truk Atoll on the night of April 24‑25 (West Longi­tude Date). Several enemy fighters were airborne but did not attempt inter­ception. Thirty‑six tons of bombs were dropped.

Ponape Town and an airstrip on Ponape Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on April 25. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 379, APRIL 27, 1944 

General Douglas MacArthur, Commander in Chief, Southwest Pacific Area, and Admiral C. W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, recently conferred regarding the future operations in the Pacific of their two commands.

Plans were completely integrated so that a maximum of cooperative effort might be executed against the enemy. 

APRIL 28, 1944 

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY FRANK KNOX DIES. 

Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox died at his home, 4704 Linnean Avenue, N. W., Washington, D. C., today at 1:08 P. M. (EWT), following a continuation of a heart attack first suffered at Manchester, New Hampshire, Sunday April 23, 1944.

The death of Colonel Knox was announced to all Naval personnel and 

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establishments, ashore and afloat, throughout the world, in a dispatch from Acting Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal. The dispatch said 

"It is with profound regret that I announce to the Naval Service the death of the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable William Franklin Knox, which occurred in Washington, D. C., at 1308 on April 28, 1944. The Navy has suffered a great loss. Frank Knox was born in Boston, Massachusetts, tended public schools in Grand Rapids and was graduated from Alma College with the degree of A. B. On June 4, 1898, he enrolled in the First Regiment, U. S. Volunteer Cavalry, known in history as the Rough Riders. With that distinguished organization he participated in the actions of the Spanish American War. After that war he entered the field of journal­ism and in 1903 became publisher of the Sault Ste. Marie Evening News. In 1912 he established the Manchester Leader and later became publisher of the Manchester Union Leader. During World War I he served in France as Major in the 303rd Ammunition Train of the 78th Division participating in the St. Mihiel and Meuse Argonne offenses. After being transferred to the Field, Artillery Reserve he was promoted on October 15, 1923 to Lieutenant Colonel, Officers Reserve Staff Corps, and in July, 1937, to the rank of Colonel. Colonel Knox's outstanding career in journal­ism included successively the office of general manager of the Hearst newspapers, publisher of the Hearst Boston newspapers and since 1931 publisher of the Chicago Daily News.

On July 11, 1940, Colonel Knox took the oath of office as Secretary of the Navy. Throughout his entire career in public life, in journalism, in the armed services, and as Secretary of the Navy he has devoted him­self unremittingly and without reserve to the best interests of his country and of the Naval Service. His active leadership during the current strug­gle has been an inspiration which will be sorely missed.

"It is directed that Colors be displayed at half mast on all ships and at all Navy Yards and stations until sunset on the date of interment and to the extent permitted by war operations special memorial services shall be conducted on an appropriate day as prescribed by the senior officer present. Because the nation is at war the firing of salutes and the wear­ing of mourning badges shall be dispensed with.

"Information as to date of interment will be transmitted later." 

APRIL 28, 1944 

A STATEMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY OF THE NAVY JAMES FORRESTAL 

In the death of Secretary Knox the Nation has lost one of its great leaders, the Navy a devoted servant and all of us who worked with him a loyal friend. His career of public service is a finer tribute to his memory than any that words could express. It can be truly said that he expended himself in the service of his country. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 380, APRIL 29, 1944 

Guam Island was bombed by Liberator bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two and of the Seventh Army Air Force on April 24 (West Longitude Date). Many enemy planes were seen on the ground but no attempt at interception was undertaken. All of our planes returned.

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Ponape Island was bombed on April 26 by Army and Navy Liberators and in a second strike the same day was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells. Ponape was also bombed before dawn on April 27 by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. Ponape Town and airfields were hit and fires started. No casualties were suffered by any of our planes or personnel.

Fifty‑four tons of bombs were dropped on Moen, Eten, Dublon, and Param in the Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on April 27. Several enemy planes were in the air but did not attempt intercep­tion. Antiaircraft fire was light and ineffective.

The airfield at Puluwat Island was bombed by a single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two on April 25. Antiaircraft fire was intense. Fires were started.

Remaining enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands were bombed and strafed on April. 26 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 381, APRIL 29, 1944 

Revetments and runways at Ponape Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on April 27 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Forty‑eight tons of bombs were dropped on remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls on April 27 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and shore‑based Navy Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 382, APRIL 30, 1944 

Forty‑one tons of bombs were dropped on the Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of April 2 (West Longitude Date). Anti­aircraft fire was meager. Several enemy planes were seen but did not at­tempt interception.

Ponape Island was bombed on April 28 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells and a single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator. Airfields were hit and fires observed.

Sixty‑five tons of bombs were dropped on remaining enemy objectives in the Marshalls on April 28 by Mitchells and Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Navy Hellcat fighters. Gun positions, buildings, and runways were hit. At one objective a barge was severely strafed by Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 384, MAY 1, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru in the Kurile Islands before dawn on April 29 (West Longitude Date). Light antiaircraft fire did no damage to our planes. All of our planes returned.

A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and damaged a ship at anchor in the Truk Lagoon and strafed airstrips on Moen and Eten Islands on April 29. 

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Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bomb­ers on April 29. Runways and adjacent installations were hit. A large ex­plosion was observed near one airfield. Moderate antiaircraft fire was en­countered.

Thirty‑five tons of bombs were dropped on remaining enemy objectives In the Marshalls on April 29 by Mitchell and Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine aircraft wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 518, MAY 2, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of twelve vessels, includ­ing three combatant ships, as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 large tanker
1 large naval auxiliary
2 medium cargo transports
5 medium cargo vessels
1 light cruiser
2 destroyers

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 44, MAY 2, 1944 

Powerful Naval Task Forces of the Pacific Fleet under command of Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, U. S. Navy, have completed further attacks against enemy bases in the Central Pacific following their operations in sup­port of the Hollandia‑Humboldt Bay occupation.

Installations in Truk Atoll were attacked by carrier aircraft on April 29‑30 (West Longitude Date); Satawan, in the Nomoi Islands, was attacked by carrier‑based aircraft and shelled by cruisers under the command of Rear Admiral J. B. Oldendorf, U. S. Navy, on April 30; Ponape was attacked by carrier‑based aircraft on May 1 and shelled by battleships commanded by Vice Admiral W. A. Lee, U. S. Navy. None of our ships was damaged in any of these operations, and our aircraft losses were light. Approximately 30 flight personnel are missing.

In the first day's attack on Truk, 60 enemy planes were shot down in air combat, an equal number destroyed on the ground. Five enemy planes were shot down by our ships.

In the second day's attack at Truk, the one enemy plane encountered was shot down. Our planes dropped eight hundred tons of bombs in the Truk area, inflicting heavy damage to shore facilities.

Considerable damage was caused by our protracted shelling and bombing of Satawan and Ponape.

Our ships shot down five enemy search planes on April 26 during the retirement from the Hollandia Area. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 385, MAY 2, 1944 

Wake Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on April 30 (West Longitude Date). Ninety‑five tons of bombs were dropped on defense installations. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. Several enemy planes were in the air over the target but did not attempt intercep­tion. All of our planes returned.

Ponape Island was bombed on April 30 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers. Explosions and fires were caused at an airfield. Anti­aircraft was moderate.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls were attacked on April 30 by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 386, MAY 4, 1944 

Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed the Truk Atoll on the night of May 1‑2 (West Longitude Date). Fifty tons of bombs were dropped on airstrips and adjacent installations, starting fires and causing large explo­sions. A searchlight battery was destroyed. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. Two enemy planes were in the air over the target but did not attempt inter­ception.

A single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed Ponape Island at night on May 1. A fire was set in Ponape Town.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed on May 1 and on May 2 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Navy Hellcat fighters. Gun positions, shore installations, buildings and a power station were bombed and strafed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 387, MAY 5, 1944 

Paramushiru in the Kurile Islands was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four on the night of May 3‑4 (West Longitude Date). Explosions were caused and large fires started. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. All of our planes returned.

Nauru Island was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on May 3. Barracks and runways were hit. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers on May 2. Runways at two airfields were hit. Antiaircraft fire was light.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were attacked on May 3 by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Hits were obtained in a magazine area and on gun positions. 

CINCPAC RELEASE NO. 388, MAY 6, 1944 

Eighty‑seven tons of bombs were dropped on Ponape Island by Liber­ators of the Seventh Army Air Force on May 4 (West Longitude Date). Ponape Town and dock areas were thoroughly covered, and large fires and explosions were caused. 

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Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on May 5. Antiaircraft fire was light.

Forty‑seven tons of bombs were dropped in attacks on remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls during May 4 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat lighters. Coastal batteries, anti­aircraft batteries, and magazine areas were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 389, MAY 7, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kuriles at night on May 5 (West Longitude Date). Large fires were started. Intense heavily caliber antiaircraft fire was en­countered. All of our planes returned.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape Island on May 5 concentrating on the seaplane base and airfields. Antiaircraft fire was light.

Sixty‑two tons of bombs were dropped on remaining positions in the Marshalls on May 5 by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Coastal guns, magazine areas and storage facilities were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 391, MAY 8, 1944 

Ventura search planes" of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru in daylight on May 6 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire was light.

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two shot down an enemy four‑engine patrol plane near Ulul Island on May 6 (West Longitude Date). 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 392, MAY 8, 1944 

Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Guam Island during daylight on May 6 (West Longitude Date). Our force was intercepted by approximately 25 enemy fighters. Seven of these were shot down, three probably shot down, and two damaged. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered over the target. All of our planes returned.

Truk Atoll was bombed at night on May 6 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Several fires were started. Antiaircraft fire ranged from light to moderate.

Ponape Island was bombed during daylight on May 6 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers and on the night of May 6 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Airfields and defense installations were hit. No anti­aircraft fire was encountered during either strike.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls received thirty‑three tons of bombs on May 6 from Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Coastal batteries, fuel storage facilities, and magazines were hit. 

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JOINT STATEMENT, MAY 9, 1944 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti­submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

"In April 1944, the United Nations anti‑submarine activity continued at a highly satisfactory level. Again for another month the extraordinary fact continues that the number of enemy submarines sunk exceeds the number of Allied merchant ships sunk by submarines." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 393, MAY 9, 1944 

Airfields at Ponape Island were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and Mitchells on May 7 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed on May 7 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Coastal guns, antiaircraft batteries, and a power station were hit. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 519, MAY 10, 1944

Mediterranean. 

1. The U. S. Destroyer Lansdale was sunk in the Mediterranean April 20, 1944, as the result of attack by enemy aircraft.

2. The next of kin of the casualties have been notified. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 394, MAY 10, 1944 

Ponape Island was bombed by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force on May 8 (West Longitude Date). The town and airfields were hit. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells, Dauntless dive bombers, and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls on May 8. Fuel storage facilities, antiaircraft batteries, barracks, and coastal guns were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 395, MAY 11, 1944 

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Farce bombed Truk Atoll on the night of May 8‑9 (West Longitude Date). Forty tons of bombs were dropped on airstrips and defense installations. A possible hit was obtained on a ship near Moen Island with a 2,000 pound bomb. Four enemy planes were in the air over the target but did not attempt interception. Antiaircraft fire was light.

Single Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Oroluk Atoll and Ponape Town on the night of May 8‑9.

Wake Island was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of May 9.

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells bombed Ponape on May 9. 

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Remaining enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed and strafed on May 9 by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 520, MAY 12, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of fourteen vessels, includ­ing one combatant ship, as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 destroyer
1 large tanker
1 medium tanker
1 medium transport
1 medium cargo transport
7 medium cargo vessels
1 small cargo transport
1 small cargo vessel 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 397, MAY 12, 1944 

Better than 7 to 1—that's the ratio the Navy's carrier squadron have es­tablished during the past eight months: 1,229 Japanese aircraft destroyed at a cost of 164 U. S. planes. A large proportion of the crews of these 164 air­craft were rescued.

The score begins with the Marcus Island raid on September 1 last year, and includes our second big raid on Truk on the last two days of April. It does not include our own comparatively light losses at Truk and during the Hollandia landings on April 21. Nor does it include 54 Japanese craft shot down by task force anti‑aircraft fire.

To achieve this better than 7 to 1 superiority in aircraft destruction, our carrier‑squadrons wiped out 673 Japanese planes in aerial combat, and smashed 556 on the ground. All this was in addition to great losses and damage in­flicted on enemy ships and installations.

The escort carrier Liscome Bay, sunk by a submarine torpedo, was the only ship lost during 19 major raids against 15 enemy bases by these big carrier task forces which ranged from the Solomons to Marcus, from the Marshalls to the Marianas and Palau.

Figures released today mirror the increasing effectiveness of these forces. Only seven planes, all on the ground, were destroyed in the September 1 thrust at Marcus. But at Truk in February, 205 Japanese craft were demolished in the air and on the ground. In the 10‑week period since the initial assault on the Truk bastion, the carrier units accounted for 719 enemy craft, more than half the total for the eight‑month period.

Indicative of our increasing ascendancy in the air, at least in the area of the Japanese outer island defenses, is the fact that in the occupation

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of Kwajalein Atoll enemy air opposition was eliminated within four hours after the first fighter sweep. Further, at Truk in February not a single Japanese plane rose to challenge our aviators on the second day. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 398, MAY 12, 1944 

Single search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed landing strips at Kusaie Island and at Murilo in the Hall Islands on May 10 (West Longitude Date).

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Ponape Island on May 10.

Enemy‑held objectives in the Marshalls were bombed on May 10 by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Antiair­craft batteries, building areas, and underground shelters were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 399, MAY 12, 1944 

Two flights of Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Truk Atoll before dawn on May 11 (West Longitude Date). Sixty‑two tons of bombs were dropped. Airfields were hit and explosions and fires observed. Seven enemy planes intercepted the first flight of Liberators and one of these enemy planes was shot down. One of four enemy aircraft intercepting the second flight was probably destroyed. All of our planes returned.

A single Liberator of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape Island before dawn on May 11. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 400, MAY 13, 1944 

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed the airstrip at Kusaie Island on May 11 (West Longitude Date). On the same day another search plane shot down a Japanese medium bomber northeast of Truk Atoll.

Enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells, Ventura search planes and a single Catalina of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters during the day and night of May 11. Runways, antiaircraft batteries, and barracks were hit.

A Dauntless dive bomber was shot down near one objective and its crew rescued by one of our destroyers. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 401, MAY 14, 1944 

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Nauru Island on the morning of May 12 (West Longitude Date). Bombs were dropped on shore installations including an ammunition dump, phosphate works, and the airfield.

Enemy‑held positions in the Marshall Islands were attacked on May 12 by Corsairs and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Venturas and Catalinas of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. 

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 402, MAY 15, 1944 

Ventura search planes of. Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu in the Kurile Islands before dawn on May 13 (West Longitude Date). Several fires were started. Antiaircraft fire was intense. On the afternoon of May 13 a single Mitchell bomber of the Eleventh Army Air Force attacked two enemy patrol boats near Paramushiru.

Forty‑two tons of bombs were dropped on defense installations in Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on May 13. Two large explosions were observed on Moen Island. Antiaircraft fire was moder­ate. A single enemy fighter made an ineffective attempt at interception.

Ponape Island was bombed before dawn on May 13 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and during daylight the same day by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells. Landing strips and dock areas were hit.

Enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were attacked by Ventura, Coronado, and Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters during daylight on May 13 and during the night of May 13‑14. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 404, MAY 16, 1944 

Two hundred and forty tons of bombs were dropped on Jaluit Atoll in the Marshall Islands during daylight on May 14 (West Longitude Date) and during the night of May 14‑15 in a coordinated aerial assault by aircraft of the Seventh Army Air Force, Fleet Air Wing Two, and the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Two hundred and eighty‑four sorties were flown by Liberator and Mitchell bombers, Dauntless dive bombers, and Corsair and Hellcat fighters. Targets were cannoned by Mitchell bombers and strafed by Hellcat fighters. Attacks were made at altitudes ranging from 50 feet to 10,000 feet. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to meager. Eight of our aircraft re­ceived minor damage but all returned safely.

Other objectives in the Marshalls were harassed on May 14 and until dawn on May 15 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators, Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Ventura and Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two.

A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu in the Kuriles on the night of May 14 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered.

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two dropped four 1,000‑pound bombs on a medium size cargo vessel at anchor in Truk Lagoon before dawn on May 14. Another Fleet Air Wing Two search plane bombed and strafed the air­strip at Puluwat Island on May 14. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 406, MAY 17, 1944 

Ventura and Coronado search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed remaining enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands during the day and night of May 15 (West Longitude Date). Fuel storage facilities, runways, and buildings were hit,

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 407, MAY 18, 1944 

Wake Island was bombed during daylight on May 16 (West Longitude Date) by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. Objectives at Peacock Point and Wilkes Island were hit. A large fire was started. Moderate anti­aircraft fire did minor damage to two of our aircraft.

Nauru Island was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers on May 16. Hits were obtained on a phosphate plant and antiaircraft posi­tions. Explosions were caused and fires set. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and probably sank a ten thousand ton Japanese tanker and a medium cargo ship in Truk Harbor on May 16. Antiaircraft fire was light. The same plane later bombed and strafed the airstrip and barracks area at Puluwat Island. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered which wounded both pilot and co‑pilot but the aircraft re­turned safely to base.

Ponape Island was bombed by Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force on May 16. The seaplane base, airfields, dock installations and Ponape Town were hit. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed on May 16 by Catalina and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. Runways and gun positions were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 408, MAY 19, 1944 

Wake Island was bombed during daylight on May 17 (West Longitude Date) by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. Peale Island and Heel Point were the principal targets. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered, and one of our aircraft was shot down.

An airstrip at Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on May 17. No antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were attacked on May 17 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. Repair work on the airstrip at Wotje was interrupted by Corsairs which strafed several vehicles and de­stroyed two trucks. 

MAY 19, 1944 

JAMES FORRESTAL TAKES OATH AS SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 

James Forrestal today became the 48th Secretary of the Navy. 

Rear Admiral Thomas L. Gatch, USN, Judge Advocate General of the Navy, administered the oath at ceremonies held at 9 A.M., today in the Office of the Secretary.

Among those present were members of Congress, the Navy High Command, Chiefs of the Bureaus of the Navy Department and other ranking Naval officials.

While he is the 48th Secretary of the Navy, Mr. Forrestal is actually the 47th person to hold the office. John Y. Mason was appointed to two terms, 1844‑45 and 1846‑49.

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Secretary Forrestal succeeds the late Frank Knox, who died April 28, 1944.

President Roosevelt sent to the Senate on May 10, 1944, the nomination of Mr. Forrestal as Secretary of the Navy and Senate confirmation was voted May 17, 1944. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 409, MAY 20, 1944 

Paramushiru Island in the Kuriles was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four at night on May 18 (West Longitude Date). Large fires were started at airfields. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. One of our aircraft received minor damage but all returned safely. A Liber­ator and a Mitchell bomber of the Eleventh Army Air Force damaged and probably sank an enemy patrol vessel east of Paramushiru during daylight on May 18. On the same day a Ventura search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four attacked an enemy auxiliary vessel present in the same locality.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Coronado and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters at­tacked enemy positions in the Marshalls during daylight on May 18 and during the night of May 18‑19. Runways, magazines, power stations and piers were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 410, MAY 21, 1944 

A single Liberator of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Shimushiru and Ketoi Islands in the Kuriles on the night of May 18‑19 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered.

Shimushu Island was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 19. Large fires were started at an airfield. Anti­aircraft fire was meager.

Nauru Island was attacked by Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force during daylight on May 19 (West Longitude Date). The phosphate workings and defense installations were hit. Explosions and fires were observed. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on May 19. An airfield was the principal target. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Remaining enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed on the night of May 18‑19 and during daylight on May 19 by Catalina and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 411, MAY 22, 1944 

Ponape Island was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells at sight on May 19 and during daylight on May 20 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Coronado, 

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Catalina, and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters during the night of May 19‑20 and on May 20. Runways, antiaircraft batteries, and buildings were hit. Antiaircraft fire was meager. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 412, MAY 23, 1944 

Army, Navy, and Marine shore‑based aircraft dropped 230 tons of bombs on Wotje Atoll on May 21 (West Longitude Date). Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters flew 207 sorties in the coordinated attack. Specific targets were strafed by Mitchell bombers and Corsair fighters. Antiaircraft fire was meager. All of our planes returned, although ten suffered minor damage.

Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed Mille Atoll on May 21. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 413, MAY 24, 1944 

Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands were bombed by Ven­tura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 21 (West Longitude Date). Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. All of our aircraft returned.

A single Ventura search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu Island before dawn on May 23. No opposition was encountered.

Ponape Island was bombed during daylight on May 22 by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force. Airfields, gun positions, and buildings were hit and fires started. Meager antiaircraft fire was en­countered. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 521, MAY 25, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of fifteen vessels, includ­ing one combatant ship, as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows 

1 destroyer
1 large cargo transport
1 large tanker
2 medium cargo transports
7 medium cargo vessels
1 small transport
1 medium tanker
1 small tanker

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué.

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 45, MAY 25, 1944 

Carrier‑based aircraft of a Pacific Fleet Task Force commanded by Rear Admiral A. E. Montgomery, U. S. Navy, attacked Marcus Island on May 19 and 20 (West Longitude Date) and Wake Island on May 23.

At Marcus our aircraft in 373 sorties dropped 148 tons of bombs on air­drome installations. Ammunition and supply dumps were destroyed and gun positions and buildings damaged. Only two enemy aircraft were seen in the area: one of these a medium bomber was shot down near the target and the other, also a twin‑engine plane, was strafed on the ground. A small cargo ship was set afire north of Marcus. Our losses were four planes and three men.

One hundred and fifty tons of bombs were dropped on Wake in 354 sorties. No enemy aircraft were sighted in the Wake area. Twenty buildings were destroyed and others damaged; storage areas and other airdrome in­stallations were heavily hit. Several small craft were sunk or damaged. None of our planes was shot down. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 415, MAY 25, 1944 

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Ponape Island on May 23 (West Longitude Date).

Enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were attacked on May 23 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Defense instal­lations were bombed and severely strafed. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 417, MAY 26, 1944 

Shimushu in the Kurile Islands was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 24 (West Longitude Date). Several fires were started. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 419, MAY 26, 1944 

A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Kusaie Island during daylight on May 25 (West Longitude Date). Medium antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Ponape Island was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on May 24. An airfield and dock areas were hit. Antiaircraft fire was meager. One of our aircraft was damaged.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed on May 24 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Numerous fires were observed. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. Hits were obtained on anti­aircraft batteries and buildings. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 421, MAY 27, 1944 

Shimushu in the Kurile Islands was bombed by a Ventura search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 25 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered. 

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Matsuwa Island was bombed by a Liberator of the Eleventh Army Air Force before dawn on May 25 without opposition.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on May 25. Docks, warehouses, and gun positions were hit. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands were bombed on May 25 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Antiaircraft fire ranged from medium to moderate. Runways, antiaircraft batteries, and barracks were hit. One Corsair fighter made a forced landing near Wotje Atoll and its pilot was rescued. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 423, MAY 29, 1944 

Ponape and Pakin Islands were strafed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers during daylight on May 26 (West Longitude Date). Anti­aircraft fire was meager.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed remaining enemy targets in the Marshalls on May 26. Storage areas, runways, and antiaircraft batteries were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 424, MAY 29, 1944 

One hundred and one tons of bombs were dropped on Ponape Island during daylight on May 27 (West Longitude Date) by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force. Ponape Town and the airfields were principal targets and barracks, hangars, and storage areas were hit. Moder­ate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Fifty tons of bombs were dropped on Wotje Island during the afternoon of May 27 by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters, a Ventura search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Defense installa­tions were hit and several fires started.

Other objectives in the Marshalls were attacked by Navy Venturas and Marine Corsairs on May 27. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to meager. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 425, MAY 30, 1944 

Saipan Island in the Marianas was bombed by Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force during daylight on May 28 (West Longitude Date). Moderate heavy caliber antiaircraft fire was encountered. Twelve enemy fighters attacked our formation. Two fighters were shot down and two were damaged.

Shimushu Island in the Kuriles was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 27. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered.

On May 28 enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed by Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat. fighters. Runways, barracks, antiaircraft batteries and other defense installations were hit. 

157

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 426, MAY 30, 1944 

Ten officers and enlisted men of the Submarine Forces, Pacific Fleet, were presented awards for distinguished performance of duty by Admiral C. W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief of the Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, in a ceremony at Pearl Harbor on 30 May. 

In presenting the medal awards Admiral Nimitz said: 

"During thirty months of war in the Pacific our submarine forces have penetrated far into Japanese home waters; have cut heavily into the available tonnage of Japanese shipping; and in so doing have prob­ably made more unsung heroes than any other branch of the naval service. The numerous men of distinguished valor who are to be found in the submarine forces receive little public recognition because details of submarine operations cannot be made public for good reasons of military security. It is possible, however, to confer medal awards upon those who have particularly distinguished themselves in undersea war­fare, while the dramatic exploits and achievements which make these awards so richly deserved must remain untold until after the war.

"One of the major reasons why Japan's once grandiose plan for conquest of the entire Pacific has gone glimmering is the enemy's in­ability to maintain control of the sea lanes which he must use to take supplies to his military outposts and bring supplies to the Empire. From the beginning of the war our submarines have challenged that control, and the western Pacific, which normally would be dominated by the enemy, is instead a No Man's Sea in which our submarine forces are daily increasing their interference with and interruption of Japan's war­time commerce and the movement of men and munitions. That our submarines will be joined sooner or later in these intrusion tactics by our surface forces and aircraft must be expected by our enemy.

"Our submarines have sent more than two and a half million tons of Japanese shipping to the ocean floor, and are sending a very consider­able quantity of tonnage into Japanese shipyards for repair, which ties up repair facilities and resources which the Jap needs for other purposes.

"This steady attrition of shipping space available to the enemy is slowly and surely sapping his strength.

"In accomplishing these results the submarine forces have demon­strated skill and daring, and have shown a noteworthy capacity to learn new tactics and new methods of getting the best out of their versatile weapons.

"In recognition of recent outstanding achievements by twelve of your number, I now have the pleasure of presenting individual awards. In presenting these awards, I am simply acting for the President of the United States. If it were possible, our Commander in Chief would de­rive the keenest pleasure from pinning these medals on you himself." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 427, MAY 31, 1944 

A single Liberator of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Shimushiru Island in the Kuriles before dawn on May 29 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered. Another Eleventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed Matsuwa Island before dawn on May 29.

158

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands in the Kuriles before dawn on May 29. Moderate antiair­craft fire was encountered. Large fires were started at Shimushu. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 428, JUNE 1, 1944 

Shimushu Island in the Kuriles was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 30 (West Longitude Date). Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed enemy positions in the Marshalls on May 29. Runways, piers, and antiaircraft batteries were hit. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 429, JUNE 1, 1944 

Guam Island was bombed by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force during daylight on May 28 (West Longitude Date). Approximately ten enemy fighters attempted to intercept our formation. One fighter was prob­ably shot down. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to intense.

Truk Atoll was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators at night on May 30. The airstrips were hit, and a fire started which was visible one hundred fifty miles. One enemy plane was in the air over the target. Anti­aircraft fire was meager.

Wake Island was bombed on May 30 by Seventh Army Air Force Liber­ators, which obtained hits on Peacock and Wilkes Islands and Heel Point. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Ponape Island was raided by Seventh Army Air Force Mite‑hells during daylight on May 30. Gun positions, runways, and defense installations were hit. Antiaircraft fire was meager and no interception was attempted.

Enemy positions in the Marshall Islands were bombed and severely strafed on May 30 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Daunt­less dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters. Blockhouses, barracks and coastal guns were hit. Antiaircraft fire was meager. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 430, JUNE 2, 1944 

Shimushu in the Kurile Islands was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on May 31 (West Longitude Date). Several large and small fires were started in the vicinity of the airfield. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. All of our planes returned. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 431, JUNE 3, 1944 

A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed and strafed ship­ping and shore installations at Truk Atoll at night on June 1 (West Longi­tude Date). Four one‑thousand‑pound bombs were dropped over a medium cargo vessel, two of them scoring direct hits and two straddling the vessel, which was believed sunk. The search plane then strafed a number of small 

159

cargo vessels, the seaplane base at Dublon and the airstrips at Eten Island. Two of the small vessels were set on fire, fires were started at Dublon Island and Eten Island, and an ammunition dump exploded. In retiring the search plane was pursued by a single enemy plane which did not make an attack. Over the target antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Two Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Shimushiru Island in the Kuriles before dawn on June 1. No opposition was encountered.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu Island before dawn on June 1. Fires were started. Antiaircraft fire was light and inaccurate. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 432, JUNE 4, 1944 

Shimushu and Paramushiru Islands in the Kuriles were bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on June 2 (West Longitude Date). Two large fires were started on Shimushu. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. Matsuwa Island was bombed by Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force before dawn on June 2. No opposition was encountered. All of our planes returned.

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on June 3. Forty‑one tons of bombs were dropped on storage areas and on runways. Several fires and explosions were observed. Antiaircraft fire was meager. Two enemy fighters attempted to attack our force but did no damage.

Nauru Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers and search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two on June 2. Antiaircraft bat­teries were hit and fires Started. Antiaircraft fire was moderate.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on June 1. An airfield, hangars, and adjacent buildings were hit. No antiair­craft fire was encountered.

Remaining enemy objectives in the Marshalls were attacked by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters on May 31 and on June 1 and 2. In these raids antiaircraft batteries, coastal defense guns, runways and barracks were strafed and bombed. Antiaircraft fire was generally meager. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 522, JUNE 5, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of sixteen vessels in operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows: 

1 large transport
1 large cargo vessel
7 medium cargo vessels
2 small cargo vessels
4 medium cargo transports
1 small cargo transport

2. These actions have not been reported in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué.

160

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 523, JUNE 5, 1944

Atlantic. 

1. The Escort Carrier USS Block Island was sunk in the Atlantic during May, 1944 as the result of enemy action.

2. The next of kin of casualties, which were light, have been notified. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 433, JUNE 5, 1944 

Several enemy patrol‑type vessels were sighted west of Truk Atoll on June 2 (West Longitude Date) and attacked by a single search plane. One was probably sunk and all were heavily strafed. On June 3 another search plane sighted the disposition and made an attack which resulted in the sink­ing of one of the auxiliaries and severe damage to another.

Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Ketoi Island in the Kuriles before dawn on June 4. No opposition was encountered. A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Paramushiru Island before dawn on June 4. All of our planes returned from these operations. 

JUNE 6, 1944 

MEMORANDUM TO THE PRESS 

The following was given to the press by Admiral Royal E. Ingersoll, USN, Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet, at the press conference of Secre­tary of the Navy James Forrestal today: 

"Recently on a brilliant moonlight night one of our destroyer escorts sighted a submarine, fully surfaced, silhouetted against the moon. The de­stroyer escort immediately rang up full speed and headed for the submarine, opening fire with all her guns. The submarine elected to fight it out and opened fire with her deck guns and machine guns, tracers passing high over the bridge of the destroyer escort. The submarine maneuvered at high speed and fired a torpedo. The destroyer escort closed the range rapidly, following the sub's evasive maneuvers and burying the sub under a withering fire at point blank range, machine guns and three inch forecastle guns. The range finally closed until the submarine was only 20 yards away. All fire on the submarine having ceased at this point the destroyer escort rode up on the forecastle of the submarine where she stuck. Men began swarming out of the submarine and up onto the destroyer escort's forecastle. The destroyer escort opened up on them with machine guns, tommy guns and rifle fire. Ammunition expended at this time included several general mess coffee cups which happened to be at the gun stations. Two of the enemy were hit on the head with these. Empty cartridge cases also proved effective for re­pelling the boarders. During this heated encounter the destroyer escort suffered her only casualty of the engagement, when a husky seaman bruised his fist knocking one of the enemy over the side.

"At this stage of the battle the boatswain's mate in charge forward with a 45 Colt revolver and a Chief Firecontrolman with a tommy gun accounted for a number of those attempting to board. The destroyer escort then de­cided to back off to stop any more enemy trying to board her. Again the running battle was resumed, hits falling like rain on the sub's topside. Even shallow depth charges were used against the submarine. The destroyer es­cort rammed a second time and then the submarine rolled slowly over.

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Personnel on the escort's deck had a clear view into the conning tower which was ablaze. A torpedoman threw a hand grenade which dropped through the sub's conning tower before exploding. The submarine finally sank with her diesel engines still running, and the conning tower hatch open, fire blazing from It.

"The commanding officer of the destroyer escort was a young Lieutenant Commander in the Naval Reserve, who came on active duty in 1941." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 434, JUNE 6, 1944 

Truk Atoll was bombed during the night of June 3‑4 (West Longitude Date) by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. The airfields at Moen and Param Islands were hit. Four enemy fighters were airborne but did not attack our force. Antiaircraft fire was meager and inaccurate.

Ponape Island was attacked on the night of June 3 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and on June 4 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells. Installations on Langar Island and antiaircraft batteries were hit.

Lauru Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells during daylight on June 3, and by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two on June 5. Gun positions were the principal targets. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed on June 3‑4

search Venturas of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless live bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Gun positions and runways were hit. Antiaircraft fire was meager. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 435, JUNE 7, 1944 

Guam Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two during daylight on June 5 (West Longitude Date). Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to intense. Our force was not attacked by enemy aircraft. All of our planes returned.

Nauru Island was bombed on June 5 by Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two. The barracks area, phosphate plant, and gun positions were principal targets.

Ponape Island was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on June 5. Antiaircraft fire was meager.

On June 4 Mille Atoll in the Marshalls was attacked by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing. Runways were principal targets. Light caliber antiaircraft fire was intense.

A search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two sighted a group of small enemy cargo ships proceeding northwest of Truk on June 5, and attacked and damaged one of the vessels. Another search plane shot down an enemy torpedo bomber west of Truk on June 5. 

JOINT STATEMENT, JUNE 9, 1944 

The following joint Anglo‑American statement on submarine and anti­submarine operations is issued under the authority of the President and the Prime Minister: 

"During May our shipping losses have been by far the lowest for 

162

any month of the war, and they have in fact been a fraction of the losses inflicted on enemy shipping by our warships and aircraft, although their merchant shipping is petty compared to that of the Allies.

"There has been a lull in the operations of the U‑boats which perhaps indicates preparation for a renewed offensive. The change which had come over the scene is illustrated by the fact that in spite of the few U‑boats at sea, several are now sent to the bottom for each merchant ship sunk whereas formerly each U‑boat accounted for a considerable number of merchant ships before being destroyed.

"This is to be ascribed to the vigilance and to the relentless attacks of our Anglo‑American‑Canadian and other anti‑U‑boat forces, including the scientists who support them in a brilliant manner." 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 438, JUNE 9, 1944 

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of June 7‑8 (West Longitude Date). Airfields were the principal tar­gets. Antiaircraft fire was meager and inaccurate.

Ponape Island was attacked by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on the evening of June 6 and at night on June 8. Airfields, plantation areas, and Ponape Town were bombed. Antiaircraft fire was meager.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Pakin and Nauru Islands on June 6. Antiaircraft batteries were hit at Pakin Island.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters on June 6 and 7. Runways, coastal gun emplacements, and antiaircraft batteries were principal targets. A Corsair fighter was downed near Mille Atoll on June 7 and its pilot rescued by a destroyer. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 439, JUNE 10, 1944 

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on June 8 (West Longitude Date). No opposition was encountered.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Nauru Island on June 7 and 8 and Ocean Island on June 7. Barracks and gun emplacements were hit. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to intense. Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells bombed Nauru Island on June 8, hitting coastal defense guns and antiaircraft emplacements. Antiaircraft fire was intense.

A single search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed gun positions at Puluwat Island on June 9.

Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Ponape Is­land on June 7. Hangars near the seaplane base and shops were hit. Meager antiaircraft fire was encountered. On June 8 a single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed Ponape.

Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Air­craft Wing, Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters bombed and strafed remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls on June 7 and 8. Piers and antiaircraft batteries were bombed. At one objective a large explosion was caused near an antiaircraft emplacement. On June 8

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two Corsair fighters were downed by antiaircraft fire near Maloelap. One of the pilots was rescued by a destroyer. A Dauntless dive bomber was shot down near Mille the same day and its pilot rescued by a destroyer. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 46, JUNE 11, 1944 

A powerful Pacific Fleet Task Force struck enemy positions on Saipan, Tinian, and Guam, in the Mariana Islands, with carrier aircraft on June 10 (West Longitude Date). Further details are not now available. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 524, JUNE 12, 1944

Mediterranean. 

1. PC‑558 was sunk as a result of enemy action in the Mediterranean on May 9, 1944.

2. The next of kin of casualties have been notified. 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 525, JUNE 12, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported sinking eighteen vessels as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows: 

1 large tanker
1 medium transport
6 medium cargo transports 6 medium cargo vessels
4 small cargo vessels

2. These actions have not been reported in any previous Navy De­partment communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 441, JUNE 12, 1944 

Carrier aircraft again struck Guam, Rota, Tinian, and Saipan on‑ June 11 (West Longitude Date).

Truk Atoll was attacked by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force at night on June 9 and 10. Airfields at Param, Eten, Dublon and Moen Islands were principal targets. Several fires were started.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on the night of June 9. Ponape Town and gun positions were hit.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two bombed Ocean Island during daylight on June 9, encountering moderate antiaircraft fire. Two of the planes continued to Nauru Island to strafe small craft there.

On June 10 Mitchells of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Nauru, and started fires visible twenty miles. Heavy antiaircraft fire downed one Mitchell bomber. A Catalina search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two rescued the crew.

Enemy Positions in the Marshalls were bombed and strafed on June 9, during the night of June 9‑10, and on June 10. Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two and Navy Hellcat fighters participated in these attacks. Coastal defense guns and antiaircraft batteries were hit. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 47, JUNE 13, 1944 

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas communiqué Number 46, the following information is now available concerning operations of Pacific Fleet Forces against enemy installations at Guam, Saipan, Tinian, and Rota Islands in the Marianas. These objectives were attacked by carrier aircraft on June 10 and 11 (West Longitude Dates).

On June 10 our fighter planes swept the objectives in force and destroyed 124 enemy aircraft. A large majority of these were destroyed in the sir. Our losses were 11 Hellcat fighters and eight pilots.

On June 11 our attacks were continued, resulting in the destruction of 16 enemy aircraft, two small cargo ships at Saipan, and a small oiler north­west of Saipan.

A formation of enemy ships apparently attempting to escape from Saipan was brought under attack on June 11. One large oiler, one destroyer, three corvettes, one large cargo ship, one medium cargo ship, and three small cargo ships were sunk; five medium cargo ships and five escort vessels were damaged.

A second formation of enemy ships several hundred miles away was at­tacked and heavily damaged by our aircraft on June 12. These were: three destroyers, one destroyer escort, and two cargo ships.

In the operations on June 11 our losses were four aircraft and seven flight personnel.

On the night of June 10 several enemy planes approached our force, but failed to drive home an attack, and one of them was shot down by antiaircraft fire. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 442, JUNE 13, 1944 

Truk Atoll was bombed by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force be­fore dawn on June 12 (West Longitude Date). Thirty‑eight tons of bombs were dropped on airfields and the seaplane base. Three enemy fighters Inter­cepted our force, and damaged one Liberator. Antiaircraft fire was meager. All of our planes returned.

Ventura search planes of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two, bombed Nauru and Ocean Islands on June 11. Gun positions and barracks were attacked. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells on June 11, meeting light antiaircraft fire.

In the Marshalls Navy and Marine fighters and dive bombers attacked Maloelap and Wotje Atolls on June 11. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 48, JUNE 14, 1944 

Attacks directed against enemy positions in the Southern Marianas con­tinued on June 13 (West Longitude Date).

Battleships, cruisers, and destroyers of the Pacific Fleet bombarded Tinian and Saipan Islands on June 12. Large fires were started at Tanapag Harbor, and in the towns of Garapan and Charan Kanoa. Our ships suffered no dam­age.

Further air attacks were coordinated with the Naval shelling of Tinian and Saipan.

Pagan island was attacked by carrier aircraft on June 12. Enemy In­stallations were well worked over and three enemy aircraft were destroyed and one probably destroyed.

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In operations on June 11 our forces have reported the following additional losses: Three fighter planes, one dive bomber, and four flight personnel.

More than 60 survivors of an enemy ship bombed and sunk northwest of Saipan on June 11 have been rescued and made prisoners of war.

On June 12 and 13 ships and aircraft of the Pacific Fleet attacked enemy installations in the Kuriles. A fleet task force bombarded Matsuwa Island and aircraft bombed Shimushu and Paramushiru Islands with airfields as their principal targets. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 443, JUNE 14, 1944 

The Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, has received a preliminary re­port from Rear Admiral J. F. Shafroth, U. S. Navy, president of a board of inquiry convened to investigate an explosion and fire which occurred on May 21, 1944, among a group of landing craft moored in Pearl Harbor.

The following casualties were caused by the explosion of ammunition being unloaded and the subsequent fire: Dead; Army 8, Navy 9, Marine Corps 10. Missing; Army 53, Navy 21, Coast Guard 26. Injured; Army 56, Navy 143, Coast Guard 3, Marine Corps 159, civilian 19.

This accident was originally announced in Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas Press Release Number 414. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 444, JUNE 14, 1944 

On June 11 an explosion occurred near a magazine maintained by the Naval Ammunition Depot on Oahu Island. Several torpedo warheads being transferred from a truck to a platform were detonated in the explosion. Some damage was caused in the magazine area and minor damage was done to power lines and railroad tracks.

Three men were killed and seven are missing as a result of the accident. The names of casualties are being withheld pending notification to the next of kin. A court of inquiry of which Rear Admiral T. S. Wilkinson, U. S. Navy, is senior member, has been convened to investigate the accident. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 445, JUNE 14, 1944 

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Group One, bombed Truk Atoll during daylight on June 12 (West Longitude Date). Airfields were hit and several fires started. Approximately 15 enemy fighters attempted to attack our force. One of their planes was shot down, two probably shot down, and four damaged. Two additional fighters were probably destroyed on the ground. All of our planes returned.

Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on June 12.

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Group One, attacked Ocean and Nauru Islands on June 12. Barracks and antiaircraft positions were hit.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were attacked by Ventura and Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters on June 12 and during the night of June 12‑13. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 49, JUNE 15, 1944 

Operations for the seizure of Saipan Island in the Mariana Group have been initiated by strong Pacific Ocean Areas forces.

Assault troops have effected landings on Saipan Island, following inten­sive preparatory bombardment of Saipan, Tinian, Pagan, Guam and Rota Islands by carrier‑based aircraft and by a portion of the battleships, cruisers and destroyers of the Pacific Fleet.

Landings are being continued against strong opposition under cover of supporting bombardment by our air and surface forces. Initial reports indicate that our casualties are moderate. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 50, JUNE 15, 1944 

Assault troops have secured beachheads on Saipan Island and are ad­vancing inland against artillery, mortar, and machine gun fire. Virtually all heavy coastal and antiaircraft batteries on the island were knocked out by Naval gunfire and bombing. Our troops have captured Agingan Point. In the town of Charan Kanoa, brisk fighting is continuing.

The enemy has attempted several counterattacks with tanks. These at­tacks have been broken up by our troops with the support of ships and air­craft.

In general, fighting is heavy but good progress is being made against well organized defenses. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 51, JUNE 16, 1944 

Chichi Jima, and Haha Jima in the Bonin Islands and Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands were attacked by carrier aircraft on June 14 (West Longitude Date). Thirty‑three enemy fighters which attempted to intercept our forces at Chichi Jima were shot down. Four multi‑engined seaplanes were damaged at Chichi Jima. At Iwo Jima two airborne enemy aircraft were probably destroyed and 14 were destroyed on the ground.

One medium cargo ship was sunk by bombing at Chichi Jima, and four small cargo ships and six small craft were damaged. A medium transport, discovered underway near the Bonins, was heavily damaged by aircraft and later sunk by one of our destroyers. One hundred and twelve survivors were rescued and made prisoners of war.

Ground installations, including barracks, airfields, and fuel tanks were bombed by our aircraft.

Our losses were four aircraft and five flight personnel. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 52, JUNE 16, 1944 

United States assault troops are engaged in bitter fighting against defend­ing forces on Saipan Island.

On June 14 (West Longitude Date) and during the night of June 14‑15 our troops were withdrawn a short distance toward the beach in some sectors in the face of intense mortar and artillery fire. Positions were consolidated and during the night our Naval forces carried out a heavy bombardment of enemy strong points. 

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On the morning of June 15 enemy resistance in the strongly held sector north of Charan Kanoa was broken. At midday a major element of our forces commenced an attack which advanced our line nearly one half mile in the southern sector of the island. Lesser advances were made in other sectors.

Our assumption that Saipan Island would be strongly held because of its strategic location in the Japanese defensive system has been proven correct. Preliminary estimates indicate there are upwards of two divisions of enemy troops defending Saipan. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 53, JUNE 17, 1944 

United States Marines supported by elements of an Army Infantry divi­sion have improved their positions on Saipan Island, and are driving forward toward Aslito airdrome. Harassment of our beachheads by enemy mortar fire has been considerably reduced.

On the night of June 14 (West Longitude Date) enemy torpedo planes launched an attack against our carrier force, but were repulsed without damage to our ships.

Our heavy surface units bombarded Guam Island on June 15.

Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force bombed Matsuwa, Paramu­shiru and Shimushiru on June 14. Five enemy aircraft were airborne near Matsuwa but only one attempted to attack our force, and did no damage. Fourteen enemy fighters appeared over Paramushiru and several made attacks causing damage to one of our planes. One enemy fighter was probably shot down and an enemy medium bomber was damaged. Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four also bombed Paramushiru and Shimushu on June 14. Fifteen enemy fighters attacked our force, causing minor damage to several of our aircraft. Shimushiru was again attacked by Eleventh Army Air Force Liberators on June 15.

Army, Navy and Marine aircraft of Central Pacific Air Forces bombed objectives in the Marshall Islands and Eastern Caroline Islands on June 13 and 15 (West Longitude Date.) 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 54, JUNE 17, 1944 

United States Marines and Army troops advancing east across the south­ern portion of Saipan Island, made gains averaging 1500 yards during the night of June 15‑16 and on June 16 (West Longitude Date). The area now held by our forces extends from a point just south of Garapan for a distance of approximately five and one half miles to Agingan and extends inland two miles at the point of deepest penetration. Our forces have captured Hinashisu due east of Lake Susupe.

Our positions were under sustained enemy fire during the night of June 15‑16, and before dawn on June 16 the enemy launched a determined counter­attack. This attack, which was broken up, cost the enemy heavily in lives and destroyed more than 25 enemy tanks.

Early in the morning of June 16 our troops launched the offensive which resulted in general advances. Some of our forward echelons penetrated the Naval air base at Aslito Airdrome but were later withdrawn under severe enemy fire.

During the action on June 16 our aircraft bombed and strafed enemy posi‑

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tions, and during the night of June 15‑16 enemy strong points were shelled by our ships.

On June 15 one of our destroyer transports encountered five enemy coastal cargo ships and sank them. Twenty‑nine survivors were rescued and made prisoners of war. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 448, JUNE 17, 1944 

As the South Pacific has become relatively quiet, Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr., U. S. Navy, has been relieved of command of the South Pacific Area and the South Pacific Force. He will henceforth command the Third Fleet which will operate in the Pacific Ocean in the same way that the Fifth Fleet is operating under command of Admiral Raymond A. Spruance, USN 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 55, JUNE 18, 1944 

In the early morning of June 17 (West Longitude date) the enemy launched an amphibious counterattack against our forces on Saipan. A group of troop‑carrying barges attempted a landing south of Garapan, but were re­pulsed by our armed landing craft. Thirteen enemy barges were sunk. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 56, JUNE 19, 1944 

Our assault troops on Saipan Island have captured Aslito Airdrome and have driven eastward across the island to Magicienne Bay, where we hold the western shore. Two pockets of enemy resistance remain east of Lake Susupe. The enemy continues to counterattack, but all attacks have been suc­cessfully repulsed.

Seabees are at work on the airstrips at Aslito Airdrome.

On June 18 (West Longitude Date) our carrier task force providing cover and support for our amphibious force was subjected to a severe aerial attack which continued for several hours.

The attack was successfully repulsed by our carrier aircraft and antiair­craft fire. Information presently available indicates that only one of our surface units was damaged, and this damage was minor.

It is believed a portion of the enemy planes were carrier‑based, and used nearby shore bases as shuttle points. However the effectiveness of this pro­cedure was sharply limited by our systematic bombing and strafing of the air­fields at Guam and Rota.

It is estimated that more than 300 enemy aircraft were destroyed by our forces during this engagement. No estimate is yet available of our own air­craft losses. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 526, JUNE 20, 1944 

1. The submarine, USS Grayback, is overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of casualties of the Grayback have been so notified. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 57, JUNE 20, 1944 

United States Marines and Army infantrymen are continuing to advance on Saipan Island closely supported by aircraft bombing by Army and Marine artillery and Naval gunfire against severe enemy artillery fire. Our troops now hold the entire southern portion of the island from the southern out­skirts of Garapan across to the center of the western shore of Magicienne Bay. Several strong pockets of enemy resistance within this area are being heavily attacked by our forces.

During June 19 (West Longitude Date) the airfields on Tinian Island were bombed by our aircraft and shelled by our surface units. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 450, JUNE 20, 1944 

Truk Atoll was bombed by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on June 18 (West Longitude Date). Airfields on Moen Island were principal targets. No fighter interference was encountered and antiaircraft fire was meager.

A single Seventh Army Air Force Liberator bombed Ponape on June 18.

Nauru Island was attacked on June 18 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers which shelled and bombed antiaircraft emplacements and buildings. Antiaircraft fire was intense but inaccurate.

Enemy positions in the Marshalls were attacked during the day and night of June 18 by Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and Navy Hellcat fighters. Antiaircraft fire did sufficient damage to a Dauntless dive bomber to force it down on the water before reaching its base. The crew was rescued by a Catalina search plane of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 58, JUNE 21, 1944 

In the afternoon of June 19 (West Longitude Date) carrier‑based recon­naissance planes of the Fifth Fleet sighted a Japanese fleet, which included carriers and battleships, approximately midway between the Mariana Islands and Luzon. Aircraft of our fast carrier task force were immediately ordered to attack and made contact with the enemy fleet before dusk. Enemy losses and our own losses have not yet been assessed. Additional details will be made known as they become available.

In the ground fighting on Saipan Island, our assault troops made ad­vances in a northly direction along the western shore of Magicienne Bay and made progress against an enemy strong point at Nafutan Point. Severe fighting continues. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 452, JUNE 21, 1944 

Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four bombed Shimushu in the Kuriles before dawn on June 17 (West Longitude Date). Fires were started near the airfield. No opposition was encountered. Paramushiru Island was bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four and Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force before dawn on June 19. Antiaircraft fire was meager and no attempt was made, to intercept our force.

Truk Atoll was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators during 

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daylight on June 19. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered but there was no fighter opposition. Ponape Island was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators and Mitchells on June 19.

Mille, Maloelap and Wotje Atolls were bombed on June 19 by Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Ventura and Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Group One, and Navy Hellcat fighters. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 59, JUNE 22, 1944 

1. During the attack by enemy carrier‑type aircraft on our ships on June 18 (West Longitude Date), 353 enemy aircraft were shot down of which 335 were destroyed by our carrier aircraft and 18 by our own antiaircraft fire. This is a revision of the estimate contained in communiqué No. 56.

Two of our carriers and one of our battleships received superficial dam­age. We lost 21 aircraft in combat.

2. The following information is now available concerning the attack of our carrier aircraft upon units of the Japanese fleet in the late afternoon of June 19 (West Longitude Date).

The enemy forces attacked consisted of: Four or more battleships, five or six carriers, five fleet tankers, and attached cruisers and destroyers.

On the basis of information presently available, our planes inflicted the following damage

One carrier, believed to be the Zuikaku, received three 1,000‑pound bomb hits.

One Hayataka Class carrier was sunk.

One Hayataka Class carrier was severely damaged and left burning furiously.

One light carrier of the Zuiho or Taiho Class received at least one bomb hit.

One Kongo Class battleship was damaged.

One cruiser was damaged.

Three destroyers were damaged, one of which is believed to have sunk.

Three tankers were sunk.

Two tankers were severely damaged and left burning.

Fifteen to 20 defending aircraft were shot down.

Our losses were 49 aircraft, including many which landed in the water at night and from which an as yet undetermined number of pilots and aircrewmen have been rescued. Search for others is continuing.

3. The engagement was broken off by the Japanese fleet which fled during the night toward the channel between Formosa and Luzon.

The Pacific Fleet units in these two actions were commanded by Admiral R. A: Spruance. The carrier task force was under the immediate tactical command of Vice Admiral M. A. Mitscher. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 60, JUNE 22, 1944 

Our troops on Saipan Island have made further advances of more than a mile along the shoreline of Magicienne Bay to the town of Laulau and have advanced about a mile up Mount Tapotchau. The pocket of enemy resistance tat Nafutan Point has been reduced by one half, and our forces have gained

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the heights of Mount Nafutan on the east coast. Heavy pressure is being maintained night and day against enemy troop concentrations and defense works by our aircraft, Army and Marine artillery, and Naval gunfire.

At night on June 20 (West Longitude Date) several enemy aircraft dropped bombs near our transports and along shore but did no damage. Sporadic fire has been directed against our ships by shore batteries but the enemy emplacements have been quickly knocked out. 

JUNE 22, 1944 

STATEMENT BY SECRETARY OF THE NAVY JAMES FORRESTAL 

"Under the circumstances our Fleet did a magnificent job, but the Navy is not going to be satisfied until the Japanese Fleet is wiped out.

"The Japanese were extremely cautious and never came very far to the eastward so that the bulk of our forces could engage them. As a result, we were able to send home but one air attack at very long range from our carriers just before dark.

"Some of the Japanese vessels which were damaged may be able to make port and eventually return to the fight. This is especially true of the war­ships, only one of which is reported as definitely sunk." 

N. D. COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 527, JUNE 23, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of 16 vessels, including one Naval auxiliary, as a result A operations in these waters, as follows:

11 medium cargo vessels
4 small cargo vessels
1 medium Naval auxiliary 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 61, JUNE 23, 1944 

A Pacific Fleet submarine torpedoed a Shokaku Class carrier on June 18 (West Longitude Date). Three torpedo hits were obtained and the Japanese carrier is regarded as probably sunk.

Supplementing Pacific Ocean Areas communiqué No. 59, the following more detailed information is now available concerning the strike by carriers of the Fifth. Fleet against units of the Japanese fleet on June 19:

One small carrier of unidentified class previously reported damaged received two aerial torpedo hits.

One destroyer previously reported damaged sank.

Two additional Japanese navy twin‑engined bombers were shot down by carrier aircraft returning to our carriers after attacking the Japanese force.

Ponape Island was bombed on June 20 by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchell bombers, and on June 21 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Gun positions were principal targets.

Seventy tons of bombs were dropped on Truk Atoll by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on June 20 and 21. On June 20 five enemy aircraft 

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attempted to intercept our force. Two enemy fighters were damaged, and one Liberator was damaged. On June 21 nine enemy aircraft attempted to Inter­cept our force. One Liberator was damaged and one enemy fighter. All of our planes returned.

Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Navy Hellcat fighters carried out attacks in the Marshalls on June 20 and 21, bombing and strafing gun positions and targets of opportunity. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 62, JUNE 24, 1944 

1. Carrier aircraft of the fast carrier task force swept Iwo Jima in the Bonin Islands on June 23 (West Longitude Date). Sixty or more enemy air­craft of a force which attempted to intercept our fighters were shot down. Twelve of the enemy planes found our carriers and all of these were shot down by our combat air patrols. We lost four fighters. There was no damage to our surface ships.

2. Pagan Island in the northern Marianas was attacked by carrier air­craft on June 22. The following damage was inflicted on the enemy:

Four small cargo ships and one sampan, sunk.
Two small cargo ships and 12 sampans, damaged.
Four enemy aircraft destroyed and two probably destroyed on the ground.
A flight consisting of one twin‑engine bomber and five Zero fighters Inter­cepted some distance from our carrier force was shot down.
A wharf and fuel dumps at Pagan were destroyed and buildings and run­ways were damaged.

We lost one Hellcat fighter and one pilot.

3. United States Marines and Army troops are pushing ahead on Saipan Island and have made new gains along the northern shore of Magicienne Bay. Booby traps and land mines are being extensively employed by the enemy. Two enemy aircraft detected in the Saipan area were shot down by carrier aircraft of the fighter screen on June 21. Coastal guns on Tinian Island have intermittently shelled our ships at anchor of Saipan, but have done little damage. On June 23 the airfields on Tinian Island were heavily bombed and shelled.

4. The airstrip and buildings at Rota Island were attacked by carrier aircraft on June 22. A medium cargo ship at Rota was sunk by an aerial torpedo. Our planes received no damage.

5. Shimushu Island in the Kuriles was attacked by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on June 23. In the Central Pacific, Army, Navy, and Marine aircraft continued neutralization raids on June 23 against enemy positions in the Marshall and Caroline Islands. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 63, JUNE 25, 1944 

On the basis of latest reports received tabulating damage inflicted upon the enemy during operations in the Mariana Islands, the following revisions are necessary.

A) During the attack by enemy carrier aircraft on our ships on June 18 (West Longitude Date), 402 enemy aircraft were destroyed, of which 369 were shot down by our carrier‑based fighters, 18 by antiaircraft fire; and 15 were

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destroyed on the ground. We lost 18 pilots and 6 aircrewmen from 27 aircraft shot down by the enemy.

B) In the attack by our carrier aircraft upon units of the Japanese Fleet in the late afternoon of June 19, one heavy cruiser and one light cruiser, neither of which was previously reported, were damaged. One light carrier, not previously reported, received seven 500‑pound bomb hits. One of the three tankers previously reported sunk has been. transferred to the severely damaged category. 26 enemy aircraft were shot down, instead of the previously re­ported 17 to 22. We lost 22 pilots and 27 aircrewmen from 95 aircraft either shot down by the enemy or forced to land in the water.

C) In the fighter sweep over Iwo Jima in the Volcano Island on June 23, 116 enemy aircraft were shot down, and 11 were probably shot down. We lost five fighters instead of four.

On June 24, United States Marines and Army troops on Saipan launched an attack, preceded by intense artillery and Naval gunfire preparation, which resulted in advances on our Western flank around Mount Tapotchau, ranging from 500 to 800 yards. Strong enemy opposition continues. Enemy aircraft dropped bombs among our transports off Saipan on June 23, doing minor dam­age to several landing craft. During the evening of June 23 a small fight of enemy planes dropped several bombs in the area occupied by our forces on Saipan. Casualties were very light.

On June 23, Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Truk Atoll, and Army, Navy and Marine aircraft continued their reduction of enemy defenses in the Marshall and Caroline Islands. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 528, JUNE 26, 1944

Mediterranean Area. 

1. The U. S. Destroyer Escort Fechteler was sunk in the Mediterranean during the month of May as the result of enemy action.

2. The next of kin of the casualties have been notified. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 64, JUNE 26, 1944 

United States Marines scaled Mount Topatchau on June 24 (West Longi­tude Date) and have established positions near its summit. Further ground was gained along the western shore, and more of the southern portion of Garapan fell to our forces. Simultaneously, substantial gains were made along the eastern shore, and the gagman Peninsula is now entirely in our hands. In the center of our lines progress was slowed by enemy troops occupying caves in cliffs overlooking our positions. Our troops have advanced beyond and surrounded this pocket of resistance, and it is being subjected to artillery fire at close range. In the south, small gains were made against enemy troops cornered on Nafutan Peninsula. In these operations three coastal defense guns were captured on Kagman Peninsula. To date our forces have destroyed 36 enemy tanks and captured 40 more.

Guam and Rota Islands in the Marianas were attacked by aircraft of our fast carrier task force on June 24 (West Longitude Date). At Guam, six enemy aircraft were destroyed on the Orote Peninsula airfield, and two were probably destroyed: Runway revetments were bombed. A large cargo vessel in Apra Harbor, damaged in a previous strike, was attacked again. Several

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tons of bombs were dropped on the airstrip near Agana Town, and one enemy plane was destroyed on the ground and eight to ten were damaged. At Rota Island, revetments and buildings were bombed, and fires started. Two enemy aircraft were destroyed on the ground.

Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands were bombed by Libera­tors of the Eleventh Army Air Force and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on June 24, starting large fires. Intense antiaircraft fire was encountered. All of our planes returned.

Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Navy Hellcat fighters continued neutralization raids in the Marshalls on June 24. 

JUNE 28, 1944 

NAVAL ADVANCE TO THE WESTWARD 

The advance of our Naval forces to the westward began with the reoccupa­tion of Attu and Kiska in the far north, and the capture of the most important islands in the Solomons group in the far south.

From our far northern bases we began attacking the Japanese Kuriles from the air. We have also made several surface vessel bombardments against the enemy's shore installations in the Kurile chain.

In the south, the successful termination of the Solomons campaign made possible air and surface raids against Japanese garrisons in the Bismarck Archipelago and along the northern New Guinea Coast.

With our positions in the far north and in the south firmly established the next step was the squeeze made in the middle of the enemy's perimeter. This resulted in the capture of the Gilbert Islands. Following that, the Marshall campaign then gave us Kwajalein, Majuro; and Eniwetok. .Farther to the south we took the Admiralty Islands and also important positions on New Britain. Then strategic areas along the northern New Guinea coast fell to us with the. result that we were then able to launch air and. surface attacks against Truk, Ponape, Kusaie and other islands in the Caroline group, from several directions. We also were able to strike from Australia in the far south against Japanese positions in Java. But it was the capture of certain of the Marshalls group that permitted us to launch our surface and air attacks as far west‑as Palau, Guam, Saipan, Rota and the Bonin Islands.

Our last offensive blow, aimed in the ultimate capture of Saipan, already has permitted our air and surface fleets to strike still farther westward. The final occupation of Saipan will enable us to project surface and air operations that will include the mainland of Japan, the Philippines and a greater part of the Dutch East Indies. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 65, JUNE 28, 1944 

1. United States Marine and Army troops have made further gains on Saipan Island, pushing north nearly two miles along the east coast, passing the villages of Donnay and Hashigoru: On the west coast, further penetra­tions have been made into Garapan Town. Enemy troops broke through our lines containing them on Nafutan Point on the night of June 26 (West Longi­tude Date), and attempted to drive northward. Two hundred enemy troops were killed in this counterattack. The next day further attacks were launched

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by our forces against Nafutan Point and the enemy now holds only the extreme tip of the point.

Close support is now being given our troops by shore‑based aircraft operat­ing from Aslito Airdrome. Tinian Island has been subjected to protracted daily bombardment to neutralize enemy positions there.

On the night of June 25 several enemy torpedo planes attacked a carrier group screening our transports. Several torpedoes were launched, but no hits were obtained. One enemy plane was shot down, and another probably shot down. During the night of June 26‑27 enemy aircraft again attacked our transports, but all bombs landed in the water. One near miss on a transport injured a member of the crew.

2. Surface units of the Pacific Fleet bombarded Kurabu Zaki at the southern tip of Paramushiru in the Kuriles on the night of June 25‑26.

Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands were bombed by Liberators of the Eleventh Army Air Force and Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on June 25 and 26. Several fires were started in these raids. Antiaircraft fire was intense. Eleven enemy fighters attacked a single Ventura of Fleet Air Wing Four near the airfield at Paramushiru before dawn on June 26. Two of the attacking planes were damaged, and one disappeared into a fog bank trailing smoke. The Ventura returned with superficial damage.

3. Carrier aircraft swept Guam and Rota Islands in the Marianas on June 26. Fuel reservoirs and coastal defense gun positions were bombed. three small craft in Apra Harbor at Guam were destroyed. The cargo vessel damaged in previous strikes was observed to have sunk. At Rota the airstrip was strafed and buildings were set afire. There was no enemy air opposition during these attacks.

4. Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on June 25. One of five enemy fighters which intercepted our force was shot down. We suffered no damage. Army and Marine aircraft attacked enemy objectives in the Marshalls on June 25.

5. An enemy twin‑engine bomber was shot down south of the Hall Islands by a search plane of Fleet Air Wing Two, Group One, on June 26. The same day an enemy torpedo plane was damaged by another search plane northwest A Truk. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 66, JUNE 29, 1944 

Organized resistance at Nafutan Point on Saipan Island ceased on June 27 (West Longitude Date). The entire point has been occupied by our forces. Small gains were made along the western shore into Garapan Town, and in the center of the island. Our advance northward is being made against severe enemy resistance. On the night of June 27 enemy aircraft dropped bombs in the area occupied by our forces. Two of the attacking planes were shot down by antiaircraft batteries.

Carrier aircraft attacked Pagan Island on June 27. Barracks and a water reservoir were hit. Only one plane was seen on the ground, and it appeared unserviceable. Several small craft badly damaged in previous strikes were hit by rocket fire.

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on June 27, and neutralization raids were made against objectives in the Marshall and Caroline Islands on June 26 and 27. 

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JUNE 29, 1944 

NAVAL AVIATORS HAVE DESTROYED MORE THAN 6,259 JAPANESE AIRPLANES 

Naval Aviators have shot 5,521 Japanese warplanes out of the air since Pearl Harbor, while losing 1,260 planes in aerial combat. At least 65 per cent of the U. S. Navy airmen shot down have been rescued.

In addition to the 5,521 Jap aircraft destroyed in the air, Naval Aviators have, in 1944 alone, destroyed at least 738 Jap planes on the ground. Only 17 Navy planes were lost in this way during the same period.

This 43 to 1 ratio in ground destruction partially explains the drop in ratio of U. S. air victories In the last three months from 4.7 to 1 to 4.4 to 1, according to Rear Admiral A. W. Radford, USN, Acting Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air). He explained that the accumulation of Naval strength in the Pacific, plus increasing effectiveness of Navy aerial recon­naissance, has made it possible for carrier task forces to surprise the Japanese and destroy their aircraft before they can become airborne to fight.

"As a result," Admiral Radford said, "fewer Jap planes are available for us to shoot down. In addition, the Jap pilot is becoming less and less anxious to close with our pilots. So the air ratio of victories has dropped slightly. This is more than compensated, however, by the 43 to 1 ground ratio. We don't care where they are when we destroy them"

Compilation of statistics in ground destruction of planes for 1942 and 1943 is being completed, but that phase of the aerial war during that period was relatively unimportant.

Combining the available figures not including ground losses of 1942 and 1943, the Navy enjoys a 4.8 to 1 advantage over Japan in the air war, having shot out of the air and destroyed on the ground a total of 6,259 planes, as against 1,277 planes lost. These figures for destruction of Jap planes do not include losses inflicted by antiaircraft fire. They cover the period from Decem­ber 7, 1941, through June 23, 1944. The figures for the period May 1 through June 23, 1944, are not final.

One reason for the increased air losses of Navy planes in 1944 over 1942 and 1943 is the loss of planes in the incessant Bombing raids on Jap holdings, such as the Kuriles, Truk and the Marshalls, where aerial opposition is rarely encountered any more, but where heavy antiaircraft exacts a toll‑a very small toll in relation to the frequency and intensity of the bombing raids carried out. 

The record of air losses by years follows:

    Year Japs Navy Ratio
    1942 (including December 1941) 1134 384  3‑1
    1943 2212 351 6.3‑1
    1944 2175 525 4‑1
         Total 5521 1260 4.4‑1
    1944 (ground) 738 17 43‑1
         Grand total 6259 1277 4.8‑1

All of the Navy's planes have played a part in amassing the victory record. Naturally, it was the fighters‑Grumman Hellcat and Wildcat and Vought Corsair‑which scored the large majority of the victories, either while escort­ing the torpedo and dive bombers, or while defending American sea and land 

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forces. The bombers‑Grumman Avenger, Douglas Dauntless and Curtiss Helldiver, Consolidated Catalinas and Liberators, Lockheed Venturas‑drove hone the heavy blows while the fighters fended off the enemy's air forces.

The Wildcat and Avenger are also built by General Motors' Eastern Air­craft Division, the Corsair by Goodyear. The Helldiver is also built by Canadian Car and Fairchild of Canada, the Liberator by Ford and Douglas. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 464, JUNE 29, 1944 

Aslito Airfield on Saipan Island today was renamed Isely Field in honor of Commander Robert Henry Isely, USN, Commander of Torpedo Squadron Sixteen, who was shot down June 12 by Japanese antiaircraft fire as he was leading a bombing attack on the field.

The change in name was recommended by Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher, Commander, Fast Carrier Task Force, Pacific Fleet, and was made by Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, U. S. Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas. Aslito Airdrome was first attacked by carrier aircraft of Admiral Mitscher's task force in February of this year.

A Naval aviator since 1937, Commander Isely had taken part in attacks at Tarawa and other Gilbert Islands, at Kwajalein, Palau, Woleai and Truk. He flew aerial cover for General MacArthur's troops when they landed in Hollandia in New Guinea. Admiral Mitscher's recommendation was based on Commander Isely's gallant performance of duty during all of these Pacific actions. ' 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 67, JUNE 30, 1944 

Our troops on Saipan Island have made new gains both in the center and on the right flank of our lines, pushing ahead through difficult terrain and intensified enemy resistance. High ground occupied near the town of Charan Danshii places our forces in a commanding position over the area held by the enemy. Strong points in the Tanapag area are being subjected to aircraft bombing and shelling by Naval surface vessels. Air attacks and Naval gunfire continue against enemy defenses on Tinian Island.

Our casualties in the ground fighting on Saipan Island through June 28 (West Longitude Date) are as follows: Killed in action: Marines, 1,289, Army, 185, total 1,474. Wounded in action: Marines, 6,377, Army 1,023, total 7,400. Missing in action: Marines, 827, Army, 51, total 878.

No accurate estimate of enemy casualties is possible. A great many Japanese dead and wounded have been carried back by the retreating enemy troops. However, our troops have buried 4,951 enemy dead.

Rota Island was attacked by carrier aircraft on June 28 (West Longitude Date). Fires were started, and revetments and runways were bombed and strafed. No enemy aircraft attempted to intercept our forces.

Army, Navy, and Marine aircraft continued neutralization raids against enemy objectives in the Marshall and Caroline Islands on June 28. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 68, JULY 1, 1944 

Our troops are consolidating their positions on Saipan Island and have wiped out several pockets of resistance by‑passed in previous advances. Small 

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gains were made during June 29 (West Longitude Date) in the central sector of our lines. During the night of June 29‑30 several enemy planes dropped bombs in the area occupied by our forces. One enemy plane was shot down. Aircraft bombing and Naval shelling intended to neutralize enemy gun posi­tions on Tinian Island continues.

Buildings and runways on Rota Island were bombed by carrier aircraft on June 29. No enemy aircraft attempted to intercept our force.

Paramushiru and Shimushu in the Kurile Islands were bombed before dawn on June 29 by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four. No at­tempt was made to intercept our force and antiaircraft fire was meager. All of our aircraft returned. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 69, JULY 2, 1944 

Marine and Army troops on Saipan Island have made small gains in the central sector, and on the right side of our lines advance patrols have forged ahead distances up to a mile. To June 30 (West Longitude Date) eighty enemy tanks have been destroyed or captured. Our troops have buried 6015 enemy dead and have taken more than 200 prisoners of war.

Seventy tons of bombs were dropped on Truk Atoll by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force on June 29. Several airborne enemy fighters made ineffective attempts to intercept our force. Meager antiaircraft fire was en­countered. On the same day Army, Navy, and Marine aircraft bombed Ponape and Nauru Islands and remaining enemy objectives in the Marshall Islands. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 70, JULY 2, 1944 

The Second and Fourth Marine Divisions and the Twenty‑seventh Infantry Division have made gains ranging from 500 yards to a mile along their entire front on Saipan Island. The advance was made during July 1 (West Longi­tude Date) with the close support of aircraft, artillery, and Naval gunfire. On the right flank our troops are within 5 1/2 miles of the northern tip of the island. On the left flank our forces have penetrated further into Garapan, and have seized the heights overlooking the town and Tanapag Harbor. In the center we have occupied the mountain village of Charan Tabute. Large quantities of enemy equipment, including food and ammunition, have fallen into our hands.

Before dawn on July 1 several enemy aircraft attempted to attack our transports and screening vessels. These attacks did no damage. Two enemy aircraft were shot down.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Truk Atoll on the night of June 30‑July 1. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. Several enemy fighters made an ineffective attempt to attack our force. Army, Navy and Marine aircraft continued attacks against enemy positions in the Marshall islands on June 30. A Dauntless dive bomber of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing was forced to land in the water near Maloelap Atoll, and the pilot VMS rescued by a Catalina search plane of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two.

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 465, JULY 2, 1944 

The principal components of the expeditionary troops now fighting on Saipan consist of the Second Marine Division, the Fourth Marine Division and the Twenty‑seventh Infantry Division, U.S.A. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 71, JULY 4, 1944 

Garapan and Tanapag Towns on Saipan Island have been captured by our forces in a general advance along the entire front. Our line now extends inland from Tanapag on the west coast of the island, skirts the mountain village of Atchugau in the center, and is anchored on the east coast at a point within four miles of Inagsa Point at the northeast tip of Saipan. During the night of July 2‑3 (West Longitude Date) a small force of Japanese attacked our lines from the rear. Twenty‑five enemy troops were killed. We suffered no losses. Our troops have buried 7,312 enemy dead.

Carrier aircraft of a fast carrier task group attacked Iwo Jima Island on July‑2 (West Longitude Date). Thirty‑nine enemy fighters which attempted to intercept our force were shot down, and 16 were probably shot down. In­complete reports indicate 24 enemy aircraft were destroyed or damaged on the ground. Two small vessels were strafed, and bomb hits were obtained on a fuel dump.

Rota Island was bombed by carrier aircraft and shelled by light Naval surface units on July 2. Runways and revetments were hit. A huge explosion was caused by a hit apparently in an ammunition dump.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Truk Atoll during day­light on July 1 and at night on July 2. In the attack on July 1 seven enemy fighters intercepted our force. Four enemy aircraft and two Liberators were damaged. All our planes returned. No effective opposition was encountered on July 2. Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing attacked enemy positions in the Marshall Islands on July 1 and 2. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 72, JULY 4, 1944 

Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands and Haha Jima in the Bonin Islands were heavily attacked by carrier aircraft of a fast carrier task group on July 3 (West Longitude Date). Iwo Jima, in addition to being severely bombed and strafed, was shelled by cruisers and destroyers. Rocket fire from carrier aircraft was extensively employed at both objectives.

Preliminary reports indicate the following damage to the enemy:

Three destroyers sunk or beached.
One large cargo ship sunk.
One medium oiler sunk.
One destroyer, dead in the water and burning.
Several small cargo ships damaged.
Harbor installations and warehouses at Haha Jima were set afire by bombs, rockets, and machine gun fire.
Twenty‑five enemy planes were shot down by our aircraft, and an undetermined number damaged on‑‑the ground. We lost six planes.
There was no damage to any of our surface craft.

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JULY 5, 1944 

REMARKS BY SECRETARY OF THE NAVY AT PRESS CONFERENCE 

You have the news review for this week. I would like to make these further observations: 

The Navy's desire is to present the news of the war so far as Naval action is concerned as realistically as is humanly possible. It is desired that news be angled neither optimistically nor pessimistically; any such attempt carries the implication that the people of the country are not able to place proper evaluation upon events of the war. The Navy does not believe that to be the case.

At the conclusion of a recital of news such as has been related today, I am always struck by the fact that the net impression left is a distinctly favorable one; the cumulative effect of such impressions cannot but lead sub­consciously to the conclusion that the war is relatively close to being over.

That is not the case. I am saying that as much to myself as to you. What is happening now is that, logistically speaking, we are getting close to the place where we can force the enemy in the Pacific to stand up and fight; but I have no illusions but that the fighting which the enemy will do when he is cornered will be bitter and costly. In battering down the outer rim of Japanese defenses we have been successful, and that work has gone at a somewhat faster pace than had been hoped for. The main battles, however, which will be necessary before Japanese power can be destroyed are still to come. It is likely that these final battles will occur on land, and that means the application of infantry power with all of the accompanying elements of assault over vast areas.

The war in the Pacific goes well, but it is a long war. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 529, JULY 5, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of 17 vessels, including two combatant ships, as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters, as follows:

1 light cruiser
1 destroyer
2 medium tankers
5 medium cargo transports
3 small cargo vessels
1 large cargo transport
3 medium cargo vessels
1 small cargo transport

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqués. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 73, JULY 6, 1944 

Reports from a fast carrier task group which attacked Chichi Jima in the Bonin Islands on July 3 (West Longitude Date) and participated in the attack on Haha Jima the same day indicate the following additional damage to the enemy

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A group of several enemy ships located eighty miles northwest of Chichi Jima was attacked, resulting in the sinking of two destroyer escort type vessels and damage to a medium cargo ship. At Chichi Jima the following results were obtained:

One small oiler, one medium ammunition ship and one medium cargo ship, sunk. One minelayer, one trawler and four luggers probably sunk. One large cargo ship, three medium cargo ships, one small cargo ship, two small oilers, one minelayer and one destroyer damaged. Several were beached.

At Haha Jima two small cargo ships and nine luggers were damaged. Buildings and defense installations were bombed at both objectives. Nine enemy aircraft were shot down, and three were damaged on the ground. In these strikes we lost five pilots and four aircrewmen from seven of our aircraft which failed to return.

Pagan Island in the Marianas was attacked by carrier aircraft on July 4 (West Longitude Date). The runway at the airfield and adjacent buildings were bombed and strafed.

Barracks and supply facilities at Guam Island were bombed by carrier aircraft on July 4, starting large fires. We lost one plane from intense anti­aircraft fire.

Search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, Group One, bombed gun positions at Marpi Point on Saipan Island on July 4, strafed the airfields at Tinian Island and bombed defense installations.

Forty tons of bombs were dropped on Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on July 4, hitting antiaircraft positions and objectives near the airfield. Five enemy aircraft were in the air but did not attempt to inter­cept our force. Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers on the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing continued to neutralize enemy positions in the Marshalls on July 4. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 74, JULY 7, 1944 

Our ground forces on Saipan have continued advancing against strong opposition. On the eastern side of the island our line has reached a point less than two miles from Inagsa Point on the northeast tip of Saipan, and extends laterally across the island to a western anchor slightly more than four miles from Marpi Point on the northwest tip. A force of approximately 200 of the enemy attempted to evacuate from the northwest coast of Saipan in barges on the night of July 4‑5 (West Longitude Date). The formation was broken up by artillery fire. Our troops have buried 8,914 enemy dead.

Aircraft of our fast carrier task force attacked Guam and Rota on July 5 and 6 (West Longitude Date). Airstrips and other ground installations were worked over with bombs, rockets, and machine gun fire. At Rota one enemy plane was destroyed on the ground, and two were damaged. There was no enemy interception at either objective. We lost two fighters. The pilot of one was rescued.

During July 5, Seventh Army Air Force Liberators attacked Moen, in the Truk group, with 30 tons of bombs. On the same day Corsairs and Dauntless dive bombers of Group One, Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing attacked Wotje, Jaluit, and Taroa in the Marshall Islands. We lost no planes.

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 75, JULY 8, 1944 

Before dawn on July 6 (West Longitude Date) several thousand Japanese troops launched a desperate counterattack directed against the left flank of our line on Saipan Island. In this attack our lines along the western shore were penetrated up to 2,000 yards, and the enemy reached the outskirts of Tanapag Town. The counterattack was halted before noon, and our troops began to push the enemy back. In this assault the fighting was very severe and numerous casualties were incurred. It is estimated 1,500 Japanese troops were killed. Meantime on the right flank our forces continued their advance and are now a little more than a mile from the airfield at Marpi Point.

Small groups of enemy planes raided our positions on Saipan before dawn on July 6 and on the night of July 6‑7. Bombs were also dropped near some of our ships but did no damage. One enemy plane was shot down. Isely Field on Saipan was shelled by shore batteries on Tinian Island before dawn on July 6 but the enemy batteries were quickly silenced by destroyer and artillery fire.

Supplementing Communiqué Number 72, it has been determined that 32 enemy aircraft were destroyed and 96 damaged on the ground by our carrier aircraft in attacks on Chichi Jima and Haha Jima on July 3.

Nineteen of the aircraft destroyed and 34 of those damaged were two-engine bombers.

Some of this total may have been damaged in previous strikes by our aircraft.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force dropped 43 tons of bombs at the Dublon Island naval base in Truk Atoll on July 6. Five of approximately 12 enemy fighters which attempted to intercept our force were shot down. Three of our aircraft received minor damage.

Nauru Island was bombed by Liberator and Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force on July 6. Incendiary bombs started fires visible for 30 miles.

Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Air­craft Wing attacked Wotje and Maloelap Atolls on July 6, bombing and straf­ing remaining enemy defense installations. 

JOINT STATEMENT, JULY 9, 1944

The following statement on submarine warfare has been approved by the President and the Prime Minister.

"Hitler's submarine fleet failed on all counts in June 1944. Not only were the U‑boats unable to halt the United Nations' invasion of the continent, but their efforts to prevent the necessary supplying of our constantly growing Allied Army in Europe were made completely ineffective by our counter‑measures.

"The U‑boats apparently concentrated to the west of the invasion during the month, relatively few of them being disposed over the Atlantic. Their sinking of United Nations' merchant vessels reached almost the lowest figure of the entire war. For every United Nations' merchant vessel sunk by German submarines, several times as many U‑boats were sent to the bottom."

The President has also approved the recommendation of the Prime Minis‑ 

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ter that the following additional special communiqué be released with the U‑boat statement: 

"Thousands of Allied ships have been moved across the Channel to Normandy and coastwise to build up the Military Forces engaged in the liberation of Europe. No merchant vessel of this vast concourse has been sunk by U‑boat with the possible exception of one ship. In this case doubt exists as to her destruction by U‑boat or mine.

"This is despite attempts by a substantial force of U‑boats to pass up‑channel from their bases In Norway and France. Such attempts were of course expected and U. S. and British Air Squadrons of coastal com­mand, working in cooperation with the surface forces of the Allied Navies, were ready.

"From the moment that the U‑boats sailed from their bases they were attacked by aircraft of coastal command. Both aircraft and surface forces followed up sighting reports, hunting and attacking the U‑boats with relentless determination.

"The enemy were thus frustrated by the brilliant and unceasing work of coastal command and the tireless patrols of the surface forces and have suffered heavy casualties.

"Operations continue." 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 76, JULY 9, 1944 

Our forces have completed the conquest of Saipan. Organized resistance ended on the afternoon of July 8 (West Longitude Date) and the elimination of scattered, disorganized remnants of the enemy force is proceeding rapidly.

Aircraft of our fast carrier task force attacked Guam and Rota on July 7‑8 (West Longitude Date). Runways, antiaircraft batteries, coastal defense guns and barracks were subjected to rocket fire and bombing. On July 7 nine enemy fighters apparently attempting to fly from Guam to Yap Island were shot down by our combat air patrol. Six twin‑engine enemy aircraft were destroyed on the ground and two were probably destroyed near Agana Town at Guam. We lost one fighter and one torpedo bomber in these raids.

Twenty‑two tons of bombs were dropped on Truk Atoll on the night of July 7‑8 by Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force. There was no Inter­ception, and all of our planes returned safely.

During July 7 Mille, Jaluit, Taroa, and Wotje were harassed by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, and a search Catalina of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two, attacked Taroa before dawn on July 7. We lost no planes. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 77, JULY 10, 1944 

Guam Island was shelled by light surface units of the Pacific Fleet on July 8 (West Longitude Date). Defense positions And buildings were dam­aged, and several small craft along the beaches were hit.

Carrier aircraft of a fast carrier task group attacked Guam and Rota island on July 9. At Guam military objectives at Piti Town were hit, and antiaircraft batteries and coastal guns bombed. Antiaircraft fire ranged from moderate to intense. One of our aircraft made a water landing and a de­stroyer rescued the crew. At Rota Island rockets and bombs were used

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against objectives in Rota Town and the airstrip, and gun emplacements were strafed.

Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force bombed Truk Atoll on July 8. Several enemy aircraft were in the air but did not press home an attack. One Liberator received minor damage from moderate antiaircraft fire. Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing attacked Jaluit, Maloelap and Wotje in the Marshalls on July 9. 

JULY 11, 1944 

SUBMARINE LOST IN PACIFIC DURING TRAINING EXERCISES 

The U. S. submarine S‑28 recently was accidentally lost in the Pacific while engaged in training exercises.

The depth of water makes it impossible to salvage the submarine and hope has been abandoned for the recovery of the missing personnel.

An investigation is now in progress to determine the available facts in the case.

There were no survivors. The next of kin of casualties have been notified. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 78, JULY 11, 1944 

Mopping up operations continued on Saipan on July 9 (West Longitude Date). Small segments of enemy troops continued to make futile attacks against our forces and were killed or driven into temporary refuge to be hunted down later. Many of the enemy survivors who had been driven into the sea on the night of July 8 were found in the hulks of ships wrecked offshore and killed or captured. A number of the enemy found swimming in the sea were made prisoners.

Light surface units of the Pacific Fleet shelled Guam Island on July 9.

Our shore‑based fighters attacked Pagan Island in the Marianas on July 7. Antiaircraft fire was intense. The enemy made no attempt to intercept our force.

Paramushiru and Shimushu Islands in the Kuriles were bombed by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four before dawn on July 10. Sev­eral fires were started. Antiaircraft fire was light, and all of our planes re­turned without damage.

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators before dawn on July 10. Antiaircraft positions on Moen Island were bombed. Anti­aircraft fire was meager and no interception was attempted. Mitchell bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force, Dauntless dive bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing, conducted further neutralization raids against enemy positions in the Marshall Islands on July 9. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 79, JULY 12, 1944 

Mopping up operations and elimination of snipers continued on Saipan Island during July 10 and 11 (West Longitude Dates). One Marine regiment killed 711 enemy troops on July 10. Our forces have now captured more than 1,000 enemy troops who have been made prisoners of war, and have interned more than 8,000 civilians.

Guam and Rota Islands were attacked by carrier aircraft of a fast car‑ 

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rier task group on July 10. Military installations at Agana, Umatac, and Agat Towns on the western shore of Guam Island were bombed and subjected to rocket fire. Buildings near Orote Point were also hit. At Rota Island runways and defense installations were bombed. One twin‑engine enemy bomber was shot down. There was no attempt at fighter interception. Anti­aircraft fire was moderate.

Fifty tons of bombs were dropped by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on July 10 at the Dublon Island Naval Base in Truk Atoll. No interception was attempted and antiaircraft fire was meager. Neutralization raids against enemy positions In the Marshalls were carried out by the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and Fleet Air Wing Two on July 10. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 530, JULY 13, 1944

European Theater. 

1. In Allied operations for Europe's Liberation the following U. S. Naval ships were lost due to enemy action:

USS Tide (minesweeper)
USS Partridge (fleet tug)
USS Susan B. Anthony (transport)
USS Meredith (destroyer)
USS Glennon (destroyer)
USS Corry (destroyer)
USS Rich (destroyer escort) 

2. Notification has been made to next of kin of all casualties. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 80, JULY 13, 1944 

Guam Island was shelled by cruisers and destroyers of the Pacific Fleet on July 10 and 11 (West Longitude Dates). Gun emplacements, blockhouses, and warehouses were hit. Five barges were sunk. There was no damage to our surface ships.

Guam and Rota Islands were attacked by carrier aircraft of a fast car­rier task group on July 11 and 12. Rockets and bombs were employed against defense installations and runways at Rota Island on July 11. Many fires were started. At Guam military objectives near Piti were hit, and gun em­placements were strafed. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. We lost one plane.

Truk Atoll was bombed by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators at night on July 11. Antiaircraft positions were principal targets. Several enemy planes were in the air but did not attempt to intercept our force. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 81, JULY 13, 1944 

Elements of the Second Marine Division landed on Maniagassa Island ap­proximately two miles north of Mutcho Point on Saipan Island on July 12 (West Longitude Date). Light resistance encountered was quickly over­come. Elimination of the remnants of Japanese resistance continues on Saipan island, and additional prisoners have been taken. Enemy dead which have been buried, by our troops now number nearly 16,000 with a good many yet to be buried. Artillery bombardment and Naval gunfire intended to neutralize enemy defenses is being directed against Tinian Island. 

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It was learned on Saipan that July 7 (West Longitude Date) Vice Ad­miral Chuichi Nagumo, Commander in Chief of the Central Pacific Area for the Imperial Japanese Navy, was among those who met their deaths on Saipan Island. On the same day one Rear Admiral Yano lost his life. Vice Admiral Nagumo was in command of the Japanese forces which attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941; and was in command of the Japanese carrier task force that was destroyed in the Battle of Midway. Prior to his present duty he was commandant of the Sasebo naval base.

It is now clear that Saipan Island was built up by the Japanese as the principal fortress guarding the southern approaches to Japan and as a major supply base for Japan's temporary holdings in the South Seas area. Saipan was long the seat of the Japanese government for the mandated Marianas, and Garapan Town was the headquarters of the Commander in Chief, Central Pacific Area. The topography of the island lent itself well to defense, and elaborate fortifications manned by picked Japanese troops testify to the im­portance which the enemy attached to the island. The seizure of Saipan con­stitutes a major breach in the Japanese line of inner defenses, and it is our intention to capitalize upon this breach with all means available. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 474, JULY 15, 1944 

Guam and Rota Islands were attacked by carrier aircraft of a fast carrier task group on July 13 (West Longitude Date). Bombs and rockets set fire to buildings and ammunition dumps, and damaged storage facilities, gun positions, and other defense installations. We lost no aircraft. One of our destroyers sank a small enemy coastal transport near Guam during the night of July 10‑11.

Liberator bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Truk Atoll on July 12. Defense installations at Eten and Dublon Islands were the princi­pal targets. Sixteen to 19 enemy fighters attempted to intercept our force. Four fighters were shot down, four were probably shot down, and five were damaged. Four of our aircraft received minor damage. Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing bombed and strafed enemy positions in the Marshall Islands on July 11 and 12. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 475, JULY 15, 1944 

Guam Island was shelled by units of the Pacific Fleet and bombed by carrier aircraft on July 14 (West Longitude Date). Gun emplacements and the airfield at Orote were principal targets. Four enemy aircraft were de­stroyed on the ground. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered.

Mitchell medium bombers of the Seventh Army Air Force and Liberator search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, bombed Nauru Island on July 13. Orro Town was hit and several fires started. Moderate antiaircraft fire was en­countered. Truk Atoll was bombed on July 13 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Antiaircraft positions on Dublon and Moen Islands were hit. Several enemy fighters were in the air but failed to press home their attacks. On the same day Seventh Army Air Force Liberators bombed Ponape Island, and remaining enemy positions in the Marshalls were attacked by Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing.

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CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 476, JULY 16, 1944 

Guam Island was attacked on July 15 (West Longitude Date) by air­craft of a fast carrier task group. Bombs and rockets destroyed or damaged buildings and caused fires among bivouac areas. A dive bomber was shot down but landed in the water two miles off Guam where the crew was picked up by one of our destroyers.

On July 15 rocket‑firing carrier planes attacked ground installations on Rota Island. Fires were started and a direct hit scored on a concentration of automotive and railroad equipment.

Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands was attacked July 13 by low flying Liberators of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two. A Japanese destroyer was hit squarely by a 500‑pound bomb. Explosions and fires resulted after one 6,000‑ton and one 3,000‑ton cargo ship were strafed. A destroyer escort, a coastal ship and 12 smaller craft were heavily strafed. An oil dump was set afire and five other fires were started. Three Japanese airplanes on the ground at the time of the attack on the south field were believed destroyed and 10 damaged by strafing. There was no enemy airborne interception. Intense antiaircraft fire slightly damaged one of our planes.

Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing Corsair fighters and Dauntless dive bombers bombed Japanese antiaircraft and coastal gun positions in the Marshall Islands on July 14. Gun emplacements were strafed. Meager antiaircraft fire damaged one of our planes. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 477, JULY 17, 1944 

Gun emplacements and other defense installations on Guam Island were heavily shelled by battleships, cruisers, and destroyers of the Pacific Fleet on July 15 (West Longitude Date). Enemy shore batteries returned sporadic fire but did no damage to our surface ships.

On July 16 aircraft of a fast carrier task group obtained direct hits on an airfield at Rota Island, bombed barracks, and destroyed a bridge. On the same day Guam was subjected to further carrier aircraft attacks, resulting in damage to antiaircraft positions, barracks, and a radio station. Several fires were started by incendiary bombs and rockets. We lost one dive bomber in these operations.

Param Island in Truk Atoll was attacked by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on July 15. Hits were obtained on antiaircraft positions. Approxi­mately 10 enemy fighters attempted interception, dropping bombs from above our formation. These bombs were ineffective, but one Liberator received minor damage from machine gun fire. One Zero fighter was probably shot down, and three were damaged. Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing attacked Wotje and Mille Atolls on July 15. Enemy antiaircraft posi­tions were hit. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 478, JULY 18, 1944 

Guam Island was shelled at close range by battleships, cruisers, and destroyers of the Pacific Fleet on July 16 (West Longitude Date). Spotting aircraft directing the fire of our heavy units encountered some antiaircraft fire, and these antiaircraft positions were in turn neutralized by our light units.

On Saipan Island a few remaining snipers are being hunted down. As of July 16 our forces had captured 1,620 enemy troops who have been made

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prisoners of war, and have interned 13,800 civilian residents of Saipan, the majority being Japanese. Neutralization of enemy defenses on Tinian Island by Saipan‑based aircraft and field artillery continues. Our destroyers shelled selected targets on Tinian during July 16 and during the night of July 15‑16.

Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Air­craft Wing and Ventura search planes of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two, attacked enemy positions in the Marshalls on July 16. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 531, JULY 19, 1944

Pacific and Far East. 

1. U. S. submarines have reported the sinking of fourteen vessels includ­ing two combatant ships as a result of operations against the enemy in these waters as follows:

1 destroyer
2 small cargo vessels
8 medium cargo vessels
1 medium naval auxiliary
1 small cargo transport
1 escort vessel 

2. These actions have not been announced in any previous Navy Depart­ment communiqué. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 479, JULY 19, 1944 

More than 320 tons of bombs were dropped on Guam Island by carrier aircraft of the fast carrier task force on July 17 (West Longitude Date). Pillboxes, gun emplacements, and other defense installations were knocked out. More than 650 sorties were flown over the target area. On the same day our battleships, cruisers, and destroyers laid down an intense barrage against defensive positions on the island.

On July 18 bombardment of Guam by surface ships continued, and carrier aircraft dropped 148 tons of bombs on antiaircraft guns, search lights, supply areas, and defense works. Several enemy positions were strafed.

Rota Island was attacked with rocket fire and bombing from carrier air­craft on July 17. Nearly 80 tons of bombs were dropped, resulting in large fires among buildings and fuel storage facilities. Aerial reconnaissance in­dicates that Rota Town is virtually destroyed. In this operation we lost one scout bomber.

Army, Navy, and Marine aircraft continued neutralization raids against enemy positions in the Marshall and Caroline Islands on July 17. 

CINCPAC PRESS RELEASE NO. 480, JULY 20, 1944 

More complete reports of the carrier aircraft attack on Guam Island on July 18 (West Longitude Date) raise the tonnage of bombs dropped to 401 from the previous total of 148 announced in Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas Press Release No. 479. Widespread and heavy damage has been done to military objectives on Guam as a result of coordinated aerial bombing and shelling by surface ships.

Pagan Island in the Northern Marianas was bombed twice on July 17. 

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Chichi Jima and Haha Jima in the Bonin Islands were attacked by Libera­tor search planes of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two, on July 18. The attacks were made from low level. Eleven seaplanes were damaged and four coastal vessels were set afire by strafing. At Haha Jima a small cargo ship was sunk. Several fires were started among buildings on the seaplane base. Antiaircraft fire was moderate. All of our aircraft returned.

On Saipan Island shore‑based artillery and aircraft are being used to neutralize enemy defenses on Tinian Island. Selected targets are being shelled from the sea by our light surface units. As of July 17 our forces have buried 19,793 enemy dead.

The Naval base at Dublon Island in Truk Atoll was bombed on July 18 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Two of eight airborne enemy fighters were damaged by our planes. Seven of our planes received some damage, but all returned. Liberators of the Seventh Army Air Force, Catalina search planes of Fleet Air Wing Two, and Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing continued neutralization raids against enemy positions in the Marshalls on July 18.

Amphibious operations for the assault and capture of Saipan Island were directed by Vice Admiral Richmond K. Turner, U. S. Navy Commander Am­phibious Forces, Pacific Fleet. All assault troops engaged in the seizure of Saipan were under command of Lieutenant General Holland McT. Smith, USMC, Commanding General Fleet Marine Forces, Pacific. Major General Sanderford Jarman, U.S.A., has resumed command of Saipan as Island Com­mander. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 82, JULY 21, 1944 

United States Marines and Army assault troops established beachheads on Guam Island on July 20 (West Longitude Date) with the support of carrier aircraft and surface combat units of the Fifth Fleet. Enemy defenses are being heavily bombed and shelled at close range.

Amphibious operations against Guam Island are being directed by Rear Admiral Richard L. Conolly, U. S. Navy.

Expeditionary troops are commanded by Major General Roy S. Geiger, USMC, Commanding General, Third Amphibious Corps.

The landings on Guam are continuing against moderate ground opposition. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 83, JULY 21, 1944 

1. Good beachheads have been secured on Guam Island by Marines and Army troops. Additional troops are being landed against light initial enemy resistance. The troops advancing inland are meeting increasing resistance in some sectors.

On July 19 (West Longitude Date) six hundred and twenty seven tons of bombs and 147 rockets were expended in attacks on Guam by carrier aircraft. Naval gunfire and aerial bombing were employed in support of the assault troops up to the moment of landing, and remaining enemy artillery batteries are being neutralized by shelling and bombing. Preliminary estimates indicate that our casualties are moderate.

2. Liberator search planes of Group One, Fleet Air Wing Two, bombed Haha Jima and Chichi Jima in the Bonin Islands and Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands on July 19 (West Longitude Date). At Iwo Jima the airfield and 

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adjacent installations were hit. At Chichi Jima an enemy destroyer was bombed. Anti‑aircraft fire ranged from moderate to intense. One of our planes was damaged but all returned. 

N. D.  COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 532, JULY 22, 1944 

2. [sic] The submarines USS Trout and USS Tullibee are overdue from patrol and must be presumed to be lost.

2. The next of kin of casualties of the Trout and Tullibee have been so notified. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 84, JULY 22, 1944 

Our troops are making satisfactory progress in both sectors on Guam. We have captured Mount Alifan in the southern area. In the north the roads from Agana to Piti Town are in our hands.

Our northern beach extending from Asan Point to Adelup Point, was under mortar fire during the night of July 20‑21 (West Longitude Date). Before day­light on July 21 the enemy launched a counter attack on the eastern side of our lines in the northern sector which was thrown back after daylight by our troops supported by air, naval, and artillery bombardment. Cabras Island is under our control and about half of it has been occupied.

At the southern beachhead, extending from Agat Town south to Bangi Point, the enemy attempted a counter attack in the early morning of July 21, which was thrown back. In retreating the enemy left behind five tanks and approximately 270 dead.

Initial beachheads on Guam Island were established immediately above and immediately below Orote Peninsula. Troops of the Third Marine Division landed on the northern beach. The First Provisional Marine Brigade landed in the south. Following the Initial assault landings, elements of the Seventy Seventh Infantry Division, U. S. Army, were landed in support of the Marines. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 85, JULY 23, 1944 

Substantial gains were made by our forces on Guam during the night of July 21 and during the day of July 22 (West Longitude Dates). In the north­ern area all of Cabras Island and Piti Town were captured. Attempts made by the enemy during the night of July 21‑22 to infiltrate our lines were re­pulsed. In the southern area Orote Peninsula has been nearly cut off by our forces. Aircraft and Naval gunfire are closely supporting our troops. Our estimated casualties through July 22 are as follows: Killed in action 348; wounded in action 1500; missing in action 110.

Intense artillery and Naval gunfire was directed against Tinian Island on July 21. Enemy gun positions and troop concentrations were principal targets. On the same day Thunderbolt fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force attacked Tinian and Pagan Islands. At Tinian gun emplacements and pill­boxes were bombed. At Pagan the airstrip was bombed and strafed. Intense antiaircraft fire over Pagan damaged two of our aircraft.

Seventy‑five tons of bombs were dropped on airfields and dock areas at Truk Atoll on July 21 by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators. Fires and explosions were observed. Two airborne enemy fighters did not attempt to intercept our force. Antiaircraft fire was meager. 

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 86, JULY 24, 1944 

Assault troops of the Second and Fourth Marine Divisions established beachheads on Tinian Island on July 23 (West Longitude Date) supported by carrier and land‑based aircraft and by artillery and Naval gunfire.

Amphibious operations against Tinian Island are being directed by Rear Admiral Harry W. Hill, U. S. Navy, Commander Group Two Amphibious Forces Pacific Fleet.

Expeditionary troops are commanded by Major General Harry Schmidt, USMC, Commanding General Fifth Amphibious Corps.

The landings are being continued against light ground opposition. 

JULY 24, 1944 

GROWTH OF THE NAVY 

The United States Navy on August 18, 1944, will triple the number of combatant ships it had in the fleet on July 1, 1940, with the completion of the destroyer escort USS Grady.

When the Navy began its intensive building program in July, 1940, it had in the fleet 383 combatant ships. Completion of the Grady, barring any addi­tional combat losses and failure to complete any of the ships listed for com­pletion before August 18, will triple this total.

Total vessels of all types in the Navy have increased much more rapidly due principally to the addition of numerous amphibious vessels. On June 30, 1944, the Navy had more than ten times the number of craft of all classes, exclusive of small landing craft and small yard and district craft, than it had in commission on July 1, 1940. During the fiscal year which closed June 30, 1944, the number of Naval craft of all types approximately doubled.

The number of Navy planes on hand at the close of the last fiscal year was almost 20 times the number on hand on July 1, 1940. The number of planes on hand more than doubled during the 1943‑44 fiscal year.

The Navy had no advance base program actively under way on July 1, 1940. From a modest beginning late in 1940, the advance base program has now grown to one of the Navy's major activities. The value of work in place at Navy advance bases more than doubled during the fiscal year just closed.

While the ship, plane and advance base programs doubled during the 1943‑44 fiscal year, the enlisted personnel of the Navy increased by only 73 per cent. Allowing for the increase in personnel which the President has authorized and which was announced July 23, the enlisted strength of the Navy as of June 30, 1943, will not double until June 30, 1945‑almost a year hence. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 87, JULY 24, 1944 

Enemy forces on Orote Peninsula, on Guam Island, have been completely cut of by troops of the First Provisional Marine Brigade, and the Seventy-Seventh Infantry Division which advanced during July 23 (West Longitude Date) across the base of the peninsula. In the northern sector, the Third Marine Division has made additional gains against strong enemy opposition which continues despite heavy casualties inflicted by our ground troops and intense air and Naval bombardment.

In the North our lines as of 6:00 P.M., July 23, extend northeast from the mouth of the Sasa River to Adelup Point and extend inland approximately

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2900 yards at the point of deepest penetration. In the south our lines extend from the inner reaches of Apra Harbor to a point opposite Anae Island. The greatest depth of advance is approximately 5000 yards.

Rota Island was attacked by carrier aircraft on July 23. Runways and adjacent installations were principal targets. Ponape in the Caroline Islands was bombed on July 22, by Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells. Gun positions were bombed and harbor installations strafed.

Shimushu Island in the northern Kuriles was attacked on July 22, by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four. A large fire was started near the airfield. Moderate antiaircraft fire was encountered. Eight enemy fighters intercepted our force and caused some damage to a Ventura. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 88, JULY 24, 1944 

A firm beachhead had been secured on the northwest shore of Tinian Island by troops of the Second and Fourth Marine Divisions. Our forces control approximately two and one half miles of coastline, extending from a point twenty five hundred yards south of Ushi Point to a point twelve hundred yards north of Faibus San Hilo Point. During July 23 (West Longitude Date) enemy resistance was confined largely to machine gun and rifle fire. Our casu­alties through July 23 were light. The situation is considered well in band. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 89, JULY 25, 1944 

1. On July 24 (West Longitude Date) contact was established between patrols from the northern and southern assault forces on Guam Island, along the eastern shore of Apra Harbor. In the northern sector good progress has been made and pockets of resistance near Adelup Point have been wiped out. In the north our lines now extend from Adelup Point in a general south­westerly direction to the mouth of the Aguada River. In the southern sector our lines extend across the base of the Orote peninsula to a point opposite Anae Island. Carrier aircraft and naval surface units continue to bomb and shell selected targets and are interfering with troop movements in the rear of the enemy lines. Our casualties through July 24 were 443 killed in action, 2366 wounded in action, and 209 missing in action. Our forces have counted 2400 enemy dead.

2. The Tinian beachhead was broadened and deepened during July 24. An enemy counter attack before dawn on July 24 was broken up by our troops, inflicting heavy casualties on the enemy and destroying five tanks. At mid­morning our forces began an attack, preceded by heavy artillery and Naval fire support, which advanced our lines half way across the northern end of the island and widened the coastal area under our control to a distance of 3 1/2 miles. Our casualties through July 24 were 15 killed in action and 225 wounded. Our troops have counted 1324 enemy dead.

3. Paramushiru in the Kurile Islands was attacked by Ventura search planes of Fleet Air Wing Four on July 23. An airfield was bombed and fires started. Several fishing vessels offshore were strafed. Enemy fighters inter­cepted our force and damaged one of our planes. One enemy fighter was probably shot down and another damaged.

4. Sixty seven tons of bombs were dropped on Truk Atoll by Seventh Army Air Force Liberators on July 23. Waterfront installations, warehouses,

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CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 90, JULY 26, 1944 

An attack launched by our forces on Tinian Island in the early morning of July 25 (West Longitude Date) resulted in rapid advances and the entire northern quarter of the island is now in our hands. Our line is anchored below Faibus San Hilo Point on the west coast and extends to Asiga Point on the east coast. During the day one of our battleships located and knocked out several camouflaged blockhouses. Selected targets continue to be bombed and strafed by our aircraft. Our troops have counted 1,958 enemy dead.

Saipan‑based Thunderbolt fighters of the Seventh Army Air Force, sup­porting ground operations, dropped fire bombs and strafed troop areas, a rail­road junction, coastal guns and barracks on Tinian Island on July 24. Other Thunderbolts attacked Pagan Island, in the Northern Marianas, scoring bomb hits on the airfield and taxiways.

Carrier aircraft continued support bombing of Guam, attacking Japanese ground installations on July 25, and also bombed enemy positions on Rota Island.

Seventh Army Air Force Mitchells attacked Jokaj Island in the Ponape group on July 23. On July 24 a single Liberator bombed Truk, starting fires visible for 30 miles. On the same day, fighter‑bombers and light‑bombers of the Fourth Marine Aircraft Wing and medium bombers of Fleet Air Wing Two raided bivouac areas, antiaircraft and coastal gun positions on the Japanese‑held islands in the Marshalls. A Navy Ventura bombed Nauru Island on July 24. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 91, JULY 26, 1944 

Enemy forces cut off on Orate Peninsula on Guam Island made desperate attempts to escape during the night of July 24‑25 (West Longitude Date) but did not succeed in penetrating our lines. On the morning of July 25, our forces counterattacked, supported by intense artillery and Naval gunfire and bombing, and drove about 3,000 yards up the peninsula. We now control the southern half of the peninsula, with the remainder of the defenders trapped on the northern portion.

Our northern and southern forces have joined their lines and now domi­nate the area on the west coast between Adelup Point on the north and to a point opposite Anae Island on the south.

Our counterattack on Orate Peninsula destroyed at least 12 enemy tanks. The Japanese lost 400 dead in their attempt to break out of their trap on the peninsula. 

CINCPAC COMMUNIQUÉ NO. 92, JULY 27, 1944 

United States Marines continued their advance on Tinian Island on July 26 (West Longitude Date), and now control the northern one third of the island, including Mount Lasso, the island's commanding height. Our lines extend diagonally southeast across the island from a point south of Faibus San Hilo Point on the west coast to a point several thousand yards north of Masalog Point on the east coast. Light surface units and Seventh Army Air