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United States. 1842. Annual report of the Secretary of the Navy. Washington: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.

Report of the Secretary of the Navy [1842] 

REPORT

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

Navy Department,
December, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to present the following report in relation to this Department:

The home squadron, authorized by the act of the 1st day of August, 1841, has been put in commission, and placed under the command of Commodore Stewart. It is composed of the frigates Independence (the flag ship), now under the command of Captain Stringham; the frigate Constitution, Captain Parker; the steam-frigate Missouri, Captain Newton; the steam-frigate Mississippi, Captain Salter; the sloop Falmouth, Commander Mcintosh; the sloop Vandalia, Commander Ramsay; the brig Dolphin, Commander Knight; and the schooner Grampus, Lieut. Van Brunt.

The original design of this squadron was to cruise along our own coast, with a view to extend the usual protection to our trade; but more particularly to afford assistance to vessels in distress; to make accurate soundings and observations along our shores, from which charts might be formed; to afford vessels of different classes, always ready to take the places of those returning from distant stations; and to perform any occasional service for which vessels of war might be required. Finding, however, that it was unnecessarily large for these purposes, and that active employment could not be given to it, I determined to assign to it the duties of the West India squadron, and to withdraw that squadron from service. This has accordingly been done, and the cruising ground of the home squadron now extends from the banks of Newfoundland to the river Amazon, including the Caribbean sea and gulf of Mexico. This service requires one or two small vessels in addition to those originally assigned to the squadron, and these I propose to add.

It is found that the steamships Missouri and Mississippi are unsuited to cruising in time of peace. Their engines consume so much fuel as to add enormously to their expenses; and the necessity that they should return to port after short intervals of time for fresh supplies, renders it impossible to send them on any distant service. They will be useful vessels in time of war as guards to our coast and harbors, and as auxiliaries in fleets; but they can not be relied on as cruisers, and are altogether too expensive for service in time of peace. I have therefore determined to take them out of commission, and shall substitute for them other and less expensive vessels.

The Independence has not yet gone to sea, owing in part to the fact that her crews have been taken from time to time for other vessels, and in part to the necessary engagements of Commodore Stewart in other services. The rest of the squadron has, under his orders, been kept actively and usefully employed, and promises to answer all the expectations of Congress in establishing it.

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The duties originally contemplated for the home squadron are highly important, and such as require in the commander the best order of qualifications. They do not, however, require so many vessels as the law establishing that squadron authorizes. While, therefore, it is desirable that the squadron should be such as to be worthy of the best professional rank and talent, it is equally desirable that it should not be so large as to have any portion of it inactive. By assigning to it the duties of the West India squadron, and extending the cruising ground to the northern boundary of the cruising ground of the Brazil squadron, the larger vessels may be kept on constant duty to windward. In the meantime, the smaller vessels may, in like manner, be employed in the Caribbean sea and gulf of Mexico, where the harbors are too shallow to admit those of larger size. The impossibility of beating up the coast against the tradewinds and gulf stream, suggests the propriety of assigning two or three steam-vessels of medium size to that duty. These would afford a sufficient protection to our commerce, while they would serve to keep up the necessary intercourse between the commander of the squadron and that portion of it destined to service in the gulf of Mexico. Without the aid of steam, that intercourse could not well be maintained; for a vessel, not propelled by steam, entering the gulf of Mexico from the windward, could not regain her position without a tedious and dangerous passage through the gulf of Florida.

The duties thus contemplated for the home squadron will afford full employment for it, except during the hurricane season, when it would not be prudent for it to keep the sea except in the northern part of its cruising ground.

The Brazil squadron consists of the Delaware (74), Captain McCauley; the frigate Columbia, Captain E. R. Shubrick; the sloops-of-war Concord, Commander Boerum; John Adams, Commander Conover; Decatur, Commander Farragut; and the schooner Enterprise, Lieut. J. P. Wilson; all under the command of Commodore Morris. This squadron, I have every reason to believe, has distinguished itself for good order, discipline, and constant and strict attention to all the appropriate duties and exercises of squadron service. I have also the pleasure to report that the interests of our citizens committed to the care of Commodore Morris, have been fully protected and secured; and that our relations with the countries within the range of his command have been preserved on the most favorable and honorable footing.

After the return of the frigate Brandywine, in July last, the squadron in the Mediterranean consisted of only two sloops-of-war, the Fairfield, Commander Tattnall, and the Preble, Commander Voorhees, under the command of Commodore Morgan. I regret to say that Commander Voorhees died at Smyrna, on the 27th July last; he was an officer of a high order of merit, and his death is a serious loss to his country. The Preble is now under the command of Commander Nicholson, and Commander Bigelow has succeeded Commander Tattnall, who has returned to the United States.

On the 15th of July last, the frigate Congress, Captain P. F. Voorhees, sailed for the Mediterranean; and on the 29ih day of August last, the Columbus 74, Captain Spencer, was despatched to the same station. The squadron now consists of the Columbus, Congress, Fairfield, and Preble, all under the command of Commodore Morgan. Orders have been given, however, assigning to Commodore Morris the command of the Mediterranean squadron, and to Commodore Morgan that of the Brazil squadron.

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This exchange is made in execution of a plan which I propose for the management of all our squadrons, and of which I shall speak more at large in a subsequent part of this report.

Our relations with the countries of the Mediterranean have been preserved on the most friendly footing, with the single exception of the empire of Morocco. Inconsequence of an outrage, offered by a subordinate officer of that Government, to the late consul of the United States, Mr. Carr, it was deemed necessary to call on the higher authorities to disavow the act, and to punish the aggressor. This was promptly done by Commodore Morgan, and after many delays and much unnecessary formality on the part of the Emperor, ample redress was afforded by the public disavowal of the offence, and the dismissal of the offending officer. Commodore Morgan appears to have conducted this affair with much skill and address, asserting with proper firmness the respect due to our flag, and yet claiming nothing in an arrogant or dictatorial spirit. I have every reason to be satisfied with the part he has borne in this delicate transaction. The friendly relations between the two countries are now restored.

The squadron in the Pacific consists of the frigate United States, Captain Armstrong, sloop Cyane, Commander Stribling, sloop Yorktown, Lieutenant Nicholas, sloop Dale, Commander Dornin, and the schooner Shark, Lieutenant Engle, all under the command of Commodore T. Ap. C. Jones. The St. Louis, Commander Forrest, returned on the 16th September last, and her place has not yet been supplied.

Nothing has occurred, since my last report, to interrupt the friendly relations of our country with the nations bordering on the Pacific coast of America. Our squadron has, at all times, ably and faithfully performed its duty; but it is much too small to render all the services expected of it, in that remote region. Every part of that vast ocean is traversed by our trading vessels, and in every part of it the protection of our naval flag is consequently required. The few ships allowed even to the largest squadron that we have ever sent to the Pacific, are not enough to guard our whaling interest alone. It can scarcely be expected that five or six vessels, most of which are of the smallest class, can properly protect our commerce and our people, along a coast of three thousand miles in extent, and throughout an ocean four thousand miles wide. I respectfully suggest that too little attention has heretofore been paid to the important interests of our country in the Pacific ocean. There is at this time, a stronger necessity than ever, for more strict vigilance and more active exertion on our part, to prevent other nations from subjecting our trade to injurious restrictions and embarrassments. The English settlers have, by their enterprise, nearly engrossed the trade from the Columbia river to the islands, so that our countrymen are as effectually cut off from it, as if they had no rights in that quarter. The people of various countries are rapidly forming settlements all along the shores of the Pacific, from Columbia river to the gulf of California; and this, too, with the countenance and support of their respective Governments. In the meantime, we are doing literally nothing for our own interests in that quarter. To those of our people who are inclined to settle there, we do not even hold out the encouragement of a reasonable expectation that we will protect them against the violence and injustice of other nations. A few small vessels, scarcely as many as we ought to keep constantly upon the coast of each of the South American nations on the Pacific—these, too, charged with duties which twice their number would not be able to perform, can offer but little

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aid or support to the infant settlements of our people, remote from each other, and demanding the constant presence of some protecting power. There are many considerations, connected with this subject, of deep importance in themselves, but which belong rather to other departments of the Government than to this. I advert to them only so far as to justify me in recommending a very large increase of the Pacific squadron.

In the East Indies we have only two ships; the frigate Constellation, Captain Kearny, commanding the squadron, and the sloop-of-war Boston, Commander Long. It is owing more to our good fortune than to our strength, that our commerce has suffered no material interruption. That little squadron has done all that could have been expected of it, and it deserves much credit for its great vigilance and activity, and for the prudence and sound discretion with which Commodore Kearny has acquitted himself of the important trusts reposed in him.

On the coast of Africa we have no squadron. The small appropriation of the present year was believed to be scarcely sufficient to answer the pressing demands of more important stations; and hence no vessel has been equipped expressly for the African seas. The sloop-of-war Vandalia, Commander Ramsay, belonging to the Home Squadron, was assigned to that service in March last, and is still on the coast. The ratification of the treaty with England renders it necessary that a squadron of at least eighty guns should be assigned to that service.

I regret to say that, in consequence of the unprotected condition of our trade on that coast, several of our vessels have been captured by the natives, and their crews barbarously murdered. The last aggression of this sort was upon the schooner Mary Carver, Captain Farwell, in the district of Beribee, ninety miles south of Cape Palmas. Instructions have been given to Commander Ramsay to proceed to that point and demand such reparation as the circumstances of the case may require. This, however, will be at best but little satisfactory, since no chastisement which can be inflicted upon such savages can either do honor to our flag, or prevent other outrages of the like kind. Our commerce with Africa is rapidly increasing, and is well worthy of all the protection which it asks. This protection is to be derived, not from any terror which can be inspired by the destruction of a few miserable villages on the sea beach, but from the presence of armed vessels, able to prevent, as well as to punish, all violations of the rights and laws of fair trade.

I need scarcely add, that our duty in the suppression of the slave-trade can not be discharged without a much larger force on the coast of Africa than we have ever yet maintained there.

The return of the Exploring Squadron, late under the command of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes, has given to the country rich and abundant stores in all the departments of natural history. I am now arranging them, under the authority of a law of the last session of Congress. Lieutenant Wilkes himself is engaged in preparing a narrative of his voyage, and in completing the various charts of the numerous surveys made under his direction. In this work he has, at his own request, the assistance of Lieutenants O. Carr, T. A. Budd, and G. M. Totten, of the navy. I regret that I have no authority to furnish him with the additional aid which he has a right to expect from the scientific corps attached to the expedition. There is no fund under my control out of which a compensation could be paid to them. I respectfully suggest that provision ought to be made for

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this. The country looks with very deep interest for the results of the expedition; and it is due, not less to the officers concerned in it than to the country itself, that they should be fairly and properly laid before the world. It can scarcely be expected that Mr. Wilkes, even with the aid of the few naval officers whose assistance he has asked, can, in any short time, accomplish a task of so much labor; nor is it reasonable to suppose that naval officers, however skilled in what properly belongs to their profession, will be able to perfect the drawings and other mechanical works, and works of art, necessary to prepare this publication in the style contemplated by Congress.

When I had the honor to present to you the usual report from this department, at the commencement of the last session of Congress, I proceeded upon the idea that it was the settled policy of the Government gradually to increase the navy. Notwithstanding the favorable change which has since occurred in our foreign relations, and notwithstanding the present unfavorable condition of the public Treasury, I have seen no reason to believe that this policy is less approved now than heretofore, by the great body of our people. It is true that the circumstances in which we are now placed, render necessary very great modifications of the systems which would otherwise be proper; but the opinion is as general now as it ever has been, that a suitable navy is absolutely necessary to the protection of our trade, the security of our people, and the respectability of our Government. Fortunately, there is nothing in the circumstances of our country to render this in any degree a local question. Apart from the general proposition that what is best for the general interest should be regarded as best for the whole, there is a local and particular interest in nine tenths of our country which demands a respectable naval establishment.

The commercial towns on our seaboard, by which nearly all our foreign and coasting trade is conducted, have so immediate and direct an interest in the subject, as to render unnecessary any remarks upon that point. The various agricultural and manufacturing classes, scattered throughout the country, and connected with, and dependant upon, this trade, have an indirect interest, not less apparent. The great and increasing commerce of the lakes, although less exposed than that of the ocean, is yet far too important to be left undefended, even against the single power which may become its enemy. But the gulf of Mexico has peculiar claims. It is believed that there is not in the world, an equal amount of commercial and agricultural interest belonging to any one country, so much at the mercy of the most inconsiderable maritime force, as is that of the gulf of Mexico. Not only the States which lie immediately on that water, but all those whose streams enter into it, including the vast and fertile region of the Mississippi and its tributary waters, make this their chief channel of commerce. And we may properly add, also, no inconsiderable amount in the article of cotton, sent from Texas by means of the Red river, and paying tribute to our commercial agencies in its transit through our territory. Cotton is the principal material of our trade, both foreign and domestic; it probably constitutes three fourths of our exports, in its raw and manufactured states. Taking the year ending on the 31st August, 1842, it is found that the whole cotton crop amounted to 1,683,574 bales; of which 1,160,389 were shipped from the ports of the gulf of Mexico. Of this crop, 1,465,249 bales were exported to foreign countries; and of these exports, 937,830 bales were from the ports of that gulf. Thus it may be assumed, that two thirds of the most valuable article

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of our commerce, foreign and coastwise, is shipped in the ports of the gulf of Mexico.

In other articles, the productions of the west, the proportion, although perhaps not quite so large, is yet large enough to give peculiar importance to the gulf of Mexico. The tobacco, the iron, the lead, the sugar, the hemp, and the provisions of that great and rich region (and in a few years we may add also its coal) find their way to market chiefly through that single channel. These already form no inconsiderable part of the entire exports of our country, and will, after no long process of time, enter still more largely into our trade, both foreign and domestic. Without pretending to perfect accuracy; we may safely assume that not less than two thirds of the entire commerce of our country, exclusive of the whale fisheries, passes through the gulf of Mexico; and we may, with even more safety, assume, that this proportion will increase from year to year, with the increase of the population and wealth of our western States.

It is to be borne in mind that nearly all this valuable trade, is carried on through the gulf of Florida. I had the honor to present my views upon this subject, in a report which I made to the Senate, during the last session of Congress, but which was not acted on by that body. I respectfully refer to that document, as containing many suggestions connected with this inquiry, which I believe to be not wholly unworthy of public attention. I repeat here, only the well-known fact, that, in consequence of the strength of the gulf stream and trade-winds, there is virtually no passage for our trade eastward, on the south side of the Island of Cuba. It must, of necessity, pass through the Gulf of Florida—a narrow strait which can be effectually blockaded by two active steam-frigates, and probably by one. Even if a trading vessel should pass such a blockading force in the night, it would have but one path open to it for a great distance, and might, of course, be pursued with a certainty of being overtaken. It would not enjoy even the ordinary chances of a vessel escaping from a blockaded port, into a wide and open sea.

The facts to which I have thus adverted, show a striking peculiarity in our condition. The greatest portion of our commerce, confined to a single channel for some hundreds of miles, is exposed, in a peculiar manner, to any enemy having possession of the sea; and, what would render our condition still worse, if we be without a naval force, that commerce may be annihilated, at a cost which would not be felt by any tenth-rate maritime power!

If these views be correct, I am at a loss to perceive what portion of our country is not interested in them. To the States bordering on the gulf of Mexico, and to all those which use the Mississippi river as a channel of trade, the subject is of deep and daily increasing interest. So far as their prosperity depends on the outlet of the various productions of their country, they have but a single question to decide: Is, or is not, their commerce worth the cost of a naval power, adequate to protect it? It has no other protection, and it can not have any other, until its present channels shall be changed.

To these considerations, are to be added others, growing out of the particular character of our Government and institutions, and the exposed condition of our lake and seacoast. On these points, I can only repeat the suggestions offered in my last report. No country in the world has a greater interest than ours to guard itself against invasion. If we are destined to see again the smoke of an enemy's camp, we should, at least, be careful not to allow it to ascend from our own soil. It is, in all respects, better for us to repel an enemy from our coast, than to subdue him after he has landed upon our

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shores. To do this, we must cherish our naval power, not as the institution; of a day or of a year—not as a subject which we can lay aside, and take up again whenever we please, as the policy or the caprice of the moment may dictate, but as a great and permanent institution, worthy of a great people, and demanding the grave attention of Government—an institution resting upon a wise system, and worthy to be maintained in the spirit of a liberal, comprehensive, and stable policy.

These considerations forbid us to fall so far in the rear of other nations, and of the age in which we live, as to surrender our due share of the dominion of the seas. A commerce, such as ours, demands the protection of an adequate naval force. Our people, scattered all over the world, have a right to require the occasional presence of our flag, to give assurance to all nations that their country has both the will and the power to protect them. Our position among the nations is such as to leave us without excuse, if we voluntarily strip ourselves of a power which all other nations are anxious to grasp. Our forms of government and municipal institutions suggest that a naval force is our safest, and, perhaps, our only defence; and, as an additional recommendation, of no small weight, the expenditure which this defence requires, is to be made chiefly among our own people, encouraging their enterprise, invigorating their industry, and calling out the abundant and now almost hidden resources of our country.

If our navy is not to be put down altogether, nor abandoned to neglect and decay, it is high time that it were placed upon some fixed and permanent plan. With a view to this, I respectfully offer the following suggestions:

In the present favorable condition of our foreign relations, promising a long continuance of peace, I can not recommend any considerable appropriation for building new vessels of war. We have already as many vessels as it will be necessary to keep in commission, except, perhaps, in the classes of sloops of war and small brigs and schooners. A few more of these are required, and they can be built out of materials now on hand, at a very small cost. It seems to me to be too obvious to admit of doubt, that our true policy is to apply as much as possible of the appropriations for the general naval service, to the employment of ships in commission.

I hope to be excused for repeating here, an idea thrown out in my last report, and which I am anxious to enforce, because it is the foundation of all sound policy in regard to the navy: it is an easy thing to build a ship of war; it is a difficult thing to qualify an officer to command her. This simple proposition, which every one knows to be true, should never be lost sight of by a nation that does not intend to abandon the ocean altogether. It requires at least five years of strict attention to make a good seaman; and not less than twenty years of active service, in different grades, to form a properly-qualified naval commander. Surely, then, since competent officers can not spring up with every exigency which may require their services, true policy demands that we should keep the requisite number of them in constant training, to be; ready whenever their country shall call for them. The best ship of war is powerless, when unskilfully commanded. We build fleets for our enemies, when we put them in charge of incompetent men.

In order to carry out this idea, it is necessary not only that we should keep more ships in commission than heretofore, but that we should employ them in a different manner. Our squadrons on foreign stations have been generally kept too much in port; have been too little employed in cruising, and too

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seldom exercised in squadron manoeuvres. To remedy this, I propose to establish a system of interchange between the several squadrons; and, with that view, so to arrange them that no ship, except, perhaps, that of the commander-in-chief, shall remain more than one year on the same station. I propose that the squadrons of the Mediterranean and the Brazils shall consist, as near as possible, of the same number and classes of vessels; and that the same equality shall prevail between those of the East Indies and the Pacific. After particular intervals of time, a vessel of the Mediterranean squadron shall be sent to Brazil; and, at the same time, one of the same description from Brazil to the Mediterranean; and so of the squadrons of the East Indies and the Pacific. The advantages of this system are great and obvious:

1. By keeping the ships more at sea, the officers will be more exercised in their proper duties, and will acquire more of the science and practice of their profession.

2. Discipline will be better learned and better enforced, both on officers and crews. It is always relaxed while vessels are in port.

3. The dangerous connexions and fatal habits, so often formed amid the seductions of luxurious ports, will be avoided.

4. Officers will have a better opportunity to become acquainted with different coasts and harbors; with their currents, winds,& c.; with the languages, manners, customs, &c., of different regions of the globe; all which information is indispensable to an accomplished naval commander.

5. The flag of the country will be displayed in different ports, on many different vessels, thereby giving to foreign countries a better idea of the extent of our naval power. Heretofore, the habit of sending the same vessels repeatedly to the same foreign station has produced the impression that wo had no others to send, and has thus detracted from the respect which ought to attach to us as a naval power.

6. Our vessels of war will be! kept constantly in the tracks of our commerce, and be thus ready, on all occasions and in all places to afford to it whatever assistance it may need. In this way, the small force destined for the protection of our African trade, and for the suppression of the slave-trade, may be occasionally strengthened by the presence of vessels of war interchanging between the Mediterranean and the Brazils; But the great interest of our commerce in the Pacific, and particularly that most important part of it, the whale-fisheries, will derive peculiar advantages from this system. At present, most of our whalers rarely see one of our vessels of war although it is well-understood that they often need their protection. Our national ships; crossing the Pacific, should be directed to visit the whaling stations; a process, by which that distant and now neglected part of our commerce may always be within the reach of the protecting arm of their country.

The system thus proposed; will require, in order to prosecute it with all its advantages, larger squadrons than we have heretofore employed. The good effects, however, which may reasonably be expected from it, will, it is hoped, recommend it to adoption. The charge upon the Treasury need not be materially, if at all increased, if the appropriations heretofore made for "increase and repair," should be, as far as possible, for "equipment, pay, and subsistence."

I have caused estimates to be prepared for such squadrons as could, in my opinion, be most usefully and profitably employed in the manner abovementioned. This it is my duty to do, submitting it to Congress to determine whether, under the circumstances of the country, so large a force can properly

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be put in commission, or not. If the condition of the Treasury will warrant it (of which they are the judges), I have no hesitation in earnestly recommending the employment of the largest force estimated for. But, in order that Congress may, without trouble, apportion the appropriation to the force which they are willing to keep in commission, I have caused to be prepared a table, showing the cost of a ship of each class. Thus, the reduction in the estimates may be made in exact proportion to the reduction of the vessels in commission.

Whether it be the pleasure of Congress to authorize a large or a small naval force, the necessity will be the same for placing it on a proper footing. The navy can not be reformed by merely reducing its size. In my report of last year, I invited your attention to a variety of points on which I considered legislation necessary, in order to give due efficiency to this Department, and to correct the abuses existing throughout the whole naval establishment: In my opinion, every reform necessary to place the navy upon the most useful, and at the same time, upon the most economical footing, may be easily effected. With that view I respectfully offer the following suggestions:

So far as the materiel is concerned, nothing is required except fidelity, vigilance, and industry, on the part of those to whom that matter is intrusted,' and such changes in the laws as will insure a proper accountability. A great; deal has already been accomplished in this respect It is confidently believed that the expense of buildings repairing, and equipping, our vessels of war is much less at this time, than it was at any previous period within the last twenty years. This result is attributable, not so much to the head of the Department, as to the steady and zealous efforts of those officers of the navy who have had charge of the navy-yards. Little is now required, except to establish a rigid system of accountability, in every branch of expenditure Much has already been done to attain this object.

The law for the reorganization of this Department has been carried out, as far as has been found practicable. The advantages of this change, in the increased facilities of transacting business, and in the concentration of responsibilities, are manifest: and great I regret to say, however, that the system is yet very imperfect. It is with extreme reluctance that I bring this subject again to your notice; and I should not do so if I were not convinced that it is the wish of Congress to make the work of reform, which they have thus commenced, as perfect as possible. The bill as it, passed the Senate would, it is believed, have proved as complete and effective in its provisioned as could be reasonably expected of any new measure, running so much into details; but the changes which were made in it by the House of Representatives, have produced difficulties and embarrassments in practice, which were not foreseen at the time. The uniting of two bureaux whose duties are wholly distinct, and require a wholly different order of qualifications to discharge them, has been found extremely inconvenient and embarrassing. The Bureau of Construction and Repairs, for example, is charged with duties of the Bureau of Equipment. It requires a ship-carpenter to build or repair a vessel of war; it requires a naval officer to equip her. In like manner, the providing of ordnance and ordnance stores has no natural connexion with hydrographical surveys; and yet these two subjects are intrusted to the same bureau.

It would probably be impossible to find any one man properly qualified to perform all the duties of building, repairing, and equipping, a vessel of war; and although it would not, perhaps, be so difficult to find one compe-

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tent to the duties of the two Bureaux of Ordnance and Hydrography, yet it would probably happen, in most instances, that he, who was best qualified for the one, would be least qualified for the other. Besides, great confusion will necessarily exist, in keeping, by the same set of clerks, the accounts of matters so wholly distinct. The clerical force allowed to these two bureaux is much too small. Indeed, this is true, though not to the same extent, of the other bureau. The severe labors imposed, and the small salaries allowed, are positive discouragements to a zealous and energetic discharge of duty.

In providing a chief of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, the alternative was between a naval captain qualified to equip, and a naval constructor qualified to build and repair. I did not hesitate to prefer the former, and the place is filled by a member of the late Board of Navy Commissioners. But, in uniting the two bureaux, it was, I presume, not perceived that the salary, originally contemplated for the Bureau of Construction and Repairs, was retained. Thus it happens that one of the captains, at the head of a bureau, receives five hundred dollars per annum less than his pay as a captain in command, and less, by the same sum, than is received by each of the captains holding correspondent stations in the Department. This was doubtless not intended, and will be corrected.

I also respectfully suggest that there is no good reason for giving to the chief of the Bureau of Medicine a less salary than is received by others in corresponding positions. He ought to be, and it is presumed always will be, a man of a high order of professional attainments, and general education, holding a social position equal in all respects, to that of any other man. His expenses, of course, will, be as great, and his sacrifices certainly will not he less. Of the importance and utility of this bureau I already have the most satisfactory proof, in the improved organization of the medical department of the service, and in the saving of expense greatly beyond my expectations. An expenditure, twice as large as the bureau now calls for, will be more than twice saved annually, by its services. Its claims, therefore, to the increase of salary which I recommend, are of the strongest character in every respect.

These defects in the law are obvious. Whenever they shall be corrected, it is confidently believed that a system of administration may be established in this Department, as prompt, exact, and efficient, as can be found in any other department of the Government. The acts of the last session, "to establish and regulate the navy ration," and "to regulate the pay of pursers and other officers of the navy," promise the most beneficial results to the economy of the service; and will probably remove many of the difficulties which would otherwise. have existed, in accomplishing all the objects proposed in the reorganization of the Department.

The personnel of the navy is a subject of much deeper interest, although it presents no greater difficulties. That abuses exist, and that the public eye is occasionally offended with displays of disreputable behavior, is not surprising. Such things might be expected in any body of men equally numerous; they are seen every day, in social circles on shore, without affixing to those circles any individual or even general reproach. The navy is as free from such scandals as any equal number of men in any order of society. It is matter of just surprise that it should be so. Withdrawn, in a great degree, by the very nature of their pursuits, from the immediate influence of that public opinion, which is the best corrective of manners, and with a most imperfect

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system of laws and regulations as a substitute for it, what is there, but their own sense of propriety, to prevent naval officers from falling into the worst excesses? For twenty years past, the navy has received from the Government little more than a stepmother's care. It was established without plan, and has been conducted upon no principle, fixed and regulated by law. Left, to get along as well as it could, the wonder is that it retains even a remnant of the character which it won so gloriously during the last war.

Reform, in this particular, must commence with the midshipmen. After a time, these boys become men, and these midshipmen become lieutenants, and commanders, and captains. Hence it is of the utmost importance that none should be appointed, who are not duly qualified, and suited in all respects to that peculiar service. And yet, to this great and fundamental truth, no attention has hitherto been paid. The Department has been left free to appoint whom it pleased, and as many as it pleased, without any law whatever to guide or regulate its judgment. The only rule by which the Secretary can be governed, is to appoint those who are, or who seem to be best recommended; and yet, in half the cases, the boy himself is as well known as those who certify in his favor. Hence the Secretary acts in the dark, and must of necessity be often in error. It is a notorious fact, that wayward and incorrigible boys, whom even parental authority can not control, are often sent to the navy as a mere school of discipline, or to save them from the reproach to which their conduct exposes them on shore. It is not often that skilful officers or valuable men are made out of such materials. The corrective which I propose is this:

1. The naval establishment shall be fixed bylaw; ascertaining, among other things, the number of officers to be allowed in each grade. There must be a due proportion among the several grades, or else it will be impossible that the different duties of the service, can be properly discharged. In this respect, the proviso of the appropriation bill of the last session of Congress, limiting the number of midshipmen to the number who were in service on the 1st of January, 1841, and of other officers to the number who were in service on the 1st of January, 1842, will, if persisted in, prove extremely unfortunate in its action. The precise proportion proper for the effective officering of a ship depends upon her class. We may find in an average of the different ships, a rule near enough to perfect accuracy to afford a safe guide of legislation upon the subject. But this proportion is wholly destroyed by the proviso abovementioned, so that it will be impossible, under that law, to furnish the proper officers for the several stations of our ships of war, supposing any considerable number of our captains and commanders to be employed. The inconvenience of that proviso is already felt, in regard to the medical officers in the service. I had the honor to represent, at the last session, the pressing necessity for an increase of the number of surgeons and assistants. There are not now in service enough to afford the aid which it is the acknowledged duty of the Government to afford to those who are engaged in her service at sea; and yet, whatever may be the necessity for them, their numbers can not be increased. In regard to the forward warrant officers, such as boatswain, carpenter, gunner, &c., the restriction is scarcely less inconvenient. They are appointed only as their services are required, so that there is no danger that their numbers will be inconveniently great. At all events, they should bear a due proportion to the other officers.

2. There should be established proper naval schools on shore. Little or

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no attention has hitherto been paid to the proper education of naval officers. Through a long course of years, the young midshipmen were left to educate themselves and one another; and it is creditable to them that they lost few opportunities of doing so. Suitable teachers are now provided for them, but their schools are kept in receiving ships and cruising vessels, in the midst of a thousand interruptions and impediments, which render the whole system of little or no value. Under such circumstances, the foundation of a solid and useful education can rarely be laid. This subject was brought to the attention of Congress at its last session, and a bill establishing a naval school passed the Senate. It was not acted on by the House of Representatives for want of time. I again earnestly recommend it, convinced as I am that its effect upon the navy will be in the highest degree beneficial. If adopted, Congress will of course prescribe such rules and regulations in regard to it, as may seem to them proper; but respectfully suggest the following as the outline of the system:

The schools shall be established at such of the old military fortifications on the seaboard, as may afford suitable accommodations, and as may not be required by the War Department.

The officers and teachers shall be supplied from those actually in the naval service; and all nautical instruments, boats for practice, & c., shall be furnished from the navy. This will save nearly the whole expense of the schools.

Instruction in the schools shall be given to candidates for admission into the navy, and to midshipmen actually in the service.

The admission of candidates shall be regulated by law, as is done in regard to the West Point academy.

No boy shall receive an acting appointment in the navy, until he shall have passed a certain period of diligent study at a naval school; nor unless he shall produce the necessary certificates from his officers and instructors, of his good conduct, capacity, physical ability, and general fitness.

Among those who shall produce such certificates, appointments shall be made, according to such rule as Congress shall prescribe.

These precautions will afford a reasonable assurance that no boy will be admitted into the navy, without being qualified for, and worthy of, that station. But the watchful care of the Government over him should not stop here. He should receive, in the first instance, an acting appointment, as is now the practice, and not be entitled to a full appointment until he shall have seen at least one year's service at sea, and made suitable progress in the science and practical duties of the service. After receiving his full appointment, he should pass not less than five years in active service at sea, before he should be entitled to examination for a warrant as "passed midshipman." That examination should be rigorous and thorough, and none should be entitled to it who could not produce the most satisfactory proofs of good conduct, attainments, capacity, and general fitness. By this time the boy will have attained a period of life when the character is generally well developed, and in some degree fixed; so that the country will have good reason to trust him in the higher grades of the service. A corps of officers, formed of such materials, would probably present few instances of misconduct or incapacity, and would reflect honor on the country, while rendering to it the most valuable services.

This system could not fail to relieve the personnel of the navy, often time, of all its present incumbrances, and would certainly tend to keep it in

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a healthy condition. But it would be too slow in its operation, for the cure of existing evils. Probably there never was a similar institution in and country, into which abuses have not crept, after so long a period as thirty years of profound peace, and of consequent neglect. Governments and their people are too apt to overlook the military arm, when there is no immediate need of its protection; forgetting the wise maxim, that in peace we should prepare for war. Our navy has experienced its full share of those unfavorable influences; and the natural consequence is seen in the admitted fact, that it contains some officers who do no credit to their commissions. Their number, however, is much smaller than might have been justly expected, under the operation of so many discouraging and corrupting causes. Every nation finds it necessary, after particular intervals peace, to revise and reform its military establishments; and the time has now arrived, when such a corrective may be advantageously, applied to the navy of the United States. The only difficulty is in adopting the right process. To dismiss from the service officers who have committed no positive offence, would be unjust and cruel. The nature of their profession, is such as to disqualify them for nearly all the pursuits of industry on shore. Most of them have been kept long on probation, and have been thus encouraged to expect that they would remain the service. Many of them now have families dependant on them, who would be exposed to great suffering, if the public support should be entirely withdrawn. On the other hand, it is to be borne in mind that the officer stipulates with his country, that he will be both willing and able to perform all the; duties of the station which he solicits and receives at her hand: and he, has, therefore, no, right to complain, that she rejects him when he proved either neglectful or incompetent. Perhaps no more, just rule can be adopted, than to compel the officer to retire, upon a certain proportion of his annual pay. A system; of compulsory furlough, properly regulated, and guarded against abuse, would have the most salutary effect. To lodge such a power in the Secretary of the Navy would probably not be generally acceptable, The natural jealousy which every one feels, of whatever approaches, to arbitrary power, would present a strong objection with most persons, to intrusting so much to the discretion of any one man. For myself, however, I have no doubt that the only danger would be, that the power would be too cautiously and too seldom exerted. Public opinion, in this country, is a sure corrective of all abuses of that sort; and no man, who valued either his reputation or his comfort, would hazard the one or the other by challenging that public opinion for the indulgence of any feeling, unbecoming the impartial justice of his station. Still, however, it is desirable, not only that the Department should be in fact just and impartial, but that the public and the navy officers, should believe it to be so. I propose, therefore, that whenever the Secretary of the Navy shall be of opinion that an officer is unfit for the service, he shall be required to present his name to the Senate for furlough; stating fully, if required so to do, the reasons for that opinion. If the Senate, after such inquiry as it may choose to institute, shall concur with him, the officer shall be put on furlough, upon a certain proportion—say one half his pay,—and be considered out of the service. In this way, the same power that appoints, will remove; and the act, receiving the sanction of the Senate, will be placed above the suspicion of injustice or oppression.

It may be urged, as an objection to this plan, that it will create a body of quasi pensioners upon the Treasury, who have done nothing to deserve such

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favor. This is not true, in point of fact. These officers are already in the service, and if they be not put on furlough, will receive their whole pay, instead of only half of it. No officer will ever be put on furlough if he be really qualified for the service; and if he be not qualified, he ought not to be, and I presume will not be, called into service at all. Of course he will remain a dead weight upon the Treasury, to the full amount of his whole pay. To put him on furlough, therefore, is a positive relief to the Treasury, to the extent of one half his pay.

But the evil, if it really be one, will be of very short duration. When the navy officer shall come to understand that there is a process, more certain and summary than a trial by court martial, by which his dignity and his income may both be reduced, he will be cautious not to bring himself within such peril. The effect of the furlough system will be, to create a new motive on the part of the naval officer to exert himself to excel in his profession, and to place himself above suspicion, in point of personal character and conduct. The belief, heretofore prevailing, that an officer, of any standing in the navy, could not be driven out of it, or at least that he could not be kept out of it, has had a strong influence in ruining its discipline, and corrupting its morals and manners. The furlough system, firmly administered, will serve to remove this impression; and, with the assistance of an unsparing and impartial administration of the law, through courts martial, will soon purify the service, and will long keep it pure. When the inefficient who are now in the navy shall have been removed, it is probable that the Treasury will, thereafter, be rarely taxed with the pay of furloughed officers. The necessity of some mode of proceeding, by which the navy may be rid of the incompetent, as well as of the guilty, is universally admitted; and I have not been able to devise any mode more just, more effective, or less objectionable on the score of expense, than that which I now suggest.

If this system should be fully and faithfully carried out, I do not perceive that anything more will be necessary to insure to the navy competent and honorable officers. Hitherto, it has been their great misfortune, that, with fewer opportunities than others to educate themselves, the Government has done nothing to educate them. The cadet from West Point enters the army well founded in the principles of solid and useful learning, and fully prepared to engage, with advantage, in any pursuit, whether of civil or military life. The candidate for the navy, on the contrary, is deemed well enough qualified, if he be able to read and write, to answer a few simple questions in geography and English grammar, and to solve plain problems in the elementary rules of arithmetic. Why should this difference be made? Important as a proper preparatory education may be to the army officer, it is even more important to the officer of the navy. Apart from the fact that he has few opportunities to improve himself, it is to be remembered that he is the most frequent representative of his country abroad—the standard by which foreign nations will be most apt to measure her moral and intellectual character. He is, also, frequently intrusted with important and delicate negotiations, involving the rights of our citizens, and the peace and honor of our country. The function of the naval commander is much more useful, important, and dignified, than is generally supposed. To his skill and vigilance are intrusted, at every hour of the day and night, the safety of the ship, and the lives of her crew. The honor of his country's flag, and, in a great degree, her harmonious relations in peace, and her protection in war, are among the awful trusts with which he is clothed. Very few men can be

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found, qualified in every respect, for so high and imposing; an office; and, unhappily, there are too few among those who now hold it, who duly feel its importance and dignity. I humbly think that it is a high duty of Government to adopt every means calculated, in any degree, to elevate the standard of character in the naval commander, and to fit him in knowledge, in professional skill, and in personal character, to discharge the high and solemn duties of his office. This can be best done by giving him a suitable preparatory education, and by providing proper and ready means of removing him from the ranks of his profession whenever he may be found unworthy to occupy a place in them.

I respectfully renew the suggestions heretofore made—that there is yet one thing more necessary to complete the process of reform. The naval officer should feel that he has a place in the respect and confidence of his country, and that the honors and distinctions which his services shall have earned, will not be withheld from him. Promotion; is the vital principle of military service; and hence, as many grades should be established as maybe found consistent with the due order and efficiency of the service. The experience of every day tends to confirm me in the belief that the several grades of admiral, vice-admiral, and rear-admiral, ought to be established in our navy. I had the honor to bring this subject to your notice in my last report, and to urge such reasons as seemed to me to be sufficient in support of the recommendation now renewed. I have only to add, that this important measure need not increase the expenses of the navy at all. It will afford an opportunity to reward, by well-deserved promotion, many officers in the several grades who are well qualified for the highest stations and most important duties of the service. These men (most of whom would soon become the ornaments and grace of any other navy in the world) are likely, under our present system, to grow gray in subordinate and obscure stations: their merits unacknowledged, and their usefulness thrown away. We may, at least, be allowed to regret that the higher officers of the navy—those who, by their services in war, have reflected most honor on their country, and given the best proofs of their own merits, are so rapidly passing from the stage of life, that, even if our policy in this respect should ultimately change, others are likely to reap the honors which they have so richly earned. This should be deemed, by a generous country, a reason > for adopting, at once, a policy which, beyond all doubt, will ultimately be forced upon us, if we shall continue to maintain any navy, at all.

I again respectfully ask for an increase in the number of marines, and of marine officers of the lower grades. Not less than twenty millions of dollars of the public properly are now exposed, in our navy-yards, to conflagration and theft, for want of proper marine guards. Thefts to a considerable extent have recently been detected, and doubtless others have been committed which never will be detected. One fire, which a single additional marine might prevent, would probably destroy, in a few hours, more than the expenses of the whole marine force for ten years. Surely it can not be true economy to leave so much of the public property exposed to such great dangers, for want of so very cheap a protection as a few additional marines.

It is an object of great interest to me to make the navy subservient to the encouragement of American industry. This may be done, not only by the protection which it affords to American commerce (upon which I have already commented), but also by means of the supplies which it requires. We are, probably, the only people in the world who can, with perfect con-

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venience, build, equip, arm, feed, and clothe a navy of the largest size, from our own home resources. A nation of any magnitude, having all the materials of war constantly at its command, is essentially powerful. Hence, it is of the utmost importance that we should adopt a policy calculated at once to cherish and to develop these sources of our strength and security. The measures more immediately necessary to accomplish this object, have already been brought to the notice of Congress; but, as they have not yet been acted on, it would seem to be proper that I should again refer to them.

The first in importance is the preservation of navy timber growing on the public lands. No other country possesses so rich a store of this material as the United States. Properly protected, it would afford a supply for the largest navy in the world, for an indefinite time, without any sensible diminution. But I regret to say that the laws which have been enacted with this view are, in some respects, inoperative, and in all respects inefficient; Depredations of the most ruinous kind are daily committed, in spite of all the vigilance which this Department can use, and in defiance of all the power which it is authorized to exert. Our own people are daily selling to the Government timber which they take against law from the public lands, and it is understood that large supplies of the same timber are already contracted for by foreign Governments. It is impossible to prevent these depredations under existing laws. The subject is, in my opinion, worthy of the serious and prompt attention of Congress. If they should thoroughly investigate it, the information which this Department can afford will not fail to convince them of the necessity of a reform in the laws relating to it, and of additional grants of power and means to the officers of the Government to whom they may choose to intrust this valuable part of the public property.

The subject next in importance is the establishment of a navy-yard on the largest scale on the waters of the lower Mississippi; I had the honor to give my views upon this subject in a report to the Senate of the 31st of January last. Respectfully referring to that report, I forbear to repeat at large the suggestions which it offers. I will only say that the object which I have in view is to afford whatever facilities such an establishment can afford to the industry of the whole valley of the Mississippi, now cut off, in a great degree, from its due share in the supplies of the navy. The iron of that region would find there a ready and convenient market; an extensive rope-walk, a necessary appendage to such a navy-yard, would present a constant demand for hemp; the provisions of the west, now worth little or nothing, from their superabundance, would find a ready purchaser at fair prices. Every branch of western industry would feel, directly or indirectly, the influence of such an establishment, while the navy itself would be secure of abundant and cheap supplies, sufficiently convenient to the ocean, and yet perfectly safe from the attacks of an enemy.

It is by arrangements of this sort that the navy can be made to return to the country twice the wealth which is expended in support of it. The wealth of a nation does not consist in the quantity of gold which it may have in its treasury; the economy of a nation is not shown only in the smallness of its expenditures. It is rich only in proportion as its people are rich; and it is economical only so far as it applies the public money to uses more valuable to the people who pay it than the money itself. This is but another name for national thrift, but it is the only sense in which national economy in of any value. Nine tenths of the appropriations to the navy are paid back to our own people for materials, labor, and subsistence. It is thus put into cir-

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culation, paying debts, supplying wants, and sustaining credit. Every dollar thus employed increases the tax paying ability of the people to twice that amount, and this tax:paying ability is the true wealth of the nation. The expenses of the navy, therefore, are not to be: considered a dead tax upon the Treasury. They not only go back and circulate among our own people, but, unlike most other expenditures of the Government, they give employment to industry, encouragement to enterprise, and patronage to genius. They perform, to a great extent, the office of a protective tariff, in developing and bringing into use various sources of our national wealth, particularly in copper, iron, hemp, provisions, and coal. The effect of even a small disbursement so made upon the public prosperity and comfort is much more important and extensive than the first view of it would lead us to suppose. I am far from saying that taxes ought to be levied merely for the purpose of so expending them. No tax should be imposed, direct or indirect, which is not required for the legitimate and proper uses of Government. But if a necessity for the tax can be shown to exist; if the purposes to which it is proposed to apply it clearly appear to be useful and profitable to the country far beyond the measure of the tax itself, it ceases to be a burden, and is: relieved from all fair objection. Such, in my opinion, is emphatically the case with almost the entire appropriation to the naval service. It is confidently believed that such appropriations, as liberal as any convenient and proper revenue system will allow, may be, and of necessity must be, applied to "uses far more valuable to the people who pay them than the money itself;" and that, far from being an oppressive burden, they will operate as a measure of positive relief.

In looking for the sources of unnecessary expense throughout the naval establishment, I have found much to correct. It can not be denied that our navy has cost much more than it ought to have cost, considering the small number of vessels that we have usually kept in commission. I do not know that this could have been very easily prevented, under the former defective organization of the Department. The mode heretofore pursued of obtaining the supplies of the surgeons' and pursers' departments has subjected the seamen to unnecessary charges, and the Government to constant impositions, in many cases to gross frauds, and consequently to heavy losses. These losses have been the greater, in consequence of the want of proper, means of establishing a system of strict accountability, which would have enabled the Department not only to see the extent of the evil, but to apply the proper remedy. The bureaux to which these subjects belong have been diligently and successfully engaged in devising suitable means of guarding against similar impositions for the future. The articles are now procured, as far as possible, from those who make or produce them; so that the profits—always large, and often extortionate, which have heretofore been paid to the grocer, the apothecary, and the contractor for clothing—-are saved to the Government and the sailor. Such supplies as we are still compelled to obtain in the former mode, are subjected to rigorous inspection, which assures us of their good quality and reasonable prices; and when brought into the public stores, the persons under whose charge they are placed are required to account for them with a degree of minuteness which promises to guard effectually against any waste or extravagance in the use of them.

I have very little doubt that much of the mechanical labor which has been performed at our navy-yards has been too dearly paid for. I can per-

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ceive no good reason why a mechanic should work fewer hours in the day, or receive higher wages, in a public dock-yard, than in a private workshop; on the contrary, if there be any difference, it should be in favor of the Government, in consequence of the more constant employment, and the more prompt and certain pay. It is certainly good policy on the part of the Government to give such wages as will command the most competent and faithful workmen; but this can always be done, for the reason above assigned, for the same wages which are paid at the best private establishments. Measures have been adopted to place the Government upon terms of just equality with individuals, in this respect.

But a still more considerable source of expense—in building, repairing; arming, and equipping our vessels of war—may be found in the high prices and indifferent quality of the iron and copper which have been used. The Department has given much attention to these two important subjects, with a view to the correction of former abuses. In particular kinds of iron, the standard has been raised seventy-five per cent.; and yet it is found that supplies can be obtained at less prices than heretofore, although the quality is nearly twice as good. The fact, now generally known, that proper tests are applied, and that no iron will be received which does not bear them, has served to create an honorable competition among those engaged in that branch of industry; so that the most important improvements are constantly made. The United States can furnish as good iron as any other country in the world; and with suitable encouragement, would soon be able to supply the world with that metal.

In chain cables, an invaluable improvement has been made. None but the very best iron is ever applied to that use; and an apparatus is now in progress, and very nearly completed, for subjecting the cables, when finished, to thermotension. Along series of careful and accurate experiments has ascertained that this process adds seventeen per cent, to its strength. By this means the weight, and consequently the cost, of a cable of given strength, is greatly diminished, and so also is the labor of handling it on board ship. For this great improvement, we are indebted to the scientific information and industrious researches of Professor Walter R. Johnson, of Philadelphia. It is impossible to calculate its value to the whole navigating interest of the world. The fate of the largest ship, and of all her crew, often depends upon the strength of her cables; so that a little more or less of strength in a single link may save or destroy her. I have considered it, therefore, of the utmost importance to improve, by every practicable means, the quality of chain-cable iron. It is believed that, even at the present day, we are not surpassed in this respect by any other nation; and if improvements shall advance hereafter as rapidly as heretofore, we may in a short time safely challenge the competition of the world.

A similar improvement has been made in iron for ordnance. Too much importance can not be attached to the soundness of cannon. The bursting of a single gun in battle is often more disastrous than many broadsides from the enemy. It not only destroys life, and withdraws so much from the effective battery of the ship, but it also creates confusion and disorder, excites in the minds of the crew distrust in the soundness of the other guns, and thus discourages and renders them timid. Hence, no consideration of mere money-saving should ever enter into the arrangements for procuring ordnance for the navy. True economy requires that the very best guns which can be made, and none others, should ever be used. Upon this idea

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this Department is acting. No cannon is received which does not bear the most satisfactory tests; and yet it is not found that the cost of ordnance is any greater than heretofore. On the contrary, guns of the same kind which have heretofore cost more than $130 per ton, have recently been contracted for at $95.

In copper, the frauds which have been practised upon the Government, have been gross and enormous. Pure copper ought to last upon a ship's bottom twenty years; and yet that which we have used upon our ships of war, has not lasted upon an average more than seven. Upon examining a portion of the copper recently taken from the bottom of the Columbus, I found that it exhibited the appearance of worm-eaten wood; the reason of which is, that it was full of impurities, which corroded and fell out. Even that which remained, instead of possessing the toughness which belongs to pure copper, would not bear to be bent, but broke short off, like a piece of cast-iron. It is impossible to be too careful in procuring an article so costly, as copper. Nothing but the application of proper scientific tests, can detect, its impurities, or prevent the grossest and most ruinous impositions. A single defective sheet on the bottom of a large ship, will render it necessary to bring her into dock, and will thus cost the country ten times as much as would have been required to prevent any such result. The copper in a ship's bottom is no small part of her entire cost; and this cost is more than doubled by using copper of bad quality.

The great importance of guarding against impositions in this respect, has induced the department to institute a series of experiments, under the management of Professor Johnson, the results of which, promise to be of great benefit to the economy of the service. These results I have the honor to communicate in a copy of Mr. Johnson's report, hereto annexed.

As steamships will hereafter form a part of our navy, it becomes important to ascertain what kind of fuel can be most advantageously used. With this view, I have taken measures to cause a proper analysis to be made, of the several coals of our country, and also of those of England. All persons interested in this subject, were invited, by public advertisement, to send samples of their coal to the navy-yard in Washington, in order that a proper comparison might be made, under suitable philosophical tests. About thirty samples have been sent, and some progress has been made in the examination of them. Professor Johnson, to whom this investigation has been intrusted, was called from Washington before any conclusive results had been obtained; but his experiments will be resumed as soon as possible, and will undoubtedly present a mass of most useful information on this important subject.

The application of scientific principles in the mechanical arts is now universal. The mere artisan, whose skill is derived only from practice, is far behind the times. Science is now lending her aid to the arts, in all their departments—expanding their powers, multiplying their uses, and perfecting their works. I respectfully suggest that this aid is nowhere more important, than in the various operations connected with a naval establishment. When we consider the number and variety of the materials which are used, the costliness of many of them, and the high importance that they should all be of the best and most durable kinds, the propriety of subjecting them to all necessary tests, and of improving their quality as far as possible, will at once be admitted. This can be done, only by the union of science with practical skill. The knowledge which we obtain from experience is always slow, always costly, and not always sure; that which we obtain from experiment,

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particularly in physical science, rarely deceives, and seldom fails richly to repay us. The experiments which have already been made, under the direction of this Department, haves imparted to it a degree of information, which, could not have been derived from any other source, and which will more than repay their cost, in the building of a single ship. These experiments, however, are but the beginning of what might be accomplished in the same way. If the Department were in a condition to avail itself of the improvements which are daily made in practical science, the most important results would soon be realized, in the improved quality of our ships, and in the general economy of the service. I respectfully recommend the subject to the favorable consideration of Congress.

I shall, in a few days, have the honor to lay before Congress a code of rules and regulations for the navy, prepared in obedience to their directions.

I invite attention to the existing laws on the subject of navy pensions, which appear to me to need many changes and modifications.

I have thus, sir, submitted, without reserve, my views of the present condition and actual requirements of our naval service. It is my duty to do this, without reference to any other considerations. Whether my recommendations shall be adopted or not, must of course depend on the view which may be taken of them by the legislative department of the Government. In presenting my own views, I simply discharge my own duty to those, to whose better judgment all the measures which I have proposed must be referred.

All which is respectfully submitted.

A. P. UPSHUR.

The President

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Schedule of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy to the President of the United States.

No. 1. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the Bureau of the Navy Department.

2. Estimate for the expenses of the southwest executive building.

3. General estimate for the Navy.

Detailed estimate:

A 3. Report and estimate of the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks.

B 3. Report and estimate of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

C 3. Report and estimate of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs.

D 3. Report and estimate of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing.

E 3. Report and estimate of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.

F 3. Pay of officers waiting orders.

4. Estimate for the Marine Corps.

5. List of vessels in commission, their commanders and stations.

6. List of deaths in the Navy.

7. List of dismissions from the Navy.

8. List of resignations from the Navy.

9. Report of the Commissioner of Pensions.

10. Fourth Auditor's statement of the receipts and expenditures on account of the navy pension fund, from October 1, 1841, to September 30, 1842.

11. Professor Johnson's report of experiments on copper. (Not included in digital version.)

12. Expenditure of appropriation for the suppression of the slave-trade

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_____________

No. 1.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the bureaux of the Navy Department, for the half year ending 30th June, 1843:

Secretary of the Navy $3,000
Clerks and messengers 6,675
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks:  
Chief of bureau 1,750
Clerks, draughtsman, and messenger 2,450
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography:  
Chief of bureau 1,750
Clerks, draughtsmen, and messenger 2,950
Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs:  
Chief of bureau 1,500
Clerks, assistant constructor, &c, and messenger 3,050
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing:  
Chief of bureau 1,500
Clerks and messenger 2,059
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery:  
Chief of bureau 1,250
Clerks and messenger 1,350
  29,275

For contingent expenses of the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the bureaux of the Navy Department, viz:

Secretary's office:  
For blank books, binding, and stationery $500
For extra clerk-hire 1,500
For printing 300
For labor 350
For miscellaneous items 250
For newspapers and periodicals 100
For amount required to pay sundry bills for stationery, newspapers, &c., for 1839, 1840, 1841, and 1842 700
  3,700
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks:  
For contingent expenses $250
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography: $250
For contingent expenses  
Bureau of Construction, &c.:  
For blank books, stationery, &c. $100
For miscellaneous items 90
For labor 60
  250

--557--

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing:  
For blank books, stationery, and binding $300
For miscellaneous items 150
  450
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery:  
For blank books, binding, and stationery $300
For miscellaneous items 150
  450

RECAPITULATION.

Secretary's office $3,700
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks 250
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography 250
Bureau of Construction, &c. 250
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing 450
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 450
Total 5,350
Submitted: For arrearages of clerks' salary in the office of the late navy board $456 24

_____________

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the bureaux of the Navy Department, for the year ending 30th June, 1844:

Secretary of the Navy $6,000
Clerks and messengers 13,350
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks:  
Chief of bureau 3,500
Clerks, draughtsman, and messenger 4,900
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography:  
Chief of bureau 3,500
Clerks, draughtsmen, and messenger 5,900
Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs: 3,000
Chief of bureau  
Clerks, assistant constructor, &c., and messenger  
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing:  
Chief of bureau 3,000
Clerks and messenger 4,100
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery: 2,500
Chief of bureau  
Clerks and messenger 2,700
  58,550

--558--

For contingent expenses of the office of the Secretary of the Navy and the bureaux of the Navy Department, viz:

Secretary's office:  
For blank books, binding, and stationery $800
For extra clerk-hire 4,000
For printing 300
For labor 350
For miscellaneous items 350
For newspapers and periodicals 200
  6,000
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks:  
For contingent expenses $500
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography:  
For contingent expenses $500
Bureau of Construction, &c.:  
For blank books, stationery, &c. $200
For miscellaneous items 180
For labor 120
  500
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing:  
For blank books, stationary, and binding $400
For miscellaneous items 200
  600
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery:  
For blank books, binding, and stationery $400
For miscellaneous items 200
  600

RECAPITULATION

Secretary's' office $6,000
Bureau of Navy-yards and Docks 500
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography 500
Bureau of Construction, &c. 500
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing 660
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery 600
  8,700

--559--

_____________

No. 2.

Estimate of sums required for the expenses of the southwest executive building, for the half year ending on the 30th June, 1843.

Superintendent $125 00
Three watchmen, at $365 per annum 543 00
Labor 162 50
Fuel and light 675 00
Miscellaneous items 575 00
  2,080 50

Note.—An additional sum of $100, each, for the watchmen, for the half year is submitted, in consideration of their being required to watch day and night, to wit: from 3 o'clock, P. M., till relieved by the messengers of the Department, about 8 o'clock, A. M. When their salaries were formerly fixed at $500, they were required to watch only from sunset till sunrise.

Estimate of sums required for the expenses of the southwest executive building, for the fiscal year ending on the 30th June, 1844.

Superintendent $250
Three watchmen 1,095
Labor 325
Fuel and Light 1,350
Miscellaneous items 1,150
  4,170

Note.—An additional sum of $200, each, is submitted for the watchmen, in consideration of their being required to watch day and night, to wit: from. 3 o'clock, P. M., till relieved by the messengers of the Department, about 8 o'clock, A. M. When their salaries were formerly fixed at $500, they were required to watch only from sunset to sunrise.

--560--

____________

No. 3.

GENERAL ESTIMATES.

There will be required for the general service of the navy during the half year ending June 30, 1843, exclusive of the amount required for the marine corps, the sum of $3,673,607 07, in addition to any balance that may remain in the Treasury on January 1, 1843.

 

    For the half year ending June 30, 1843.
1. For the pay of commission, warrant, petty officers, and seamen $1,476,569 50
2. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards 36,860 00
3. For provisions 553,769 50
4. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick 57,030 00
5. For the increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission 950,000 00
6. For the improvement and necessary repairs of navy-yards, viz:  
Portsmouth, N. H. 15,510 40
Charlestown, Mass. 33,992 70
Brooklyn, N. Y. 40,000 00
Philadelphia, Pa. 9,950 00
Washington, D. C. 17,335 00
Gosport, Va. 34,200 00
Pensacola, Flo. 28,800 00
7. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, viz:  
Charlestown 1,500 00
Brooklyn 8,832 00
Norfolk 2,000 00
Pensacola 1,500 00
Philadelphia naval asylum 945 00
a For magazines at  
Charlestown 500 00
Brooklyn 350 00
Washington 250 00
Norfolk 350 00
9. For ordnance and ordnance stores 48,422 97
10. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent, travelling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; for house-rent to pursers, when duly authorized; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk-  

--561--

No. 3—Continued.

        For the half year ending June 1843
  hire, office-rent, stationery and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses for recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judges advocate; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services as authorized by law; for printing and stationery of every description, and for working the lithographic press; for books, maps, charts, mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire-engines and machinery; for the repair of steam-engines in navy-yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage, and towing ships of war; for taxes and assessments on public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental expenses at navy-yards; not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel, and for candles and oil for the use of navy yards and shore stations; and for no other object or purpose whatever. $330,000 00
  For contingent expenses for objects, not herein before enumerated. 25,000 00
    3,673,667 07

--562--

No. 3—Continued.

GENERAL ESTIMATES.

There will be required for the general service of the navy during the year ending June 30, 1844, exclusive of the amount required for the marine corps, the sum of $6,983,245 64, in addition to any balance that may remain in the Treasury on July 1, 1843. 

    For the year ending Appropriated for 1842.
1. For the pay of commission, warrant, petty officers, and seamen $2,953,139 00 $2,335,000 00
2. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all civil establishments at the several yards 73,720 00 78,420 00
3. For provisions 1,104,539 00 720,000 00
4. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other, expenses on account of the sick 43,967 00 30,000 00
5. For the increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission   2,000,00 00
6. For the improvement and necessary, repairs of navy-yards, viz:    
Portsmouth, N. H.   47,425 00
Charlestown, Mass.   29,000 00
Brooklyn, N. Y. 60,000 00 129,100 00
Philadelphia, Pa. 18,070 00 1,600 00
Washington, D. C, 26,597 00 15,300 00
Gosport, Va. 70,310 00 56,800 00
Pensacola, Flo. 63,091 00 35,300 00
7. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, viz:    
Charlestown, Mass. 1,300 00 3,960 00
Brooklyn, N. Y. 15,000 00 1,500 60
Norfolk, Va. 2,000 00 13,750 00
Pensacola, Flo. 2,448 25 2,000 00
Philadelphia naval asylum, Pa. 366 00 1,300 00
8. For magazines at    
Charlestown, Mass. 1,000 00  
Brooklyn, N. Y. 350 00  
Washington, D. C. 250 00  
Norfolk, Va. 350 00  
9. For ordnance and ordnance stores 96,847 93  
10. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of    

--563--

No. 3—Continued.

    For the year ending June 30, 1844. Appropriated for 1842.
  every description; for wharfage, and, dockage, storage and rent, travelling expanses of officers, and transportation of seamen; for house-rent to pursers, when duly authorized; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk-hire, office-rent, stationery and fuel to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses for recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for, compensation to judges advocate; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services as authorized by law; for printing and stationery of every description, and for working the lithographic press; for books, maps, charts, mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire-engines and machinery; for the; repair of steam-engines in navy-yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships of war; for taxes and assessments on public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental expenses at navy-yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal, and other fuel, and for candles and oil for, the use of navy-yards and shore stations; and for no other object or purpose whatever $450,000 00 $450,000 00
11. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated 3,000 00 3,000 00
    6,983,245 64  

--564--

___________

A No. 3.

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to present to you, in conformity to the directions contained in your letter of the 28th ultimo, the estimates for the improvements of the navy-yards; for the repairs of all the buildings which may require them; for the prosecution of the work on the new dock at New York, if it should be deemed proper to recommence it; and for the support of their establishments, including all the civil officers attached to each. The estimates for the support of the navy hospitals, for the preservation of the magazines, and for the ordinary of the various yards, are also included.

The sums estimated for the yards for the first half of the ensuing year, and for the year beginning on the 1st July, 1843, and ending on the 30th June, 1844, are nearly in the same proportion as those for the present year, making an allowance for the additional period for which they are required.

The number of officers for duty in the yards, has been increased in order to insure a proper supervision of their duties; to secure a diligent and continual attention to the work to be performed, and to keep a careful watch by day and by night. To maintain, as far as practicable, their security, and to prevent theft and plunder, is another object of this increase, and a very important one. There is not now a sufficient force stationed at any of the yards for this purpose; and a police establishment for each, is much wanted; of what this police guard shall consist, may be a question for consideration.

At present, there is neither a sufficiency of watchmen or of marines; and the demand for the latter on board ship prevents the expectation of our receiving from that source an increase. The watchmen, as at present furnished, are the principal reliances, and their organization, if the establishment may be so termed, is defective and requires amendment. The number should be increased, and they should be called upon to serve, for a certain period of time, under such regulations and written agreements as would be binding on them for their whole time and service, if it should be your intention to continue them.

For the whole of the yards, the sum asked for the ensuing eighteen months is $514,756 56. The amount asked for the present year, was $504,428, making an excess of the former over the latter of only $10,328 56; although the period for which the first named sum is required, is greater than that for the last named by one half. Of the above amount of $514,756 56 for the period stated, the sum of $50,000 is intended to be applied to the construction of the dock, which being so costly and so important a work, as to form a specific object of appropriation, and a subject of distinct expenditure, does not, therefore, fall under the regular head of improvements of navy-yards, for which estimates are annually made.

Beginning with the northernmost establishment, that of Portsmouth, New Hampshire, I proceed to slate my views of each in general terms. The amount asked for it will be profitably laid out in the permanent improvements necessary to bring it up to a scale somewhat commensurate with the others, and to prepare it for carrying on expeditiously such work as may, from time to time, be deemed requisite. To do this the expenditures, after making provision for the repairs of all buildings and other works, are to be directed to a permanent quay-wall; a new wharf for the accommodation of vessels principally,

--565--

and to some smaller works, which will add to the convenience and despatch of business.

At Boston, the continuance of the boundary wall for the security of the yard, has become an object of importance, to preserve it from depredation, and to render it less accessible. The remaining objects to be commenced and accomplished, under this estimate, are also very requisite; and being in accordance with the approved plan, will do much to ensure expedition, economy, and safety, in the operations of the yard, and the preservation of materials.

For New York, it has been considered proper to preserve all the different buildings in repair, and to estimate for the erection or building of such works only, as are requisite for the current or daily duties of the yard. The want of a proper and approved plan, by which all the future improvements of this yard may be regulated, prevents the call for a greater expenditure. When that is authorized, which it is supposed will be ere long, in a future estimate, such works will be embraced as will be calculated to bring it up to an equality of accommodation with the other dock yards. The uncertainty of a permanent location, within the waters of New York harbor, has hitherto prevented this point from being settled. It is, however, presumed this will not much longer be a matter of doubt.

At Philadelphia, the principal object to be undertaken, is the extension and filling-in of the two principal wharves, which is rendered a work of indispensable necessity, by the accumulation of mud at their extremities, and the gradual shoaling of the water in their fronts, by the annual deposites of silt. These deposites are the consequence of the greater projection into the river, of the city wharves above or to the north of the navy-yard. The remaining expenditure will be confined to the preservation and repair of those objects which are in a state to require them.

For the Washington yard, it is proposed to erect an iron foundry, in which may be combined all the conveniences for castings and the making of steam engines, water tanks, chain cables, &c. This building, therefore is of considerable importance, in point of economy and despatch. The present one is a mere temporary affair, by no means sufficient to the increased work; and is also most inconveniently situated. It was built, or converted to its present use, at a time when the demand for its services was by no means equal to the present exigencies. The wharf is also much needed; and experience shows that stone is a much cheaper material for its construction than wood; as the repairs, in a few years, would make it nearly equal in expense to that of the former material. The estimates for the other objects will be found, on reflection, to be equally necessary, including that for repairs, which last is much wanted at several points and parts of the yard.

At Norfolk the improvements are to consist of a continuation of the timber dock, which is not only intended for the deposite and soaking of timber, but for the admission of vessels of light draught of water, loaded with stores of the various kinds, intended for the preparation and equipment of vessels, as well as the different species of timber which are required. In connexion with this large work, is the very useful one of a stone wharf or quay-wall; to the eastern or water front of the yard, a portion of which, from the north building slip to the south end or corner of building slip and house B, has been finished, and includes three permanent launching slips. These having been solidly constructed on piles, and with great care, may last for centuries. To continue this wall from the north building slip, as far as the north corner, or

--566--

boundary, of the yard on that side, is a part of the work, to be done under this item, as well as its continuance (on the south part of that which has, as beforementioned, been finished) to the north side of timber dock. When this work is complete, to which it is expected the sum now asked will greatly contribute, there will then be an uninterrupted quay, extending from north to south of more than 900 feet. The erection of a new house, and the completion of a second, which are to be timber sheds and storehouses, form all the new works at present to be undertaken, with the exception of two small houses for the watchmen. The repairs of all the buildings, including painting, and the repairs which may be necessary for the dock, with the purchase; and setting of some machinery for house number 36,; in which the sawing, turning, and boring, are to be done for the whole establishment, comprise the remaining objects in this yard, for which an appropriation is asked for the ensuing prescribed periods.

For Pensacola, as that yard is less advanced, in conveniences than the others; it has been considered proper, to ask for more than has lately been required for it. The necessity for a large and commodious wharf at this place, is so great, that in addition to the sum allotted to that object, out of the fund this year provided for improvements, it has seemed to be essential that a considerable addition should be made for this item. What is now asked for will, it is presumed, be sufficient. The houses for officers, now asked for in addition, are also much wanted for the accommodation of those who are(required to do daily, and even night duty, without the means of procuring comfortable lodgings, if indeed any can be procured at all.

The carrying of good wholesome water into the yard, for the use of our public vessels and for its inmates, will be attended with great advantages. Upon this, a subject of, such obvious importance, it is unnecessary to enlarge. It has been hitherto, and is yet, a great desideratum at that establishment, and felt very much by the crews of all the cruisers resorting to it for a supply, as it is difficult to procure it good, and then not without much labor. The other objects, although requiring much smaller sums to complete or accomplish them, are yet very necessary.

Before closing this report, it may be proper to, state, that the items for the repair of the different hospitals, have been made with a due regard to the urgency of the wants of those establishments; and the propriety of retaining them in a state capable of accommodating, in security and comfort, those who may need their services.

For the magazines, of which there is one at each of the Boston, New York, Washington, and Norfolk yards, a small sum has been required, sufficient for the purpose of keeping them in repair, improving their arrangement, and providing for unlooked-for damage by storms or other accidents, &c., &c.

In making provision for the proposed improvements, care has been taken to preserve inviolate, the arrangements made by the officers of the commission of 1827 and 1828, for the examination and digestion of a suitable plan for each yard, according to which, all the buildings, slips, walls, quays, and docks, are to be erected or constructed. Such plans were formally approved by the President, in November, 1828, and have been implicitly followed since, with one or two slight variations, which it was found necessary to make to suit situations and circumstances, as experience and more particular information rendered them necessary. A revision of those will be made in the course of the winter and spring, by which you will be enabled to ascer-

--567--

tain if any further change should be requisite, and see at one glance all that has been done, and all that is to be done to complete them. It is believed that little change, if any, will be necessary, as everything was settled, after great deliberation, consideration, and personal observation. The exception to this, is the New York yard, of which a plan was made by the late able civil engineer, L. Baldwin, Esquire, without having been submitted, however, to the commissioners, who determined the other plans, as it was not then known what spot might be ultimately fixed on as its site.

The question of further improving and increasing this yard, and to what extent, will be a subject for your decision, after all the requisite information shall have been obtained and laid before you. To enable you do this with certainty, it is my intention in a short time to have a map on a large scale made, designating all the existing, as well as the proposed works, and laying down conspicuously its boundaries. The present limits, when those parts now marshy overflowed are converted into solid, ground, will, it is believed be sufficiently large, at least for many years.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

Hon. A. P. UPSHUR,
Secretary of the Navy.

____________

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to submit, on a separate sheet, the estimate of the amount necessary to the support of this bureau for the ensuing eighteen months, made for the periods of the first half of the next year, and for the twelve months following, as directed.

I beg leave to call your attention to the salary of the chief clerk of this bureau, which has been the only salary of the clerks of the late Navy Board that is reduced by the act for the reorganization of the Navy Department. Under the late law it was $1,600; and I understand it was the intention of the committee which reported the bill to continue it as it was originally; but by an error or misapprehension in copying the bill for its engrossment, it was put down at the present rate.

If it can be now remedied, and it is presumed it can be, it will be but an act of justice to one whose labors are certainly increased, although his income is curtailed.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, your obedient servant,

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy,

--568--

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Yards and Docks for the half year ending June 30, 1843, and for the year beginning July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844, under act of Congress, approved August 31, 1842.

Commodore L. Warrington, chief of bureau, at $3,500 per annum, $1,750
W. P. S. Sanger, civil engineer, 2,000 " 1,000
Geo. de La Roche, draughtsman, 1,000 " 500
William. G. Ridgely, chief clerk, 1,400 " 700
Stephen Gough, clerk. 1,000 " 500
D. H. Haskell, clerk, 800 " 400
S. A. Hutchins, messenger, 700 " 350
Contingent expenses     250
  5,450
The amount that will be required for this bureau, as above organized, for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844, will be $10,900

Bureau of Yards and Docks, Nov. 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

____________

Schedule of the papers accompanying the report of the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks to the Secretary of the Navy, November 25, 1842:

Y. & D. A.—General estimate, showing the amount required for the half year ending June 30, 1843.

Y. & D. B.—General estimate, showing the amount required for the year ending June 30,1844.

Y. & D. No. 1.—Receiving vessels in detail, being part of the 1st item in the general estimates, showing the amount required for the half year ending June 30, 1843, and that for the whole year ending June 30, 1844.

Y. & D. No. 2.—Recruiting stations in detail, being a part of the 1st item in the general estimate, showing the amount required for the half year ending June 30,1843, and that for the year ending June 30,1844.

Y. & D. No. 3.—Officers and others at yards and stations in detail for the year ending June 30, 1844; note A, at the end of this estimate, being a part of the 1st item in the general estimate; and note B, showing the amount of the 2d item in the general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 4.—Officers and others at yards and stations for the half year ending June 30, 1843.—See Y. & D. No. 3, for detail.

Y. & D. No. 5.—Improvements and repairs of navy-yards: Column A, showing the amount required for the half year ending June 30, 1843; and column B, that required for the year ending June 30, 1844.

Y. & D. No. 6.—Improvements and repairs of hospitals and magazines:

Column A, showing the amount required for the half year ending June 30, 1843; and column B, that required for the year ending June 30, 1844.

Y. & D. No. 7.—Statement showing the sums which make up the 1st and 2d items in the general estimate marked Y. & D. A.

Y. & D. No. 8.—Statement showing the sums which make up the 1st and 2d items in the general estimate marked Y. & D. B.

--569--

______________

Y. & D—A.

GENERAL ESTIMATE.

Estimated amounts that will be required for the naval service, for the half year ending 30th June, 1843, so far as coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks.

1st. For the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen—[See paper marked Y. & D., No. 7]   $266,998 00
2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards and stations—[See paper marked Y. & D., No. 7]   36,860 00
3d. For the improvements and necessary repairs of navy yards, viz—[See Y. & D., No. 5, column A]    
Portsmouth, N. H. $15,510 40  
Charlestown. Mass. 33,992 70  
Brooklyn, N. Y. 40,000 00  
Philadelphia 9,950 00  
Washington 17,335 00  
Gosport, Va. 34,200 00  
Pensacola 28,800 00  
    179,788 10
4th. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, viz—[See Y, & D., No., 6, column A]:    
Charlestown, Mass. 1,500 00  
Brooklyn, N. Y. 8,832 00  
Norfolk, Va. 2,000 00  
Pensacola 1,500 00  
Philadelphia asylum 945 00  
    14,777 00
5th. [See Y. & D., No. 6, column A.] For magazines at—    
Charlestown, Mass. 500 00  
Brooklyn 350 00  
Washington 250 00  
Norfolk 350 00  
    1,450 00
6th. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores for yards and docks; for printing and stationery; for books, maps, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of; fire-engines, and for machinery of every description; for the re-    

--570--

Y. & D.-A-Continued.

pair of steam-engines in yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses; for carts, timber wheels, and, workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for coals and other fuel; and for candles and oil, for the use of navy-yards and shore stations, and for furniture; for incidental labor at navy-yards, not applicable to any other appropriation, and for no other object or purpose whatever $45,000 00  
    544,873 10

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

____________

Y. & D.—B.

GENERAL ESTIMATE.

Estimated amounts that will be required for the naval service, for the year ending 30th June, 1844, so far as coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks.

1st. For the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen—[See paper marked Y. & D.—No. 8]   $533,996 00
2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards and stations—[See paper marked Y. & D.—No. B]:   73,720 00
3d. For the improvements and necessary repairs of navy-yards, viz—[See Y. & D.—No. 5, column B]:    
Portsmouth, N. H. $24,900 76  
Charlestown, Mass. 71,999 70  
Brooklyn, N. Y. 60,000 00  
Philadelphia 18,070 00  
Washington 26,597 00  
Gosport, Va. 70,310 00  
Pensacola 63,091 00  
    334,968 46

--571--

Y. & D.—B—Continued.

4th. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, viz—[See Y. & D.—No. 6, column B]:    
Charlestown $1,300 00  
Brooklyn 15,000 00  
Norfolk 2,000 00  
Pensacola 2,448 25  
Philadelphia asylum 366 00  
    $21,114 25
5th. [See Y. & D.-No. 6, column B.]    
For magazines at-    
Charlestown 1,000 00  
Brooklyn 350 00  
Washington 250 00  
Norfolk 350 00  
    1,950 00
6th. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores for yards and docks; for printing and stationery; for books, maps, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire-engines and machinery of every description; for the repair of steam-engines in yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses; for carts, timber wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for coals and other fuel; and for candles and oil for the use of navy-yards and shore stations, and for furniture; for incidental labor at navy-yards, not applicable to any other appropriation, and for no other object or purpose whatever   90,000 00
    1,055,748 71

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

--572--

____________

Y. & D.—No. 1.

RECEIVING VESSELS.

Estimate of the number and pay of officers and others required for seven receiving vessels for the half-year ending 30th June, 1843, with an additional estimate for the year commencing on the 1st July, 1843, and ending 30th June, 1844, if no alteration is made in the number of vessels, or in their respective complements.

  Boston. New
York.
Philadelphia. Baltimore. Norfolk. New
Orleans.
Charleston. Total. Aggregate
amount.
Captains 1 1     1     3 $5,250
Commanders 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 7,350
Lieutenants 4 4 2 2 4 2 2 20 15,000
Masters 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 3,500
Pursers 1 1     1     3 3,750
Surgeons 1 1     1     3 3,600
Assistant surgeons 1 1     1     3 1,800
Chaplain 1 1     1     3 1,800
Passed midshipmen 3 3     1     9 3,375
Midshipmen 6 6 3 3 6 3 3 30 5,250
Clerks 1 1     1     3 750
Boatswains 1 1     1     3 1,200
Gunners 1 1     1     3 1,200
Carpenters 1 1     1     3 1,200
Sailmakers 1 1     1     3 1,200
Yeomen 1 1     1     3 720
Boatswain's mates 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 10 1,140
Gunner's mates 1 1     1     3 342
Carpenter's mates 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 798
Quartermasters 3 3     3     9 972
Masters-at-arms 1 1     1     3 324
Ship's corporal 1 1     1     3 270
Ship's stewards 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 864
Officers' steward 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 10 1,080
Surgeon's steward 1 1     1     3 324
Ship's cooks 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 756
Officers' cooks 2 2 1 1 2 1 1 10 900
Captains of hold 1 1     1     3 270
Seamen 30 30 2 2 30 4 2 100 7,200
Ordinary seamen 70 70 4 4 90 9 4 231 13,860
Landsmen and apprentices 100 100     100 4   304 12,768
  243 243 19 19 243 30 19 816 98,813

Additional estimate for the year-commencing on the 1st July, 1843, and ending on the 30th June, 1844, if no alteration is made in the number of vessels, or in the number and grade of officers and others attached to each, as above, $197,626.

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

--573--

____________

Y. & D.—No. 2.

RECRUITING STATIONS.

Estimate for the pay of officers attached to recruiting stations for the half-year ending 30th June next, with an additional estimate for the year commencing 1st July, 1843, ending 30th June, 1844, if no alteration is made in the number of stations.

  Boston. New York. Philadelphia. Baltimore. Norfolk. New Orleans. Charleston. Total. Amount.
Commandants 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 7,350
Lieutenants. 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 14 10,500
Surgeons. 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 7 6,125
Midshipmen 2 2 2 2 2 2 2   2,450
Total 6 6 6 6 6 6 42 26,425

Additional estimate for the year ending 30th June, 1844, if no alteration is made in the number of stations or number of officers attached to each station, as above, $52,850.

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

____________

Y. & D.-No. 3.

Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy yards and stations for the year commencing 1st July, 1843, and ending 30th June, 1844.

  PORTSMOUTH, N. H. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 master 1,000  
3 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
3 midshipmen at $350 each 1,050  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  

--574--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  PORTSMOUTH, N. H.—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 carpenter $700  
1 sailmaker 700  
1 purser 2,000  
1 steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $18,360
  Ordinary.    
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 carpenter's mate 228  
6 seamen, at $144 each 864  
12 ordinary seamen, at $120 1,440  
      4,032
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,400  
1 naval constructor 2,300  
1 foreman and inspector of timber 700  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 clerk to the master builder 400  
1 porter   7,650
  Total   30,042
  BOSTON.    
  Naval.    
1 captain    
1 commander 2,100  
4 lieutenants, at $1,600 each 6,000  
2 masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
1 chaplain 1,200  
1 professor 1,200  
4 passed midshipmen, at $700 each 3,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 sailmaker 700  
1 purser 2,500  
1 steward 216  
1 steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $28,676

--575--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  BOSTON—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
  Ordinary.    
2 lieutenants, at $1,500 each $3,000  
1 master 1,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
4 carpenter's mates (3 as calkers) at $228 each 912  
2 boatswain's mates, at $228 each 456  
14 seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,320  
  Hospital.    
1 surgeon 1,750  
2 assistant surgeons 1,900  
1 steward 360  
2 nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 washers, at $96 each * 192  
1 cook 144  
  *when the number of sick shall require them   4,566
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,700  
1 naval constructor 2,300  
1 measurer and inspector of timber 1,050  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 keeper of magazine 480  
1 porter 300  
      10,380
  Total   58,4[36]

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the marines also.

--576--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  NEW YORK. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
4 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 6,000  
2 masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
1 chaplain 1,200  
1 professor 1,200  
4 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 sailmaker 700  
1 purser 2,500  
1 steward 216  
1 steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $28,676
  Ordinary.    
2 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
1 master 1,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
4 carpenter's mates (3 as calkers) at $228 each 912  
2 boatswain's mates, at $228 each 456  
14 seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,320  
      14,854
  Hospital.    
1 surgeon 1,750  
2 assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 steward 360  
2 nurses, at $120 each 240  
2 washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 cook 144  
  *When the number of sick shall require them   4,586
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,700  
1 naval constructor 2,300  

--577--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  NEW YORK—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 measurer and inspector of timber $1,050  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 keeper of magazine 480  
1 porter 300  
      $10,380
  Total   58,496

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines.

  PHILADELPHIA. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
2 lieutenants 3,000  
1 master 1,000  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
3 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
2 midshipmen, at $350 each 700  
1 chaplain 1,200  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 purser 2,000  
1 steward 216  
      $20,816
  Ordinary.    
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 boatswain's mate 228  
4 seamen, at $144 each 576  
12 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,440  
      3,744

--578--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  PHILADELPHIA—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval Asylum and Hospital.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 secretary 900  
1 surgeon* 1,750  
1 assistant surgeon* 950  
1 steward* 360  
2 nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 cook* 144  
  *To attend to the hospital also, if required   $9,536
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,250  
1 naval constructor 2,300  
1 inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 clerk to the naval constructor 400  
1 porter 300 7,700
  Total   41,796

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the receiving vessel and to the marines.

  WASHINGTON. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
2 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
1 master 1,000  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
3 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
2 midshipmen, at $350 each 700  
1 chaplain 1,200  

--579--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  WASHINGTON—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 boatswain $700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 purser 2,000  
1 steward 216  
1 steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 steward to hospital 360  
      $21,536
  Ordinary.    
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 boatswain's mate 228  
1 carpenter's mate 228  
6 seamen, at $144 each 864  
14 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,680  
      4,500
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,700  
1 inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 master camboose maker and plumber 1,250  
1 chain cable and anchor maker 1,250  
1 keeper of magazine 480  
1 porter 300  
      9,180
  Total   35,216

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the hospital when necessary.

  NORFOLK. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
4 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 6,000  
2 masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  

--580--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  NORFOLK—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 surgeon $1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
1 chaplain 1,200  
1 professor 1,200  
4 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 sailmaker 700  
1 purser 2,500  
1 steward 216  
1 steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $28,676
  Ordinary.    
2 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
1 master 1,000  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
4 carpenter's mates (3 as calkers) at $228 each 912  
2 boatswain's mates, at $228 each 456  
14 seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,320  
      14,854
  Hospital.    
1 lieutenant 1,800  
1 surgeon 1,750  
2 assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 steward 360  
2 nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 cook 144 6,386
  * When number of sick shall require them    
  Civil.    
1 storekeeper 1,700  
1 naval constructor 2,300  
1 inspector and measurer of timber 1,050  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 900  

--581--

Y. & D.—No. 3—-Continued.

  NORFOLK—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 clerk (2d) to the storekeeper $450  
1 clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 keeper of magazine 480  
1 porter 300  
      $10,380
  Total   60,296

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines.

  PENSACOLA. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 captain $3,500  
1 commander 2,100  
3 lieutenants, at $1,500 each 4,500  
1 master 1,000  
1 surgeon 1,800  
1 assistant surgeon 950  
1 chaplain 1,200  
3 passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
3 midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 boatswain 700  
1 gunner 700  
1 carpenter 700  
1 sailmaker 700  
1 purser 2,500  
1 steward 216  
      $23,866
  Ordinary.    
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 carpenter 700  
1 carpenter's mate 228  
1 boatswain's mate 228  
10 seamen, at $144 each 1,440  
40 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,800  
      8,896
  Hospital.    
1 surgeon 1,750  
2 assistant surgeons 1,900  

--582--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  PENSACOLA—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 steward    
2 nurses, at $120 each $360  
2 washers, at $96 each 240  
1 cook 192  
  * When number of sick shall require them 144  
      $4,586
  Civil.    
1 naval constructor 1,500  
1 storekeeper 1,700  
1 clerk to the yard 900  
1 clerk to the commandant 900  
1 clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 porter 300  
      7,250
  Total   44,598

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the marines and the receiving vessel, if one should be stationed near the yard, and to such persons in the yard as the commander may direct.

  BALTIMORE. Pay. Aggregate.
1 captain $3,500  
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 surgeon 1,500  
1 purser 1,500  
1 clerk 500  
      $8,500
  CHARLESTON.    
1 captain 3,500  
1 lieutenant 1,500  
1 surgeon 1,500  
1 purser and storekeeper 1,500 8,000

--583--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

  FOR DUTY AT WASHINGTON OR ON GENERAL DUTY. Pay. Aggregate.
1 chief naval constructor $3,000  
1 principal steam engineer 2,500  
      $5,500
  SACKETT'S HARBOR.    
1 master   1,000
  LAKE ERIE.    
1 naval constructor   2,300
  FOREIGN STATIONS.    
1 storekeeper at Mahon 1,500  
1 storekeeper at Rio de Janeiro 1,500  
      3,000

RECAPITULATION.

  Naval. Ordinary. Hospital. Civil. Aggregate.
Portsmouth, N. H $18,360 $4,032   $7,650 $30,042
Boston 28,676 14,854 $4,586 10,380 58,496
New York 28,676 14,854 4,586 10,380 58,496
Philadelphia 20,816 3,744 9,536 7,700 41,796
Washington 21,536 4,500   9,180 35,216
Norfolk 28,676 14,854 6,386 10,380 60,296
Pensacola 23,866 8,896 4,586 7,250 44,598
Baltimore 8,000     500 8,500
Charleston 8,000       8,000
On duty at Washington       5,500 5,500
Sackett's Harbor 1,000       1,000
Lake Erie       2,300 2,300
Foreign stations       3,000 3,000
  187,606 65,734 29,680 74,220 357,240

--584--

Y. & D.—No. 3—Continued.

Note A.—The naval, ordinary, and hospital branches of the foregoing estimates, form a part of the first item in the general estimates for the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen, for the year ending 30th June, 1844, and amount to the sum of $283,520
Note B.—The civil branch of the foregoing estimate, embracing naval constructors, storekeepers, &c., forms the second item in the general estimate for the pay of superintendents, &c., for the year ending 30th June, 1844, and amounts to the sum of 73,720
  357,240

Bureau of Yards and Docks, November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

___________

Y. & D.—No. 4.

The foregoing estimates show the amount required for the support of the yards and stations for the year ending the 30th of June, 1844. One half the amount will, therefore, be required for the same object, for the half-year ending the 30th of June, 1843, viz.:

For the naval, ordinary, and hospital branches, which form a part of the first item in the general estimate, marked Y. & D.—A $141,760
For the civil branch, embracing naval constructors, storekeepers, &c., which makes the second item in the general estimate, marked Y. & D.—A 36,860
  178,620

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

--585--

___________

Y. & D.—No. 5.

Estimate of the amounts that will be required for making the proposed improvements and repairs in the several navy-yards up to the 30th of June, 1844, showing in separate columns the amount estimated for the half-year ending the 30th of June, 1843, and that for the year commencing on the 1st of July, 1843, and ending on the 30th of June, 1844.

  A.
For the
half-year
ending 30th
of June, 1843.
B.
For the
year
ending 30th
of June, 1844.
Aggregate
amount to
30th of June,
1844.
NAVY-YARD AT PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE.      
For continuing quay wall $8,000 $18,014 76 $26,014 76
For continuing wall of site 22 2,094 40   2,094 40
For rebuilding east wall of launching slip 3,000 2,600 5,600
For repairs of all kinds, filling in low ground, &c. 2,416 4,286 6,702
  15,510 40 24,900 76 40,411 16
NAVY-YARD AT BOSTON.      
For raising boundary wall northwest side of $3,000 $7,014 $10,014
For addition to store-house number fifteen 6,000 22,000 28,000
For boundary wall from masting house to the gate on the easterly quay wall. 7,650 12,000 19,050
For rain-water pipes, dry dock, &c. 3,342 70 2,000 5,342 70
For tools and machinery for smithery 4,000 7,365 11,365
For repairs of all kinds 10,000 21,620 70 31,620 70
  33,992 70 71,999 70 105,992 40
NAVY-YARD AT NEW YORK.      
For building and enlarging brick wall round the western boundary. $7,000 $11,500 $18,500
For brick stable 2,000 3,000 5,000
For guard house 2,000 2,500 4,500
For dredging out channels 1,000 4,000 5,000
For repairing and raising wharf of timber pond and floor to cooperage 1,000 1,300 2,300
For repairing sills of storehouse 2,000 2,500 4,500
For mud scows and filling in low grounds 2,000 1,600 3,600
For repairs of all kinds 3,000 3,600 6,600
For the dock, in addition to former appropriations 20,000 30,000 50,000
  40,000 60,000 100,000

--586--

Y. & D.—No. 5—Continued.

  A.
For the
half-year
ending 30th
of June, 1843.
B.
For the
year
ending 30th
of June, 1844.
Aggregate
amount to
30th of June,
1844.
NAVY-YARD AT PHILADELPHIA.      
For extending wharfs numbers 1, 2, 3, and 4 $8,000 $16,000 $24,000
For repairs of all kinds 1,950 2,070 4,020
  9,950 18,070 28,020
NAVY-YARD AT WASHINGTON.      
For renewing wharf end of ship-house $2,500 $4,558 $7,058
For addition to officer's quarters F 1,000 1,225 2,225
For brow stage, shears, and bed 1,767 814 2,581
For iron foundry and extending iron store 8,000 16,000 24,000
For stables 968   968
For repairs of all kinds 3,100 4,000 7,100
  17,335 26,597 43,932
NAVY-YARD AT NORFOLK.      
For extending quay wall, timber dock, &c. $12,000 $26,000 $36,000
For completing store-house 16 7,000 14,500 21,500
For constructing store-house 13 9,000 20,500 29,500
For constructing two watch-houses 1,200 810 2,010
For machinery for number 36 1,000 2,500 3,500
For repairs of all kinds 4,000 6,000 10,000
  34,200 70,310 104,510
NAVY-YARD AT PENSACOLA.      
For constructing a wharf $10,000 $20,000 $30,000
For introduction of spring water into yard 5,000 15,000 20,000
For addition to guard-house 1,000 1,047 2,047
For construction of 4 warrant officer's houses 10,000 22,844 32,844
For out house in commandant's yard 800 1,200 2,000
For repairs of all kinds, grading and leveling 2,000 3,000 5,000
  28,800 63,091 91,891

Bureau of Yards and Docks,
November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

--587--

____________

Y. & D—No. 6.

HOSPITALS AND MAGAZINES.

Estimate of the sums that will be required for the repairs and improvements of the hospitals and magazines, at the several navy-yards, up to the 30th of June, 1844; showing, in separate columns, the amount estimated for the half-year ending the 30th of June, 1843, and that for the year commencing on the 1st of July, 1843, and ending on the 30th of June, 1844.

  A.
For the
half-year
ending 30th
of June, 1843.
B.
For the
year
ending 30th
of June, 1844.
Aggregate
amount to
30th of June,
1844.
HOSPITALS.      
For hospitals at Charlestown, Massachusetts. $1,500 $1,300 $2,800
For hospital at Brooklyn 8,832 15,0 0 23,832
For naval asylum at Philadelphia 945 366 1,311
For hospital at Norfolk 2,000 2,000 4,000
For hospital at Pensacola 1,500 2,448 25 3,948 25
Total for hospitals 14,777 21,114 25 35,891 25
MAGAZINES.      
For magazine at Charlestown, Massachusetts $500 $1,000 $1,500
For magazine at Brooklyn 350 350 700
For magazine at Washington 250 250 500
For magazine at Norfolk 350 350 700
Total of magazines. 1,450 1,950 3,400

Bureau of Yards and Docks, November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON, Chief of Bureau.

___________

Y. & D.—No. 7.

Statement showing the items which go to make up the sum of $266,926, being the first item in the general estimate from the Bureau of Yards and Docks, marked Y. & D.—A. for the half year ending June 30, 1843:

 

Receiving vessels, see Y. & D.—No. 1, for detail $98,813 00
Recruiting stations, see Y. & D.—No. 2, for detail 26,425 00
Navy-yards, except the civil branch, see Y. & D. No. 3, for detail for half year is 141,760 00
  266,998 00

For the second item of the general estimate $36,860, see paper Y. & D.— No. 3, for detail.

Bureau of Yards and Docks, November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

--588--

__________

Y. & D.—No. 8.

Statement showing the items which go to make up the sum of $533,852, being the first item in the general estimate from the Bureau of Yards and Docks, for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844, marked Y. & D.—B.

 

Receiving vessel, see Y & D—No 1, for the detail $197,626 00
Recruiting station, see Y. & D.—No. 2, for detail 52,850 00
Navy-yards, except the civil branch, see Y. & D.—No. 3, for detail 283,520 00
  533,996 00

For the second item of the general estimate of $73,720, see paper Y. & D. No. 3. for detail.

Bureau of Yards and Docks, November 25, 1842.

L. WARRINGTON,
Chief of Bureau.

___________

B No. 3.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography,
November 16, 1842.

Sir:

In compliance with your instructions of the 28th ultimo, I have the honor to submit the following report and estimates:

The appropriation of $59,097 for ordnance and ordnance stores on the northern lakes, per act 4th August, 1842, and a balance of $12,692 79 of the appropriation per act of 3d March, 1841, for the continuance of the survey of the coast of the gulf of Mexico, appear to be the only sums for which this bureau has to account, all other appropriations for ordnance and ordnance stores having been merged in the general appropriation for "increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission."

These two sums of $59,097 and $12,692 79, are now in the Treasury, to the credit of this bureau.

Under the administration of the late Board of Navy Commissioners, contracts were entered into, which, by their terms, are to be completed by the 31st of January, 1843, for—

50 ten-inch Paixhan guns.

200 eight-inch do.

300 thirty-two-pounder chambered guns of about 56 cwt.

60 thirty-two-pounder chambered guns of about 41 cwt.

And for a proportionate number of shells and shot.

More than a moiety of the guns and a large proportion of the shells and shot have already been received under these contracts, and are spoken of by the inspecting officers in terms of high commendation. Contracts were also entered into for 4,000 swords, 2,000 pistols, and 2,500 carbines, deliverable during the present and ensuing years; arid this bureau has contracted for 2,000 barrels of powder, deliverable the 1st December next.

--589--

Under the act of 4th August, 1842, appropriating $59,097, "for ordnance and ordnance stores for the northern lakes," this bureau has entered into contract for 10 eight-inch Paixhan guns, 25 thirty-two-pounder chambered guns, and for the appropriate number of shells and shot, to be delivered at Sackett's Harbor, New York;

For 10 eight-inch Paixhan guns, 20 thirty-two-pounder chambered guns, and the appropriate number of shells and shot, to be delivered at Buffalo, New York; and

For 10 eight-inch Paixhan guns, 25 thirty-two-pounder chambered guns, and the appropriate number of shells and shot, to be delivered at Erie, Pennsylvania—all by the 15th of May, 1843.

If the views of the late Board of Navy Commissioners, as stated in their report to the department, May 19, 1841, be adopted as the bases of all future estimates for ordnance and ordnance stores for the Navy, then there will be required for ordnance and ordnance stores for the ensuing year, an appropriation equal to that of September 11, 1841, of $600,000. If, however, it should be deemed inexpedient, at this time, to carry out the views of that report, then I would respectfully recommend that an appropriation for 100 guns, of about 25 cwt., with their equipments, be asked for, as a more suitable and efficient armament than the present, for our third class sloops-of-war, brigs, and schooners; an estimate for which accompanies this report, and in which is included a supply of small arms, copper powder tanks,& c., &c., deemed necessary to the proper armament and efficiency of the vessels now in commission. The fact that almost all maritime nations have, as it appears, simultaneously, thrown aside the light gun and carronades, and adopted the long gun for their small vessels, would seem to render it absolutely necessary that we should, in self defence, and with a becoming regard for our national character, adopt similar armaments for our vessels.

That the present is a most favorable time for providing a supply of ordnance and ordnance stores for our navy, maybe seen from the fact that the contracts recently entered into by this bureau for ordnance and ordnance stores for the northern lakes, have been at a cost full 33 1/3 per cent. less than heretofore made.

Lieutenant Powell is charged with the survey of Tampa bay, and will trace the coast on as far as the mouth of the Mississippi.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. M. CRANE.

Hon. A. P. Upshur, Secretary of the Navy.

____________

Aggregate amount of all sums required for the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from the 1st January, 1843, to 30th June, 1844.

Amount of estimates from 1st January to 30th June, 1843, 6 months $102,521 97
Amount of estimates from 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844, 12 months 195,043 93
  297,565 90

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

--590--

General estimate of the sums required for the Ordnance and Hydrographical Bureau, from the 1st January to the 30th June, 1843, as per tables A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

For the use of the Ordnance branch of the service $71,556 97
For the use of the Hydrographical branch of the service 30,965 00
  102,521 97

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_______________

A.

There will be required for the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from 1st January to 30th June, 1843, the following:

1st. For the support of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography $3,950 00
2d. For pay of officers on ordnance duly 6,850 00
3d. For estimate for ordnance and ordnance stores, &c., &c. 60,756 97
  71,556 97

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

______________

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of office of Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from the 1st January to the 30th June, 1843—6 months.

For salary of the chief of bureau, at $3,500 per annum   $1,750 00
For salary of one clerk, at $1,200 per annum* $600  
For salary of one clerk, at $1,000 per annum* 500  
For salary of draughtsman, at $1,000 per annum* 500  
For salary of messenger, at $700 per annum* 350  
    1,950 00
For contingent expenses of this bureau   250 00
    3,950 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

* For act 31st August, 1842.

--591--

_____________

C.

Estimate of pay of officers on ordnance duty, from 1st January to 30th June, 1843—6 months.

1 captain, at $3,500 per annum $1,750 00
2 commanders, at $2,100 per annum, each 2,100 00
4 lieutenants, at $1,500 per annum, each 3,000 00
  6,850 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_____________

D.

Estimate of ordnance and ordnance stores, small-arms, powder tanks, &c., required for the general service of the navy, from 1st January, 1843, to 30th June, 1844—eighteen months.

For 100 32-pounder chambered guns, 6 feet long, to weigh about 25 cwt. each, for third class sloops-of-war, brigs, and schooners, at $133 per ton $16,625 00  
For 5,000 32-pounder shot, weighing 160,000    
lbs., at 3 cents per lb. 4,800 00  
For 100 gun-carriages, with implements complete, at $150 each 15,000 00  
For 2,000 barrels of powder, at $17 34,000 00  
For 1,000 carbine, at $18 18,000 00  
For 1,000 swords, at $4 50 4,500 00  
For 600 pistols, at $5 3,000 00  
For powder tanks of copper, composition, or bronze, for 7 frigates, 18 sloops, and 20 brigs or schooners, viz:    
420 tanks, to contain 150 lbs. each, at $12 07 5,069 40  
1,665 do 100 do 914 15,218 10  
2,070 do 50 do 622 12,875 40  
2,550 powder flasks, at $1 2,550 00  
1,000 boarding pikes, at $2 2,000 00  
50 fuse extractors, at $8 400 00  
For 63,800 lbs. pig lead, for musket and pistol balls, at 3 1/2 cents per lb. 2,233 00  
For 5,000 lbs. sheet lead, for gun aprons, &c., at 8 cents 400 00  
For fuses for shells 600 00  
For gun locks, battle lanterns, magazine lanterns, woolen woven sponges, tubes, matches, and flannel for cylinders 8,000 00  
    $145,270 90

--592--

TABLE D—Continued.

For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:  
For drawings and models; for postage paid by officers on ordnance duty; for travelling expenses of officers in inspecting ordnance and ordnance stores; for hire of agents and rent of storehouses for ordnance and ordnance stores on the lakes; for experiments in gun, shell, and shot practice; for targets; for transportation of ordnance and ordnance stores; for advertising in the public newspapers; and for repairs of gun-carriages $37,000 00
Total amount required, from 1st January, 1843, to 30th June, 1844—eighteen months 182,270 90

Of the above sum of $182,270 90, there will be required from the 1st January to 30th June, 1843, one third, or $60,756 97.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

______________

E.

There will be required for the support of the Hydrographical office, from the 1st January to 30th June, 1843:

1. For pay of officers, &c. $7,000 00
2. For the purchase of instruments, &c., and all other expenses 23,095 00
    30,965 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_____________

F.

Estimate of the pay required for officers, &c., on hydrographical duty from the 1st January to 30th June, 1843 (six months).

4 lieutenants, at $1,500 per annum $3,000 00
8 passed midshipmen, at $750 per annum 3,000 00
1 clerk, attached to Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, at $1,000 per annum, per act of 31st August, 1842 500 00
1 draughtsman, at $1,000 per annum 500 00
    7,000 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

--593--

_____________

G.

Estimate of the sums required for the Hydrographical office, from the 1st January to 30th June, 1843 (six months).

For the purchase and supply of nautical books, charts, and instruments for the navy $7,000 00
For repairing and binding nautical books, charts, and instruments for the navy 1,500 00
For freight and transportation of instruments, &c. 1,000 00
For travelling expenses of officers in delivering instruments 1,500 00
For house rent 250 00
For fuel, lights, repairs of house, and contingent expenses 750 00
For postage, models, drawings, packing and unpacking instruments, and incidental labor 500 00
For account books, forms, and stationery 500 00
For working the lithographic press, including all charges on account of lithographer, stones, ink, and chemicals 600 00
To meet outstanding liabilities on 1st January, 1843 5,000 00
For the erection of building for depot 5,000 00
For the employment of a nautical and mathematical instrument maker in repairing instruments 365 00
  23,965 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

General estimate of the sums required for the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from the 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844, as per tables A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

For the use of the ordnance branch of the service $143,113 93
For the use of the hydrographical branch of the service 51,930 00
  195,043 93

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_____________

A.

There will be required for the service of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from the 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844, the following:

1. For the support of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography $7,900 00
2. For pay of officers on ordnance duty 13,700 00
3. For estimate for ordnance and ordnance stores, &c. 121,513 93
    143,113 93

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

--594--

____________

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of office of Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, from 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844 (twelve months).

For salary of the chief of bureau $3,500 00
For salary of 1 clerk,* at $1,200  
For salary of 1 clerk,* at 1,000  
For salary of draughtsman,* at 1,000  
For salary of messenger,* at 700  
  3,900 00
For contingent expenses of bureau 500 00
  7,900 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

*Per act 31st August, 1842.

____________

C.

Estimate of pay of officers on ordnance duty, from 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844 (twelve months).

1 captain $3,500 00
2 commanders, at $2,100 per annum 4,200 00
4 lieutenants, at $1,500 " 6,000 00
  13,700 00

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_____________

D.

Estimate of ordnance and ordnance stores, small-arms, powder-tanks, &c., required for the general service of the navy from 1st January, 1843, to 30th June, 1844-—eighteen months.

For 100 32-pounder chambered guns, 6 feet long, to weigh about 25 cwt. each, for third class sloops-of-war, brigs, and schooners, at $133 per ton $16,625 00
For 5,000 32-pounder shot, weighing 160,000 lbs., at 3 cents per lb. 4,800 00

--595--

D.—Continued.

For 100 gun-carriages, with implements complete, at $150 each $15,000 00  
For 2,000 barrels powder, at $17 each 34,000 00  
For 1,000 carbines, at $18 each 18,000 00  
For 1,000 swords, at $4 50 each 4,500 00  
For 600 pistols, at $5 each 3,000 00  
For powder-tanks of copper, composition, or bronze, for 7 frigates, 18 sloops, and 20 brigs or schooners, viz:    
420 tanks, to contain 150 lbs. each at $12 07 5,069 40  
1,665 do 100 do 9 14 15,218 10  
2,070 do 50 do 6 22 12,875 40 2,550 00  
2,550 powder-flasks, at $1  
3,000 boarding-pikes, at $2 2,000 00  
50 fuse-extractors, at $8 400 00  
For 63,800 lbs. pig-lead, for musket and pistol balls, &c, at 3 1/2 cents per lb. 2,233 00  
For 5,000 lbs. sheet-lead for gun-aprons, &c., at 8 cents 400 00  
For fuses for shells 600 00  
For gun-locks, battle-lanterns, magazine-lanterns, woolen woven sponges, tubes, matches, and flannel, for cylinders 8,000 00  
    $145,270 90
For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:    
For drawings and models; for postage paid by officers in inspecting ordnance and ordnance store; for travelling expenses of officers in inspecting ordnance and ordnance stores; for hire of agents and rent of storehouses for ordnance and ordnance stores on the lakes; for experiments in gun, shell, and shot practice; for targets; for transportation of ordnance and ordnance stores; for advertising in the public papers, and for repairs of gun-carriages   37,000 00
Total amount required from 1st January, 1843, to 30th June, 1844, eighteen months   182,270 90

Of the above sum of $182,270 90, there will be required from 1st July, 1843, to 30th June, 1844, two thirds—twelve months—$121,513 93.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography,
November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

--596--

_____________

E.

There will be required for the support of the Hydrographical Office, from the 1st of July, 1843, to the 30th of June, 1844, the following:

 

1st. For pay of officers, &c. $14,000
2d. For the purchase of instruments, &c., and all other expenses 37,930
    51,930

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

___________

F.

Estimate of the pay required for officers, &c, on hydrographical duty, from the 1st of July, 1843, to the 30th of June, 1844 (twelve months).

4 lieutenants, at $1,500 per annum $6,000
8 passed midshipmen, at $750 per annum 6,000
1 clerk, attached to Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, at $1,000 per annum, per act of August 31, 1842 1,000
1 draughtsman, at $1,000 per annum 1,000
    14,000

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

_____________

G.

Estimate of the sums required for the Hydrographical Office from the 1st of July, 1843, to the 30th of June, 1844 (twelve months).

For the purchase and supply of nautical books, charts, and instruments for the navy $15,000
For repairing and binding of nautical books, charts, and instruments for the navy 3,000
For freight and transportation of instruments, &c. 2,000
For travelling expenses of officers in delivering instruments 2,000
For house rent 500
For fuel, lights, repairs of house, and contingent expenses 1,500
For postage, model, drawings, packing and unpacking instruments, and incidental labor 1,000
For account books, forms, and stationery 1,000
For working lithographic press, including all charges on account of lithographer, stones, ink, and chemicals 1,200
For the erection of a building for a depot 10,000
For the employment of a nautical and mathematical instrument maker for repairing instruments 730
  37,930

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, November 16, 1842.

W. M. CRANE.

--597--

____________

C—No. 3.

Bureau of Construction and Equipment,
December 2, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit the estimates for the naval service, so far as they come under the cognizance of this bureau, prepared in accordance with the directions contained in your letters of the 28th ultimo and the 2d instant. They are in triplicate; and, agreeably to the request contained in the letter of the Register of the Treasury, of the 7th of September last, a copy of which you transmitted to me for my guidance, made both for the half year ending 30th of June, 1843, and for the year ending 30th of June, 1844.

A schedule of the papers composing the estimates accompanies each copy, and, it is believed, that their simplicity and plainness renders any particular explanation unnecessary.

I am, with great respect, sir, your obedient servant,

D. CONNER.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

____________

Schedule of papers contained in the estimates for the naval service, prepared by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, for the eighteen months ending on the 30th of June, 1844:

A. Estimate of the expenses of the bureau for the half year ending 30th of June, 1843.

B. Estimate of the expenses of the bureau for the year ending 30th of June, 1844.

A, 1. Estimate of pay of squadrons for the half year ending 30th of June, 1843.

A, 2. Estimate of the amount required for steamers and store-ships for the half year ending 30th of June, 1843.

A, 3. Estimate of the amount required under the head of increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, for the half year ending 30th of June, 1843.

A, 4. Estimate of pay of squadrons for the year ending 30th of June, 1844.

A. 5. Estimate of the amount required for steamers and store-ships for the year ending 30th of June, 1844.

A, 6. Estimate of the amount required under increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, for the year ending 30th of June, 1844.

7. A statement of the names of the vessels in ordinary, or under repair at the several navy-yards.

8. A statement of the names of the vessels on the stocks at the several navy-yards.

9. General recapitulation of estimates.

10. Estimate of the amount required to keep in commission, for one year, the whole number of vessels composing the squadrons estimated for in paper A, 4.

--598--

11. Estimate of the amount required to keep in commission a vessel of each class for one year.

12. Statement of labor at the several yards from September, 1841, to September, 1842.

13. Statement of materials received and expended from September, 1841, to September, 1842.

____________

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, for the half-year ending the 30th of June, 1843, under the law of the 31st of August, 1842.

For the salary of the chief of the bureau. $1,500  
For the salaries of four clerks, draughtsman, and messenger 3,050  
    $4,550
CONTINGENT EXPENSES.    
Blank books and stationery 100  
Miscellaneous items 90  
Labor 60  
    250
    4,800

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, November 28, 1842.

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, for the year ending the 30th of June, 1844, under the law of the 31st of August, 1842.

For the salary of the chief of the bureau $3,000  
For the salaries of four clerks, draughtsman, and messenger 6,100  
    $9,100
CONTINGENT EXPENSES.    
Blank books and stationery 200  
Miscellaneous items 180  
Labor 120  
    500
    9,600

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, November 28, 1842.

--599--

____________

A-1.

Estimate of the amount of pay that will be required for the following squadrons of vessels in commission, for the half year ending June 30, 1843.

  Squadron for the Mediterranean.    
1 Commander-in-chief $2,000  
2 Frigates of the first class 92,654  
3 Sloops of war 69,042  
3 Brigs and schooners 28,836  
      $192,532
  Squadron on the coast of Brazil.    
1 Commander-in-chief 2,000  
2 Frigates of the first class 92,654  
3 Sloops of war 69,042  
3 Brigs and schooners 28,836  
      192,532
  Squadron for the Pacific station.    
1 Commander-in-chief 2,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 46,327  
4 Sloops of war 92,056  
4 Brigs and schooners 38,448  
      178,831
  Squadron for the East Indies.    
1 Commander-in-chief 2,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 46,3[]7  
2 Sloops of war 46,028  
2 Brigs and schooners 19,224  
      113,579
  Squadron on the Home station.    
1 Commander-in-chief 2,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 46,327  
4 Sloops of war 92,056  
4 Brigs and schooners 38,448  
      178,831
  Squadron on the coast of Africa.    
1 Commander-in-chief 2,000  
2 Sloops of war 46,028  
4 Brigs and schooners 38,448  
      86,476
      942,781

--600--

RECAPITULATION.

Mediterranean squadron $192,532
Squadron on the coast of Brazil 192,532
Squadron on the Pacific 178,831
Squadron in the East Indies 113,579
Squadron on the Home station 178,831
Squadron on the coast of Africa 86,476
  942,781

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

____________

A-2.

Estimate of the amount required for the steamers Union and Poinsett, and the store-ships Lexington, Erie, and Relief, in commission for the half year ending 30th. June, 1843; and for the Mississippi, Missouri, and Fulton, for the same period, in ordinary.

Vessels. Pay. Rations. Med'cns. Ordn'ce. Contingencies. Wear & tear. Aggregate.
Union $15,657 $4,380 $350 $700 $1,000 $3,500 $25,587
Poinsett 10,609 2,263 180 350 550 1,900 15,852
Lexington 7,289 2,044 125 200 375 1,000 11,033
Erie 7,289 2,044 125 200 375 1,000 11,033
Relief 6,097 1,497 93 163 275 750 8,875
  46,94 12,228 873 1,613 2,575 8,150 72,380
IN ORDINARY.*  
Mississippi 1,100
Missouri 1,100
Fulton 1,100
  75,680

*The necessary labor on board these vessels can be performed by men from the ordinary, or yard.

The small steamer Engineer will be employed at Norfolk, as a tug-boat; and, when her services are required, she can be manned from the receiving-ship, or yard. Therefore, no estimate for her is deemed necessary.

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

____________

A-3.

There will be required under the head of "Increase, repairs, armament and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission," for the half year ending 30th June, 1843, $950,000.

Increase, repairs, armament and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission . . . $950,000

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

--601—

____________

A—4.

Estimate of the amount of pay that will be required for the following squadrons of vessels in commission for the year ending June 30, 1844.

  Squadron for the Mediterranean.    
1 Commander-in-chief $4,000  
2 Frigates of the first class 185,308  
3 Sloops-of-war 138,084  
3 Brigs and schooners 57,672  
      $385,064
  Squadron on the coast of Brazil.    
1 Commander-in-chief 4,000  
2 Frigates of the first class 185,308  
3 Sloops-of-war 138,084  
3 Brigs and schooners 57,672  
      385,064
  Squadron for the Pacific station.    
1 Commander-in-chief 4,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 92,654  
4 Sloops-of-war 184,112  
4 Brigs and schooners 76,896  
      357,662
  Squadron for the East Indies.    
1 Commander-in-chief 4,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 92,654  
2 Sloops-of-war 92,056  
2 Brigs and schooners 38,448  
      227,158
  Squadron on the Home station.    
1 Commander-in-chief 4,000  
1 Frigate of the first class 92,654  
4 Sloops-of-war 184,112  
4 Brigs and schooners 76,896  
      357,662
  Squadron on the coast of Africa.    
1 Commander-in-chief 4,000  
2 Sloops-of-war 92,056  
4 Brigs and schooners 76,896 172,952
      1,885,562

--602--

RECAPITULATION.

Mediterranean squadron $385,064
Squadron on the coast of Brazil 385,064
Squadron in the Pacific 357,662
Squadron in the East Indies 227,158
Squadron on Home station 357,662
Squadron on coast of Africa 172,952
  1,885,562

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't, and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

___________

A—5.

Estimate of the amount required for the steamers Union and Poinsett, and the storeships Lexington, Erie, and Relief, in commission for the year ending 30th June, 1844; and for the Mississippi, Missouri, and Fulton, for the same period, in ordinary.

Vessels. Pay. Rations. Med'cns. Ordn'ce. Contingencies. Ware & tear. Aggregate.
Union $31,314 $8,760 $700 $1,400 $2,000 $7,000 $51,174
Poinsett 21,218 4,526 360 700 1,100 3,800 31,704
Lexington 14,578 4,088 250 400 750 2,000 22,066
Erie 14,578 4,088 250 400 750 2,000 22,066
Relief 12,193 2,993 185 325 550 1,500 17,746
  93,881 24,455 1,745 3,225 5,150 16,300 144,756
IN ORDINARY.*  
Mississippi 2,200
Missouri 2,200
Fulton 2,300
  151,356

* The necessary labor on board these vessels can be performed by men from the ordinary, or yard.

The small steamer Engineer will be employed at Norfolk, as a tug-boat; and when her services are required, she can be manned from the receiving-ship, or yard. Therefore, no estimate for her is deemed necessary.

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't, and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

____________

A—6.

The will be required under the head of "Increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission," for the year ending 30th June, 1844, $1,900,000.

Increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission . . . $1,900,000

Bureau of Constr'n, Equipm't, and Repairs, Nov'r 28, 1842.

--603--

_______

7.

A statement of the names of the vessels in ordinary or under repair at the several navy-yards.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

Sloop-of-war Saratoga; ready for service.

At Charlestown, Mass.

Ship-of-the-line Ohio, receiving ship; in good condition

Frigates Cumberland and Potomac; these vessels can be prepared for sea in a short period.

Store-ship Erie; lately fitted as a store-ship, and ready for service.

Brig Bainbridge; ready for service.

Brig Consort; there has been no survey of this brig since her late arrival from Portland, where she has been used as a receiving-vessel.

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

Ship-of-the-line North Carolina; in good order, and used as a receiving-vessel.

Ships-of-the-line Washington and Franklin; both require very extensive repairs.

Frigate Hudson; unfit for service.

Frigate Savannah, lately launched; in good order.

Sloop-of-war Vincennes, lately repaired; can be prepared for sea in a very short time.

Brig Porpoise, in good order; can be fitted for sea in thirty working days.

Brig Oregon; can be fitted for service in twenty-five working days.

At Philadelphia.

The schooner Experiment is fitted for and used as a receiving vessel; is not considered fit for general service.

At Baltimore.

Brig Pioneer; in good order, and used as a receiving vessel.

At Norfolk, Va.

Ship-of-the-line Pennsylvania; in good order, and used as a receiving ship.

Frigates Brandywine and Macedonian, requiring slight repairs; can be fitted for sea in a short time.

Sloop-of-war Levant; nearly ready for service.

Sloop-of-war St. Louis, recently arrived from the Pacific; her survey is not yet completed; she will require considerable repairs.

Store ship Lexington; ready for sea.

Brig Truxton; ready for sea.

Steamer Engineer; transferred from the War Department; small, and unfit for a cruising vessel.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,
November 28, 1842.

--604--

________

8.

A statement of the names of the vessels on the stocks at the several navy-yards.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

The Alabama ship-of-the-line and the Santee, first class frigate.

At Charlestown, Mass.

The ships-of-the-line Virginia and Vermont.

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

The Sabine, first class frigate.

At Philadelphia.

The Raritan, first class frigate.

At Norfolk, Va.

The New York ship-of-the-line and the St. Lawrence, first class frigate.

4 ships-of-the-line.

4 frigates.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,
November 28, 1842.

--605--

____________

9.

GENERAL RECAPITULATION.

For the half year ending June 30, 1843.    
For pay of the navy, per letter A—No. 1. $942,781 00  
For pay of the navy — steamers and store-ships in commission, per letter A—No. 2. 46,940 50  
For pay of the navy — steamers in ordinary, per letter A—No. 2. 3,300 00  
For increase, repair, armament and equipment, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, per letter A—No. 3. 950,000 00  
For contingent expenses, per A—No. 2. & No. 10. 68,700 00  
    $2,011,721 50
For the year ending June 30, 1844.    
For pay of the navy, per letter A—No. 4. 1,885,562 00  
For pay of the navy — steamers and store ships in commission, per letter A—No. 5. 93,881 00  
For pay of the navy - steamers in ordinary, per letter A—No. 5. 6,600 00  
For increase, repair, armament and equipment, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, per letter A—No. 6. 1,900,000 00  
For contingent expenses, per A—No. 5, & No. 10. 137,400 00  
    4,023,443 00
    6,035,164 50

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,
November 28, 1842.

--606--

____________

10.

Estimate of the amount required to keep in commission for one year the following vessels, viz:

7 frigates $1,201,424
18 sloops of war 1,385,874
20 brigs and schooners 635,990
    3,223,278

Statement showing the sums required under the several heads of appropriation for the above number of vessels.

Vessels. Pay. Rations. Medicines. Ordnance. Wear and tear. Contingent. Aggregate.
7 frigates $648,578 $248,346 $15,750 $31,500 $210,000 $47,250 $1,201,424
18 sloops 828,504 269,370 18,000 36,000 180,000 54,000 1,385,874
20 brigs 384,480 109,500 7,000 14,000 100,000 21,000 635,980
    1,861,562 627,216 40,750 81,500 490,000 122,250 3,223,278

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, November 28, 1842.

--607--

_____________

11.

Estimate of the amount required to keep in commission a vessel of each class for one year.

Rates of vessels. Pay. Rations. Medicines. Ordnance. Wear and tear. Contingent. Aggregate.
Ship of the line $153,064 $65,335 $4,000 $10,000 $45,000 $12,000 $289,399
Frigate of first class 92,654 35,478 2,256 4,500 30,000 6,750 171,632
Frigate of second class 76,676 28,470 1,900 3,800 25,000 5,700 141,546
Sloop of first class 46,028 14,965 1,000 2,000 10,000 3,000 76,993
Sloop of third class 34,734 11,388 800 1,500 6,500 2,300 57,222
Brig or schooner 19,224 5,475 350 700 5,000 1,050 31,799
  422,380 161,111 10,300 22,500 121,500 30,800 768,591

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, November 28, 1842.

--608--

___________

12.

Statement of the amounts expended during the preceding year, from 30th of September, 1841, to 30th September, 1842, for wages of mechanics and laborers, in building, repairing, or equipping vessels of the navy, or in receiving and securing stores and materials for these purposes; and, also, the number of days' work which were performed during the same time.

Navy-yards. Days of labor. Cost of labor. Average
price
of labor
per diem.
Portsmouth, N. H. 49,782 $67,993 85 $1 36 1/2
Charlestown, Mass. 110,400 191,848 87 1 73 7/10
New York 87,953 149,462 67 1 70
Philadelphia 61,976 95,067 76 1 53 3/10
Washington, D. C. 67,035 95,652 05 1 42 6/10
Norfolk 180,372 275,257 27 1 52 6/10
  557,518 875,282 47 1 54 4/6

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,
November 28, 1842.

___________

13.

Statement showing the cost or estimated value of stores on hand, at the several navy-yards, on the 1st of October, 1841, of articles received and expended during the year; and of stores on hand 1st October, 1842, under the appropriation for increase, repairs, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission.

Navy-yards. Value on hand
1st Oct., 1841.
Receipts. Expenditures. Value on hand
1st Oct., 1842.
Portsmouth, N. H.*        
Boston $2,092,562 60 $520,521 95 $591,097 36 $2,021,987 19
New York 1,855,908 56 898,174 00 735,311 39 2,018,771 17
Philadelphia 435,225 34 181,910 23 144,856 74 472,278 82
Washington 423,163 36 339,476 43 202,130 84 560,508 95
Norfolk 1,706,537 00 607,365 47 504,473 86 1,809,428 61
Pensacola 166,889 25 20,107 73 14,421 67 172,575 31
  6,680,286 11 2,567,555 81 2,192,291 86 7,055,550 05

* Returns not complete.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,
November 28, 1842.

--609--

____________

D. No. 3.

Navy Department,
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing,
November 17, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to submit, herewith, the following estimates for the half-year commencing January 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1843; and for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844, each in triplicate, viz :

A.—Estimate of provisions for the six months.

B.—Estimate of clothing for the six months.

C.—Estimate of the expenses of the bureau for the six months.

D.—Estimate of provisions for the year.

E.—Estimate of clothing for the year.

F.—Estimate of the expense of the bureau for the year.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

CH. W. GOLD BOROUGH,
Chief of the Bureau.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

--610--

____________

A.

Estimate of the provisions required for the navy for six months, commencing 1st of January and ending 30th of June, 1843, showing the cost of each vessel and of each yard, and the aggregate cost of the number of vessels of each description, proposed to be employed, and the general aggregate of vessels and yards for provisions.

Description of vessels, &c. Number
of men
for each.
Number
of
rations
for
each.
Cost
of
rations
for
each.
Number of
vessels
estimated
for.
Aggregate
number
of men.
Aggregate
number
of rations
Aggregate
cost
of rations.
Ship of the line 890 162,425 $32,485 00 2 1,780 324,850 $64,970 00
Frigate 486 83,695 17,739 00 5 2,430 443,475 88,695 00
Sloop 205 37,412 1/2 7,482 50 18 3,690 673,425 134,685 00
Brig or schooner 75 13,687 1/2 2,737 50 20 1,500 273,250 54,750 00
Steamer Union 120 21,900 4,380 00 1 120 21,900 4,380 00
Steamer Poinsett 62 11,315 2,263 00 1 62 11,315 2,263 00
RECEIVING-VESSELS.              
Ohio 244 44,530 8,906 00 1 244 44,530 8,906 00
North Carolina 244 44,530 8,906 00 1 244 44,530 8,906 00
Pennsylvania 244 44,530 8,906 00 1 244 44,530 8,906 00
Ontario 30 5,475 1,095 00 1 30 5,475 1,095 00
Experiment 19 3,467 1/2 693 50 1 19 3,467 1/2 693 50
Pioneer 19 3,467 1/2 693 50 1 19 3,467 693 50
Small vessel at Charleston 19 3,467 1/2 693 50 1 19 3,467 1/2 693 50
NAVY-YARDS.              
Portsmouth 20 3,650 730 00   20 3,650 730 00
Boston 58 10,585 2,117 00   58 10,585 2,117 00
New York 58 10,585 2,117 00   58 10,585 2,117 00
Philadelphia 18 3,285 657 00   18 3,285 657 00
Washington 24 4,380 876 00   24 4,380 876 00
Norfolk 58 10,585 2,117 00   58 10,585 2,117 00
Pensacola 53 9,672 1/2 1,934 50   53 9,672 1/2 1,934 50
STORE-SHIPS.              
Eire* 51 9,307 1/2 1,861 50 3 153 27,922 5,584 50
Lexington*
Relief*
*Each         10,843 1,978,847 1/2 395,769 50

10,843 persons, each drawing one ration, make 1,978,847 1/2 rations, at 20 cents, $395,769 50.

It is believed that the sum thus estimated will be found sufficient to cover all expenses of transportation, cooperage, and other expenses. It is therefore respectfully recommended that the appropriation be worded accordingly.

For provisions for the navy for the half year commencing January 1, and

--611--

ending June 30, 1843, including transportation, cooperage, and other expenses, $395,769 50.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH,
Chief of the Bureau.

Navy Department,
Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 17, 1842.

The balance of the appropriation for 1842, for provisions, which will remain in the Treasury on January 1, 1843, will, it is estimated, be sufficient to meet all liabilities under that head, and spare a considerable amount; and I would suggest that $33,000 may be deducted from the above estimate; thus reducing it to $362,769 50.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH.

_____________

B.

Estimate of clothing for the navy, for the half year, commencing January 1, and ending June 30, 1843.

The whole number of persons employed on board our ships, and in our navy-yards (in the ordinary), is estimated at 10,343. Of these it is calculated that about 7,600 will draw their supplies of clothing from the Government stock. Each person heretofore, it has been estimated, has drawn, on an average, in 3 years, a supply of clothing equal to $175 70; but in consequence of the reduction in the price of materials, it is confidently believed that the estimate should be reduced to $150; so that the average each year would be $50, and the half year would be $25; then this estimate for six months will be 7,600 persons, at $25 each, $190,000.

Clothing for the navy has heretofore been paid for out of the appropriation for "pay, &c." of the navy; when issued, it has been charged to the men, as so much pay, and the amount thus issued has been restored to the appropriation for pay, &c.; but no particular account for clothing issued, has ever been settled between the pursers and the Government. Such account should show the number of each particular article of clothing delivered to, and issued by, the pursers; for instance, 1,000 suits are delivered by a storekeeper to a purser; the storekeeper is credited by the delivery, and the purser is charged and must account for each and every article received by him for issue. Another consequence which has been inconvenient to the service, is this: the actual available amount of the appropriation for pay, is reduced by considerable sums of that appropriation being vested in clothing at the. very time when the whole appropriation has been required to pay off crews arriving from distant stations. Moreover, the appropriation for pay is reduced by every condemnation of clothing, the difference between its original cost, and the amount it sells for at public auction after being surveyed and condemned as unfit for issue in the navy, would show the amount of the reduction. Another consideration which appears to me to favor the proposition of a specific appropriation, is this: that having but one appropriation to rely on, the actual expenditures under the head of clothing, can be more

--612--

readily ascertained, the accounts greatly simplified, and the actual cost clearly exhibited on the books of this bureau without referring to any other appropriation than that for "clothing for the navy."

No additional cost would arise from adopting this proposition. It is indeed hoped confidently, that the regulations recently adopted, will have a tendency to produce a considerable reduction of the expenses. So far will the expenses probably be reduced, that I would respectfully suggest that the expenses of transportation maybe included in an appropriation, without increasing its aggregate amount; so that the appropriation for "contingent expenses," heretofore used to pay for transportation, will be saved the amount thereof, and the appropriation now submitted, can be worded thus:

For clothing for the navy, including transportation, and every other expense, for the half year, commencing 1st January, and ending 30th June, 1843, $190,000.

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing,
November 17, 1842.

CHARLES W. GOLDSBOROUGH,
Chief of the Bureau.

___________

C.

Estimate of the expense of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, for the half year commencing January 1, and ending 30th June, 1843, agreeable to the 4th section of the act of 31st August, 1842, entitled, "An act to reorganize the Navy Department of the United States."

For compensation to the chief of the Bureau, at $3,000 per annum $1,500
For compensation to the chief clerk, at $1,400 per annum 700
For compensation to a clerk at $1,200 per annum 600
For compensation to a clerk at $800 per annum 400
One messenger at $700 per annum 350
Contingent:  
For blank books, binding, and stationery 300
For miscellaneous items 100

In submitting this estimate, a sense of duty requires that I should state that additional assistance is absolutely necessary to enable the bureau to keep the accounts coming under its cognizance. Every purser in the service, and every store-keeper, has accounts to settle, for all the various provisions, slop-clothing, and "small stores," committed to his care, and for which he is held responsible. These accounts, as far as practicable, should be settled every quarter. In number they may exceed sixty for each quarter, and each account necessarily embraces a multitude of items which require particular and careful examination, involving many calls for explanation, preparatory to their being admitted for entry on the journal of accounts. The present

--613--

chief clerk of the bureau has incessant employment, in performing the duties enjoined on him by the act of 26th August, 1842, section 13, in receiving and examining the monthly and quarterly returns of stoves and clothing received and expended at the stations, foreign and home, and on board all our vessels in commission, entering numerous invoices of shipments, and aiding in the correspondence of the bureau. Zealous and capable as the chief clerk is known to he, it has already become apparent that these duties are too heavy for any one individual; and when it is borne in mind that all these accounts are to be entered in a journal, and transferred thence into a ledger, and such entries and transfers are all to be carefully examined, it will, it is hoped and presumed, be at once admitted, that additional assistance is absolutely necessary.

The time of the second clerk allowed by the act of 31st August, 1842, is fully occupied by the duties arising under contracts. He has to prepare, not only the original contracts, but duplicates and triplicates, for transmission to commandants and agents: to record them; to enter and scale all bids for supplies; to receive and enter all returns as to the progress making in the execution of contracts: all payments upon them; all reservations; to prepare all advertisements for supplies, and see they are published as directed; to examine all advertising accounts, prepare them, if correct, for approval, and keep an account of all such as may be approved; and to aid in the correspondence upon all these subjects, and to record the same. The third clerk is fully employed in attending to the general records, and in keeping the requisition book, and the exhibits of moneys received and expended by the disbursing agents. Beside which, he has to aid in the general correspondence, and to prepare copies of letters and papers of various kinds. Hence, neither the 2d not 3d clerk could reasonably be required to aid in the general accounts of stores and clothing, and such accounts could not be entered on the Journal, and spread upon the ledger without additional assistance. Two able accountants in addition to the present force, would, it is hoped, be found sufficient to enable us to keep the accounts of the bureau, in such condition as would be satisfactory. I, therefore, respectfully submit the following additional estimate, viz:

Two clerks, as accountants at $_____ each per annum—the half $ _______

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 17, 1842.

CHAS. W. GOLDSBOROUGH.

--614--

______________

D.

Estimate of the provisions required for the navy, for one year, commencing 1st of July, 1843, and ending 30th of June, 1844, showing the cost of each vessel and of each yard, and the aggregate cost of the number of vessels of each description, proposed to be employed, and the general aggregate of vessels and yards for provisions.

Description of vessels, &c. Number
of men
for each.
Number
of
rations
for each.
Cost
of
rations
for each.
Number
of
vessels
estimated
for.
Aggregate
number
of
men.
Aggregate
number
of
rations.
Aggregate
cost
of
rations.
Ship of the line 890 324,850 $64,970 2 1,780 649,700 $129,940
Frigate 486 177,390 35,478 5 2,430 886,950 177,390
Sloop 205 74,825 14,965 18 3,690 1,346,850 269,370
Brig or schooner 75 27,375 6,475 20 1,500 547,500 109,500
Steamer Union 120 43,800 8,760 1 120 43,800 8,760
Steamer Poinsett 62 22,630 4,526 1 62 22,630 4,526
RECEIVING-VESSELS.              
Ohio 244 89,060 17,812 1 244 89,060 17,812
North Carolina 244 89,060 17,812 1 244 89,060 17,812
Pennsylvania 244 89,060 17,812 1 244 89,060 17,812
Ontario 30 10,950 2,190 1 30 10,950 2,190
Experiment 19 6,935 1,387 1 19 6,935 1,387
Pioneer 19 6,935 1,387 1 19 6,935 1,387
Small vessel at Charleston 19 6,935 1,387 1 19 6,935 1,387
NAVY-YARDS.              
Portsmouth 20 7,300 1,460 1 20 7,300 1,460
Boston 58 21,170 4,234 1 58 21,170 4,234
New York 58 21,170 4,234 1 58 21,170 4,234
Philadelphia 18 6,570 1,314 1 18 6,570 1,314
Washington 24 8,760 1,752 1 24 8,760 1,752
Norfolk 58 21,170 4,234 1 58 21,170 4,234
Pensacola 53 19,345 3,869 1 53 19,345 3,869
STORE-SHIPS.              
Erie* 51 18,615 3,723 3 153 55,845 11,169
Lexington*
Relief*
*Each         10,843 3,957,695 791,539

10,843 persons, each drawing 1 ration, make 3,957,695 rations, at 20 cents, $791,539.

It is believed that the sum thus estimated will be found sufficient to cover all expenses of transportation, cooperage, and other expenses. It is therefore respectfully recommended that the appropriation be worded accordingly.

For provisions for the navy for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844, including transportation, cooperage, and other expenses, $791,539.

Navy Department, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 17, 1842.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH,
Chief of the Bureau.

--615--

The balance of the appropriation for provisions for 1842, which will remain in the Treasury on January 1, 1843, will, it is estimated, be sufficient to meet all the liabilities under that head, and spare a considerable amount; and I would suggest that $67,000 may be deducted from the above estimate; thus reducing it to $724,539.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH.

____________

E.

Estimate of clothing for the navy for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844:

The whole number of persons employed on board our ships, &c., in our navy-yards (in ordinary), is estimated at 10,843.

Of these it is calculated that about 7,600 will draw their supplies of clothing from the Government stock.

Each person, it is believed, will not draw on an average, in the course of three years a supply of clothing greater than $150. So that the average for one year would be $50. Then this estimate for one year will be, 7,600 persons at $50 each, $380,000.

The appropriation to include the expense of transportation, and every other expense.

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, Nov. 17, 1842.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH,
Chief of the Bureau.

____________

F.

Estimate of the expense of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing for the year commencing July 1, 1843, and ending June 30, 1844; agreeable to the 4th section of the act of August 31, 1842, entitled, "An act to reorganize the Navy Department of the United States:"

For compensation to the chief of the bureau, at $3,000 per annum $3,000 00
For compensation to the chief clerk, at $1,400 1,400 00
For compensation to a clerk, at $1,200 1,200 00
For compensation to a clerk, at $800 800 00
For one messenger, at $700 700 00
CONTINGENT.  
For blank-books, binding, and stationery 450 00
For miscellaneous items 200 00
SUBMITTED.  
For two additional accountants  

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, November 17, 1842.

CH. W. GOLDSBOROUGH.
Chief of the Bureau.

--616--

____________

E No. 3.

Navy Department,
Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, December 1, 1842.

Sir:

In obedience to your instructions of the 28th of October, the undersigned has the honor to submit the following preamble and estimates for the medical department of the navy:

The preamble is deemed absolutely essential for a true understanding of the real condition of that part of the Navy Department which comes under the direction of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. The developments it contains are neither agreeable, nor, perhaps, expected. Yet it is right that Congress should be in possession of the facts showing the awkward condition of the medical department, in relation to its fiscal concerns. It is also just to yourself to show how much reform was needed in this branch of the service. It is but fair to the incumbent of this bureau, that the heavy demands existing on an appropriation which, for a series of years, seems to have been either insufficiently asked, or inadequately granted, in reference to the expenses that appropriation was designed to liquidate—should be explained. That the annual appropriations for the outlays of the medical department have not been, in some years, anterior to that just passed, in parity with the current expenses of those years, the undersigned sees no occasion to take upon himself to assert. But that, in (he series of years alluded to, the aggregate appropriations have not only not been commensurate with the aggregate outlay, he not only takes upon himself to say, but, also, that the deficit in the former, to bring them on an equality with the latter, amounts to a sum which, unless provided by a specific appropriation, will press heavily for years to come, on the usual medical appropriation, even by a process which would subtract a tithe of each year's grant for the gradual extinction of the present demands. It would, therefore, be equally disingenuous to assume these demands, in part, in the basis of estimates for future wants, thus vainly and uselessly, and, on the part of the undersigned, culpably endeavoring to conceal the embarrassment they occasion, and unwise to withhold any longer from Congress the fact that, until they are wholly dissipated by specific funds, no economy can be apparent, as consecutive to the reorganization which introduced a bureau in this department, among the effects of the operations of which, economy was anticipated as an important one.

To start in this bureau, under the just expectation by Congress and by yourself, of thrift and saving, with the clog of an aggregate debt of fifty thousand dollars, would be idle. This is the sum, at least, which, by a gradual increment from a previously unwise method of making estimates, meets, the undersigned in the fiscal part of his bureau. To dissipate the trammels of this residual sum after years of injudicious estimates, by gradually lessening it out of the annual appropriations, instead of acquainting Congress at once with the naked truth, would require that thirteen thousand dollars should annually, for four years, be abstracted from the medical fund! The result is plain, supposing this course should be adopted instead of the one the undersigned proposes of eclaircissement: that, for four years to come, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery would seem to increase the heretofore usual appropriation, by thirteen thousand dollars annually!! That neither system nor economy could be imputed as a part of such wild operations, is clear; that unmerited blame and obloquy would be heaped upon this part of the reorganization, is equally plain; that an unjust unpopularity would meet its

--617--

measures at every step, is not less manifest; and, finally, that its abolition would be the probable issue, is unquestionable. With these general observations, the undersigned proceeds to the details within his knowledge, on which they have been based, after the following explanatory observations:

The difficulty that meets the attempt at making the required estimates at the onset, has already been premised. Its cause, or causes rather (for there are several), will now be set forth.

These estimates are for the moiety of the year approaching, ending on the 30th of June next; together with superadded estimates for the whole of the fiscal year thereafter, ending on the 30th June, 1844. To arrive at these would be a simple affair; but the simplicity of it becomes, instead, a complex calculation, by the existence of claims unappeased, to the amount already mentioned, in round numbers.

When estimates were presented to Congress prior to August, 1842, for an appropriation of thirty thousand dollars to defray the current expenses of the medical department of the navy during the year 1842, there remained, on the day of the passage of the law granting the appropriation asked for, certain arrearages clue for outlays in the medical department to an amount, in the aggregate, actually exceeding, very considerably, the total of that appropriation.

The whole of it was, therefore, swallowed up in less than a week after the passage of the act, although five months of the year thus seemingly provided for were in future. But this is not all. At least ten thousand dollars still remained due and unpaid. This sum ($40,000) had grown out of bills charged certainly, if not justly chargeable (which admits of doubt), to the appropriation for the medical department. The result is as manifest and intelligible as its sequence was natural. An appropriation for the whole of the year 1842 was extinguished in a few days to liquidate, although only adequate to do it partially, the debts of the year 1841, those of 1842 accumulating the while. The debts of 1840, with a similar retrogression, had been paid also only in part, out of the appropriation of and for 1841; those in like manner of 1839 out of the appropriation of 1840, and so on by retrogressive shackle for perhaps a long course of years; each anterior year's debts bringing the additional increment of the portion left unpaid from the periods of time gone by, as an undecaying dead horse, the price of which was to be paid, sooner or later, out of funds set apart to buy food for the living one.

All this time Congress remained ignorant of the true state of things, believing that each annual appropriation was competent to its object, since it always reached the amount asked as competent for the year embraced.

Thus the undersigned has brought you, by the simple statement of a state of things which quickly reached his mind, to a thorough understanding of the confusion which would continue, unless the affair be rectified, on the just and competent principles of cure. It only remains to say, that whatever information this preamble may communicate, of a novel or unexpected nature, it was all forced on him with convincing celerity by the power of figures, on the moment when his duty led him to investigate the fiscal concerns of his bureau, and to ponder the singular uniformity of navy agents' returns in the loaded column appropriated to "amounts overpaid." The amazement, this uniformity and the large amounts of that column produced, can be better understood by you than explained by the undersigned. Sufficient ground for this will be admitted when he simply states that he had expected to see a clean and clear ledger, exhibiting the

--618--

distribution of the appropriation in parcels to those agents as debits for the year current, with simple offsets against these of credits for lawful outlays of that year from the medical appropriation. Far from this simplicity of grant and expenditures [ ] the result of his scrutiny; having found, not only the groaning column of overpayments on account of the appropriation for "medicines,& c.," but unwarrantable intrusions on the fund, especially for the support of the naval asylum, the irregularities in the administration of which you have promptly proceeded to correct, on the moment of the disclosures which the reorganization produced.

The cause of all this is traceable, as has been stated, several years back, by the annual interlocking with each successive appropriation for any particular year the claims of some year anterior; thus leaving an apparent competent fund in a state of glaring incompetency to meet the objects it was lawfully designed to meet.

This cause of insufficiency to liquidate the annual demands, was dilated by an immoderate expenditure, from year to year, far beyond the actual need of outlay for surgeon's necessaries and appliances; an immoderate expenditure growing out of a lax and irresponsible method of making requisitions, and obtaining their approval by officers incompetent to judge of the necessity for them, either in kind or in the quantities asked for; and. still further enlarged, by an unrestrained and craft-inviting course, in having those requisitions executed.

But these were not the only causes which impinged the strength of the appropriation. An additional one is found in the loss which the practised system of entire unaccountability engendered, of articles of imperishable nature, but costly price, and which had been obtained out of Congressional appropriations apposite to such expenditure.

The necessity for replenishing these, admitted of no abatement from the fact, that, having once been obtained, they ought to have been preserved for future and other similar use to that to which they were first applied. The fact was evident that now they were gone. This overwhelmed every other view. No accountability existing, either by law, usage, or much individual exertion on the part of those concerned, but, on the contrary, any and every essay toward instituting it having been uniformly extinguished, by a constant refusal by the usual recipients to give receipts or vouchers for delivery of articles after return-cruises, it is neither surprising that losses of costly appliances ensued, nor is it strange that a continual drain was thus instituted on a specific fund destined, in part at least, to meet outlays of one year, which would last for the same purpose in the service, if well taken care of, for several consecutive years.

It is easy to perceive how these causes might quickly impoverish an appropriation, even if it had been well devised to meet current expenses; but when it is remembered that a doubtful judgment had been shown, for years past, by those who furnished the Secretary of the Navy with the data for his estimates on the branch of the service in question; and that a policy not easily understood, or involving an unacquaintance, perhaps, with the veritable state of perpetuated claims, led to asking, or causing to be asked, of Congress, an appropriation wholly insufficient—it becomes palpable that the irregularity and irresponsibility in making requisitions, and the exorbitant charges on their execution in, at least, one of our southern sea-ports, joined to the carelessness, waste, and loss produced, in the manner noticed, are causes in combination, adequate to produce their full share in contriving he embarrassments now complained of and exhibited.

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In truth, the appropriation, for one year, was often, if not always, virtually, though perhaps not apparently, foreclosed, for any benefit to that year's outlay, by the engulfing arrearages of the year or more previous. The real state of affairs in the medical department not being known, or being known, not having been developed, it became next to impossible to meet indefinite outlays or claims by definite appropriations. A similar difficulty would now exist, if any estimates were predicated on the unsound policy of perpetuating the mystification which has characterized the medical outlay for years past. Under the full conviction of this, that specious and. deceptive lure held out by narrowed estimates is now abandoned and anathematized. The plain truth, devoid of cloud or obscurity, is now before you, and the undersigned believes that you will better receive it than a mesh of intricacies predicated on calculations which must fall short of adequacy, if devoid of that foundation. There is nothing problematical in this policy. To disclose to you that which figures in the accounting books, and in the official returns of navy agents to his bureau, revealed to the undersigned, is a duty; to make that disclosure fully and fairly, is common honesty.

It may not be without utility to observe here, that whatever may be the amount granted hereafter to the medical department, its integrity will most likely not be invaded by any of the irregular causes of diminution which have been noticed. Hitherto, there not having been any restraining influence over outlays, and no practicable method of recalling the material proceeds of those outlays into the storerooms for public property, nor any power exerted till lately (for the evil was not known to the power, until brought to light by the reorganization*) to stay a truly ruthless host of intrusions on the medical

___________

* Six hundred and sixty-five dollars and fifty-seven cents were, unauthorizedly, paid out of the appropriation for "medicines, surgical instruments, &c.," for 31 blue cloth frock-coats, with navy buttons, and a silver star ornament, 31 pairs blue cassimere pantaloons, and 31 blue cassimere vests, with navy buttons—and all this toggery for "Jack"—for pensioners who never had worn anything longer than a sailor's jacket, or at most, in storms, a monkey or pea jacket, the cost of which is eight dollars, instead of fourteen dollars charged for the frock-coats, made in officer's undress fashion. This will serve to show the unwarrantable intrusions on the appropriation for medicines, referred to in the text. But it may more strongly be set forth by this fact: of seven thousand one hundred and twenty-one dollars and sixty-four cents, paid by the navy agent at Philadelphia, from the 1st of October, 1841, to the 25th of October, 1842, out of the appropriation for "medicines, &c.," only one thousand and forty dollars and nineteen cents were for medicines, surgical instruments, and surgical purposes. The remaining six thousand one hundred and eighty-one dollars and forty-five cents were for items of expenditure, wholly foreign to the intent of the appropriation, and, of course, were what have been appropriately called intrusions on the fund, not known to be practised, nor thought of by Congress, when they made the appropriations in question.

How could thirty thousand dollars, appropriated for the whole naval service, for the whole year 1842, be deemed sufficient, when a mal-administration of the fund, on one station, swept off at once, in a few days more than twelve months, $6,181 45, not lawfully chargeable to the medical fund? Could the balance, $23,818 55, be for a moment thought competent to supply all the ships, sick quarters, hospitals, &c., in the United States, for a whole year? That this mal-administration may be understood, the navy agent's return to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery is annexed, in toto, as an appendix. It will not be understood, however, that the slightest blame is imputed in these irregular transactions, to that gentleman, officially, or in any other way. The irregularity is chargeable, and it is now unhesitatingly charged, on the governor of the naval asylum, who approved the bills, and thus ordered their payment out of an appropriation which no sophistry could make chargeable with such burdens. In addition to these irregular outlays, the sum of $3,500 is reported on the purser's pay rolls, as paid, annually, for wages or pay alone (exclusive of officers' pay), in that institution—$428 of which, is the wages of a person rated and paid as hospital steward, who never performed five minutes' duty as such in the hospital, but was employed solely as purser's clerk, and to buy provisions for which he was regularly paid, as any agent not connected with the institution might have done. Of this whole amount of $3,500 for wages (the subsistence of those so paid, being a further change, and paid out of the appropriation for medicine), only $936 were allowed in the estimates of the Secretary of the Navy, and, subsequently, $303 per annum were allowed for a carpenter's mate, making $1,239 allowed: the balance, $2,361, being entirely unauthorized, to near the whole amount, the residue, to speak cautiously, at least very doubtfully authorized.

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appropriation—the inroads on which, conveyed the thought, to cool lookers-on, that its fastness must have been considered impregnable, and its resources exhaustless; nor, seemingly, any fear of that power, for, among other impoverishing drains, the appropriation has been made the passive, patient, and tiring instrument of a whimsical prodigality—which it would be affectation to call by any other name—of a "tissue of taxes, absurdly conceived, and unauthorizedly levied by a se-ipse expenditure (for a naval charity), the grotesque character of which is equally anomalous and queer; nor, as it would seem, any chastened appreciation of the intent of the appropriation—else this dwindling away of the easily-told contents of small coffers, at best, would, under the review of any rational intelligence, have quickly conveyed the self-evident truth that those coffers could no more be expected to defray such profuseness, than the recipient of a parish-bounty could be thought able to pay the rent of the almonry which gives him food, raiment, and shelter; nor, finally, above all, any gleam of accountability emanating from the confused mist surrounding the disjointed and schemeless way of furnishing the general supplies of the medical service:—nothing, of all these propositions (which, in the aggregate, make up a true sorites deducible from facts) existing in the service, the conviction that kind of argument produces is logically irresistible—that heretofore it would have been the greatest hardihood to have promised, or expected, a faithful distribution of any appropriation on which drafts were irremediably inordinate, irregular, prodigal, if not senseless, and often wholly useless for any purpose, save enriching the rapacious furnishers. That this epithet is merited by some, is, unfortunately for the weak and groaning medical appropriation, but too true. To their extortionate and unconscionable charges, especially for surgical instruments,* the under-

_____________

* It may illustrate this remark to state, that the records of this bureau show that an eminent surgical instrument maker, of Philadelphia, sold certain instruments of his manufacture, of the first-rate workmanship and approved pattern, for the sum of $669 81 to certain druggists largely supplying the medical outfits of vessels in a neighboring seaport. The commission alluded to in the text, conducted by Benjamin Homans, now of the Navy Department, shows that these identical instruments were furnished by the druggists alluded to, to certain vessels, and that they charged Government for them, the sum of $1,224 54; thus exhibiting a profit of $554 73—in other words, an exorbitant charge of about 83 per cent.! This, too, on articles of well-known established price. These prices were approved in the usual way, and actually paid.

The same commission brought to light, from actual vouchers, the charge by the same druggists of $287 82, in four years, for the recipients of medicines and freights, although they state, on oath, that the "drayage, freight,& c., was always paid by them." Epsom salt was invariably charged, in wholesale quantities, at ten cents per pound, when it can anywhere be purchased, of wholesale dealers, at five cents, and even much less. Half an ounce of veratria* was charged at eighteen dollars! An ounce of gold is worth sixteen dollars (a doubloon, or ounce). Thus was a small white powder charged at thirty-six dollars an ounce—four dollars more than twice the value of an ounce of gold. One ounce of strychnine,† a similar powder, was charged at thirty-four dollars; that is, two dollars more than twice the value of an ounce of gold. Two dozen bottles Bedford spring water were charged eight dollars, viz: thirty-three cents per bottle. Two scabs of vaccine virus were charged at nine dollars. Oiled silk, worth, of the best quality, $1 37 1/2 per yard, was charged eighty dollars for twenty yards; that is, four dollars per yard. Seventy-two bottles compound sirup sarsaparilla were charged at $108; viz: $1 50 a bottle. The retail price is everywhere seventy-five cents a bottle, and it has been purchased by this bureau in Philadelphia, at $7 50 per dozen, or $49 for 72 bottles.

In the examination of vouchers by the same commission, still more extortionate charges appeared on some articles. In short, the whole of the charges now printed in the documents of Congress are of the same extortionate character.

The illustrations given are ample to prove the truth of the remarks in the text, on the rapacity of furnishers. Of $42,504 34 paid by a navy-agent at the seaport alluded to, out of the appropriation for "medicines, &c.," these furnishers received $22,676 10.

* Philadelphia prices to this bureau: veratria $10 50 by one firm of chemists and $10 by another; the wholesale of these poisons being ounces and one and half ounces.

† Philadelphia price to this bureau, by one firm of chemists, $7 per ounce; by another, $6 50 per ounce, avoirdupois; the wholesale also of this poison being ounces and one and half ounces. Some difference existing between the manner of putting these articles up, by the two firms, their prices may be said to be about equal for the drug.

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signed has called your attention. They in part, but doubtless not to the extent of a tithe of the occult freebooting which for years has been in operation, under the guise of fair profit, have been brought to light by a report to Congress now in its printed documents. That report resulted from an investigating commission instituted by your immediate predecessor, with that peering scrutiny into irregularities and abuses for which he was remarkable, and which has in the same sharpness been instituted by yourself, and carried out (from a conviction that reform could no longer be postponed, consistently with the public interests), into a digested system of reorganization, which is hourly presenting additional facts to confirm the necessity for establishing, continuing, and expanding that reorganization. These hourly revelations are, at least in the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, absolutely amazing.

The difficulty of making, with any prospect of redemption, such a promise as has been above touched on, or realizing any such expectation as alluded to, would hitherto have been further enhanced by the practice heretofore pursued, of making good an exhausted appropriation by borrowing temporarily from another. But pay day was to come at last; the undersigned has shown you that its approach is as vicinal as the demands with which it is fraught are importunate and insusceptible of postponement. Procrastination will not mend, but mar that measure which, only, can bring the issue right. The enlightened views of Congress, once invited to this measure of fiscal appeasement, would by the undersigned be confided in to meet the emergency. You, doubtless, are inspired with the same confident reliance on their just sense of necessity for something to be done effectual, thus ultimately closing the door so long and injuriously to the public credit, wide open for the ingress of irregularities, varied, mischievous, and odd. In a word, a specific appropriation to obliterate retrospective claims, would block out that door by raising an impenetrable barrier against future abuses and irregularities. That measure once accomplished, nothing of the anomalous operations which have been developed and complained of, can be interposed (if the incumbent of this bureau does his duty) to prevent a due regard in keeping without intrusion all future appropriations.

The existing scores once erased by payment, the course will be clear for economy and thrift. The goal at the end of that course can be reached in no other way. An unsettled ledger would perpetuate embarrassment, by withholding the ready money which ought to find its way into cash payments for supplies, and diverting it into the channel clogged with the obstacles of debt and discredit—it might be said, no credit at all, for the smirch it has sustained, if not indelible, is so deep as to have actually frustrated the economy which would have been the result of cash payments by the bureau. There has been no reciprocity in the borrowing complained of, but what added to the evil. In short the medical appropriation having been made to bear the burden of a collapsing pressure, meager, ill-conditioned, ill-provided, as it has been, it was ever seized on in such plumpness as recent Congressional action may have given it, grappled with, thrown down, filched, and picked to the bone, by voracity in the furnishers, and by the relentless tugs of the visionary and the inconsiderate. The evil exhibited is considerable and pervading, but not inextirpable. Fortunately, the remedy is at hand. Should Congress deem it right and expedient to meet the emergency by the annihilating power it possesses, that course would

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dissipate the mystified condition of the concerns which now come under the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. Until that step be taken, all attempts at reducing the medical appropriation to the square-and-compass test will prove fallacious, deceptive, and unavailing. When taken, the appropriation may thereafter be in good understanding made, and in good faith expended.

It is now, therefore, submitted to your consideration whether it might not be well to lay these facts before the appropriating power, and ask for the requisite funds to release the accounts, in abeyance, from all prospective trammel or postponement. This would render the operations of the bureau fully perspicuous and effectually economical. It would, too, relieve its chief from floundering in future amid debts and drawbacks, which otherwise would create a vis inertia inimical to the object of its institution, and fatal perhaps to its existence.

This may be a fit place to suggest what the undersigned can not but deem a modification in the future medical appropriation, imperatively called for by the principles of unity in purchases, requisitions, issues, and accountability, adopted in this bureau. The modification alluded to has reference to that distinct appropriation, heretofore recognised, for the medical disbursements for the marine corps. This separation of objects homogeneous in their nature and uses, presents an unnecessary distracting influence over the medical department of the navy; and moreover, the distinct appropriation exhibits Often, an ungainly disproportion to that for the service of the navy proper. In the present year, for example, that disproportionate unsuitableness between means and the objects they are to embrace, was very striking—$4,140 to $30,000. When the relative numerical strength of the navy proper, and the marine corps, is glanced at, this injudicious variance in proportion will be readily perceived. There are other reasons for amalgamating the two appropriations involving the good of the service, in the generalization now aimed at in the bureau. After maturely considering all the aspects of this hitherto distinct appropriation, the undersigned is unable to perceive any good reason for continuing as a separate item of appropriation, the funds for the sick and hurt of the marine corps. Indeed, he can find, in the whole view of the subject, not only no reason, good or plausible, why it should be distinct from the general naval appropriation, but every good and sufficient reason that might be fairly asked for, why it should not be perpetuated in separation.

They may be summed up in these: The naval surgeons in all instances, without exception, perform the duty of medical officers to the marine corps, from headquarters down to the smallest guard allotted to vessels of war to many instances, notwithstanding the separation of appropriations that have a common object and tendency, the necessaries and appliances for the sick and hurt marines, are drained from the supplies obtained out of the appropriation for the naval service proper. The same kind of drain carries away a large portion of the supplies on board of all vessels having a marine guard. There remains, perhaps, only the medical department of the marines at headquarters in Washington, to be supplied out of the specific and distinct appropriation for marines. There does not seem any appropriate cause, or plausible, much less valid reason, why this should continue, especially now that all requisitions and approvals, both for the articles and the payments for them, originate or are entertained and adjusted, in the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery. If all requisitions then and the administrative surveillance of them

--623--

preparatory to payment, exist in one office, there seems to be much propriety in suggesting that the funds should be a unit for the two objects.

Should this state of separate appropriation be not hereafter set aside; the result will inevitably be an irruption on the unity of action, expenditure, issues, and accountability, general and fiscal, which ought to be maintained inviolate in the concerns of this bureau. The primitive cause of the usage is not known, nor can its necessity be defended on any stable ground. For these reasons it is now submitted to you, whether the present would not be a fit opportunity so to modify the next solicited appropriation for the sick and hurt, as to embrace, under one general head, the navy proper and the marine corps.

In addition to this improvement in the essential base of the appropriation for the sick and hurt of the navy, the undersigned takes occasion to suggest another, less essential or important, but still an improvement, which, if, adopted, would not be without its advantage. It relates simply to the phraseology of the appropriation as it has heretofore been expressed.

The nomenclature of appropriations is entirely conventional; and it is presumed something of appositeness in the funds required to the objects they are destined to procure, is intended to exist. Under this idea it is suggested, that hereafter the funds given by Congress for the medical department be styled "an appropriation for surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the sick and hurt of the naval service, including the marine corps."

The phraseology of the appropriation as heretofore used, is not in sufficient generalization. The details expressed, even, form but a small part of the whole of these multifarious necessaries and appliances for the use of the sick and hurt: and hence, it seems strange to designate them by a virtual misnomer, and to suffer them, a mere part of a multitudinous whole, to give a nomenclature for the appropriation. The generalization of the subject seems more proper; and the title of the appropriation now proposed seems to embrace that generalization.

It will be perceived that the sum of one thousand five hundred dollars has been appended to the estimates, for the purchase of surgical instruments. This requires some explanation. The instruments of the medical department of our service, are, confessedly, in a state of imperfection. Nay, notwithstanding the large sums heretofore annually paid for them, many are good for nothing, or, at least, indifferently passable. This is owing to the incorrect manner of procuring them without any responsible judge of their workmanship and pattern. But a more important fact must not be withheld. Much money has annually been spent for instruments, both good and indifferent, for twenty or thirty years past, and yet, where are they? Who can tell? Many are gone, very many. That the undersigned can tell. Whither, who can say? None having been responsible, in the slightest degree, for them—none seriously and officially charged with their custody, it would, indeed be difficult to say whither gone. But it avails not to speculate. Gone they are, and they must, if the navy exists, be replaced. The reorganization you have effected, will render it impossible, for cause, to put these unanswerable interrogatories in future. The defective and indifferent instruments still remaining ought to be sold. The proceeds of such sale, reverting to the medical appropriation, from which they were purchased, will, when effected, lessen virtually the grant solicited for the purchase of these indispensable portions of surgeons' necessaries and appliances. Under this candid reveal-

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merit of the facts connected with these expensive outfits, it is not doubted that Congress will see occasion to make the grant.

One other grant is suggested as really needful, in the opinion of the undersigned, but as it is of novel character, he prefers asking you to leave the sum unnamed, requesting of Congress that whatever importance may be attached there, to the request, it may meet with a corresponding degree of liberality in the sum appropriated. The object referred to in the suggestion for a grant of money to meet it, is intimately connected with the efficiency of medical officers. It is, that a small compact medical and surgical library shall be authorized to be purchased for each vessel of war, in proportion to her size and capacity for the accommodation of books in the surgeon's department, and also for the hospitals and sick quarters of navy-yards. A due responsibility for these, well devised and rigidly enforced, would secure them always, for each successive cruise, subject only, to the losses and destruction incident to the disasters of the sea. Extensive and costly libraries are furnished by Government to the commanders of all ships in the navy, often embracing a large proportion of mere general literature. Professional works, so important to medical officers, should not be denied.

All which is most respectfully submitted by your obedient servant,

WILLIAM P. C. BARTON.

Hon. A. P, Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

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Abstract of bills paid by Thomas Hayes, Navy Agent, Philadelphia, from, the 1st of October, 1841, to 31st October, 1842, under the appropriation, of "medicines,& c."

Date. To whom paid. Articles delivered. Remarks. Amount.
1841.        
Oct. 1 Abraham Levy Bread, milk, &c. Sick quarters, navy yard $40 17
5 Henry Patton Bread Naval Asylum 102 30
5 S. E. Lane Charcoal Naval Asylum 13 33
5 A. D. Ashton Vegetables, &c. Naval Asylum 14 50
5 A. D. Ashton Hay Naval Asylum 13 40
5 M. W. Aylwine Slop clothing Naval Asylum 31 05
5 C. Heishley Beef Naval Asylum 45 06
6 A. D. Ashton Vegetables, &c. Naval Asylum 33 73
6 S. R. Reed Repairing cart and wagon Naval Asylum 9 23
6 Jno. K. Graham Whiskey Naval Asylum 9 59
18 Alex. Fullerton Drugs, &c. Pensacola navy yard 291 20
18 A. D. Ashton Pitchers, &c. Naval Asylum 10 45
20 C. Hamilton Coal Naval Asylum 960 00
29 A. D. Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum 11 50
29 Allibone & Troubat Sperm oil Naval Asylum 37 85
29 Crawford &. Mooney. Horse-shoeing Naval Asylum 2 62
29 John Colhoon Corn Naval Asylum 24 96
30 S. E. Lane Charcoal Naval Asylum 16 74
Nov. 1 John C.Clark Stationary Naval Asylum 27 66
1 Abraham Levy Sundries Sick-quarters, navy yard 27 72
3 A. D. Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum 36 59
11 Benjamin Franklin Repairing wagon, &c. Naval Asylum 25 75
11 A. D. Ashton Straw, &c. Naval Asylum 14 63
11 Robert McCall Crockery Naval Asylum 3 00
12 Satts & Hines Ice Naval Asylum 12 75
12 A. D. Ashton Clothing Naval Asylum 232 85
12 A. S. Reigin Candles Naval Asylum 46 41
12 A. S. Reigin Vinegar Naval Asylum 3 56
12 C. Heishley Beef Naval Asylum 41 32
12 C. Heishley Oats Naval Asylum 5 00
19 J. J. & A. R. Perkins. Muslin and flannel Naval Asylum 4 08
24 C. Moore Cupping Sick quarters, navy yard 10 00
Dec. 2 Abraham Levy Sundries Sick quarters, navy yard 30 70
7 S. E. Lane Charcoal Naval Asylum 15 81
7 Allibone & Troubat Sperm oil Naval Asylum 83 50
9 A. D. Ashton Clothing Naval Asylum 39 66
9 C. Heishley Beef Naval Asylum 39 23
9 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c. Naval Asylum 31 26
10 A. D. Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum 7 00
10 A. D. Ashton Lampwick, &c. Naval Asylum 7 03
10 James McManus Stove and pipe Naval Asylum 24 40
15 McGrath & Fox Stove and pipe Naval Asylum 23 27
20 James K. Graham Whiskey Naval Asylum 10 12
22 John Desham Butter Naval Asylum 7 10
23 Parker. & Wright Carriage hire Sick at navy yard 14 00
1842.        
Jan. 12 Abraham Levy Bread, &c. Sick at navy yard 35 29
12 John Murray Horse-shoeing Naval Asylum 2 65
13 John Colhoon Horse feed Naval Asylum 21 80
22 A. Nelingen Leeching Sick quarters, navy yard 2 00
Feb. 17 Frederick Brown Drugs, &c. Steamer Mississippi 608 62
17 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c. Naval Asylum 32 57
17 A. D. Ashton Hay Naval Asylum 21 37
17 A. D. Ashton Clothing Naval Asylum 125 88
17 A. D. Ashton Vegetables, &c. Naval Asylum 11 50
17 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c. Naval Asylum 36 17
17 A. D. Ashton Brushes Naval Asylum 18 25

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Date. To whom paid. Articles delivered. Remarks. Amount.
Feb 17 A. D. Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum, $12 03
17 Henry Patton Bread Naval Asylum 112 15
17 Board of Health Medical attendance Sick quarters, navy yard 17 14
18 John C.Clark Stationary Naval Asylum 4 06
23 John K. Graham Whiskey Naval Asylum 8 08
23 John K.Graham   Naval Asylum 6 59
28 C.S.Wrig ht Carriage hire Sick quarters navy yard 23 00
Mar. 9 C. Heishley Beef Naval Asylum 47 11
9 C. Heishley Beef Naval Asylum 49 65
12 A. D. Ashton Clothing, &c Naval Asylum 109 50
12 A.D.Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum 30 31
12 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c Naval Asylum 1150
14 C. Rippergen Cupping Sick quarters, navy yard 2 00
14 Hogan & Thompson Stationary Naval Asylum 27 56
21 John Rosen & Son Surgical instruments Sick quarters, navy yard 8 25
April 9 Sarah Patten Scrubbing and cleaning Naval Asylum 8 25
9 Ann Thompson Scrubbing and cleaning Naval Asylum 8 25
9 E. Freeland Scrubbing and cleaning Naval Asylum 8 62
9 R. Buchanan Butter, &c. Naval Asylum 25 50
9 A. D. Ashton Vegetables Naval Asylum 11 47
14 S. E. Lane Charcoal Naval Asylum 73 78
15 W. O. Benthall Painting Naval Asylum 18 00
18 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c Naval Asylum 39 58
18 A. D. Ashton Clothing, &c Naval Asylum 27 75
18 Hogan & Thompson Stationary Naval Asylum 5 75
19 M. Philips Painting Naval Asylum 10 50
19 James Ewing Painting Naval Asylum 1125
22 William Lane Wood Naval Asylum 14 06
22 Frederick Brown Drugs, &c Sick quarters, navy yard 224 80
22 Frederick Brown Drugs, &c Naval Asylum 6519
23 A. D. Ashton Crockery, &c Naval Asylum 18 83
23 C. Moore Cupping Sick quarters, navy yard 9 00
23 Robert Dunn Horse-shoeing Naval Asylum 10 12
23 Henry Patton Bread Naval Asylum 123 12
26 John K. Graham Whiskey Naval Asylum 9 25
26 C. Heishley Beef and fish Naval Asylum 47 28
26 C. Heishley Beef and fish Naval Asylum 40 22
29 C. P. Collins Paints, &c Naval Asylum 34 63
29 A. Nebinger, jr Leeching Sick quarters, navy yard 2 50
May 2 Thomas Kee Straw and hay Naval Asylum 1180
2 Thomas Kee Feed chest Naval Asylum 3 00
2 Hogan & Thompson Stationary Naval Asylum 13 12
4 Abraham Levy Bread and chickens Sick quarters, navy yard 17 84
7 James K. Graham Whiskey Naval Asylum 8 66
10 Peters & McClung Mending hose Naval Asylum 11 62
18 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c Naval Asylum 26 81
13 A. D. Ashton Vegetable's Naval Asylum 15 85
18 A. D. Ashton Linen, &c Naval Asylum 22 37
18 Sarah Patton Whitewashing Naval Asylum 63 00
18 Philip Graba Painting Naval Asylum 3 00
18 W. O. Benthall Painting Naval Asylum 100 00
20 James Helsh Harness Naval Asylum 25 00
21 David Conrad Repairing locks Naval Asylum 1181
23 Fullerton & Donelly. Clothing Naval Asylum 665 57
25 E Mount Tables Naval Asylum 26 00
June 13 R. Buchanan Butter Naval Asylum 29 52
13 A. D. Ashton Mutton, &c Naval Asylum 28 52
14 W. E. Sherman Shirts, &c Naval Asylum 251 12
Aug. 8 Thomas Harris Orders 4th Aud'rs 348 00
8 Henry Patton Bread Naval Asylum 126 64
10 Watering Com. Phila. Water rent Naval Asylum 140 00

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ABSTRACT—Continued.

Date. To whom paid. Articles delivered. Remarks. Amount
1842.        
Aug. 10 George Flowers Hay Naval Asylum $17 60
12 Board of Health Medical attendance Sick quarters, navy yard 15 71
17 W. E. Sherman Shirts, &c Naval Asylum 118 59
19 C. S. Wright Carriage hire Sick quarters, navy yard 20 00
22 George S. Blake Requisition Coast survey 250 00
Sept. 20 Edward Mitchell Repairing chains Naval Asylum 6 50
22 Henry Shively Trusses Naval Asylum 3 50
Oct. 25 Henry Tenant Hose and fixtures Sick quarters, navy yard 15 37
        7,121 64

Navy Agent's Office,
Philadelphia, November 5, 1842.

THOMAS HAYES, Navy Agent.

____________

F.

Estimate for surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the sick and hurt of the naval service, including the marine corps, for the moiety of the year 1843, ending on the 30th of June.

Mediterranean One frigate first class, outfit 1,800 1,800  
Three sloops, outfit each 1,206 3,600  
Three brigs and schooners, outfit each. 800 2,400  
One ship-of-the-line 2,500 2,500  
      $10,300 00
Brazil Same as Mediterranean     10,300 00
Pacific One frigate first class, outfit 1,800 1,800  
Four sloops, outfit each 1,200 4,800  
Four brigs and schooners, outfit each 800 3,200  
        9,800 00
East Indies One frigate, outfit 1,800 1,800  
Two sloops, outfit each 1,200 2,400  
Two brigs and schooners, outfit each 800 1,600  
      5,800 00
Home One frigate first class, outfit 1,600 1,600  
Four sloops, outfit each 1,000 4,000  
Four brigs and schooners, outfit each 600 2,400  
      8,000 00
Africa Two sloops of 20 guns, outfit 800 1,600  
Brigs and schooners carrying 40 guns, outfit for 40 guns - 1,600 1,600  
      3,200 00
Steamers Steamer Union, outfit 700 700  
Steamer Poinsett, outfit 450 450  
Steamer Engineer, outfit 250 250  
        1,400 00
Receiving vessels Receiving ship Ohio, already outfitted, additional outfit 250 250  
Receiving vessel North Carolina, already outfitted, additional outfit 250 250  
      500 00
Experiment receiving vessel at Philadelphia nothing, the yard dispensary serving.      
Norfolk navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit 350 350  
Philadelphia navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit for a dispensary building, and steward 210 850    
210    
      1,060  

--628--

ESTIMATE—Continued.

New York navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit $350 $350  
Boston navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit 250 350  
Portsmouth, N. Hampshire navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit 150 150  
Pensacola navy-yard Outfitted, additional outfit 250, 250  
Charleston, S. C. station Outfit 350 350  
        2,760 00
Norfolk hospital Additional outfit 800 800  
Philadelphia hospital Additional outfit 450 450  
New York hospital Additional outfit 800 800  
Chelsea hospital Additional outfit 800 800 2,850 00
  The estimates for additional outfits are      
  to provide for stewards and other aid, and other necessaries additional. Instead of any distinct appropriation for marine corps, additional to supercede appropriations for marine corps     2,120 00
  Total     57,030 00

 

Additional estimates for the whole of the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1844, viz.: Two thirds the amount severally of all the preceding estimates for each purpose already specifically estimated for is $38,020 33 $38,020 33
For meeting any uncontemplated but necessary outlays, which, from the remoteness of the time, can not be anticipated, and to supersede the necessity of any distinct appropriation for marine corps, the further sum of 4,586 67 4,586 67
Additional aid for nurses, stewards, gardeners, and clerks to hospitals, &c. 1,360 00 1,360 00
Additional estimates for either the moiety of the year 1843 or the fiscal year thereafter, ending June 30, 1844, for or to be divided as may be expedient throughout the whole eighteen months, whatever balance may remain unexpended in the appropriation for the marine corps for the year 1842, at the expiration of that year, to be added to these estimates,* from which the ship Pennsylvania and other objects can be supplied.    
Total estimates for the fiscal year ending on the 30th of June, 1844   43,967 00

* There remains of this appropriation now in the Treasury $1,051 58. In hands of the quartermaster, November 23, a further sum of $793 64, and few unliquidated demands will accrue by the end of the year, making a total unexpended balance at this date of $1,845 22.—(November 26, 1842.)

For surgical instruments one thousand five hundred dollars (explained in preamble accompanying.

WILLIAM P. C. BARTON.

December 1, 1842.

--629--

____________

F—No. 3.

Waiting orders.

Estimate of the pay required for the commissioned and warrant officers, waiting orders, for the half year ending 30th June, 1843.

38 captains $47,500
69 commanders 62,100
99 lieutenants 59,400
19 surgeons 15,200
5 chaplains 2,000
3 chief engineers 1,800
3 1st assistant engineers 1,050
6 2d assistant engineers 1,500
9 3d assistant engineers 525
  191,075
Add for 46 midshipmen, who, after examination,
 may be entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen,
in addition to their pay as midshipmen
6,900
  197,975

Note.—The difference is occasioned by the change in the number and rank of officers.

Waiting orders.

Estimate of the pay required for the commissioned and warrant officers, waiting orders, for the year ending 30th June, 1844.

38 captains $95,000
69 commanders 62,100
99 lieutenants 118,800
19 surgeons 30,400
5 chaplains 4,000
3 chief engineers 3,600
3 1st assistant engineers 2,100
6 2d assistant engineers 3,000
9 3d assistant engineers 1,050
  382,150
Add for 46 midshipmen, who, after examination,
may be entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen,
in addition to their pay as midshipmen
13,800
  395,950

Note.—The difference is occasioned by the change in the number and rank of officers.

--630--

____________

No. 4.

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Washington, November 19, 1842.

Sir:

I enclose to the Department estimates for the Marine corps for eighteen months from the 1st January next.

In the first half year of 1843, I have caused to be inserted items for purchasing, ground, and commencing the building of barracks, at four stations. Appropriations for this object were twice, at least, made by Congress, and for come unaccountable cause, were not used for that purpose and returned into the Treasury.

I remain, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

ARCH. HENDERSON,
Colonel Commandant.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

____________

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Washington, November 14, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to report to the department that, in the course of the present year, I have inspected the men and their quarters at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Charlestown, Massachusetts, New York, Philadelphia, and Norfolk. At each of those stations there is a force so small as to be inadequate to afford protection to the public property. The accompanying general return of the corps will show the force at each of those stations, as follows: At Portsmouth, 19 privates; at Charlestown, 51 privates; at New York, 58 privates; at Philadelphia, 37 privates; and, at Norfolk, 55 privates. At Pensacola, there are 25, and, at headquarters, 73 privates—20 of these are to be. shortly sent on board the steamer Union.

At Portsmouth there are two men sick, and one on daily duty, and four as a boat's crew, leaving but twelve for guard duty; and the daily guard is but four privates, which can furnish but one sentinel.

At Charlestown, the last muster-roll shows seven privates sick, four on daily duty, and four on police duty, leaving but thirty-four for guard duty. In regular military service, not more than one third of the effective strength is on guard at one time. Commodore Nicholson, in a letter to the department of recent date, says, that eight or ten sentinels are required for the navy-yard—one, at least, is required at the barracks—making eleven sentinels on post constantly. To accomplish this, a guard would be composed of thirty-three privates; and, to furnish a regular and proper relief to this, would take sixty-six effective privates; each private of a guard is eight hours of the twenty-four on post.

At New York, the last muster-roll shows forty-two effective men to furnish the same number of sentinels as are required on the Boston station.

The muster-rolls of the other four stations show about the same results. Portsmouth is the only station where the barracks can be considered as permanent. At Boston and Philadelphia, the ground on which the barracks are now placed is required for naval purposes; and the barracks themselves are too small for the number of officers and men.

At New York, Norfolk, and Pensacola, there are no barracks at all. If guards of marines are to be employed on those stations, the propriety of building barracks to receive them is evident. The alms-house at Brooklyn

--631--

is now rented for the marines there, and temporary quarters are provided for the guards at Norfolk and Pensacola. In the estimates for the corps, an appropriation for purchasing ground and commencing these barracks will be asked for, and I trust it will meet your sanction.

By the general returns, it appears that there are now on board of the several ships of war, 2 captains, 7 first lieutenants, 8 second lieutenants, 59 sergeants, 66 corporals, and 647 privates. Captains Dulany, Macomber, and Brevoort, are under orders to join the Home, the Brazil, and the Pacific squadrons—making five captains on sea duty; three are in the staff, and one, from a paralytic affection, unfit for active duty, leaving but four captains for a relief to those on sea service. When the ships receive the number of lieutenants to which they are entitled, there will be at sea 18 first and 19 second lieutenants.

In addition to the vessels now in commission, guards will shortly be wanting for the steamer Union and the squadron for the coast of Africa; one hundred and eight privates, with the usual number of non-commissioned officers, will be required, increasing the number at sea from 647 to 755 privates.

I would further call your attention to the fact, that, though so large a portion of the corps is at sea, there is but one single vessel that has a full guard— the Fairfield, sloop-of-war. It will also appear from the accompanying table (marked No. 2), that, to provide full guards for the different vessels now, and soon to be in commission, a force considerably larger than the whole present strength of the corps will be necessary. The experience of our own service, as well that of the English, shows that not less than one private marine for each gun should be on board a ship-of-war. Table No. 2 carries out this principle; and, exclusive of the steamers and receiving-ships, gives 878 privates for sea duty during the ensuing year. Fifty on board each receiving-ship, and twenty on board each steamer, would raise the number to over 1,100. The most effective crew for steamers is yet undecided. In reports to the department, I have heretofore hazarded an opinion that soldiers, drilled both as infantry and artillery, could not fail to be essentially useful in them. So far as I have been able to obtain further information on this interesting point, it has tended to strengthen this impression; and I hope I do not exceed my appropriate limits in bringing this subject to the attention of the department.

It will appear from the general report, that the only surplus over the legal strength of the corps is now in the non-commissioned officers and music.

The present year's estimates provide for 1,068 privates, including the 68 servants for officers. The corps is, therefore, 51 short in its privates, and 86 over in non-commissioned officers and music—making, in all, 35 over its proper strength. - At the end of this month, the excess over its numerical legal strength will be very small. It does not follow that an increase of the marine corps necessarily increases public expenditure. For every additional marine on board a ship-of-war, there is a landsman less. At the navy-yards watchmen are now employed to give security to the public interests. An increase of the corps would render this expense unnecessary, and would afford additional security by a guard under naval law, and, consequently, responsible for its efficiency and fidelity. I remain, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON,
Colonel Commandant.

Hon. A. P. Upshur, Secretary of the Navy.

--632--

[Note. Pages 632 and 633 represent a single table.]

General return of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and

Stations, &c. Colonel Comdt. Lieut. Colonel. Majors. Captains. 1st Lieu-tenants. 2d Lieu-tenants. Non-com'd staff. 1st Ser-geants. Ser-geants. Corporals. Musicians attached to the band. Drummers.
Headquarters 1     4 5 5 4 6 14 7 19 7
Guard at the navy yard, D. C                 1 1    
New York     1 1 1 2   1 8 5   1
Charlestown, Massachusetts.     1 1 1 1   1 5 4   2
Gosport, Virginia           2   1 7 S    
Philadelphia   1     2 1   1 6 3    
Portsmouth, New Hampshire     1   1     1 3 1    
Pensacola, West Florida         1     1 4 3   1
Asst.-Q. M.'s office, Philadelphia.         1     1 1      
Norfolk, Va., clothing store               1        
Receiving ship Pennsylvania         1     1 3 5   2
Receiving ship North Carolina       1   1   1 2 3   1
Receiving ship Ohio           1   1 3 2    
Steamer Fulton               1   2    
Steamer Mississippi               1   2   1
Steamer Missouri           1   1 1 2   1
Delaware 74       1   2   1 2 4   1
Columbus 74.           1   1 2 3   1
Razee Independence           1   1 2 3   1
Frigate Constellation         1     1 2 3   1

--633--

[Note. Pages 632 and 633 represent a single table.]

privates, of the United States Marine Corps, for the month of Oct'r, 1842.

Fifers. Privates. Aggregate. Remarks.
5 70 147 Twelve sergeants, 1 corporal, and 23 privates, on daily duty as clerks, mechanics, &c.; and 12 privates returned here are boys learning music. Captain Nicholson, Lieuts. Sloan, Caldwell, and Tansill, on leave of absence; Lieut. A. S. Taylor "sick." Three of the captains returned here are attached to the staff; two of the first lieutenants, to wit, Lieut. Carter attached to the quartermaster's department, and Lieut. Hardy to the paymaster's department.
  10 12  
  52 73 One sergeant returned here is onboard brig Somers; and 1 private ordered from Gosport, Virginia, to this post, 11th ultimo.
1 51 68  
1 34 54 Three of the privates returned here are insane, in naval hospital, Norfolk,
1 37 52 One corporal and 6 privates returned here are on board receiving vessel
1 19 27  
  25 35 September 30, 1842. Lieutenant Gillespie absent since 9th August last.
  1 4  
    1 Lieutenant Stark, commanding marines on board receiving ship Pennsylvania, furnished this return.*
1 38 51  
1 30 40  
  21 28  
1 11 15  
1 19 24 June 30, 1842.
1 28 35 September 30, 1842, when this guard was 1 second lieutenant, 2 sergeants, 2 corporals, 2 musicians, and 26 private's; since which, 9 privates transferred to New York, and 4 privates joined from New York, which make this number.
1 52 64 June 30, 1842.
1 54 64 This guard joined from Charlestown, Massachusetts, in August last
  33 41  
1 20 29 April 30, 1842.

 

  Non-commissioned sergeants. Sergeants. Corporals. Musicians. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
*In October, 1842 4 124 100 19 33 30 949 1,259
Add for officer's servants             68 68
  4 124 100 19 33 30 1,017 1,327
Allowed by law 4 80 80   30 30 1,000 1,224
    44 20 19 3   17 103

--634--

[Note. Pages 634 and 635 represent a single table.]

GENERAL RETURN

Stations, &c. Colonel Comdt. Lieut. Colonel. Majors. Captains. 1st Lieu-tenants 2d Lieu-tenants Non-com'd staff. 1st Ser-geants. Ser-geants. Corporals. Musicians attached to the band. Drummers.
Frigate Congress         1 1   1 3 3   1
Frigate Constitution         1     1 2 3   1
Frigate United States         1     1 2 3   1
Frigate Columbia         1     1 2 3   1
Sloop Ontario               1 1 2    
Sloop Falmouth               1 1 2   1
Sloop Decatur               1   2    
Sloop Vandalia               1 1 2   1
Sloop John Adams               1   2    
Sloop Fairfield               1   2   1
Sloop Marion               1 1 2   1
Sloop Preble               1   1    
Sloop Yorktown               1   3   1
Sloop Boston               1   2   1
Sloop Concord               1 1 2   1
Sloop Cyane               1 1 2   1
Sloop Dale               1   1   1
Waiting orders       1   1            
Recruiting service, New York       1       1        
Recruiting service, Baltimore, Md.       1       1   1    
Under orders     1 2                
On leave of absence         1              
Total 1 1 4 13 20 20 4 43 81 100 19 33

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Adjutant and Inspector's Office, Washington, Nov'r 13, 1842.

--635--

[Note. Pages 634 and 635 represent a single table.]

—Continued.

Fifers Privates. Aggregate. Remarks.
1 38 49 June 30, 1842, when this guard was 1 first lieutenant, 1 second lieutenant, 5 sergeants, 3 corporals, 2 musicians, and 32 privates; since which, 1 sergeant transferred to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and 6 privates
  38 46 September 30, 1842, when this guard was 1 second lieutenant, 3 sergeants, 3 corporals, 1 drummer, and 39 privates; since which, First Lieutenant Lang joined, and Second Lieutenant A. S. Taylor and 1 private transferred
1 34 43 June 30, 1842
1 35 44 June 30, 1842, when this guard was 1 first lieutenant, 3 sergeants, 3 corporals, 3 musicians, and 36 privates; since which, 1 private joined at
  15 19 September 30, 1842
1 16 22 August 31,1842
1 11 15 June 30, 1842
1 20 26 April 31, 1842
  20 23 June 30, 1842
1 28 33 March 31, 1842, when this guard was 2 sergeants, 2 corporals, 1 drummer, 1 fifer, and 16 privates; since, 1 sergeant, 1 fifer, and 3 privates, transferred to frigate Brandywine, and 1 fifer and 15 privates joined from frigate Brandywine
1 17 23 October 30, 1842. One private sick, in naval hospital, Norfolk, Virginia.
  11 13 May 31, 1842
  12 17 March 31, 1842
1 9 14 April 30, 1842
1 11 17 June 30, 1842
1 15 21 April 30, 1842
1 11 15 March 31, 1842, when this guard was 1 sergeant, 2 corporals, 1 drummer, 1 fifer, and 11 privates; since which, 1 corporal joined sloop St. Louis.
    2 Captain Job G. Williams, and Lieutenant Josiah Watson, at Washington city, D. C.
    2  
  3 6  
    3 Major Twiggs and Captain Linton since 13th ultimo, and Capt. Brevoort
    1 Lieutenant Garland, since 13th August last
30 949 1,318  

P. G. HOWLE, Adjutant and Inspector.

--636--

____________

No. 1.

This table shows the number of marines afloat on the 1st November, 1842.

Vessels. Rate. Cap-tains. 1st Lieu-tenants. 2d Lieu-tenants. 1st Ser-geants. Ser-geants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
Receiving ship Pennsylvania 120   1   1 3 5 2 1 38 51
Receiving ship North Carolina 92 1   1 1 2 3 1 1 30 40
Receiving ship Ohio 92     1 1 3 2     21 28
Steamer Fulton         1   2     11 15
Steamer Mississippi         1   2 1 1 19 24
Steamer Missouri       1 1 1 2 1 1 28 35
Delaware 74 92     2 1 2 4 1 1 52 64
Columbus 74 74     1 1 2 3 1 1 54 64
Razee Independence 64     1 1 2 3 1   33 41
Frigate Constellation 42   1   1 2 3 1 1 20 29
Frigate Congress 54   1 1 1 3 3 1 1 38 49
Frigate Constitution 54   1   1 2 3 1   38 46
Frigate United States 54   1   1 2 3 1 1 34 43
Frigate Columbia 54   1   1 2 3 1 1 35 44
Sloop Ontario 20       1 1 2     15 19
Sloop Falmouth 24       1 1 2 1 1 16 22
Sloop Decatur 18       1   2   1 11 15
Sloop Vandalia 24       1 1 2 1 1 20 26
Sloop John Adams 24       1   2     20 23
Sloop Fairfield 24       1   2 1 1 28 33
Sloop Marion 18       1 1 2 1 1 17 23
Sloop Preble 18       1   1     11 13
Sloop Yorktown 18       1   3 1   12 17
Sloop Boston 24       1   2 1 1 9 14
Sloop Concord 24       1 1 2 1 1 11 17
Sloop Cyane 24       1 1 2 1 1 15 21
Sloop Dale 18       1   1 1 1 111 15
Total   2 7 8 27 32 66 22 20 647 831

 

  Colonel. Lieut. Colonel. Majors. Cap-tains. 1st lieu-tenants. 2d lieu-tenants. Non-com'd Sergts. Ser-geants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates
Number allowed by law 1 1 4 13 20 20 4 80 80 30 30 1,000
Number afloat, 1st November, 1842       2 7 8   59 66 22 20 647
  1 1 4 11 13 12 4 21 14 8 10 353

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Adjutant and Inspector's Office, Washington, Nov'r 11, 1842.

P. G. HOWLE, Adjutant and Inspector.

--637--

____________

No. 2.

This table shows the supposed number of marines required for sea service on the 1st January, 1843, allowing one private for each gun the respective vessels carry.

Vessels. Rate. Captains. 1st
Lieu-tenants.
2d
Lieu-tenants.
1st
Ser-geants.
Ser-geants. Cor-porals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates Aggregate.
Receiving ship Pennsylvania 120 1 1 1 1 4 6 2 2 120 138
Receiving ship North Carolina 92 1 1 1 1 3 4 1   92 105
Receiving ship Ohio 92 1 1 1 1 3 4 1   92 105
Steamer Fulton     1   1 2 3 1   42 51
Steamer Missi sippi     1   1 2 3 1   42 51
Steamer Missouri     1   1 2 3 1   42 51
Steamer Union       1 1   2 1   *20 26
Delaware 74 92 1 1 1 1 3 4 1   92 105
Columbus 74 74 1 1 1 1 3 4 1   74 87
Razee Independence 64 1 1 1 1 2 3 1   64 75
Frigate Constellation 42   1   1 2 3 1   42 51
Frigate Congress 54   1   1 2 3 1   54 63
Frigate Constitution 54   1   1 2 3 1   54 63
Frigate United States 54   1   1 2 3 1   54 63
Frigate Columbia 54   1   1 2 3 1   54 63
Sloop Ontario 20     1 1 1 2 1   20 27
Sloop Falmouth 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Decatur 18   1   1 1 2 1   18 25
Sloop Vandalia 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop John Adams 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Fairfield 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Marion 18     1 1 1 2 1   18 25
Sloop Preble 18     1 1 1 2 1   18 25
Sloop Yorktown 18     1 1 1 2 1   18 25
Sloop Boston 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Concord 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Cyane 24     1 1 1 2 1   24 31
Sloop Dale 18     1 1 1 2 1   18 25
Sloop Vincennes 24   1   1 1 2 1   24 31
2 Sloops* 40   2   2 2 4 2 2 40 54
2 Brigs* 24       2   4     24 30
2 Schooners* 24       2   4     24 30
*Coast of Africa squadron     18 19 35 50 91 32 32 1,328 1,611
Total.                      

*One bugler is also ordered to this vessel.

Headquarters' of the Marine Corps,
Adjutant and Inspector's Office, Washington, Nov'r 11, 1842.

P. G. HOWLE, Adjutant and Inspector.

--638--

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Quartermaster's Department,
Washington, November 19,1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit, herewith, in compliance with your instructions, two sets of triplicate estimates for the support of the Quartermaster's Department, from the 1st of January to the 30th of June, 1843; and from the 1st of July, 1843, to the 30th of June, 1844.

These estimates vary from those of last year in the item of provisions $6,787 59, and in that of clothing $2,964 89, in consequence of instructions received by the paymaster from the Treasury Department to estimate for those allowances for his clerks, and for officers' servants; and also for premiums to men for re-enlisting under act of the 2d of March, 1835, all of which had heretofore been estimated for by this Department. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,
Quartermaster Marine Corps.

Colonel A. Henderson,
Commandant Marine Corps, Washington, D. C.

_____________ 

Estimate of the expenses of the Marine Corps from the 1st of January to the 30th of June, 1843.

There will be required for the support of the Quartermaster's Department of the Marine Corps, from the 1st of January to the 30th of June, 1843, in addition to the balances remaining on hand on the 1st of January, 1843, the sum of $242,124 14.

1st. For provisions for the non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, serving on shore $19,128 08
2d. For clothing 20,349
3d. For fuel 8,137 06
4th. For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erection of barracks at Charlestown, Massachusetts 50,000
For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erection of barracks at Brooklyn, New York 50,000
For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erection of barracks at Gosport, Virginia 50,000
To commence the erection of barracks at Pensacola 25,000
5th. For keeping barracks in repair, and for rent of temporary barracks 3,000
6th. For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and expenses of recruiting 4,000
7th. For medicines, hospital supplies, surgical instruments, and pay of matron and hospital stewards 2,120
8th. For military stores, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, accoutrements, ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments for the band 1,400
9th. For contingencies, viz.: freight, ferriage, toll, wharfage and cartage, per diem allowance for attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, compensation to judges advocate,  

--639--

ESTIMATE—Continued.

house-rent, where no public quarters are assigned, per diem allowance to enlisted men on constant labor, expenses of burying deceased marines, printing, stationery, forage, postage on public letters, expenses in pursuit of deserters, candles and oil, straw, barrack furniture, bed-sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, carpenters' tools, and for the purchase and keeping of a horse for the messenger $14,221 25
  247,355 39

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,
Quartermaster Marine Corps.

____________

No. 1.—PROVISIONS.

For whom required. Enlisted men. Washerwomen. Matron. Servants. Clerks. Total. Rations
per day
at 19 cents.
Rations
per day
at 20 cents.
Aggregate amount.
For non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen 517 34 1     552 1   $18,983 28
For clerks         4 4   1 144 80
                  19,128 08

_____________

No. 2.—CLOTHING.

For whom required. Enlisted men. Servants. Clerk. Total. Amount.
For non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $33 per annum 1,156     1,156 $19,074 00
For 150 watch coats, at $8 50 each         1,275 00
          20,349 00

--640--

ESTIMATE—Continued.

No. 3.—FUEL.

For whom required. Number. Fuel for each. Total fuel. Amount.
Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords. Feet. Inches.
Colonel commandant 1 20     20      
Lieutenant colonels south of latitude 39 1 14     14      
Majors south of latitude 39 1 14     14      
Majors north of latitude 39 3 15 2   45 6    
Captains north of latitude 43 1 13 1 4 13 1 4  
Captains north of latitude 39 2 12 6   25 4    
Captains south of latitude 39 3 11 4   34 4    
Staff south of latitude 39 3 14     42      
Staff north of latitude 39 1 15 2   15 2    
Lieutenants north of latitude 43 2 10 2 8 20 5 4  
Lieutenants north of latitude 39 12 10     120      
Lieutenants south of latitude 39 14 9     126      
Non-commissioned officers, musicians,
privates, servants, and washerwomen,
north of latitude 40
239   6 6 194 1 6  
Non-commissioned officers, musicians,
privates, servants, and washerwomen,
south of latitude 40
370   6   277 4    
Clerk to paymaster 1 1 1 4 1 1 4  
Hospital matron 1   6     6    
Commanding officer's office at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1 4 5 4 4 5 4  
Guardroom at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1 15     15      
Hospital at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1 11     11      
Mess room at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1 2 2 8 2 2 8  
Office of the commanding officer and assistant quartermaster
at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia
4 4     16      
Guard rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 3 14     42      
Hospitals at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 3 10     30      
Mess rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 3 2 4   7 4    
Offices of the commandant and staff and commanding officer
at headquarters Norfolk and Pensacola
7 4     28      
Guard rooms at headquarters navy yard Washington, Norfolk,
and Pensacola
4 12     48      
Hospital at headquarters 1 18     18      
Hospital at Norfolk and Pensacola 2 9     18      
Mess rooms for officers at headquarters Norfolk and Pensacola 3 2     6      
Armory at Washington 1 16     16      
          1,226 7 6  
Which, at $7 per cord, is               $8,588 56

--641--

Estimate of the expenses of the Quartermaster's Department of the Marine Corps for the year commencing the 1st of July, 1843, and ending the 30th of June, 1844.

There will be required for the support of the Quartermaster's Department of the Marine Corps during the year commencing on the 1st of July, 1843, and ending on the 30th of June, 1844, in addition to the balances remaining on hand on the 30th of June, 1843, the sum of $134,570 92.

1st. For provisions $38,678 80
2d. For clothing 40,698
3d. For fuel 16,274 12
4th. For repairs of barracks, and for rent of temporary barracks 6,000
5th. For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and expenses of recruiting 8,000
6th. For medicines, hospital supplies, surgical instruments, and pay of matron and stewards 4,140
7th. For military stores, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, accoutrements, ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments 2,800
8th. For contingencies; viz., freight, ferriage-toll, wharfage and cartage, compensation to judges advocate, per diem for attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, house-rent, where no public quarters are assigned, per diem to enlisted men on constant labor, burial of deceased marines, printing, stationery, forage, postage, pursuit of deserters, candles, oil, straw, bed-sacks, barrack furniture, spades, shovels, axes, picks, carpenters' tools: and the keeping of a horse for the messenger 17,980
    134,570 92

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A, NICHOLSON, Quartermaster Marine Corps.

____________

No. 1.—PROVISIONS.

For whom required. Enlisted men. Washerwomen. Matron. Servants. Clerks. Total. Rations at 19 cents. Rations at 20 cents. Amount.
Non-commissioned officers,
musicians, privates, and washerwomen.
517 34 1     552 1   $38,386 00
Clerks         4       292 80
                  38,678 80

--642--

ESTIMATE—Continued.

No. 2.—CLOTHING.

For whom required. Enlisted men. Servants. Clerks. Total. Amount.
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $33 per annum 1,156     1,156 $38,148 00
300 watch coats, at $8 50 each         2,550 00
          40,698 00

___________

No. 3.—FUEL.

For whom required. Number. Fuel for each. Total fuel. Amount.
Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords Feet. Inches.
Colonel commanding 1       36 4    
Lieutenant colonel south of latitude 39 1       26      
Major south of latitude 39 1       26      
Major north of latitude 39 3 29     87      
Captains north of latitude 43 1       24 4 8  
Captains north of latitude 39 2 23 6   47 4    
Captains south of latitude 39 3 21 2   63 6    
Staff south of latitude 39 3 26     78      
Staff north of latitude 39 1       29      
Lieutenants north of latitude 43 2 19 1 4 38 2 8  
Lieutenants north of latitude 39 12 18 4   222      
Lieutenants south of latitude 39 14 16 4   231      
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen,
north of latitude 40
239 1 5   388 3    
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen,
south of latitude 40
370 1 4   555      
Clerk to paymaster 1       2 2 8  
Hospital matron 1       1 4    
Commanding officer's office at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1       8 5 4  
Guard room 1       25      
Hospital 1       19 1 4  
Mess room 1       4 1 4  
Offices of the assistant quartermaster and commanding officers at Philadelphia,
New York, and Charlestown
4 8     32      
Guard rooms at Philadelphia, New York, 3 24     72      
Hospitals at Philadelphia, New York, and 3 18 4   55 4    

--643--

No. 3—Continued.

For whom required. Number. Fuel for each. Total fuel. Amount.
Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords. Feet. Inches.
Mess rooms at Philadelphia, New York, and Charlestown 3 4     12      
Offices of the commandant and staff, and commanding officers
at headquarters Norfolk and Pensacola
7 7     49      
Hospital at headquarters 1       33      
Hospital at Norfolk and Pensacola 22 16 4   33      
Guard room at headquarters navy yard Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola 4 21     84      
Mess rooms at headquarters Norfolk and Pensacola 3 3 4   10 4    
Armory at Washington 1       30      
          2,324 7    
Which, at $7 per cord, is               16,274 12

Headquarters Marine Corps,
Paymaster's Office, November 19, 1842.

Sir: Herewith you will receive triplicate estimates for the pay department of the murine corps for six months, beginning the 1st of January, 1843, and ending the 30th June, 1843; also triplicate estimates for the year beginning the 1st of July, 1843, and ending the 30th of June, 1844.

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. WALKER,
Paymaster Marine Corps.

Colonel Archibald Henderson,
Commandant Marine Corps, Headquarters.

--644--

Detailed estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, of the marine corps of the United States, from the 1st of January, 1843, to the 30th of June, 1843, inclusive.

Rank and grade. Number PAY. SUBSISTENCE. Aggregate.
Pay per month. Extra pay per month. Number of servants
at $8
per month.
Number of servants
at $7
per month.
Total. Number of
rations
per day,
at 20 cents per ration.
Number of
 extra or
double
rations
per day,
at 20 cents per ration.
Total.
Colonel commandant   75     2 $534 00 6 6 $434 40 $968 40
Lieutenant colonel 1 60     2 444 00 5 5 362 00 806 00
Majors 4 50     2 1,536 00 4 4 1,158 40 2,694 40
Adjutant and inspector 1 60   2   456 00 4 4 289 60 745 60
Paymaster 1 60   2   456 00 4 4 289 60 745 60
Quartermaster 1 60   2   456 00 4 4 269 60 745 60
Assistant quartermaster 1 50   1   348 00 4   144 80 492 80
Captains commanding posts and at sea 8 50     1 2,736 00 4 4 2,316 80 5,052 80
Captains 2 40     1 564 00 4   289 60 653 60
First lieutenants commanding guards or detachments at sea 4 40     1 1,128 00 4 4 1,158 40 2,286 40
First lieutenants 15 30     1 3,330 00 4   2,172 00 5,502 00
Second lieutenants 20 25     1 3,840 00 4   2,896 00 6,736 00
Sergeant major 1 17       102 00       102 00
Quartermaster sergeant 1 17 $20     222 00       222 00
Drum and fife majors 2 16       192 00       192 00
Orderly sergeants and sergeants of guards at sea 34 16       3,264 00       3,264 00
Orderly sergeants employed as clerks to colonel commandant, adjutant and inspector, paymaster, and quartermaster 6 16 20     1,296 00       1,296 00
Sergeants 40 13       3,120 00       3,120 00
Corporals 80 9       4,320 00       4,320 00

--645--

Drummers and fifers 60  8                            2,880 00              2,880 00
Privates 1,000 7       42,000 00       42,000 00
Hospital steward 1 18       108 00 1   36 20 144 20
Clerk to paymaster 1         *325 00       325 00
Additional rations to officers for five years' service 62         868 00 146   5,212 80 5,212 80
Bounty for re-enlistment                   868 00
Two months' pay for unexpired time of former enlistment 62         868 00       868 00
Two months' rations for unexpired time of former enlistment 62           1 at 19 cts   716 80 716 80
Two months' clothing for unexpired time of former enlistment, at $2 50 per month 62               310 00 310 00
Officers' servants, at $8 50 per month, for clothing and rations 68               3,468 00 3,468 00
Undrawn clothing                 3,000 00 3,000 00
            75,393 00     24,545 00 99,938 00

* This sum of $325 covers and is in lieu of pay, clothing, rations, fuel, and quarters, for the half year ending June 30, 1843.

Respectfully submitted.

GEO. W. WALKER,
Paymaster Marine Corps.

Headquarters Marine Corps,
Paymaster's Office, November 19, 1842.

--646--

Detailed estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, of the marine corps of the United States, from the 1st of July, 1843, to the 30th June, 1844, inclusive.

Rank and grade. Number. PAY. SUBSISTENCE. Aggregate.
Pay
per month.
Extra
pay
per month.
Number
of
servants
at $8
per month.
Number
of
servants
at $7
per month.
Total. Number
of
rations
per day,
at
20 cents
per ration.
Number
of extra
or double
rations
per day,
at
20 cents
per ration.
Total.
Colonel commandant 1 75     2 $1,068 00 6 6 $878 40 $1,946 40
Lieutenant colonel 1 60     3 888 00 5 5 732 00 1,620 00
Majors 4 50     2 3,072 00 4 4 2,342 40 5,414 40
Adjutant and inspector 1 60   2   912 00 4 4 585 60 1,497 60
Paymaster 1 60   2   912 00 4 4 585 60 1,497 60
Quartermaster 1 60   2   912 00 4 4 585 60 1,497 60
Assistant quartermaster 1 50   1   696 00 4   292 80 988 80
Captains commanding posts and at sea 8 50     1 5,472 00 4 4 4,684 80 10,156 80
Captains 2 40     1 1,128 00 4   585 60 1,713 00
First lieutenants commanding guards or detachments at sea 4 40     1 2,256 00 4 4 2,342 40 4,598 40
First lieutenants 15 30     1 6,660 00 4   4,392 00 11,052 00
Second lieutenants 20 25     1 7,680 00 4   5,856 00 13,536 00
Sergeant major 1 17       204 00       204 00
Quartermaster sergeant 1 17 $20     444 00       444 00
Drum and life majors 2 16       384 00       384 00
Orderly sergeants and sergeants of guards at sea 34 16       6,528 00       6,528 00
Orderly sergeants employed as clerks to colonel commandant, adjutant and inspector, paymaster, and quartermaster 6 16 20     2,592 00       2,592 00
Sergeants 40 13       6,240 00       6,240 00
Corporals 80 9       8,640 00       8,640 00

--647--

Drummers and fifers 60 8                                       5,760 00                    5,760 00
Privates 1,000 7       84,000 00       84,000 00
Hospital steward 1 18       216 00 1   73 20 289 20
Clerk to paymaster 1         *650 00       650 00
Additional rations to officers for five years' service             160   11,712 00 11,712 00
Bounty for re-enlistment 125         1,750 00       1.750 00
Two months' pay for unexpired time of former enlistment 125         1,750 00       1,750 00
Two months' rations for unexpired time of former enlistment 125           1 at 19 cts.   1,448 75 1,448 75
Two months' clothing for unexpired time of former enlistment, at $2 50 per month 125               625 00 625 00
Officers' servants, at $8 50 per month, for clothing and rations 68               6,936 00 6,936 00
Undrawn clothing                 6,000 00 6,000 00
            150,814 00     50,658 15 201,472 15

* This sum of $650 covers and is in lieu of pay, clothing, rations, fuel, and quarters, for the year ending Juno 30, 1844.

Respectfully submitted.

GEO. W. WALKER,
Paymaster Marine Corps.

Headquarters Marine Corps,
Paymaster's Office, November 19, 1842.

--648--

____________

No. 5.

List of vessels in commission, of each squadron, their commanders and stations, on 1st October, 1842.

Class. Name. Commanders of vessels. Commanders of squadrons. Stations.
Ship-of-the-line Columbus Captain William C. Spencer. Commodore C. W. Morgan Mediterranean
Frigate Congress Captain P. F. Voorhees do do.
Sloop Fairfield Commander A. Bigelow do do.
Sloop Preble Commander W. C. Nicholson do do
Frigate United States Captain James Armstrong Commodore T. Ap C. Jones Pacific
Sloop Cyane Commander C. K. Stribling do do
Sloop Dale Commander T. A. Dornin do do
Sloop Yorktown Lieutenant Jno. S. Nicholas do do
Schooner Shark Lieutenant Henry Eazle do do
Storeship Relief Lieutenant J. S. Sterett do do
Ship-of-the-line Delaware Captain C. S. McCauly Commodore Charles Morris Coast of Brazil
Frigate Columbia Captain Ed. lt. Shubrick do do
Sloop Decatur Commander D. G. Farragut do do
Sloop Concord Commander V. Boerum do
Sloop John Adams Commander T. A.Conover do do
Schooner Enterprise Lieutenant J. P. Wilson do do
Frigate Constellation Captain L. Kearney Commodore L. Kearney East Indies.
Sloop Boston Commander J. C. Long do do
Razee Independence Captain S. H. Stringham Commodore Charles Stewart. Home squadron.
Frigate Constitution Captain p. A Parker do do
Sloop Falmouth Commander J. McIntosh do do
Sloop Vandalia Commander William Ramsay do do
Sloop Vincennes Commander F. Buchanan do do
Brig Dolphin Commander J. D. Knight do do
Brig Boxer Lieutenant O. Bullus do do
Schooner Grampus Lieutenant G. J. Vanbrunt do do
Sloop Marion Commander W. M. Armstrong   Special duty
Brig Oregon Lieutenant L. M. Powell   Survey coast of Florida
Steamer Poinsett Lieutenant C. McBlair   do
Ship-of-the-line Ohio Captain J. Smith   Receiving ship, Boston
Ship-of-the-line North Carolina Captain J. H. Gregory   Receiving ship, New York
Schooner Experiment Lieutenant G. A. Magruder   Receiving vessel, Philadelphia
Brig Pioneer Lieutenant Zac. Johnson   Receiving vessel, Baltimore
Ship-of-the-line Pennsylvania Captain J. P. Zantzinger   Receiving ship, Norfolk
Sloop Ontario Commander V. M. Randolph   Receiving ship New Orleans

--649--

____________

No. 6.

List of deaths in the Navy, as ascertained at the Department since the 1st of December, 1841.

Name and rank. Date. Place.
Captain.    
John Gallagher Nov. 1, 1842 Near Wilmington, Delaware.
Commander.    
Ralph Voorhees July 27, 1842 Smyrna, Mediterranean.
Lieutenants.    
Joseph W. Jarvis Sept. 18, 1842 North Carolina.
Franklin Clinton Feb. 26, 1842 New York.
John F. Borden April 5, 1842 Drowned in the Potomac.
John Carroll Mar. 31, 1842 Brig Boxer, New York.
Surgeon.    
George S. Sproston Jan. 21, 1842 Baltimore.
Assistant Surgeon.    
Richard J. Harrison Feb. 27, 1842 Mediterranean.
Passed Midshipman.    
Wm. H. Adams Nov. 8, 1842 Naval hospital, Norfolk.
Midshipmen.    
John J. McCook Mar. 30, 1842 At sea, coast, of Brazil.
John C. Richardson. Sept. 29, 1841 At sea, U. S. ship Constellation.
Philip C. Van Wyck Dec. 31, 1841 Sing Sing, New York.
Masters.    
Thomas Barry June 27, 1842 Navy-yard, Washington.
Albert G. Handy.    
Professor of Mathematics    
David McClure April 13, 1842 Philadelphia.
Boatswains.    
James Banks Nov. 10, 1841  
John A. Frost Oct. 20, 1842  
Gunners.    
Daniel Kelly June 9, 1841  
Jac. Carpenter March 8, 1842  
Carpenter.    
Daniel Caswell Feb. 25, 1842 Norfolk.

--650--

No. 6-Continued.

Name and rank. Date. Place.
Sailmaker.    
John Beggs Sept. 20, 1840 Valparaiso.
Navy Agent.    
John P. Henry March 8, 1842 Savannah, Georgia.
Chaplain.    
James Wiltbank Mar. 19, 1842 Philadelphia.

No. 7.

List of dismissions from the Navy since the 1st of December, 1841.

Name and rank. Date of dismission.
Captain.  
John H. Clack April 16, 1842.
Commanders.  
Wm. J. Belt November 2, 1842.
Charles S. Williamson October 27, 1842, cashiered.
Lieutenant.  
Nathaniel G. Bay. October 14, 1842.
Midshipmen.  
Samuel D. Cowden August 5, 1842.
James M. Turner August 5, 1842.
Charles Weston October 27, 1842.
Master's Mate.  
George G. Decker July 6, 1842.
Gunners.  
Cas. S. Skiddy October 27, 1842.
Jeremiah Buell July 6, 1842.
Peter Freeman June 7, 1842.
Samuel P. Scott Jan. 15, 1842, appointment revoked.
Carpenter.  
Russell Smith July 28, 1842.
Naval Storekeeper.  
Tunis Craven October 10, 1842.

--651--

No. 8.

List of resignations in the Navy since the 1st of December, 1841.

Name and rank. Date of acceptance.
Passed Midshipmen.  
Wm. Craney February 15, 1842.
R. M. Bowland July 7, 1842.
Midshipmen.  
Jas. Julian Barry September 20, 1842.
Charles Bertody January 31, 1842.
Charles S. Cooper April 9, 1842.
James C. Campbell July 7, 1842.
Stewart A. Godman May 14, 1842.
J. H. McJ. Madison November 4, 1842.
Edwin W. Oliver June 1, 1842.
Augt. W. Stebbins September 20, 1842.
Jacob F. Sperry January 28, 1842.
Benjamin B. Wright October 24, 1842.
Edward Z. C. Judson June 8, 1842.
Charles Wager February 19, 1842.
Chaplain.  
Jared L. Elliott October 18, 1842.
Boatswains.  
Henry Edgar November 19, 1841.
John Miller March 22, 1842.
George W. Clark June 1, 1842.
Sailmakers.  
Thomas Tatem September 7, 1842.
J. F. Tatem June 8, 1842.
Marine Corps.  
Lieutenant.  
James Maguire January 25, 1842.

--652--

____________

No. 9.

Pension Office, November 19, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit, herewith, in obedience to the 3d section of the act of Congress, of the 10th of July, 1833, entitled "An act for the regulation of the navy and privateer pension, and navy hospital funds;" six lists, viz:

1. A list containing the names of widows whose pensions ceased on the 31st of August last, in conformity with the provisions of the act of the 16th of August, 1841, entitled, "An act to provide for the payment of navy pensions."

2. A list of orphans whose pensions expired on the 31st of August last, agreeable to the provisions of the act of August 16, 1841.

3. A list of widows pensioned since the last annual report was made from this office, some of whose pensions ceased on the 31st of August last.

4. A list of orphans pensioned since the last report, whose pensions ceased on the 31st of August last.

5. A list of widows who are now on the pension roll under the act of June 30, 1834, granting five years' half-pay.

6. A list of persons who are now on the roll of invalid pensioners.

The invalids constitute the only list of permanent navy pensioners now-left. There are at present 503 on the rolls, and there is now in the Treasury an undrawn balance of this year's appropriation of $31,123 33, which will be sufficient to pay them on the 1st of January next, and to meet all other demands for the first quarter of the ensuing year. To pay the invalids now on the rolls, and those who may be added during the first half year of 1843, as well as the widows under the act of June 30, 1834, granting five years' half-pay in certain cases, and widows and orphans' claims still unsettled, under the act of March 3, 1837, the sum of $27,800 will be required for the half year ending June 30, 1843, viz : invalids, $18,000; widows under the act of June 30, 1834, $1,800; and widows and orphans' claims under the act of March 3, 1837, $8,000.

For the fiscal year ending the 30th of June, 1843, the sum of $49,600 will be required, making necessary an appropriation of $77,400 for the years 1843 and 1844.

The only stocks now belonging to the navy pension fund are, 700 shares of the Bank of Washington, the nominal value of which is $14,000; and stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown, the nominal value of which is $8,700. The last-mentioned institution is now closing its concerns; and, as soon as collections can be made, the directors will pay from the dividends of its capital stock, the amount due to the navy pension fund. Since my report of November, 1841, $900 have been paid into the Treasury by this bank, which has been applied to the payment of pensions, as will be seen by the 4th Auditor's report, which has been sent to you. The stock of the Bank of Washington cannot now be sold to advantage, and the amount of interest which it yields is so inconsiderable, that I have not introduced it into the present report as available. The sum of $2,500 received for interest on Cincinnati corporation stock, and applied to the payment of navy pensions, since the date of my last report, was due to the navy pension fund before the stock was sold.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. L. EDWARDS,
Commissioner of Pensions.

Hon. A. P. Upshur, Secretary of the Navy.

--653—

1.

Alphabetical list of Widows whose pensions ceased on the 31st of August, 1842.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of Congress
under which allowed.
Sally Annis Seaman April 20, 1815 $6 00 March 4, 1814.
Abigail Appleton do Jan'y 4, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary P. Archer. do Oct'r 12, 1839 6 00 do
Emma Anderson Passed midshipman Dec'r 29, 1840 12 50 do
Martha Ann Atwood Purser May 11, 1823 20 00 do
Louisa Auchmuty Lieutenant Oct'r 8, 1835 25 60 June 30, 1834.
Catharine L. Armistead Lieut. marine corps April 14, 1841 15 00 March 3, 1837.
Catharine Anderson Marine Feb'y 19, 1813 3 50 do
Elizabeth Armitage Seaman March 7, 1810 6 00 do
Sarah Bernard Carpenter's mate Sept'r 10, 1829 9 50 do
Eliza K. Boughan Lieutenant Nov'r 6, 1832 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Susan Barber Boy Oct'r 24, 1840 3 00 March 3, 1837.
Emily Beale Purser April 4, 1835 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Beeler Corporal marine corps. Sept'r 8, 1830 4 50 March 3, 1837.
Lydia Brown Carpenter March 28, 1824 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Jane Bergamer Marine Sept'r 12, 1839 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary E. Broom Major marine corps Nov'r 14, 1840 25 00 do
Mary Ann Boyd Surgeon March 26, 1839 30 00 do
Elizabeth Buck Musician marine corps Dec'r 5, 1838 4 00 do
Elisabeth Bellingham Seaman August 9, 1837 6 00 do
Caroline M. Berry Lieutenant July 17, 1824 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Maria Babbit Surgeon May 24, 1826 25 00 do
Polly Barry Marine Dec'r 7, 1812 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Bishop Seaman Dec'r 18, 1813 6 00 do
Martha Burrell do Dec'r 14, 1832 6 00 do
Elizabeth Bartlett do April 25, 1813 6 00 do
Abigail Baily Landsman Dec'r 31, 1813 4 00 do
Nabby Burchstead Carpenter Dec'r 11, 1833 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza Bradlee Sergeant marine corps. April 12, 1838 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Julianna Burchmore Surgeon Sept'r 10, 1839 27 50 June 30, 1834.
Letitia Blake Marine August 14, 1836 3 50 do
Elizabeth Beckford Landsman Nov'r 30, 1839 4 00 do
Julianna S. Babbit Commander Sept'r 9, 1840 30 00 March 3, 1837.
Houldah Bennett Sailingmaster August 18, 1840 20 00 do
Phebe Butler Purser April 9, 1837 20 00 do
Susan Bainbridge Captain July 27, 1833 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine M. Beers Surgeon June 8, 1831 25 00 March 3, 1837
Elizabeth Barnes Carpenter Nov'r 2 1819 10 00 do
Sarah Beggs Sailmaker Sept'r 21, 1840 10 00 do
Sarah Berry Boatswain March 2, 1829 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth H. Baldwin Captain's clerk April 12, 1816 12 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth E. Chandler Surgeon July 28, 1841 30 00 do
Leah Carter Musician marine corps Sept'r 23, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann D. Campbell Lieutenant June 3, 1836 25 00 do
Sarah Ann Cooke Surgeon Dec'r 4, 1838 35 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary Cheever   April 12, 1814 8 33 1/3 April 12, 1814.
Abigail Cowell Lieutenant April 18, 1814 25 00 March 3, 1817.
Harriet Carter do Sept'r 6, 1823 25 00 do
Margaret Carmick Major marine corps. Nov'r 6, 1816 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Cowen Gunner Sept'r 14, 1831 10 00 do
Rebecca G. Cooper Boatswain October 4, 1840 9 00 do
Caroline L. Covington Gunner Nov'r 4, 1840 10 00 do
Ann Maria Clunet Sergeant marine corps Dec'r 1, 1825 6 50 June 20, 1813.
Eliza M. Cloud Assistant surgeon August 1, 1831 15 00 June 30, 1834.

--654--

1—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement of pension. Monthly pension. Acts of Congress
under which allowed.
Elizabeth Cernon Ordinary seaman Nov'r 38, 1823 $5 00 March 3, 1837.
Maria Christy Seaman Sept'r 7, 1839 6 00 do
Eliza Cassin Purser August 19, 1821 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Maria J. Cuvillier Musician marine corps June 28, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Clementson Sailmaker July 9, 1833 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Eleanor Correia Gunner Dec'r 21, 1823 10 00 do
Celia Cross Lieutenant Feb'y 10, 1834 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Chauncey Captain Jan'y 28, 1840 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Frances F. Cook Lieutenant Feb'y 7, 1834 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza W. Cocke do March 7, 1823 25 00 June 20, 1813.
Ann V. Cocke do May 31, 1835 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Fanny Cassin do Nov'r 30, 1826 25 00 do
Mary Cassin do Oct'r 15, 1837 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth J. Caldwell do August 9, 1831 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Susanna Crichet Seaman June 19, 1812 6 00 March 4 1814.
Harriet Creighton Captain Oct'r 13, 1838 50 40 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Chapman Ordinary seaman July 5, 1805 5 00 do
Eleanor Cox Marine April 10, 1839 3 50 do
Anna Cain Ship's corporal Oct'r 25, 1834 7 00 do
Ann Conrad Landsman March 8, 1834 4 00 do
Ellen Cox Passed midshipman June 30, 1832 12 00 do
Elizabeth Cash Seaman Jan'y 12, 1837 6 00 do
Rodolphine Claxton Captain March 7, 1841 50 00 do
Elizabeth Ann Dent Captain July 31, 1823 50 00 do
Susan Decatur do March 22, 1820 50 00 do
Mary Ann Denham Sergeant marine corps April 7, 184  8 00 do
Laura P. Daggett Gunner April 9, 1836 10 00 do
Sarah Drew Sailingmaster April 9, 1823 20 00 do
Susan Davis Quartergunner August 10, 1800 7 50 do
Ellen Dever Landsman April 23, 1823 4 00 do
Mary Francis Davis Sailmaker Jan'y 26, 1839 10 00 do
Prudence Denham Ordinary seaman June 27, 1837 5 00 do
Peggy Dorney Steward Jan'y 25, 1838 9 00 do
Eliza Doxey Sailing master May 20, 1828 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Ellen Dix Surgeon April 16, 1823 27 50 March 3, 1814.
Lamitia Dill Boatswain Dec'r 19, 1831 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Virginia Duncan Passed midshipman August 3, 1836 12 50 March 3, 1837.
Arabella Dubois Seaman August 30, 1837 6 00 do
Sarah Davis Master's mate Jan'y 6, 1820 10 00 do
Mary Davis Quartermaster Sept'r 11, 1814 9 00 do
Ann Edwards Lieut. marine corps Oct'r 16, 1800 15 00 do
Abigail Eldridge Seaman June 2, 1831 6 00 do
Phebe Eldridge Gunner Dec'r 31, 1806 10 00 do
Hannah Everett Chaplain April 12, 1837 20 00 do
Ann R. Edwards Lieutenant Jan'y 19, 1824 25 00 do
Susan Eaton Gunner Feb'y 22, 1840 10 00 do
Harriet Ann Elbert Lieutenant Dec'r 20, 1812 2 5 00 March 4, 1814.
Dorothy M. Evans Boatswain July 9, 1832 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Abigail Fernald Seaman Feb'y 24, 1815 6 00 March 4,1 814.
Lucy Flagg Gunner April 20, 1816 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary Forrest Sergeant marine corps March 11, 1832 8 50 June 30, 1834.
Mary Ford Carpenter's mate April 20, 1815 9 00 March 4, 1814.
Ann Fletcher Marine Jan'y 20, 1818 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Ferguson Seaman July 24, 1814 6 00 do.
Mary T. Forrest Lieutenant Oct'r 1, 1825 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Fremody Ordinary seaman Jan'y 20, 1836 5 00 do.
Eliza M. Fortin. Steward Jan'y 28, 1833 9 00 March 3, 1837.

--655--

1—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement of pension. Monthly pension. Acts of Congress under which allowed.
Susanna Flann Seaman Oct'r 1, 1839 $6 00 March 31, 1837.
Jane Goslin Marine Dec'r 28, 1831 3 50 do
Margaret F. Green Carpenter Nov'r 11, 1834 10 00 June 30, 1334.
Mary Gallon Seaman April 28, 1825 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Sophia Gardner Master commandant Sept'r 1, 1815 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Eliza Grayson Captain marine corps June 30, 1823 20 00 do
Mary Class Carpenter's mate Oct'r 1, 1837 9 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Goldthwait Ordinary seaman August 25, 1813 5 00 do
Elizabeth C. Gray Boatswain Feb'y 15, 1830 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Rebecca Gulliver Marine Jan'y 31, 1822 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Joan Goodwin Seaman August 29, 1837 6 00 do
Mary S. Gadsden Master commandant August 28, 1812 30 00 do
Olive Grover Ordinary seaman Feb'y 2, 1836 5 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann T. Green Purser August 24, 1812 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann Gardner Gunner April 28, 1835 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Hannah L. Gamble Major marine corps Sep'r 11, 1836 25 00 do
Mary Griffin Surgeon Nov'r 1, 1814 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Dionysia Goodrum Lieutenant May 9, 1836 2 5 00 June 30, 1834.
Ellen Nora Hanbury Sergeant marine corps Jan'y 4, 1825 8 00 do
Mary R. Hatch Pilot Feb'y 5, 1814 20 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Mary Henley Captain Oct'r 7, 1828 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Susan Harraden Master commandant Jan'y 20, 1818 30 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Eliza Henley Captain May 23, 1835 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Theresa Hoffman Musician marine corps Sept'r 19, 1837 4 00 do
Hannah Hazen Seaman March 28, 1814 6 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Mary Ann H. Holmes Armorer Sept'r 8, 1833 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Hannah Hammond Marine Nov'r 10, 1817 3 50 do
Phebe Hollis do May 13, 1811 3 50 do
Emma Horton Midshipman August 7, 1815 9 50 do
Ann J. Holmes Master-at-arms August 22, 1836 9 00 do
Rebecca Higgins Seaman Sept'r 30, 1837 6 00 do
Sarah A. Huntt Purser April 4, 1837 20 00 do
Diana Hardy Ordinary seaman Sept'r 10, 1813 5 00 March 4, 1814.
Sarah Higgins Seaman Sept'r 28, 1834 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Hanna Gunner Jan'y 17, 1837 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann R. Hall Sailmaker Sept'r 18, 1826 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Ann Horsley Surgeon Sept'r 8, 1831 27 50 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Holland Carpenter's mate August 10, 1800 9 50 do
Ellen Hunter Marine May 16, 1838 3 50 do
Eliza Halsey Purser Jan'y 2, 1838 20 00 do
Cornelia Hobbs Lieutenant April 3, 1836 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Hetty Henry Seaman May 25, 1834 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary S. Hunter Chaplain Feb'y 24, 1823 20 00 do
Mary Ann Hartnett Carpenter Sept'r 9, 1830 10 00 do
Phebe Hammersly Lieutenant Oct'r 1, 1823 25 00 do
Phebe W. Hoffman Captain Dec'r 10, 1834 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Henrietta Hixon Master Sept'r 8, 1840 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary E. Holbert Corporal marine corps June 30, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Hackleton Seaman Dec'r 5, 1812 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Johnston Landsman Feb'y 21, 1833 4 00 do
Elizabeth Jones Marine Sept'r 1, 1827 3 00 June 30, 1834.
Maria T. Johnson Carpenter's mate Jan'y 30, 1814 9 50 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Hannah Ingraham Seaman April 10, 1837 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Jones do August 16, 1800 6 00 do
Catherine Johnson Gunner August 11, 1818 10 00 do
Mary Ann Jackson Ordinary seaman May 2, 1838 5 00 do

--656--

1—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement of pension. Monthly pension. Acts of Congress under which allowed.
Theresa Jones Marine June 26, 1810 $3 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary Jameson Midshipman Nov'r 11, 1828 9 50 do
Ellen Jenkins Seaman June 2, 1825 6 00 Juno 30, 1834.
Mary Jones Chaplain Jan'y 39, 1829 20 00 do
Susan J. Jackson Purser Oct'r 31, 1840 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Jones Cook April 20, 1815 9 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Catharine C. King Sergeant marine corps August 3, 1837 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Kitchen Seaman August 16, 1800 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza Kitts Sailingmaster Sept'r 27, 1819 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Harriet J. Kissam Surgeon Oct'r 6, 1828 30 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann M. Kelly Gunner marine corps. June 10, 1841 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Frances M. Lewis Master commandant Sept'r 1, 1815 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Susannah Lippincott Ordinary seaman Jan'y 1, 1838 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Lydia Low Yeoman August 1, 1834 7 50 Juno 30, 1834.
Betsey Low Seaman Sept'r 1, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Deborah Linsay Sailingmaster May 19, 1826 20 00 do
Elizabeth Lagoner Seaman March 4, 1835 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Julia M. Lawrence Captain June 1, 1813 50 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Sarah Ann Lent Sailmaker's mate Sept'r 11, 1824 9 50 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Leaky Marine Dec'r 27, 1840 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Sarah Matthews Quartergunner Nov'r 30, 1814 9 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Hetty McDermot do Sept'r 30, 1837 7 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary Ann Marshall Gunner August 8, 1827 10 00 do
Celeste McGowen Lieutenant Feb'y 19, 1826 25 00 do
Ann Mix Commander Feb'y 8, 1839 30 00 do
Abigail Morgan Carpenter's mate March 12, 1813 9 50 do
Hester Meredith Ordinary seaman Feb'y 17, 1838 5 00 do
Mary McNelly Gunner Nov'r 29, 1834 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Phoebe Montgomery Surgeon Jan'y 3, 1828 25 00 do
Rebecca McGee Marine Jan'y 26, 1830 3 00 do
Mary E. McPherson Master commandant April 28, 1824 30 00 do
Hester Murphy Corporal marine corps. Dec'r 26, 1831 4 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary G. Maury Lieutenant June 22, 1840 25 00 do
Elizabeth Myers Marine Oct'r 10, 1839 3 50 do
Catharine Mitchell Landsman Nov'r 20, 1832 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth H. Marshall Corporal marine corps. Dec'r 11, 1822 4 50 March 3, 1837.
Ann G. McCullough Sailingmaster August 24, 1814 20 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Jane Moulton Seaman April 20, 1815 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Caroline Monteith Lieutenant Oct'r 16, 1819 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Martha McNelly Boatswain July 14, 1839 10 00 do
Honora McCarty Ordinary seaman May 25, 1839 5 00 do
Ann Martin Quartergunner April 20, 1815 9 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Elizabeth Martin Boatswain Sept'r 1, 1829 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Susan McCullough Lieutenant Dec'r 31, 1827 25 00 do
Mary McCall Surgeon Sept'r 15, 1831 25 00 do
Eliza Maury Lieutenant June 24, 1823 25 00 March 3, 1817.
Elizabeth McCann Purser's steward April 26, 1840 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth McMurtrie Purser March 23, 1836 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine McLaughlin First class boy Feb'y 15, 1837 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary D. McClure Quarter gunner June 5, 1834 7 50 do
Mary McCawley Captain marine corps Feb'y 22, 1839 20 00 do
Rachel Marshall Seaman Dec'r 31, 1827 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann Nantz Sailingmaster Dec'r 27, 1824 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Laura C. Nicholson Captain Dec'r 12, 1838 50 00 do
Sarah L. Noyes Ship's corporal Oct'r 9, 1835 7 00 do

--657--

1-Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of Congress
under which allowed.
Rhoda Newcomb Lieutenant Nov'r 1, 1825 $25 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Nagle Boatswain Nov'r 19, 1834 9 50 do
Mary Neale Lieutenant Sept'r 1, 1815 25 00 March 3, 1817.
Teresa Nicholas Seaman June 30, 1838 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Ann Nelson do Nov'r 11, 1837 6 00 do
Eliza Netto Captain's steward Dec'r 6, 1838 9 00 do
Charity Nicholson Carpenter Sept'r 9, 1814 10 00 do
Margaret Navarro Sailmaker Oct'r 2, 1823 10 00 March 3, 1817.
Sarah H. Nichols Sailingmaster Sept'r 12, 1822 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Rebecca Oellers Seaman March 21, 1839 6 00 do
Margaret Osborn do August 16, 1834 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza A. Oliver Gunner March 30, 1834 10 00 do
Elizabeth O'Hare Carpenter's mate August 28, 1838 9 50 March 3, 1837.
Catharine Ann Price Carpenter's mate Sept'r 10, 1829 9 50 do
Eliza L. Pierce Lieutenant August 7, 1822 25 00 March 3, 1817.
Frances Pottenger do Feb'y 7, 1833 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Maria Page Surgeon March 15, 1832 25 00 do
Nanny Patch Seaman Oct'r 29, 1812 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Frances W. Parker Carpenter August 26, 1830 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Nabby Pippen Coxswain April 20, 1815 9 00 do
Mary Proctor Steward July 1, 1837 9 00 do
Abigail Parrott Ordinary seaman March 3, 1832 5 00 do
Lydia G. Pinkham Lieutenant Oct'r 27, 1839 25 00 do
Eleanor H. Prentiss do July 5, 1840 2 5 00 do
Elizabeth C. Perry Captain August 23, 1820 50 00 March 3, 1817.
Margaret Parcels Sailmaker August 20, 1819 10 00 do
Sarah T. Phillips Carpenter Oct'r 9, 1839 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Rachel Patton Ordinary seaman August 11, 1835 5 00 do
Mary Preble Captain August 25, 1807 50 00 do
Lucretia [ ] Purser May 8, 1832 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza [ ] Sailingmaster Sept'r 16, 1826 20 00 do
Sarah Potts do May 8, 1839 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Georgiana A. Peaco Surgeon May 23, 1827 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Phillips Marine Oct'r 22, 1834 3 50 do
Mary Ann Patterson Boatswain Dec'r 13, 1836 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza C. Porter Master commandant Sept'r 2, 1831 30 00 June 30, 1834.
George Ann Patterson Captain August 25, 1839 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Henrietta M. Prather Marine Sept'r 14, 1834 3 50 June 30, 1834.
Catharine S. M. Ray Surgeon Sept'r 7, 1835 35 00 do
Rebecca Rainey Ordinary seaman Nov'r 11, 1804 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Rumney Sailingmaster March 31, 1823 20 00 do
Ann I. Ross Lieut. marine corps Dec'r 11, 1836 1 5 00 do
Sally Russell Master's mate Oct'r 17, 1803 10 00 do
Elizabeth J. Russell Lieutenant July 21, 1833 25 00 do
Mary Russell Sergeant marine corps July 7, 1829 6 50 June 30, 1834.
Martha Rose Seaman Sept'r 10, 1813 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Catharine Rinker Sailingmaster July 10, 1823 20 00 do
Elizabeth Roberts Sergeant marine corps Feb'y 14, 1838 8 00 March 3, 1837.
Sarah Ross Marine Dec'r 18, 1840 3 50 do
Catharine C. Read Lieutenant Jan'y 6, 1812 25 00 do
Ann M. Rodgers Captain May 21, 1832 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Richardson Boatswain's mate Jan'y 9, 1837 9 50 March 3, 1837.
Minerva Rogers Captain August 1, 1838 50 00 do
Mary W. Rose Master commandant August 27, 1830 30 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Rossmusoin Pilot July 22, 1813 28 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Nancy Riggs Seaman Dec'r 27, 1814 6 00 March 4, 1814.

--658--

1—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
Phebe Reynolds Boatswain May 21, 1823 $10 00 March 3, 1817.
Eliza Sitcher Drummer Feb'y 28, 1841 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Stevens Captain Jan'y 21, 1841 50 00 do
Hannah Stricker Sergeant marine corps Oct'r 1, 1829 6 50 do
Eleanor Smart Seaman Oct'r 15, 1814 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Louisa Ann Smith Lieutenant Nov'r 30, 1836 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Patty Smith Boatswain June 17, 1815 10 00 do
Elizabeth L. Stallings Lieutenant April 26, 1841 25 00 do
Mary H. Stockton do Nov'r 20, 1836 25 00 do
Mary C. Spence Captain Sept'r 26, 1826 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Mehitable Smith Lieutenant Sept'r 10, 1829 25 00 do
Sarah Smith Steward Dec'r 19, 1820 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Hannah Stone Seaman July 1, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Mary B. Shaw Captain Sept'r 17, 1823 50 00 do
Harriet H. Sanders Lieutenant Dec'r 7, 1816 25 00 Jan'y 30, 1813.
Sally Schlosser Seaman Feb'y 5, 1821 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Catharine Smith. Marine March 18, 1337 3 50 do
Elizabeth A. Starke Corporal marine corps Dec'r 10, 1839 4 50 do
Louisa Sherburne Lieutenant Nov'r 20, 1830 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann E. Sardo Musician marine corps Dec'r 20, 1835 4 00 do
Rachel Steel Orderly serg't m. corps Nov'r 28, 1832 8 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary Stellwagen Sailingmaster Nov'r 16, 1828 20 00 Jan'y 30, 1834.
Ann Stephenson do August 27, 1813 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Jane Smith Midshipman March 21, 1831 9 50 June 30, 1834.
Mary Stevens Sailingmaster April 18, 1816 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Alice Smiley Seaman Feb'y 27, 1813 6 00 do
Elizabeth Simmons Marine Jan'y 38, 1811 3 50 do
Ann Maria Stivers Landsman April 22, 1839 4 00 do
Mary Stone Seaman April 20, 1840 6 00 do
Mary Stevenson do Oct'r 8, 1828 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Sevier Captain marine corps. May 9, 1837 20 00 Jan'y 20, 1813.
Mary Ann Springer Lieutenant May 25, 1820 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Frances A. Thomas do Sept'r 10, 1829 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann Tight. Seaman March 24, 1834 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Trapnell Marine Sept'r 10, 1813 3 50 March 4, 1814.
Ann Tilden Seaman April 20, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Toohey Sergeant marine corps Nov'r 13, 1837 6 50 do
Hannah Thompson Seaman April 9, 1835 6 00 do
Lucy R. Temple Lieutenant June 23, 1830 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann Taggart Gunner Dec'r 13, 1836 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Jane Trusty Cook July 24, 1839 9 00 do
Ann E. Tingey Captain Feb'y 22, 1829 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Emily Tupper Captain marine corps Jan'y 18, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Trenchard Captain Nov'r 3, 1824 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Emma C. B. Thompson do Sept'r 2, 1832 50 00 do
Hannah Ulrick Sailingmaster June 6, 1822 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Rachel Van Patten Ordinary seaman April 23, 1825 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Lydia Vanhorn Marine Oct'r 10, 1814 3 50 March 4, 1814.
Anna Vanderfeen Ordinary seaman June 30, 1824 5 00 June 30, 1834.
Eleanor Wills Landsman August 10, 1800 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Warren Marine Sept'r 12, 1812 3 50 do
Hannah Webb Seaman Jan'y 1, 1813 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Sarah V. Waldo Master August 30, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth White Master-at-arms May 18, 1815 9 00 do

--659--

1—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
Margaret C. Worth Lieutenant Feb'y 3, 1841 $25 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary D. Wade do Nov'r 15, 1816 25 00 do
Catharine Walling Seaman Dec'r 3, 1813 6 00 do
Mary S. Wilkinson Passed midshipman Nov'r 14,1839 12 50 do
Edna M. Wood do Oct'r 9, 1836 12 50 June 30, 1834.
Electa Webster Lieutenant August 25, 1825 25 00 do
Marvel Wilcox Carpenter's mate August 8,1813 9 50 March 3, 1817.
Susan C. Woolsey Captain May 18, 1838 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Ellen Woolsey Lieutenant Oct'r 25, 1840 25 00 do
Catharine Wise Purser Nov'r 20,1824 20 00 June 30,1834.
Sarah A. Willard Sergeant marine corps May 30, 1837 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Charlotte Wares Sailingmaster Dec'r 4, 1815 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Julia Weed Captain marine corps March 5, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Rebecca Winn Purser Feb'y 18, 1836 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Drucilla Whetcroft Sergeant marine corps August 29, 1834 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Ann T. Yarnall Carpenter's mate April 30, 1837 9 50 do

Number of widows, 348.

Annual amount of their pensions, $64,558.

____________

2.

Alphabetical list of minor children whose pensions ceased on the 31st of August, 1842.

Names of children. Father's rank. Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
Elizabeth Ardis Carpenter's mate $9 50 September 8, 1831
Ann Ardis
Emma Ardis
Franklin Armstrong Sergeant marine corps 7 50 January 23, 1825
Venerando Armstrong
Thomas W. Adams Sailmaker 10 00 September 10, 1829
Laura V. Anderson Captain marine corps 20 00 January 1, 1837
Ann E. Armstrong Carpenter 10 00 November 27, 1839
Thomas P. Armstrong
George W. Armstrong
Virginia Armstrong
Julia A. Blakeslee Marine 3 50 July 31, 1827
John Bell
James Bell
Mary Jane Bell Cook 9 00 August 15, 1831
Maria Bell
Marcellus Bell
Elizabeth E. A. Berry Seaman 6 00 October 9, 1810
Thomas J. P. Bliss do 6 00 July 1, 1838
William L. Booth Master commandant 30 00 January 1, 1837
Thomas A. Booth
George T. Bassett Surgeon 25 00 August 20, 1830

--660--

2—Continued.

Names of children. Father's rank. Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
James Covenhoven Marine $3 50 February 26, 1837
Margaret T. Chamberlain Sailingmaster 20 00 February 8, 1322
Emeline Cousins Seaman 6 00 May 21 1829
Delia Cousins
Charles W. Conway Private marine corps 3 50 July 14, 1833
William M. Caldwell Lieutenant 25 00 June 5, 1827
John G. Carr Lieutenant 25 00 April 15, 1840
Emma Demarest Sergeant marine corps 8 00 August 24, 1824
Margaret P. Darragh Purser 20 00 January 9, 1831
Teresa Davis Carpenter 10 00 January 11, 1829
Eliza E. A. R. Denison Purser 20 00 March 15, 1822
Mary Jane Fisher Corporal marine corps 4 50 May 18, 1829
Elizabeth Ann Franks Sergeant marine corps 6 50 October 27, 1340
Henry N. Franks  
Children of Timothy Griswold Ordinary seaman 5 00 July 1, 1838
M. A. S. Grimke Lieutenant 25 00 November 30, 1825
Edward Garrison Seaman 6 00 April 2, 1825
Adolphus Heerman Surgeon 35 00 April 20,1837
Theodore Heerman
Valentine M. Heerman
Charles, F. Heerman
Clifford Heerman
Stephen D. Hibbert Gunner 10 00 July 9, 1832
George J. Hall Seaman 6 00 December 10, 1834
Mary Ann Hunt Ordinary seaman 5 00 April 20, 1837
John Henry Harrison do 5 00 August 16, 1831
Joseph B. Jones Sailingmaster 20 00 May 21, 1826
Lucinda Jolly Captain foretop 7 00 August 15, 1839
Hannah Jolly
James Jolly
Jane Jolly
William Kidwell Private marine corps 3 50 July 1, 1837
John Kidwell
J. B. O'H. Lightelle do 3 50 December 22, 1824
James Livingston Ordinary seaman 5 00 June 4, 1829
Caroline Lord Gunner 10 00 July 9, 1829
Adeline K. Lowe Lieutenant 25 00 May 2, 1826
Mary F. Linscott Gunner 10 00 May 25, 1827
Caroline W. Linscott
William O. Martin Seaman 6 00 October 10, 1838
Margaret R. Munroe Boatswain 10 00 March 27, 1832
Augustus R. Macdonough Captain 50 00 January 1, 1837
Thomas Macdonough
Charles R. Macdonough
Mary A. McCloud Boatswain 10 00 July 1, 1837
Martha E. Mozart Master-at-arms 9 00 August 16, 1839
Mary Ann McCoy Seaman 6 00 October 13, 1835
James B. McCauley Lieutenant 25 00 February 20, 1827
Alexander Moran Quartergunner 7 50 February 10, 1829
Maria C. Norris Master commandant 30 00 January 1, 1838
Shubrick Norris

--661--

2—Continued.

Names of children. Father's rank. Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
Alexander Ferry Lieutenant $25 00 July 1, 1837
Mary R. Ritchie do 25 00 June 26, 1831
Mary K. Reany Purser's steward 9 00 January 3, 1831
Mary Roberts Musician marine corps 4 00 October 1, 1835
Margaret Roberts
Sarah Robinson Ordinary seaman 5 00 March 10, 1841
Susan Robinson
Hannah T. Sanderson Lieutenant 25 00 August 23, 1831
Gilberta F. Sinclair Captain 50 00 January 1, 1837
Alonzo P. Smith Lieutenant 25 00 January 1, 1840
Deborah Sullivan Seaman 6 00 July 7, 1840
Florence Sullivan
Catharine M. Smith Master commandant 30 00  
Robert Towner Gunner 10 00 September 2, 1834
Margaret R. Timberlake Purser 20 00 April 2, 1828
Eliza J. Trimble Sailmaker 10 00 July 1, 1837
John L. Thurston Sergeant marine corps 6 50 September 11, 1840
Children of Robert L. Thorn Surgeon 30 00 October 12, 1838
Emily Vandackenhausen Private marine corps 3 50 March 12, 1833
John Woods Boatswain 10 00 January 1, 1839
T. G. Westcott Lieutenant 25 00  
Thomas A. Young Lieutenant marine corps 12 50 July 7, 1835

Number of minor children, 95.

Annual amount of their pensions, $11,448.

____________

3.

Alphabetical list of Widows who have received pension certificates since the 20th of November, 1841.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of Congress
under which allowed.
Mary E. Arlett Marine March 5, 1812 $3 50 June 30,1834.
Sarah A. Bacon Passed midshipman May 1, 1839 12 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary Barry Master June 23, 1842 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Eunice Corbit Ordinary seaman May 1, 1823 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Ellen Griffin do April 25, 1835 5 00 do
Dyonisia Goodrum Lieutenant May 9, 1841 25 00 do
Mary Ann Morrice Ship's steward August 2, 1841 9 00 do
Ann Palmer Sergeant marine corps Oct'r 13, 184 1 8 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Phillips Landsman Feb'y 18, 1834 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Almira Pease Carpenter May 12, 1842 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Susan Rackliff Ordinary seaman July 6, 184 1 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Maria Ridgeway Commander Nov'r 1, 1841 30 00 June 30, 1834.
Jane Sproston Surgeon Jan'y 21, 1842 35 00 do
Julia Snowman Seaman October 5, 1841 6 00 do
Maria M. Wainwright Lt. Col. marine corps October 6, 1841 30 00 do
Mary Jane Wilson Armorer July 27, 1841 9 00 do
Constance Wade Gunner Feb'y 27, 1841 10 00 March 3, 1837.

All the pensions granted under the act of March 3, 1837, expired on the 31st August, 1842, in conformity with the first section of the act of the 16th of August, 1841, entitled, "An act to provide for the payment of navy pensions." Pensions granted under the act of June 30, 1834, are for five years, unless the widow should marry or die before the expiration of that period.

Number of widows, 17 ; annual amount of their pensions, $2,724.

--662--

____________

4.

Alphabetical list of minor children to whom pensions have been granted, under the act of March 3, 1837, since the 20th November, 1841.

Names of children. Father's
rank.
Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
John Brown Musician $4 00 February 3, 1841
William Brown
James Brown
Richard Brown
James M. Grymes Captain marine corps 20 00 September 25, 1841
Louisa Goss
John A. T. Goss Carpenter's mate 9 50 February 6, 1842
Thomas Goss
Thomas T. Hooper Seaman 6 00 February 14, 1815
Benjamin Jackson Gunner 10 00 November 26, 1831
Matilda T. Lee Lieutenant 25 00 October 25, 1838
John Moran Landsman 4 00 April 26, 1838
Lewis R. Morris Lieutenant 25 00 August 12, 1841
G. J. O'Neill Palmer Passed assistant surgeon 17 50 January 5, 1840
John Sivers Sergeant marine corps 6 50 January 1, 1842
Wilhemina Steinbogh Boatswain 10 00 July 13, 1841

All the above-mentioned pensions expired on the 31st of August, 1842, in conformity with the first section of the act of the 16th of August, 1841, entitled, "An act to provide for the payment of navy pensions."

Number of minor children, 18; annual amount of their pensions, $1,650.

____________

5.

Alphabetical list of widows who are now on the pension list under the act of June 30, 1834, granting five years' pensions, complete to November 19, 1842.

Names of the widows. Names of their husbands. Their husbands' rank. Monthly allowance. Time up to which they are to be paid, &c.
Ashton, Louisa Gurdon C. Lieutenant $25 00 Commencing Oct. 11, 1840, & terminating Oct. 11, 1845
Arlett, Mary E. John C. Marine 3 50 Commencing Mar. 5, 1842, & terminating Mar. 5, 1847.
Bacon, Sarah A. Frederick A. Passed midshipman 12 50 Commencing May 1, 1839, & terminating May 1, 1844.
Barry, Mary Thomas Master 20 00 Commencing June 28, 1842, & terminating June 28, 1847.
Cope, Isabella John Seaman 6 00 Commencing Jan. 31, 1840, & terminating Jan. 31, 1845.
Corlette, Susan Edward Ordinary seaman 5 00 Commencing July 5, 1840, & terminating July 5, 1845.
Crawford, Mary David R. Passed midshipman 12 50 Commencing July 26, 1841, & terminating July 26, 1846.
*Coulter, Sarah Mifflin Surgeon 25 00 Commencing Oct. 12, 1840, & terminating Oct. 12, 1845.

--663--

5—Continued.

Names of the widows. Names of their husbands. Their husbands' rank. Monthly allowance. Time up to which they are to be paid, &c.
Lyne, Elizabeth B. William B. Lieutenant $25 00 Commencing May 1, 1841, & terminating May 1, 1846.
Pease, Almira Levi Carpenter 10 00 Commencing May 12, 1842, & terminating May 12, 1847.
Palmer, Ann Morris Or. sergt. m. corps 8 00 Commencing Oct. 13, 1841, & terminating Oct. 13, 1846.
Ridgeway, Maria Ebenezer Commander 30 00 Commencing Nov. 1, 1841, & terminating Not. 1, 1846.
Snowman, Julia Samuel Seaman 6 00 Commencing Oct. 5, 1841, & terminating Oct. 5, 1846.
Sproston, Jane George S. Surgeon 35 00 Commencing Jan. 21, 1842, & terminating Jan. 21, 1847.
Stinger, Rebec. S. John Landsman 4 00 Commencing July 15, 1839, & terminating July 15, 1844.
Underwood, S. J. Joseph A. Lieutenant 25 00 Commencing July 34, 1840, & terminating July 24, 1845.
Wilson, Mary J. Enoch Armorer 9 00 Commencing July 27, 1841, & terminating July 27, 1846.
Wainwright, M. M. Robert D. Lt. col. m. corps. 30 00 Commencing Oct. 6, 1841, & terminating Oct. 6, 1846.

* Dead. The remainder to be paid to her children.

Number of widows, 17; annual amount of their pensions, $3,498.

_____________

6.

Alphabetical list of invalid naval pensioners, complete to November 18, 1842.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
Samuel Abbott Seaman March 1, 1815 $5 00 April 23, 1800.
Zephaniah Allen Marine March 1, 1801 3 60 do
George Adams Quarter gunner Dec'r 31, 1836 5 62 1/2 do
George Alexander Ordinary seaman July 19, 1814 8 00 do
William Adams Seaman July 25, 1833 3 00 do
Joseph Ashley Ordinary seaman Dec'r 18, 1835 2 50 do
James Allcorn Sailing-master January 1, 1815 20 00 do
Robert Andrews Quartergunner August 1, 1829 4 50 do
Thomas Austin Yeoman Dec'r 7, 1833 7 50 do
John Adams Seaman Feb'y 17, 1836 6 00 do
Alexander Adams do October 6, 1812 3 00 do
Gabriel Anderson do August 19, 1835 1 50 do
John Anderson Captain of the hold Oct'r 21, 1841 1 87 1/2 do
Nathan Burr Quarter gunner Dec'r 30, 1814 4 50 do
Samuel Bryant Seaman March 5, 1830 3 00 do
John Brown do July 1, 1829 6 00 do
Peter Barnard Ordinary seaman Dec'r 1, 1814 4 00 do
John Brannan Seaman June 23, 1815 5 00 do

--664--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
         
John Beatty Marine June 1, 1830. $4 00 April 23, 1800.
Luke Brown Seaman July 5, 1834 3 00 do
John Bevins Quarter gunner Feb'r 24, 1837 7 50 do
Isaac Bassett Ordinary seaman May 15, 181 4 5 00 do
John Bostrom Quarter gunner May 30, 1834 3 00 do
Frederick Boyer Sergeant marine corps Sep'r 5, 1834 2 25 do
James Bird Seaman Nov'r 7, 1828 6 00 do
John Burnham Master's mate Dec'r 10, 1813 9 00 do
John Butler Seaman Nov'r 22, 1815 5 00 do
John Berry Master-at-arms March 18, 1835 4 50 do
John Brown the fourth Seaman August 31, 1825 3 00 do
Edward Berry do July 4, 1837 4 50 do
Loyd J. Bryan Passed midshipman Jan'y 22, 1837 3 12 1/2 do
James Bantam Ordinary seaman July 5, 1833 4 00 do
James Bell Seaman August 23, 1823 6 00 do
Godfrey Bowman do Sep'r 10, 1813 6 00 do
Jonathan Bulkley Midshipman June 17, 1834 9 00 do
Edward Barker Marine May 18, 1836 3 50 do
James Barron Captain June 22, 1807 25 00 do
John Baxter Seaman Feb'y 28, 1819 6 00 do
Peter George Captain's steward May 19, 1834 6 00 do
John Brumley Seaman Sep'r 1, 1826 6 6 00 do
William Barker Marine July 1, 180 26 00 do
William Baggs do March 1, 1814 3 00 do
George Boyle Seaman Nov'r 21, 1837 4 00 do
John Bruce Quartergunner Nov'r 1, 1826 9 00 do
William Bain do Oct'r 22, 1833 3 50 do
David C. Bunnell Seaman April 27, 1813 3 00 do
Thomas Bowden Quartermaster Dec'r 7, 1837 4 00 do
Henry S. Baker Seaman Dec'r 11, 1838 4 50 do
Robert Berry do June 22, 1829 6 00 do
Joseph Barrett Quarter gunner April 17, 1813 9 00 do
John Bennett Seaman Dec'r 14, 1814 6 00 do
James Blake Ordinary seaman July 26, 1822 5 00 do
Alfred Batts do Oct'r 24, 1833 5 00 do
George Bennett do Sep'r 16, 1839 2 50 do
Lemuel Bryant do August 1, 1814 8 00 do
Samuel Bosworth Seaman July 3, 1823 6 00 do
James Barker Quartermaster April 10, 1836 8 00 do
Julius J. Boyle Midshipman Nov'r 22, 1823 4 75 do
Thomas Bartlett Seaman Nov'r 24, 1834 6 00 do
William B. Brown Gunner July 4, 1835 2 50 do
Edward Brett Marine June 12, 1815 3 00 do
Robert Butler Quartergunner April 30, 1835 3 75 do
Robert Blair Seaman Jan'y 1, 1832 6 00 do
Samuel Butler Quartergunner August 28, 1815 8 00 do
Thomas Buchanan Marine June 4, 1829 3 00 do
Thomas Brownell Master Dec'r 31, 1829 terminating in October, 1840 10 00 Aug. 29, 1842.
Thomas J. Clarke Carpenter's mate April 27, 1839 2 37 1/2 April 23, 1800.
Horace Carter Landsman Feb'y 26, 1837 2 00 do
John Clark Boatswain's mate Jan'y 15, 1838 7 12 1/2 do
Robert Carson Ordinary seaman June 26, 1821 5 00 do
Leonard Chase do August 1, 1828 5 00 do
John Clements Seaman Dec. 29, 1812 6 00 do
Michael Collins do April 22, 1834 4 50 do
Abraham Caswell Ordinary seaman Sept. 30, 1838 2 50 do

--665--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
David Connor Lieutenant May 23, 1815 $16 66 2/3 April 23, 1800.
Daniel H. Cole Marine Dec. 27, 1833 3 00 do
John S. Chauncy Midshipman Sept. 30, 1817 4 75 do
William Cook Cabin cook June 30, 1836 4 50 do
James Cole Seaman May 1, 1823 5 00 do
Horatio N. Crabb 1st lieutenant M. C. January 1, 1831 7 50 do
John Conklin Seaman Dec. 31, 1837 3 00 do
David Christie Marine January 1, 1841 4 00 do
Enos R. Childs Midshipman April 2, 1823 9 50 do
Nathaniel Coville Quartergunner January 1, 1832 9 00 do
Nathaniel Chapman do June 10, 1815 9.00 do
George Cornell Carpenter's mate Sept. 10, 1813 9 00 do
John C. Champlin Seaman May 21, 1831 6 00 do
John Clark do May 31, 1825 3 00 do
Thomas R. Clarke Ordinary seamen Feb. 18, 1823 3 75 do
John Cole do Feb. 6, 1832 5 00 do
John Clough Sailingmaster June 4, 1829 15 00 do
Edward Cardevan Seaman Feb. 28, 1836 3 00 do
Francis Covenhoven Ordinary seaman June 22, 1807 3 75 do
Stephen Champlin Lieutenant Sept. 3, 1814 10 00 do
R. B. Cunningham do March 25, 1840 12 50 do
R. C. Cogdell Passed midshipman Feb. 24, 1839 6 25 March 3, 1837.
Robert Cathcart Seaman Sept. 20, 1816 6 00 April 23, 1800.
John Collins do Feb. 9, 1813 6 00 do
George Coomes do July 1, 1825 8 00 do
William Cantrill Marine April 8, 1830 2 00 do
Edward Carr Seaman May 13, 1835 6 00 do
William Clark Ordinary seaman August 29, 1842 5 00 do
John Conklin do August 8, 1840 5 00 do
John Carrick Landsman Sept. 16, 1842 4 00 do
John Collins Seaman Feb. 28, 1839 3 00 do
William Dunbar do May 31, 1840 4 50 do
Richard Dunn do January 1, 1829 6 00 do
James Dixon do Nov. 11, 1835 3 00 do
Daniel Denvers Marine Oct. 22, 1835 3 00 do
Marmaduke Dove Sailingmaster April 20, 1833 5 00 do
Stillman Dodge Ordinary seaman May 1, 1831 3 33 1/3 do
John Downes Master commandant Nov. 28, 1813 10 00 do
John A. Dickason Carpenter Aug. 19, 1835 3 33 1/3 do
Timothy Donigan Ordinary seaman April 27, 1837 2 50 do
William Dunn Gunner October 8, 1835 10 00 do
Joseph Dalrymple Seaman Feb. 24, 1814 4 50 do
Owen Deddolph Gunner June 25, 1814 5 00 do
Matthias Douglass Seaman April 23, 1814 10 00 do
James Dunham Gunner July 4, 1828 5 00 do
John Daniels Quartermaster Sept. 7, 1816 9 00 do
John Dunn Marine July 1, 1818 3 00 do
John Davidson Lieutenant March 1, 1801 20 00 do
Samuel Daykin Marine Oct. 22, 1834 3 00 do
John Diragen Seaman Dec. 22, 1815 5 00 do
James Darley Ordinary seamen March 1, 1838 5 00 do
William Darrington Yeoman Oct. 18, 1841 3 75 do
Thomas Edwards Quartermaster January 1, 1823 9 00 do
Standish F. Edwards Seaman May 11, 1837 3 00 do
Francis Elliott Marine April 20, 1838 3 50 do
Ebenezer Evans Seaman March 2, 1813 6 00 do
Jesse Elam Marine August 1, 1828 6 00 do
William Evans do May 1, 1827 3 00 do

--666--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
Abner Enos Master's mate June 4, 1830 $6 00 April 23, 1800.
Gardner Edmonds Ordinary seaman June 4, 1814 5 00 do
D. S. Edwards Surgeon's mate June 28, 1822 7 50 do
James Eddo Captain of the forecastle Jan. 16, 1835 1 75 do
Alvin Edson 1st lieutenant M. C. Feb. 6, 1832 7 50 do
Thomas English Ordinary seaman May 14, 1832 5 00 do
George Edwards Boy (1st class) May 21, 1837 4 00 do
Francis H. Ellison Sailingmaster Dec. 27, 1830 15 00 do
Nicholas T. Farrell Marine May 10, 1830 3 00 do
William Farrell Seaman June 4, 1829 6 00 do
Alfred Fisher do May 15, 1835 5 00 do
Warren Fogg Marine June 1, 1813 87 1/2 do
Jack Flood Seaman July 7, 1837 6 00 do
James Furguson Sailingmaster Feb'y 19, 1827 10 00 do
Andrew W. Fleming Seaman Dec'r 20, 1839 4 50 do
Robert Forsaith Marine May 18, 1799 3 00 do
William Flagg Lieutenant Oct'r 31, 1800 18 75 do
John Fallerhee Landsman August 1, 1827 4 00 do
George Fitzgerald Seaman Oct'r 11, 1838 2 00 do
Michael Fitzpatrick Master-at-arms June 4, 1829 9 00 do
Moses French Seaman April 14, 1834 6 00 do
Peter Foley Marine June 27, 1837 3 50 do
William Fitzgerald Seaman Dec'r 31, 1836 6 00 do
John Falvey do August 29, 1842 3 00 do
Henry Fry Purser Jan'y 1, 1838 20 00 August 29, 1842.
George Fields Gunner's mate Jan'y 28, 1841 4 75 April 23, 1800.
C. F. Fatio Midshipman March 25, 1825 2 37 1/2 do
Benjamin Franklin Seaman Jan'y 1, 1840 6 00 June 1, 1842.
William M. Goodshall do July 15, 1825 6 00 do
Chester Goodell Ordinary seaman Dec'r 12, 1834 3 00 do
Charles Gordon do May 11, 1835 5 00 do
James Good Seaman Jan'y 1, 1829 12 00 do
Anthony Gerome do Jan'y 1, 1832 6 00 do
William Gregory Marine May 25, 1830 4 00 do
Samuel H. Green Quartermaster Jan'y 1, 1819 9 00 do
John Geyer Seaman April 6, 1815 6 00 April 2, 1816.
Daniel Gardner Ordinary seaman March 28, 1814 2 50 April 23, 1800.
Anthony Gale Lieut. col. marine corps Jan'y 5, 1835 25 00 do
John Grant Seaman May 20, 1813 6 00 do
William Gunnison Ordinary seaman Nov'r 24, 1833 5 00 do
James Glass Sergeant marine corps Oct'r 24, 1836 3 25 do
James Grant Seaman April 9, 1829 8 00 do
Patrick Gilligan Marine June 4, 1829 3 50 do
John Granso Captain main-top March 30, 1838 3 50 do
John Grant Ordinary seaman July 1, 1831 4 00 do
Peter Green Seaman April 3, 1827 5 00 do
William Gillen do Jan'y 1, 1832 6 00 do
Jerry Gardner Ordinary seaman Jan'y 14, 1818 5 00 do
Richard Gilbody do Jan'y 14, 1826 4 00 do
Amaziah Goodwin Seaman Jan'y 1, 1840 6 00 do
Jacob Greaves do do 8 00 August 29, 1842.
James Hatch Quartergunner July 1, 1814 12 00 April 23, 1800.
William Herringbrook Seaman Feb'y 18, 1814 6 00 do
John Hogan do March 4, 1830 3 00 do
John J. Hardy do June 25, 1813 6 00 do
John Harris Quarter gunner August 1, 1827 4 50 do

--667--

6-—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
John Hussey Ordinary seaman Jan'y 1, 1832 $5 00 April 23, 1800.
Simon Hillman do July 3, 1815 4 00 do
Horatio N. Harrison Passed midshipman July 15, 1838 6 50 do
Elijah L. Harris Marine Sept'r 25, 1833 3 00 do
John Hamilton Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
John Hoxie do August 15, 1800 8 50 do
Samuel F. Holbrook Carpenter Sept'r 30, 1820 5 00 do
Isaac Harding Seaman May 9, 1834 5 00 do
Garret Hendricks do August 9, 1834 6 00 do
Uriah Hanscomb Ordinary seaman Oct'r 10,1799 6 00 do
Samuel Hambleton Purser Sept'r 10, 1813 20 00 do
John Hall Quartermaster Oct'r 20, 1830 4 00 do
Roswell Hale Ordinary seaman Dec'r 25, 1819 5 00 do
Thomas Huntley Seaman August 31, 1837 3 00 do
Ephraim Hathaway Landsman June 15, 1838 4 00 do
J. L. C. Hardy Midshipman July 31, 1821 4 00 do
Alexander Hamilton Boatswain's mate May 31, 1838 7 12 1/2 do
William Hamilton Seaman July 1, 1829 6 00 do
Joshua Howell Ordinary seaman June 30, 1836 5 00 do
William L. Hudson Sailingmaster July 6, 1817 15 00 do
Elias Hughes Ordinary seaman August 28, 1837 5 00 do
Robert Hazlett Musician marine corps Dec'r 12, 1836 2 00 do
Henry Hampton Ordinary seaman June 14, 1840 1 66 2/3 do
John Hamilton Seaman Oct'r 5, 1837 6 00 do
William Hampson Marine August 29, 1842 2 62 1/3 do
Michael Johnson Seaman Jan. 31, 1812 3 00 April 23, 1800.
David Jenkins Seaman Aug. 1, 1828 6 00 do
Richworth Jordan Seaman March 15, 1836 6 00 do
Gilbert Jones Ordinary seaman June 30, 1815 2 50 do
James Jackson Seaman March 4, 1816 5 00 do
Thomas Ap. C. Jones Lieutenant Dec. 14, 1814 25 00 do
William Jones Boy Aug. 24, 1814 2 25 do
Thomas Irwin Private marine corps Jan. 31, 1837 1 75 March 3, 1837.
Lewis Jones Seaman Oct. 27, 1835 6 00 April 23, 1800.
John Joyce Ordinary seaman Aug. 30, 1839 3 75 do
Ichabod Jackson Seaman Jan. 25, 1837 4 50 do
John Johnson Seaman March 23, 1814 6 00 do
Joseph Jackson Cook Oct. 29, 1839 4 50 do
Joseph Jennette Captain of mizentop June 12, 1838 2 33 1/3 do
Thomas Jackson, 2d Quartermaster June 1, 1813 9 00 do
Sylvester Jameson Seaman Aug. 1, 1828 6 00 do
Edward Ingram Boatswain April 1, 1831 5 00 do
James Jeffers Ordinary seaman Dec. 7, 1805 6 00 do
Henry Jackson Captain foretop Sept. 20, 1836 3 75 do
Henry Irwin Marine Feb. 20, 1837 1 75 do
John Jones Seaman Sept. 16, 1842 3 00 do
Nicholas Kline Sergeant marine corps Jan. 1, 1832 5 00 do
William C. Keene Master-at-arms Sept. 10, 1813 9 00 do
William Kinnear Marine April 3, 1834 3 00 do
Daniel Kleiss Ordinary seaman May 6, 1829 5 00 do
Andrew Key Boatswain's mate July 9, 1839 19 00 do
James Kelly Marine Aug. 24, 1814 4 50 do
John Kiggan Ordinary seaman April 30, 1838 2 50 do
Henry Keeling Gunner Aug. 30, 1834 5 00 do
John Kenny Quarter-gunner July 1, 1825 4 50 do
George Kensinger Master-at-arms May 22, 1819 9 00 do
Thomas Kelly Seaman April 25, 1815 4 00 do
Joseph Kelly Seaman Oct. 31, 1835 4 50 do
John Keegan Quartermaster March 27, 1330 6 00 do

--668--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
John Luscomb Ordinary seaman Jan. 15, 1838 2 50 April 23, 1800.
John Lang Seaman July 27, 1837 6 00 do
Edward Libbis Ordinary seaman June 11, 1836 1 66 2/3 do
John Lewis Boatswain's mate Jan. 1, 1832 9 00 do
John Lovely Seaman April 23, 1835 6 00 do
Henry P. Leslie Carpenter Feb. 18, 1840 5 00 March 3, 1837.
James Lloyd Marine April 5, 1834 2 00 April 23, 1800.
Isaac Langley Ordinary seaman Dec. 1, 1814 5 00 do
John Lloyd Marine June 8, 1819 3 00 do
John Lagrange Seaman Nov. 30, 1834 4 50 do
Robert Lewis Steward Sept. 5, 1830 6 75 do
Richard Lee Quartermaster July 1, 1820 6 00 do
Timothy Lane Cook March 25, 1816 8 00 do
Peter Lewis Ordinary seaman July 30, 1837 5 00 do
John Leonard Seaman July 1, 1829 9 00 do
John G. Lanman Quarter-gunner June 20, 1836 7 50 do
John Lynch Quartermaster Dec. 7, 1838 9 00 do
Edward Martin Seaman March 3, 1837 3 00 do
Jacob Marks Marine June 30, 1810 43 3/4 do
Richard Merchant Marine June 30, 1824 1 75 do
Charles Morris Lieutenant Aug. 19, 1812 12 50 do
James Mount Sergeant marine corps June 7, 1837 3 25 do
James Moses Purser's steward April 23, 1816 9 00 do
James McDonald Corporal marine corps. Dec. 31, 1814 2 25 do
Joseph Marks Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
Edward Myers Seaman May 97, 1837 3 00 do
Thomas Murdock Seaman June 30, 1836 6 00 do
William McKeever Ordinary seaman Oct. 14, 1835 2 50 do
John Munroe Seaman July 22, 1835 4 50 do
John Meigs Seaman July 1, 1819 10 00 do
John McGarr Steward Nov. 11, 1832 4 50 do
J. T. McLaughlin Passed midshipman Feb. 8, 1837, 9 37 1/2 do
M. F. Maury Lieutenant Oct. 18, 1839 12 50 do
Archibald Moffatt Ordinary seaman June 1, 1832 5 00 do
Enoch M. Miley Quarter-gunner March 23, 1814 8 00 do
Peter McMahon Ordinary seaman Nov. 2, 1807 6 00 do
Samuel Meade Seaman Oct. 19, 1837 3 00 do
Andrew Mattison Seaman Sept'r 10, 1813 $5 00 do
Patrick Murphy Ordinary seaman Oct'r 19, 1836 5 00 do
Giles Manchester `    5 00 do
James Merrill do Oct'r 23, 1819 5 00 do
Colton Murry Boatswain's mate August 1, 1831 9 00 do
John McMahon Ordinary seaman July 9, 1836 5 00 do
George Marshall Gunner March 31, 1825 2 50 do
William P. McArthur Midshipman Jan'y 15, 1838 4 75 do
Matthias McGill Seaman May 28, 1814 8 00 do
Samuel Miller Captain marine corps April 24, 1814 10 00 do
John Marston, jr Midshipman Dec'r 31, 1814 4 75 do
William Mervine do Nov'r 28, 1812 3 16 2/3 do
John Myrick Gunner August 7, 1837 5 00 do
John Metzer Seaman Feb'y 26, 1839 3 00 do
John Moore do January 9, 1838 4 50 do
James McDonald do Dec'r 31, 1826 3 00 do
John Malprine Landsman January 1, 1839 3 00 do
Patrick McLaughlin Ordinary seaman Nov'r 1, 1815 5 00 do
John Myers Seaman Nov'r 1, 1828 6 00 do
Samuel McIsaacs Boy July 30, 1814 5 00 do
William Moran Seaman Dec'r 5, 1815 6 00 do
Enos Marks Ordinary seaman Feb'y 16, 1815 5 00 do

--669--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
John H. McNeale Seaman June 1, 1832 3 00 April 23, 1800.
John Mitchell Quartermaster June 11, 1832 8 00 do
Matthew McMurray Seaman Sept'r 1, 1827 6 00 do
Thomas Miller do Oct'r 23, 1829 4 00 do
John Moore do Dec'r 4, 1817 6 00 do
William Middleton do January 1, 1837 8 00 do
Henry J. Mercier Ordinary seaman May 20, 1837 1 25 do
John McLaughlin Quartergunner October 3, 1842 7 50 do
James Nickerson Seaman Jan'y 15, 1815 6 00 do
James Nagle do June 30, 1834 5 00 do
John F. Noyer Marine July 1, 1826 5 00 do
John Nugent Seaman August 14, 1813 6 00 do
Francis B. Nichols Midshipman June 1, 1818 4 75 do
William Napier Corporal marine corps July 1, 1826 4 00 do
David Newbury Ordinary seaman April 15, 1836 2 50 do
William Newton do Sept'r 11, 1814 1 25 do
John Neilson Quarter gunner January 1, 1832 9 00 do
John Nicholson Ordinary seaman August 30, 1842 5 00 do
Josiah Needham Quartergunner May 4, 1842 7 50 do
Asael Owens seaman Jan'y 22, 1838 3 00 do
Samuel Odiorne, jr do Dec'r 24, 1825 6 00 do
Isaac Omans do June 26, 1821 6 00 do
Charles T. Platt Lieutenant June 4, 1829 25 00 do
Stephen Phyfer Ordinary seaman April 4, 1825 7 00 do
David Porter Captain January 4, 1825 40 00 do
Peter Pierson Seaman March 20, 1836 6 00 do
James Perry Ship's corporal Sept'r 1, 1827 9 00 do
Thomas Payne Sailingmaster Feb'y 7, 1834 20 00 do
William Perry Seaman April 9, 1825 6 00 do
Charles Pasture do March 4, 1815 5 00 do
Neal Patterson do July 1, 1820 8 00 do
John Peterson Ordinary seaman Sept'r 10, 1813 5 00 do
John Percival Lieutenant Dec'r 22, 1825 21 50 do
N. A. Prentiss Sailingmaster Nov'r 30, 1814 10 00 do
Edward Power Ordinary seaman May 27, 1834 5 00 do
Henry Powell Seaman Feb'y 10, 1840 3 00 do
Usher Parsons Surgeon Feb'y 7, 1816 12 50 do
Thomas B. Parsons Seaman Sept'r 1, 1808 9 00 do
Payne Perry do April 6, 1815 6 00 April 2, 1816.
Joseph Peck do Oct'r 19, 1836 2 50 April 23, 1800.
Charles Perry do Nov'r 30, 1837 4 50 do
John Price do May 11, 1835 6 00 do
John Piner Ordinary seaman Nov'r 6, 1828 5 00 do
Daniel Peck Seaman July 1, 1829 6 00 do
John Price do August 30, 1842 6 00 do
David Quill Quartermaster Feb'y 20, 1815 5 00 do
John Randall Marine Sept'r 2, 1805 3 00 do
John Roberts Seaman June 1, 1813 3 00 do
John Robinson Master's mate Jan'y 31, 1814 1 25 do
James Reid Ordinary seaman Jan'y 14, 1838 5 00 do
Thomas Richie Seaman May 14, 1839 3 00 do
James Roberts Quarter gunner April 14, 1833 1 87 1/2 do
Jasper Read Seaman March 28, 1814 3 00 do
John Rogers Captain's yeoman May 18, 1838 4 50 do
John Romeo Ordinary seaman April 9, 1838 5 00 do
John Revel do August 26, 1833 9 50 do

--670--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
Burnet Rogan Landsman June 6, 1838 $2 00 April 23, 1800.
James Rankin Seaman June 8, 1839 4 50 do
James Rogers Sailingmaster July 37, 815 15 00 do.
James C. Reed Ordinary seaman May 5, 1837 2 50 do
Alonzo Rowley do March 15, 1836 5 00 do
Edward Ross Boy Jan'y 1, 1827 3 00 do
Edward Rowland Ordinary seaman Sept'r 11, 1814 5 00 do
Rosnante Rhodes Seaman Dec'r 5, 1815 6 00 do
Samuel Riddle do June 30, 1836 3 00 do
Thomas Riley Gunner June 23, 1837 7 50 do
B. S. Randolph Midshipman Oct'r 7, 1815 6 00 do
Daniel Riggs Ordinary seaman May 18, 1836 3 75 do
Samuel Rose Seaman May 24, 836 4 50 do
Nathan Rolfe do Dec'r 14, 1813 6 00 do
John Rice do July 19, 1830 6 00 do
William Robinson Marine June 15, 1817 6 00 do
John Riley do July 1, 1831 3 00 do
John Richards Quartergunner Oct'r 20, 1829 9 00 do
Benjamin Richardson Master's mate Oct'r 8, 1829 10 00 do
John Richmond Marine July 31, 1816 1 75 do
Stephen B. Roath Gunner's mate August 22, 1842 4 75 do
Nathaniel Staples Seaman May 1, 1833 3 00 do
Patrick Scanton Ordinary seaman Jan'y 1, 1811 6 00 do
Benjamin Stevens Master's mate June 27, 1814 10 00 do
Stephen Simpson Marine Nov'r 16, 1835 3 50 do
William Smith Ordinary seaman June 1, 1827 5 00 do
Eli Stewart Master's mate May 20, 1814 7 00 do
Harmon Sutton Seaman July 1, 1829 3 00 do
Thomas J. Still Marine Jan'y 1, 1832 3 00 do
Charles Sheeter Boatswain's mate Nov'r 1, 1832 6 00 do
Thomas Smith Seaman April 5, 1839 2 00 do
Joseph Smith Boatswain Dec'r 31, 1837 5 00 do
Alfred Smith Ordinary seaman Sept'r 27, 1837 2 50 do
John Stevens Quartermaster May 21, 1831 4 50 do
Jeremiah Sullivan Seaman June 30, 1837 6 00 do
Thomas Smith Boatswain April 6, 1815 10 00 April 2, 1816.
Aaron Smith Ordinary seaman August 1, 1828 2 50 April 23, 1800.
Joseph Smith Lieutenant Sept'r 11, 1814 18 75 do
John Smith, 5th Seaman May 5, 1837 3 00 do
William Stockdale Marine July 26, 1816 6 00 do
William Smart Ordinary seaman July 1, 1829 5 00 do
John Smith Seaman August 31, 1834 3 00 do
James Smith Ordinary seaman Dec'r 2, 1837 2 50 do
James Shanklin do June 1, 1813 2 50 do
Robert Speddin Lieutenant Dec'r 5, 1823 25 00 do
William Smith Sergeant marine corps Jan'y 7, 1841 6 50 March 3, 1837.
John Strain Seaman Feb'y 28, 1837 4 50 April 23, 1800.
James Spiers Ordinary seaman May 5, 1837 3 75 do
John Smith Boatswain Dec'r 31, 1827 5 00 do
John Scriver Seaman April 10, 1814 5 00 do
John Schrouder do June 29, 1819 6 00 do
Horace B. Sawyer Midshipman June 3, 1813 4 75 do
Otis Sage Corporal marine corps Nov'r 16, 1835 4 50 do
Samuel Spooner Ordinary seaman Oct'r 15, 1838 1 66 2/3 do
William Seymour Seaman Feb'y 17, 1830 6 00 do
Jonas A. Stone do April 4, 1829 9 00 do
Alexander Smith do July 26, 1836 3 00 do
Thomas Stallings Ordinary seaman Nov'r 7, 1826 2 50 do
Leonard Stevens Sergeant marine corps Jan'y 27, 1837 3 25 do

--671--

6—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress under
which allowed.
R. S. Suter Midshipman Dec'r 16, 1814 $9 50 April 23, 1800.
James Stockwell Seaman. Feb'y 28, 1829 4 50 do
Charles Smith, 3d do August 19, 1841 3 00 do
Frederick Smith Captain forecastle June 14, 1842 7 00 do
Russell Smith Carpenter's mate August 2, 1842 7 12 1/2 do
Charles Staunton Boatswain's mate Feb'y 19, 1838 9 50 do
Lewis Thomas Marine May 11, 1839 2 66 2/3 do
John Tarlton Ordinary seaman May 8, 1833 4 00 do
James Turnbull Ordinary seaman April 6, 1815 5 00 April 2, 1816.
Owen Taylor Seaman Aug. 19, 1812 6 00 April 23, 1800.
B. R. Tinslar Surgeon Jan. 31, 1830 6 50 do
Thomas Tindley Seaman April 6, 1815 3 00 April 2, 1816.
John Taylor Quartermaster May 31, 1839 8 00 April 23, 1800.
Jacob Tonkins Marine May 31, 1840 3 50 do
Samuel Taylor Ordinary seaman Nov. 30, 1839 5 00 March 3, 1837.
George Tunstall Seaman April 14, 1836 3 00 April 23, 1800.
Isaac Thomas Marine Oct. 30, 1826 6 00 do
William Thompson Ordinary seaman May 20, 1826 7 50 do
James Thompson Seaman June 30, 1836 6 00 do
Julius Terry Ordinary seaman Aug. 31, 1812 5 00 do
James Tull Sergeant marine corps June 29, 1816 5 00 do
Henry Townsend Ordinary seaman Dec. 18, 1814 5 00 do
David Thomas Marine Jan. 1, 1806 3 00 do
Philip Tulley Seaman Jan. 10, 1816 6 00 do
Peter Tooley Marine Jan. 27, 1837 3 50 do
Lewis Thomas Marine May 11, 1839 2 62 1/2 do
George Turry Boatswain Aug. 9, 1839 3 33 1/3 do
Benjamin Underwood Ordinary seaman April 24, 1815 5 00 do
George Upham Marine July 12, 1816 3 00 do
Gabriel Van Horn Marine Dec. 23, 1837 3 50 do
William Venable Boatswain mate May 2, 1834 4 75 do
William Whitney Seaman Nov. 1, 1818 8 00 do
John A. Webster Sailing master Sept. 13, 1814 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Peter Woodbury Quartermaster March 18, 1813 9 00 April 23, 1800.
Robert Woods Seaman Dec. 31, 1836 3 00 do
Charles W. White Ordinary seaman Feb. 17, 1837 5 00 do
Reuben Wright Carpenter's mate Aug. 30, 1814 8 00 do
Caleb J. Wiggins Ordinary seaman May 23, 1814 3 00 do
Henry R. Williams Yeoman Aug. 2, 1840 7 50 March 3, 1837.
John Williams Seaman July 1, 1818 6 00 April 23, 1800.
Joseph Ward Seaman July 1, 1818 6 00 do
William Williams Marine July 9, 1838 3 50 do
William S. Welsh Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
James Wilson Quartermaster July 1, 1817 9 00 do
James B. Wright Quartermaster May 1, 1831 9 00 do
Charles Weeks Seaman Feb. 23, 1830 6 00 do
Thomas Williamson Surgeon Dec. 31, 1835 15 00 do
Francis Williams Landsman Jan. 15, 1838 1 00 do
John W. West Lieutenant Nov. 30, 1830 6 25 do
Job G. Williams 1st lieut. marine corps June 30, 1828 7 50 do
George Wiley Seaman March 1, 1837 3 00 do
John Waters Seaman Sept. 30, 1838 3 00 do
James Woodhouse Seaman March 17, 1836 6 00 do
George Wilson Seaman March 23, 1838 6 00 do
John Williams First captain foretop Sept. 9, 1836 1 87 1/2 do
Daniel Watson Carpenter's mate May 10, 1838 4 75 do

--672--

6-Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Act of
Congress under
which allowed.
Charles Wheeler Seaman Oct 3 , 1836 $3 00 April 23, 1800.
Henry Ward Quarter-gunner May 27, 1833 9 00 do
Henry Walpole Seaman Oct. 2, 1820 3 00 do
Henry Williams Ordinary seaman March 3, 1838 5 00 do
Solomon White Seaman Feb. 29, 1812 4 00 do
Thomas Ward Captain fore top Jan 14, 1835 7 50 do
William Ward Seaman Aug. 1, 1832 6 00 do
William Welsh Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1822 2 50 do
Samuel E. Watson Major marine corps Feb. 4, 1837 18 75 do
John Wright, 2d Ordinary seaman May 1, 1822 5 00 do
William A. Weaver Midshipman June 1, 1813 9 50 do
James Williamson Armorer Sept. 1, 1831 6 00 do
John Wright Quarter-gunner Nov. 7, 1836 5 62 1/2 do
John Waters Ordinary seaman April 24, 1824 5 00 do
James Wines Seaman March 28, 1824 6 00 do
William Wicks Ordinary seaman Aug. 4, 1813 4 00 do
Elias Wiley Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 2 50 do
William Wright Seaman Aug. 31, 1839 3 00 do
Edward-Watts Seaman Dec. 31, 1828 3 00 do
Thomas Welsh Quarter-gunner Feb. 26, 1820 12 00 do
Samuel Williams Quartermaster Sept. 1, 1827 6 00 do
William Wagner Quarter-gunner Dec. 3, 1819 9 00 do
Daniel Whitehorn Quarter-gunner June 21, 1842 7 50 do
Jack Williams Seaman March 22, 1828 6 00 do
John J. Young Lieutenant May 21, 1829 25 00 do
Richard G. York Seamen Jan. 13, 1839 3 00 do

The number of invalid pensioners is 503; annual sum to pay them, $35,368 68.

--673--

_____________

No. 10.

Treasury Department,
Fourth Auditor's Office, Nov. 14, 1842.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit, herewith, a statement (in triplicate) of the receipts and expenditures on account of the navy pension fund, from the 1st of October, 1841, to the 30th of September, 1842, inclusive; together with the balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund, and in the hand, of pension agents on the 1st of October, 1842, per the last settlement of their accounts.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

A. O. DAYTON.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

______________ 

A statement showing the balances in the hands of agents, and on the books of the Treasury, to the credit of the Navy Pension Fund, on the 1st of October, 1841; also, the amount of receipts and expenditures on account of the fund, from that date to the 30th September, 1842, inclusive; and the balances due by agents, per last settlement of their accounts.

I Balances in the hands of the agents on the 1st of October, 1841. $75,791 57
II. Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund, on the 1st of October, 1841 865,152 29
III. Amount received into the Treasury, since 1st October, 1841, from whom, and on what account, viz:  
1842.    
June 13. From Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for interest on Cincinnati corporation stock $2,500
July 9. Secretary of the Navy, for dividend of the stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown 900
14. J. P. Henry, late navy pension agent, deceased, paid, by his executor 114 30
16. J. P. Henry, late navy pension agent, deceased, paid by his executor 32 57
Aug. Appropriation by Congress, per act approved 23d August, 1842 84,951
    88,497 87
IV. Expenditures on account of the fund., per settlements made between the 1st of October, 1841, and 30th September, 1842, viz:  
1841.    
Oct. 21. Elias Kane, deceased, late navy pension agent at Washington, for payments to pensioners, and for stationery, priming, and postage

$7,750 52

--674--

1841.    
Oct. 22. John Thomas, late navy pension agent, at Baltimore, for payments to pensioners, and for stationery, printing, and postage $9,463
Nov. 2. President Mechanics' Bank, New York, for payments to pensioners, and for stationery, printing, and postage 1,568
24. J. H. McJ. Madison, for pension to 5th May, 1841 104 16
Dec. 10. Wm. C. Anderson, navy pension agent at St. Louis, for payments to pensioners 150
10. Jacob Alrichs, navy pension agent at Wilmington, Del., for payments to pensioners 120
10. J. B. Perrault, navy pension agent at New Orleans, for payments to pensioners 969 66
10. President Arcade Bunk, navy pension agent, at Providence, R. I., for payments to pensioners 1,906 99
10. President Savings Institution, Louisville, Ky., for payments to pensioners 555
10. President Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, Hartford, Conn., for payments to pensioners 744
1842.    
Jan. 3. Mary Ryall, for balance of pension due her late husband 3 73
4. Thomas T. Hooper, for pension due. him as the child of Greenfield Hooper 1,286 60
13. George Loyall, navy pension agent, Norfolk, for payments to pensioners 4,405 37
15. President Merchants and Manufacturers' Bank, Pittsburg, for payments to pensioners 204
15. Timothy Upham, navy pension agent, Portsmouth, N. H., for payments to pensioners 951.
17. Thomas Hayes, navy pension agent, Philadelphia, for payments to pensioners- 7,150
22. John P. Henry, navy pension agent, Savannah, for payments to pensioners 150
22. President Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, Hartford, Conn., for payments to pensioners 300
25. John Sivers, for pension due him as one of the children of John Sivers, deceased 900 36
25. Nancy Sivers, for pension due her as one of the children of John Sivers, deceased 668 74
Feb. 8. J. V. Browne, navy pension agent at Boston, for payments to pensioners 271 87
8. George Loyall, navy pension agent at Norfolk, for payments to pensioners 535 50
8. Thomas Hayes, navy pension agent at Philadelphia, for payments to pensioners 925 33
10. President Maine Bank, Portland, for payments to pensioners 3,232 30
10. President Trenton Bank, N. J., for payments to pensioners 2,332 40
11. R. C. Wetmore, navy pension agent at New York, for payments to pensioners 1,388 32

--675--

1842.    
Feb. 11. R. C. Wetmore, navy pension agent at New York, for payments to pensioners $10,549 02
12. S. McClellan, navy pension agent at Baltimore, for payments to pensioners 2,636 38
12. L. Jarvis, late navy pension agent at Boston, for payments to pensioners 5,344 92
April 11. Eliza Stevens, widow, for pension due her late husband 47 33
13. J. B. Perrault, late navy pension agent at New Orleans, for payments to pensioners 1,152
16. Margaret Denton, for pension due her as a child of R. M. Desha, deceased 109 50
16. President Savings Institution, Louisville, Ky., for payments to pensioners 639
16. B. D. Heriot, navy pension agent at Charleston, S. C., for payments to pensioners 1,878
May 3. Catharine Phillips, for pension as the widow of Michael Morgan 192 94
June 10. Jacob Alrichs, navy pension agent at. Wilmington, Del., for payments to pensioners 168
10. J. P. Henry, late navy pension agent, Savannah, for payments to pensioners 150
13. President Exchange Bank, Pittsburg, for payments to pensioners 72
13. W. C. Anderson, navy pension agent, St. Louis, for payments to pensioners 150
17. President Farmers and Mechanics' Bank, Hartford, Conn., for payments to pensioners 1,444
17. President Arcade Bank, Providence, R. I., for payments to pensioners 1,620
17. L. Jarvis, late navy pension agent, Boston, for payments to pensioners 1,172 53
22. Thomas Hayes, navy pension agent, Philadelphia, for payments to pensioners 4,285 10
24. J. V. Browne, navy pension agent, Boston, for payments to pensioners 6,676 75
24. George Loyall, navy pension agent, Norfolk, for payments to pensioners 4,439 14
25. R. C. Wetmore, navy pension agent, New York, for payments to pensioners 11,361 89
27. Wm. B. Scott, navy pension agent, Washington, for payments to pensioners 17,668 51
July 6. Timothy Upham, navy pension agent, Portsmouth, N. H., for payments to pensioners 871 50
6. Thomas Hayes, navy pension agent, Philadelphia, for payments to pensioners 443 08
8. President Maine Bank, Portland, for payments to pensioners 1,143
8. President of the Exchange Bank, Pittsburg, for payments to pensioners 36
11. R. C. Wetmore, navy pension agent, New York, for payments to pensioners 896 05

--676--

1842.    
July 15. George Loyall, navy pension agent, Norfolk, for payments to pensioners $567 18
30. J. B. Perrault, navy pension agent, New Orleans, for payments to pensioners 75
August 2. J. V. Browne, navy pension agent, Boston, for payments to pensioners 199 29
Sept. 5. President Exchange Bank, Pittsburg, for payments to pensioners 108
14. Henry Harvey, deceased, for pension due him, paid to his executor 349 60
22. Samuel McClellan, navy pension agent, Baltimore, paid pensioners 4,824 97
  Total 129,398 64

V. Balances due by pension agents, per last settlement of their accounts, and including advances to 1st October, 1842.

1842.    
Oct. 25. From W. C. Anderson, N. P. agent, St. Louis $53
Aug. 26. J. V. Browne, do Boston 9,917 69
Oct. 7. Thomas Hayes, do Philadelphia 1,272 56
Aug. 26. B. D. Heriot, do Charleston 2,472
26. George Loyall, do Norfolk 834 57
29. Wm. McKay, do Savannah 150
Sept. 17. Samuel McClellan, do Baltimore 5,682 82
26. Thomas G. Morgan, do New Orleans 2,310 75
July 20. Wm. B. Scott, do Washington 12,894 28
Sept. 16. R. C. Wetmore do New York 15,402 25
Aug. 26. Timothy Upham, do Portsmouth, 1,702 50
26. Pres. Farm. and Mechs. Bank, Hartford, Ct. 1,191
Oct. 25. Louisville Savings Institution, Ken. 30
4. Bank of Maine, Portland, Me. 1,357
Aug. 26. Arcade Bank, Providence 1,530
Sept. 5. Exchange Bank, Pittsburgh, Pa. 288
Aug. 26. Trenton Banking Company, N. J. 460
26. L. Jarvis, late N. P. agent, Boston 543 93
26. Michael W. Ash, do Philadelphia 915 95
26. John N. Todd, do Boston 91 92
26. Elias Kane, deceased, do Washington 1,119 60
  Total 60,219, 72

--677--

Recapitulation.

I. Amount of balances in the hands of agents, 1st October, 1841 $75,791 57  
II. Balance in the Treasury, to the credit of the fund, on the 1st October, 1841 65,152 59  
III. Amount received at (he Treasury since 1st October, 1841 88,497 87  
      $229,441 73
IV. Expenditures on account of the fund, as per settlements from 1st of October, 1841, to 30th September, 1842, inclusive 129,398 64  
V. Balances due by pension agents, per last settlements of their accounts, and including advances to the 1st of October, 1842 60,219 72  
      189,618 36
  Balance in the Treasury, 1st October, 1842   39,823 37

Treasury Department, Fourth Auditor's Office,
November 14, 1842,
A. O. DAYTON.

--720--

No. 12.

Suppression of the slave-trade under act of March 3, 1819.

Dr.         Cr.
1842.     1842.    
Aug. 4 To amount appropriated $10,543 42 Aug. 25 By amount paid W. B. Scott,
navy agent at Washington,
on settlement of his accounts
$32 60
Sept. 7 Paid J. H. Duvall, late marshal of Florida,
for expenses incurred for recaptured Africans
and for per diem for himself
1,133 46
Sept. 7 Paid Rev. Wm. McLain, for "salary due to
estate of Thos. Buchanan, late agent on the
coast of Africa
1,389 04
  By balance in the Treasury 7,998 32
    10,543 42     10,543 42
Oct. 1 To balance in the Treasury $7,998 32      

[END]

Published:Thu May 19 08:15:52 EDT 2016