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Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy - 1845

REPORT

of

THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

__________

 

NAVY DEPARTMENT, December 1, 1845.

SIR: During the past year, the usual squadrons of the navy of the United States have been maintained. In the Mediterranean, Commodore Smith had command of the Cumberland and the Plymouth. He would have despatched the Plymouth to the Black Sea, but leave was refused by the Ottoman Porte. He conducted our newly appointed consul to Tangiers, and ensured his reception.

Our ships in the Mediterranean have usually lain inactive at Port Mahon during the winter; this can be obviated by an interchange of service. The Plymouth has, therefore, been directed to join the Brazil squadron, and the Cumberland has returned home. Their places will be taken, at the opening of the season, by a part of the present African squadron.

The African squadron was organized by Commodore Perry, by whom good sanitary regulations were established. He was relieved by Commodore Skinner in the Jamestown, who has shown equal consideration for the health of all under his command. Yet the Preble and the Truxton contracted disease, and, as an act, of humanity, were ordered to return home. The Southampton has been sent out with stores, to remain on the coast. The Marion and the Dolphin followed as a reinforcement. The Boxer is destined for the same station, and will sail immediately. The Cumberland, bearing the broad pennant of Commodore Road, will proceed in January to relieve the Jamestown and Yorktown, which will then repair to the Mediterranean.

On the Brazil station, Commodore Rousseau, the first officer west of the Alleghenies ever selected to command a squadron, relieves Commodore Turner. The Raritan will repair to the home squadron; the Boston is ordered to return to the United States. The Columbia, the Saratoga, the Plymouth, and the Bainbridge, will, for the present, constitute the Brazil squadron.

Commodore Parker, after a very successful cruise, returned from the Asiatic station in September, bringing home the Brandywine, the St. Louis, and the Perry. At the Bay of Islands, Captain McKeever, in the St. Louis, had the happiness to render valuable service to the inhabitants of an infant British settlement.

In May Commodore Biddle sailed for the East Indies in command of the Columbus ship of the line and the Vincennes, bearing our minister to China, and the ratified treaty between the United States and the Chinese emperor. The health of Mr. A. H. Everett, the minister, having induced his return,

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the exchange of the ratifications of the treaty was committed to the charge of Commodore Biddle, who will doubtless show that an able and gallant naval officer conducts, satisfactorily, all affairs entrusted to him.

The Constitution is on her return from China, after having visited different ports and islands in the Indian seas.

The Pacific squadron, under Commodore Sloat, has consisted of the Savannah, the Levant, the Warren, and the Shark. The three first will return in 1846, and will he relieved by the Congress, the Portsmouth, and the Cyane. The difficulty of communicating with our ships in the Pacific makes it proper to suggest the advantage of a public mail through our own territory to a convenient port on the straits of Juan de Fuca. Arrangements should also be made at the earliest day that is proper, for getting supplies for our Pacific squadron from our own soil and our own citizens in that region.

The home squadron has been under the command of Commodore Conner, who has distinguished himself by sound judgment in the performance of his duty. His force, which consisted of the Potomac, the Falmouth, the Vandalia, the Lawrence, and the Somers, was weakened by the return of the Vandalia, which visited Hayti, and was driven home by the yellow fever contracted at Port-au-Prince, where she had been ordered on duty. The squadron was increased by the Princeton and Porpoise, the St. Mary's and the Saratoga, under Commodore Stockton, and soon after by the John Adams and the steamship Mississippi. The aggregate force of Commodore Conner was much larger than has usually rallied under one American pennant. It gave efficient protection to our interests in the gulf of Mexico, and contributed to spread a sense of security over our country, to its extreme limit of the Del Norte.

Deeming it of great importance to become acquainted with the navy-yards and establishments connected with the navy, I have, during the past summer, visited all of them, except those at Pensacola and at Memphis. They are generally in excellent order. The principal improvements in progress at those I visited are at Brooklyn, where the work on the dry dock is advancing with efficiency and economy. The vicinity to a city which is the emporium of naval stores, and is crowded with seamen, shipbuilders, and excellent mechanics of all kinds, gives to that yard great facilities for the prompt repair and equipment of ships of war.

At the naval asylum in Philadelphia, more than a hundred veteran sailors are enjoying the ample provision wisely reserved for the comfort of their declining years. Yet I would earnestly advise that the buildings of the asylum, at their present location, be never enlarged; but that, after it is full, new pensioners should be placed in some salubrious spot near the ocean, where the aged seaman can watch ships as they come and go, and have old familiar objects within his sight.

The charge on the navy hospital fund, which is noticed in the communication from the Bureau of Medicine, was incurred in 1844, on the recommendation of the chief of that bureau, at whose urgent suggestion houses for the governor and surgeon of the asylum were authorized to be erected. The expenditures have been circumscribed; and the recommendation to encroach still further on the fund, by erecting other dwellings at other stations, has not been complied with. The fund should be sacredly reserved for the immediate and personal benefit of those from whose earnings it has accrued. Nor have I thought it just to continue to appropriate a large

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part of the buildings at the asylum to the use of the midshipmen, who were preparing for the established examination previous to their passing to a higher grade.

Congress, in its great desire to improve the navy, had permitted the department to employ professors and instructors at an annual cost of about $28,200; and it had been usual, besides the few employed at the receiving ships and the naval asylum, to send professors with the midshipmen into every ocean and clime. But the ship is not friendly to study; and the office of professor rapidly degenerate into a sinecure; often not so much was done as the elder officers would cheerfully do for their juniors; the teachers on board the receiving ships gave little instruction, or none whatever; so that the expenditure was fruitless of great results. Many of the professors were able and willing; but the system was a bad one. The idea naturally suggested itself, of seizing the time when the midshipmen are on shore, and appropriating it to their culture. Instead of sending migratory professors to sea with each handful of midshipmen, the midshipmen themselves, in the intervals between sea duty, might be collected in a body, and devote their time to suitable instruction. For the pay of the instructors Congress has provided; in looking out for a modest shelter for the pupils, I was encouraged to ask for Fort Severn, at Annapolis. The transfer was readily made, by order of the Secretary of War, and a school was immediately organized on an unostentatious and frugal plan. This institution, by giving some preliminary instruction to the midshipmen before their first cruise; by extending an affectionate but firm supervision over them as they return from sea; by providing for them suitable culture before they pass to a higher grade; by rejecting from the service all who fail in capacity or in good disposition to use their time well, will go far to renovate and improve the American navy.

The plan pursued has been unpretending, but it is hoped will prove efficient. A few professors give more and better instruction than four-and-twenty at sea. No supernumerary officer has been ordered to Annapolis; no idle man is attached to the establishment. Commander Buchanan, to whom the organization of the school was entrusted, has carried his instructions into effect with precision and sound judgment, and with a wise adaptation of simple and moderate means to a great and noble end. Let not Congress infer that new expenses are to be incurred. Less than the amount that has hitherto been at the disposition of the department, for purposes of culture, will support the school, and repair and enlarge the quarters received from the hospitality of the army.

At Washington, the admirable instruments provided for the observatory have been placed under the charge of officers of the navy, who are well aware that the opportunities afforded them for advancing astronomical science are unequalled on this continent, and scarcely surpassed in Europe. Results honorable to the country may, therefore, be justly expected of them. From that institution charts are furnished to the navy at cost; and the instruments used at sea are there preserved, corrected, and repaired. Would it not be well that the plates of all charts authorized by Congress to be engraved, should be deposited there, as the place most appropriate for their preservation and use?

It was a subject of great regret that the pressure of business left no opportunity to visit the yards at the south and southwest. The plans for their improvement should be such as will not interfere with or injure each other.

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Pensacola, by its position, arrests public attention. The security of our naval power in the gulf of Mexico depends, in a great measure, on its condition and resources. The events of the summer show conclusively the necessity for a liberal provision at that station of all the means essential to a well furnished and efficient navy-yard. A large estimate for that yard is therefore presented, although I desire to await further information before finally approving the proposed mode of its expenditure.

Memphis, on the contrary, being in the heart of the country, on an ocean river, yet a thousand miles from the sea, is inappropriate for the repairs of ships of war; but in building steamships, it may compete with Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, with St. Louis, Cincinnati, and Pittsburg. It lies, moreover, just below the great hemp-growing region, and is recommended by its position for the establishment of the manufacture of cordage. A rope walk, with the latest improvements, is therefore proposed, so that the west may not only produce but manufacture the hemp used for the American navy.

I have disapproved some of the details of the plan proposed for the navy-yard at Memphis, because it was framed on a scale of extravagant expenditure, which, for the mere work of preparation, would have consumed many years, and would have cost, by estimate, at least two millions of dollars; and which contemplates the residence of many officers, civil and naval, who, in any event, would be useless. I recommend that Congress confine the use of the moneys it may appropriate, first to the immediate construction of a rope walk, and next to simple arrangements for building and equipping steamers. To introduce at the west the manufacture of American hemp for the navy, will prove a national benefit.

The United States should produce all the hemp used in its navy. Enterprise, climate, and soil leave no doubt that it may be raised and prepared of the best quality, and at prices within the limit prescribed by law. To insure that end, I gave the subject early and continued attention; and nothing but American hemp has been received under any contract made since I came into the department.

Finding, by short experience, that to insist on the inspection at Charles-town, as heretofore practiced, would be injurious to the western planter, I directed that while all who had made contracts at prices based upon inspection and delivery at Charlestown should be held to fulfill their engagements, purchases should be made of three hundred tons during the present fiscal year, to be delivered and finally inspected at Louisville and St. Louis. The subject of lake defenses is reserved for a special communication.

The care of the reservations and plantations of live oak, I recommend should be transferred to the land office, which alone has the proper means of ascertaining titles, and which can assume the charge with less expense and greater efficiency than this department.

I may ask leave during the winter to present some suggestions on the organization of the department and its bureaus.

The present contract system requires modification, so that no fraud to the United States may shield itself under the letter of the law; nor contracts be given out at prices exceeding the market price.

The balance of appropriations on hand will, it is believed, with the exercise of rigid economy, be sufficient for the remainder of the fiscal year. The estimates for the next year contemplate no increase in the force employed during the present. Those for the civil department are precisely the

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same as were granted for the current year. For the improvement of yards and docks, I recommend only what the chief of that bureau declares to be absolutely necessary. Some of the shore stations, which had been needlessly multiplied, have been abolished; in transmitting the estimate for the remainder, I am far from expressing an opinion that no further reduction should be made. The estimate for provisions, and that for pay, rest on the basis of the present restriction by law to seven thousand five hundred men; but the estimate for pay, without proper retrenchments by Congress, may prove deficient.

As the marine corps is placed under the direction of the Navy Department, it becomes my duty to present the estimates for its support. Its services on ship-board are highly valued; its evil consists in its luxury of field officers, who have no duties to perform proportionate to their pay and emoluments. During the past year this burden has been increased. By a decision of your predecessor, an addition has been made to the pay of its gallant colonel commandant; and although the procedure on which the decision rests has never had the sanction of the House of Representatives, and apparently conflicts with law, I have not felt justified in withdrawing from the consideration and decision of Congress the estimates of that officer for his own increased pay and the pay of his aide-de-camp, an officer heretofore unknown to the corps, and of doubtful propriety. The marine corps is not a brigade; not even a regiment. It is never assembled; seldom even does a full company come together. It serves in small detachments, commanded chiefly by junior officers. Though about two thirds of the corps were in summer on ship-board, all the field officers remain on shore. Of thirteen captains, but two are at sea; of forty lieutenants, about seven of each grade are at sea. At one shore station, a major, a captain, and three lieutenants have had charge of about twenty-eight men. An increase of the officers of the corps is therefore not needed for naval purposes, even on an increase of the men.

For the increase of the navy no estimates are presented. The department awaits on that subject the instruction of Congress. Yet it is to be observed, that, in comparison with other nations, our navy is poorly supplied with sea going steamers; which cannot, indeed, in the present state of science, form the main reliance of a squadron, but as auxiliaries are of vast advantage. The Mississippi and the Princeton are our only efficient vessels of that character on the ocean. Should it be determined to increase this class of ships, it is desirable that, the best experience should be consulted in their construction; and that doubtful novelties, especially such as conflict with the known laws of mechanical forces, should be disregarded.

I earnestly hope that our gallant navy during the next year, as heretofore, may perform its whole duty; displaying the flag of our republic in every ocean, protecting our commerce, extending the bounds of human knowledge, overawing semi-barbarous nations, restraining the piratical traffic in African slaves, and by its presence promoting the preservation of the peace of mankind. It contains all the elements of efficiency. It has able and skillful officers, who compete with alacrity for every post of danger or adventure; its men excel in seamanship, courage, and fidelity to their country. Unsuited to purposes of maritime dominion, it inspires respect for the American flag in every part of the world. Yet a regard for its best interests, a desire to promote the welfare of its meritorious officers, and

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a sense of justice to the country, induce me to add that its annual cost is disproportionate to its magnitude; and the system of its organization and preferments deprives merit of hope, by conferring the highest rank in the profession without much regard to capacity or previous activity in the public service.

Age alone now claims precedence, though that claim is unauthorized by the constitution, and unsustained by law. Seniority demands promotion as its right, and the highest rank and pay are awarded to the longest life; yet the chances are, that the oldest are not the most meritorious. Excellence seeks the opportunity of displaying itself, and is selected for the most perilous and wasting service; while mediocrity fails to be employed, and obtains length of days in safe and affluent retirement. Promotion by seniority is a premium upon inactivity.

Many of the best among the older officers received high promotion while comparatively in early life. The younger officers of to-day are equally full of talent and ambition; but the present system refuses to them the opportunity of command while life is in its vigor, and reserves it for the decline of their powers. In consequence, the average age of captains is constantly increasing, and is already nearly sixty. The average number of annual promotions is about two. The average age of commanders, from whom captains are and should be taken, is not much less than fifty. From their great numbers, the little sea service to which they are called is favorable to longevity. Continue the present usage twenty years longer, and while hope will be crushed in the young men in the service, the class of commanders will itself be composed of none but aged men, and there will not be a captain under threescore years and ten.

This custom discourages the most worthy, and leads the incapable and the indolent to cling with tenacity to their commissions.

Why should the incapable be promoted? Why should they be allowed to postpone the promotion of the capable? Why should gallantry, temperance, integrity in the payment of debts, distinction by service at sea, weigh no more than opposite considerations? Why should men deficient in capacity and inexperienced in their profession, be advanced; and, as a consequence, officers with every naval and manly virtue, and the brilliancy and vigor of matured powers, be left to wait till great age gives them the preferment, which genius, alacrity, and merit could not attain?

No naval service can maintain an efficient and elevated character under a long continuance of a system which levels merit and demerit, and tends to change the profession of the navy from a career of rewarded honor to a career for a livelihood. It is not strange, under this system, that the navy even contains a very few officers who have scarcely been at sea, and some, who have not seen sea service enough to accomplish them in the proper qualifications of their profession.

Those that are capable—and our service abounds in them—those, and those, only, should be promoted. The office of captain in the navy is a high executive trust. Like the judges of the Supreme Court, he considers himself as appointed for life. The oldest captain, when in service, receives a salary equal to that of a justice of the Supreme Court of the United States; the pay of the youngest captain, even when doing no duty, and only waiting orders, is much above the average salaries of the district judges of the United States. He bears the flag of his country to foreign climes; he has authority over officers and men; he directs the power of armed

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squadrons; he is the protector of the persons and interests of our citizens abroad. The body of captains should be a body of chosen men. There should not be among the number one of doubtful merit. The nomination and confirmation to that post should be acts of solemnity, fixing the attention of the country, enhanced in value by approving public opinion, and conceded to those only whose characters and career are guarantees of honorable conduct and professional merit all their life long.

Selection, it is objected, will degenerate into favoritism. In promotions there should certainly be no favor. The records of the department, or the concurrent opinion of officers, will disclose professional merit. If these could be disregarded, the Senate may interpose. If the Senate yields, the voice of public opinion, the press, the vigilance of party, the restorative influence of the popular will, would, in the end, make impartiality a necessity—would certainly protect merit from neglect. Indiscriminate promotion is injustice to the country, and, if persevered in, will prove fatal to the navy.

The efficiency of the service demands a reduction in the number of officers in active service, or awaiting it. Sudden, indiscriminate, and excessive promotions, compel the recommendation of such a reduction. There are so many captains and commanders, that, under existing laws, were all capable of commands, and each cruise to consist of three years, each captain would be at sea once in twelve years; each commander once in eighteen years. This evil attracted the attention of the last Congress; and the power so necessary to the service, of placing a reluctant officer on furlough, was restored to the department. I have been informed that this power was granted with a view to have a large part of the captains and commanders put on half pay. But it does not fully appear so on the record. The experience of the summer leaves me confident in the belief that a large number of captains and of commanders might, with public advantage, be placed on furlough, and smaller proportions of other grades. Should Congress direct this to be done, their will can perhaps be carried into effect with less division of opinion in the service than might at first be apprehended; especially if the furlough pay were in some cases to be one-half of the pay of officers on duty at sea. A board of officers, properly constituted, and the records of the department, with other information within reach, would readily make the necessary discriminations.

The service should be relieved from the burden of carrying along so very much greater a number of officers than can be employed. It is not just to the people of the United States to retain on pay, as waiting orders, men who, since their promotions, have not received orders, and, from the excess of officers, and for other reasons, can never receive them. None should have the pay as waiting orders, but those who are one day to receive orders, and are able and willing to obey them. Some very few have lived at ease on shore for so many inactive years, having no connexion with the navy but to take rank and pay, that a want of knowledge of their profession has become added to original inaptitude for the service.

The benefit to the country, by pursuing the course I have proposed, would be incalculable. They who know our officers will agree, that, after proper eliminations, you might in vain look through the world for a service that would do more honor to its country.

Wherever the principle of discrimination has been applied, the navy has been benefited. Some years ago, the rule was established for the corps of

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surgeons; and the result has given the navy a body of well-educated and well trained surgeons, of which any nation might be proud.

The same system has been applied during the summer to the engineers, and with very beneficial results. It is the only system which will shut the door against favor, and prevent the offices in the navy from becoming branches of an unauthorized pension list.

This is seen most decidedly in the case of masters. The United Suites navy has the grade of master—a high station, well paid, and requiring great ability and experience at sea. Full pay is given to thirty one masters. Of this number, some are, and have ever been, incompetent to their duty; nor can I learn that more than six or five, or perhaps four or three, are able to navigate a ship. Those who are, and, by an examination, prove themselves to have ever been incompetent, should be discharged; the rest should be employed in their turn at sea, or be put on half-pay.

To the younger branch of the service, I have felt no scruple to extend somewhat further, than was heretofore usual, the principle of discrimination by authority of the department. The number of midshipmen has gradually become so reduced, that new appointments begin to be made. A medical survey, and an examination of the candidates for appointment, have been prescribed.

It would be very desirable if a system of free competition for appointments could be devised, which would preclude all possibility of favoritism. I ought also to add, that many of the best friends of the navy believe the number of midshipmen should be brought within a still narrower limit than that which is at present established by law. If Congress, also, should be of that opinion, I would recommend that, for every five vacancies which may occur, two only should be filled, until the number is still further reduced.

I regret to be obliged to ask the interposition of Congress for new legislation respecting the corps of pursers. The law of August 26, 1842, gives them "on leave, or waiting orders, the same pay as surgeons;" that is, large and increasing pay, according to the number of years they have been in the service, without reference to their sea duty or present merit. Under the operation of this law, the old purser doing nothing on shore is frequently paid more than the faithful young purser whom duty carries round the world. The consequence is, naturally, a great love of the shore. Will not Congress remedy this, and make it for the pecuniary interest of pursers to perform their duty at sea? If this can be accomplished, their number needs no increase.

In the army, disbursing officers periodically come before the Senate to be confirmed anew. Would it not be well to extend this principle to the navy, and to require that pursers should once, in every few years, be subject to re-appointment? And would it not be a good rule that no purser should be reappointed who has not, within a reasonable period, performed a cruise?

Changes in the present law are needed to protect the treasury. Balances are sometimes retained too long, for which the best remedy is prompt settlements. Three months are now allowed to disbursing officers within the United States to render their accounts. The efficient pursers will agree unanimously, that for them forty five days are ample for the purpose. If Congress will establish that limit, I believe the Auditor will be able to settle their accounts within the next forty five days, to the immense benefit of themselves and the public service. Moneys can only come into their

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hands on specific requisitions for specific purposes, and ought never be diverted by them to the payment of their own claims, real or pretended, against the United States. These claims, in some cases, extend back twenty years, and, when traced to their origin, are not infrequently found to be based upon services which, when rendered, were recognised as a regular duty. Such unfounded demands pursers sometimes pay, by retaining public money in their hands, constituting themselves judges in their own cases, and vexatiously persist in carrying them forward in their accounts, after they have been repeatedly rejected by the legally constituted authorities. If pursers desire to hold large sums of public money for the purpose of contending in courts against the decisions of the accounting officers, sustained by the opinions of the Attorney General, they should first become private citizens; for while they are contending, the government must lose their services, or expose itself to the charge of undue advantage in sending them from home. It is, moreover, manifestly unsafe to trust them, under such circumstances, with further amounts of the public money. This subject calls for the action of Congress.

The law of January 31, 1823, requires that disbursing officers who fail to render their accounts for settlement in due time, shall be promptly reported to the President of the United States, and dismissed from the public service. Might not this law be extended, with great propriety and advantage, to those who, upon a settlement of their accounts, are reported as holding balances, and who, on requisition by the proper authority, refuse or neglect to pay into the treasury the public money remaining in their hands?

Although the aggregate number of disbursing officers in the service need not be increased, an improvement might be made by establishing, within the present limit, the grade of assistant pursers. The services of this grade would be chiefly called for in the smaller vessels; and their pay, being regulated by the amount of their responsibility, might properly be less than that of the pursers. As vacancies occur among the pursers, these assistants, if on examination they prove themselves to be fitly trained for the higher duties of their profession, might well be promoted; a system would thus be formed, which would prevent the appointment of the inexperienced and incompetent.

The excess of officers exists almost exclusively in the higher grades of the navy. Of the forward officers, the interests of the service demand that the number, especially of boatswains and gunners, should be a little increased. If permission were granted to appoint six acting boatswains, and as many acting gunners, it would be but a reasonable alleviation to a class of men, who now, from their limited number, are almost always at sea.

It has been my strenuous endeavor to make the condition of the seamen in the public employ such as Congress designed. The apprentice system, as heretofore regulated, though it has produced some excellent seamen, has not been wholly successful; but, it is believed that the failure has arisen from defects of arrangement, and not from the system itself. An attempt will be made to revive it in a simple, unpretending form, and with the hope of beneficial results in the increase of accomplished American seamen. Meantime, our mercantile marine of nearly one hundred thousand men, readily yields patriotic and skillful crews to our ships of war. The limitation of these to seven thousand five hundred men has never, in the past

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summer, been exceeded, and has had a wholesome effect in compelling reductions at the naval stations at home.

It is the glory of our navy, that our sailors are held by affection and choice. They enlist voluntarily; they are freely discharged on their return from a cruise; and. with few exceptions, they readily enlist again. They love the service; and, on whatever sea they are found, they are Americans at heart.

Efforts have been made to break up a violation of law, which has too long existed on ship-board. The mercy of the statute entrusts the power of the lash exclusively to the commanding officer. No officer, worthy of a command, will inflict punishment, except after due examination into the offenses charged. The former custom of delegating this power to subordinate officers is a flagrant violation of the will of Congress and the people. The men have rights, and must be protected in them. Experience shows that discipline is never so good, as when the commanding officer sets the example of subordination by obedience to the laws of his country.

Freedom to enter the service; protection in their rights during their service; freedom to leave it after a cruise; skillful medical attention, with comfortable quarters at naval hospitals in case of sickness; a pension in case of disability; a home at the naval asylum in old age;—these provisions show that the sailor has not been neglected by his countrymen.

I cannot close this communication without repeating that the evils in our navy, to which I have called attention, spring from the defects in the system that has been followed, rather than from the want of proper personal qualities in the officers. A period of peace, which it is to be hoped may continue, left employment at sea without the strong attraction that comes from the imminence of danger and the prospect of winning renown; and the department, while it possesses authority to summon into activity the services of all, without exception, has yet had no opportunities of rewarding those who distinguish themselves by alacrity and capacity. An exploring expedition was, indeed, sent forth and kept at sea for a long series of years; and many cases of ordinary employment have imposed great hardships and privations; but not a lieutenant or a midshipman has, in any one instance, received so much as the slightest advancement beyond those who remained, during the same period, on shore or at easier stations. Ours is the only service where activity and inactivity have fared alike; and it is the highest evidence of the capacity and integrity of our officers, and the vast amount of talent which a proper system would call forth, that, in spite of this usage of indifference, which prevails in no other country, and ought no longer to prevail in our own, the sentiments of honor and the pride of professional duty have still educated gallant officers enough to secure to our navy the confidence of the country and the respect of the world.

GEORGE BANCROFT.

TO THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.

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LIST OF PAPERS

ACCOMPANYING THE REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

1. List of deaths, resignations, and dismissions in the navy.

2. Estimates for the office of the Secretary of the Navy, bureaus, and southwest Executive building.

3. General estimate for the naval service, including the marine corps.

4. Reports and detailed estimates from the—

Bureau of Yards and Docks.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, including a report and estimates from the Hydrographical office.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, &c.

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing.

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery.

5. Estimates from the Paymaster and Quartermaster of the marine corps.

6. Schedules of proposals made to the several bureaus.

7. Report from the Commissioner of Pensions, with lists of invalid, widow, and privateer pensioners, and estimates.

8. Letter from the Secretary of the Navy to Commander Buchanan, concerning a plan for the Naval School at Annapolis.

9. Report from the Fourth Auditor, of the receipts and expenditures of the Navy Pension Fund and Privateer Pension Fund.

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List of deaths in the navy, as ascertained at the department since December 1, 1844.

Name and Rank.                                Date.                        Place                                                     
Commander.    
Wm. D. Newman. Oct. 11, 1844 Drowned at Montevideo.
Lieuteants.    
Geo. M. Hooe April 10, 1845 On board sloop Vandalia, at sea.
Jas. M. Lockert April 10, 1845 do.        do.           do.
B. S. B. Darlington Feb. 28, 1845 Portsmouth, N. H.
Stephen Dod Sept. 19, 1845 Newark, N. J.
Assistant Surgeon.    
Wm. Pitt Canning April 7, 1845 On board sloop Vandalia, at sea.
Pursers.    
Edward N. Cox August 11, 1845 Newport, R. I.
Robert S. Moore
April 3, 1845 On board sloop Vandalia, at sea.
Passed Midshipmen.    
Wm. A. Henry Dec. 14, 1845 Porto Grande, St. Vincent's.
S. D. Lavallette Feb. 14, 1845 Chester, Pennsylvania.
R. Poinsett Lovell May 7, 1845 Sloop Boston, Montevideo.
Wm. Reed Low August 1845 Concord, New Hampshire.
Midshipmen.    
Jesse M. Smith Dec. 3, 1844 Porto Grande, St. Vincent's.
Lucius M. Mason Jan. 7, 1845 Frigate Constitution, at sea.
Timothy W. Fiske Feb 16, 1845 Philadelphia.
Master.    
Robert S. Tatem Jan. 3, 1844 Philadelphia.
Gunners.    
Thomas Ryley ____, 1845  
Lewis Parker August 31, 1845 Pensacola navy yard.
George Bell Sept. 7, 1845 Pensacola.
Carpenters.    
Jno. Overman March 19, 1845 Sloop Vandalia, Port-au-Prince.

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List of deaths, &c.—Continued.

Name and Rank.                            

Date.                     

Place.                                               

Carpenter.    
Wm. Jordan June 5, 1845 Norfolk.
Sailmaker.    
Benjamin Crow March 31, 1845 Sloop Vandalia, at sea.
Naval Constructor.    
Charles D. Brodie October 4, 1845 Frigate Potomac Pensacola.
Marine Corps.    
Major.    
Wm. H. Freeman March 11, 1845  
1st Lieutenant.    
Geo. W. Robbins March 1, 1845  
2d Lieutenant.    
Robert D. Taylor Nov. 13, 1845 Naval Hospital, Norfolk, Va.

List of resignations in the navy, since December 1, 1844.

Name and Rank.                                                             Date of acceptance.                                              
Lieutenant.  
William A. Jones  May 13, 1845.
Pursers.  
Thomas E. Norris August 29, 1845
Philo White September 15, 1845.
Chaplain.  
Nathan C. Fletcher June 9, 1845.

42

 

--657--

List of resignations, &c.-Continued.

Name and Rank.                                                                               Date of acceptance.                                                 
Passed Midshipman.  
C.S. Throckmorton August 4, 1845.
Midshipmen.  
Lawrence B. Robinson March 12, 1845
Henry H. Harrison April 27, 1845
Peter Kemble June 24, 1845.
Edward A. Hopkins July 1, 1845.
John P. McFarland July 2, 1845
Alfred Bailey July 7, 1845
Martin Duralde September 18, 1845.
Samuel B. Rathbone September 20, 1845.
Edmund C. Genet September 22, 1845.
Charles F. Collins October 8, 1845
Lehman P. Ashmead November 5, 1845
Frederick A. Hallett December 1, 1845.
Professor of Mathematics.  
James P. Espy July 5, 1845.
Gunner.  
Thomas Lweis January 14, 1845.
Sailmaker.  
Charles C. Bartting. July 18, 1845.
Engineers.  
John Serro, 3d assistant October 23, 1845.
Gilbert Sherwood, 2d assistant. October 29, 1845
Levi T. Spencer, 2d assistant November 18, 1845.
Navy Agent.  
Timothy Upham, at Portsmouth, N.H. April 1, 1845.
Naval Storekeeper.  
Charles W. Cutter, at Portsmouth, N.H. May 1, 1845.

--658--

List of dismissions from the navy, since December 1, 1844.

Name and Rank.                                                                                             Date of dismission                                   
Lieutenant.  

Wm. Decatur Hurst
April 12, 1845.
Purser.  
John N. Todd November 11, 1845.
Passed Midshipmen.  
Robert A. Knapp May 17, 1845.
John S. Neville October 2, 1845.
Midshipmen.  
Albert G. Enos December 10, 1845.
Frederick P. Baldwin June 5, 1845.
Edward Allen August 9, 1845.
John L. Nelson August 19, 1845.
Ellicott D. Wall October 2, 1845.
Cyrus H. Oakley October 2, 1845 - appointment revoked.
Professor of Mathematics.  
Bartholomew McGowan April 12, 1845 -appointment revoked.
Gunner.  
Henry Keeling May 22, 1845 -appointment revoked.
Engineers.  
Thomas Copeland, 1st assistant July 30, 1845 -appointment revoked.
James Cochrane, 1st assistant November 7, 1845.
Navy Agents.  
J. Vincent Browne, at Boston April 1, 1845.
Samuel McClellan, at Baltimore April 8, 1845.

--659--

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.

Salary of the Secretary of the Navy, per act of February 20, 1819 $6,000                    
Salaries of the clerks and messengers employed in the office of the Secretary of the Navy, per acts of August 31 and August 26, 1842, $13,550
Salaries of two clerks, at $1,200 each, authorized by act of August 26, 1842, and continued since, every year, $2,400
  $21,950
Contingent expenses----  
Blank books, binding, and stationery $1,000
Printing $400
Labor $400
Newspapers and periodicals $200
Miscellaneous items $840
 

$2,840

 

$24,790

General estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, and the several bureaus of the Navy Department, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.  
Office.                                                                     Salaries. Contingent.
Secretary of the Navy                                               $21,950 $2,840
Bureau of Yards and Docks                                        12,900     500
           Ordnance and Hydrography                             8,400     520
           Construction, Equipment, and Repair               19,000     500
Provisions and Clothing                                              8,300     820
Medicine and Surgery                                                 6,600     820
                                                                              77,250    6,000

SUBMITTED FOR CONTINUANCE:

One clerk in Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography,                                                                                           $1,000

__________

 

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest executive building, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.

Superintendent                                                                                                                    $250
Three watchmen 1,095
Labor 325
Fuel and light 1,350
Miscellaneous items 1,150
   
  4,170

 

--660--

 

General estimate of the sums required for the support of the navy, for the fiscal year commencing on the 1st of July, 1846, and ending on the 30th of June, 1847.

                                                             Estimate for 1846-7                                  Estimated for  1845-6                                     Appropriated for 1845-6                          
Pay of commission, warrant and petty officers, and seamen, including the engineer corps of the navy:      
For vessels in commission     $1,588,034.00      
For navy-yards and shore stations                                                        $486,236.00            
For officers on leave, waiting orders, or on furlough, and midshipmen at naval school $507,520.00 $2,581,790.00 $2,971,130.00 $2,509,189.00
Pay of superintendents 66,970.00 75,270.00 67,270.00
Provisions, for commission, warrant and petty officers, and seamen, including engineers and marines attached to vessels for sea service 652,328.00 792,780.00 615,828.00
Clothing for the navy   100,00.00 60,000.00
Surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the sick and hurt of the naval service, including the marine corps 21,072.40 37,300.00 30,000.00
Inceases, repair, armament and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, including coal for steamers, and purchase of hemp 1,050,000.00 1,800,000.00 1,045,880.00
Ordnance and ordnance stores, including all incidental expenses 371,820.00 466,457.50 370,885.00
Nautical books, maps, charts, instruments, binding and repairing the same, and all expenses of the hydrographical office 35,900.00 43,000.00 42,702.82
Improvement and repair of navy-yards 600,000.00 1,226,223.39 597,052.00
Improvents and repairs of hospital buildings and grounds 29,006.00 177,612.77 42,412.00
Repairs of magazines 800.00 825.00 825.00

Contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

Freight and transportation; printing and stationery; books, models, and drawings; purchase and repair of fire-engines, and for machinery; repair of steam-engines in yards; purchase and maintenance of horses and oxen; carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools; postage of letters on public service; coal and other fuel, and oil and candles for navy-yards and shore stations; incidental labor not chargeable to any other appropriation; labor attending the delivery of public stores and supplies on foreign stations; wharfage, dockage, storage, and rent; traveling expenses of officers; funeral expenses; commissions, clerk-hire, store rent, office rent, stationery, and fuel, to navy agents and naval storekeepers; premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; apprehending deserters; per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services authorized by law; compensation to judge advocates; pilotage and towing vessels; assistance rendered to vessels in distress

550,000.00 600,000.00 †582,797.18
Contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,00.00
       
  5,964,686.90 8,295,598.66 5,969,841.00

* Including $17,202.82, embraced under the general head of "Contingent expenses enumerated."

† Exclusive of $17,202.82, made specially applicable to the "Appropriation for the construction of a depot of charts and instruments."

--661--

GENERAL ESTIMATE—Continued.

MARINE CORPS.

                                                                          Estimate for 1846-7               Estimated for 1845-6           Appropriated for 1845-6       
Pay and subsistence $202,081.16 $200,771.16 $200,771.16
Provisions for marines serving on shore 45,077.20 45,069.90 45,069.90
Clothing for marine corps 46,787.50 43,662.50 43,662.50
Fuel 16,274.12 16,274.12 16,274.12
Military stores 2,300.00 2,300.00 2,300.00
Transportation 8,000.00 8,000.00 8,000.00
Repairs of barracks 6,000.00 6,000.00 6,000.00
Contingencies 18,184.00 17,980.00 17,980.00
       
  344,703.98 340,057.68 340,057.68

MARINE CORPS.

--662--

REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS.

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

November 22, 1845.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit for your information, conformably to the direction contained in your letters of the 30th September last, and 4th and 19th instant, estimates for the improvement of the several navy yards, embracing the repair of all such objects as may need them; for the support of the naval and civil parts of the same establishments; and for the improvement and repairs of the naval hospital and magazines contiguous to each. They are accompanied by the estimates for the ordinary at four of the yards, for the receiving vessels, and for the recruiting stations.

The amount of the whole for the fiscal year beginning on the 1st July, 1846, and ending on the 1st July, 1847, is $1,2665,678.15; of this, the sum of $612,915.65 is for the improvement, &c. of the navy yards, including $250,000 for the dock which is under construction at New York; the sum of $223,178 for the naval part, including the ordinary of the yards; the sum of $69,470 for the civil establish merits; the sum of $140,508 for receiving vessels; the sum of $40,800 for recruiting stations; the sum of $29,006.50 for the improvement, &c. of hospitals; and that of $800 for magazines. The above form the aggregate of what will be required for the contemplated wants of the navy, under the superintendence of the head of this bureau. By comparing this with the aggregate of the estimates for the same objects for the present fiscal year, a difference of $1,040,705.01 will be seen in favor of those for the succeeding year.

A brief account of what has been done in each yard, and what is in progress, may be useful, and serve to show how the appropriations have been applied. The operations at each of the yards were necessarily restrained by the amount at its disposal, and as that was not very great for any but the two situated in the west and southwest—namely, Memphis and Pensacola—the progress will not be found to have been so great as it has hitherto been. In these two, what has as yet been done may be considered as a commencement. Their state will be more particularly explained at the end of this report.

Of the sums applied to the Portsmouth yard, together with the small balances of previous appropriations, the filling in of the low grounds, the landing place and a house for the preservation of boats, have been completed within the last year. The wharf No. 1, a part of the general line of the quay walls; the removal of timber shed No. 13; the removal of the old work in the timber dock, and the apparatus for steaming plank, are now in progress, add will be continued to completion, or as far as the appropriation will permit.

At Boston, the wall to the West of ship-house marked G has been completed within the year. The wharf No. 65, that numbered 66, a house for the storage of coal for steamers and for the consumption of the yard, have been commenced and are in progress. A reservoir for fresh water with the proper pipes will also be soon finished. When the wharves above mentioned shall have been completed, great convenience will be found in the discharging and loading of vessels, and also for the security of those which are at present often kept at a distance for the want of such accommodation. All these, it is hoped, and confidently expected, will be finished by the 1st of July next.

--663--

At New York, a roof (much wanted) has been put on the sail-loft and on the offices; much of the low ground of the yard has been filled in, thereby gaining working room, and adding much to its solidity and dryness, The repair of what is termed the gun block, or temporary place of deposit for cannon and shot, has been made; stables have been built; and, a water-tank for the more rapid supply of water to ships, which has hitherto been a great desideratum, has also been completed. The works in progress, are the clearing out of the channel by dredging, and the placing of the mud thus obtained in those places which require to be filled up. The work on the cob-wharf, or enclosure of the mud flats opposite the yard by a strong body of logs and stone work, is also advancing as rapidly as circumstances will permit; and, it is intended to apply a large portion of the contemplated appropriation to this desirable, and, I may add, important work. By it we shall gain a space of about 23 acres, a commodious place for securing ships when fitting or dismantling, and a secure position for a number of vessels from all danger of ice in the winter season.

At the Philadelphia yard, wharf No. 3 and the quay wall have been completed within the year; and the wharf across the dock, at the head of what is termed the timber pond, will soon be completed as well as filled in. The sum asked for this yard will be sufficient for the repair of such buildings as may require it, and for the extension of the ship house and removal of it a short distance further down or nearer the river, which has been made necessary by the extension of the wharves. These have been added to, on account of the rapid filling; up of the river in their fronts. It is believed that they have been sufficiently extended to obviate further difficulty on that account, unless some very great change should be made in the river front above, or to the north of the yard.

In the yard in this city, all the works for which an appropriation was granted have been completed, or nearly so. The laboratory is finished, and is occupied for the purposes of its erection. This building was erected under contract; and there being no good or sufficiently secure place for it, except in a part of the yard which was too soft to sustain so great a weight without piling, recourse was had to that mode of securing the foundation, and the expense has been increased proportionally. It was intended, at the time estimates were made for this building, that it should occupy a site on high ground, on the north side of the yard; but its vicinity to other buildings, and the recollection of the danger which impended over them by the explosion of the first edifice of the kind, induced a reconsideration of the matter, and resulted in a determination to place it where it now stands. For the excess thus caused, a small appropriation is asked, and the contractors who performed the work are well entitled to it, as it was "extra work," and to be paid for as such.

At Norfolk, the under mentioned improvements have been finished within the last year. The building No. 16 to be used as a timber shed temporarily but eventually intended, conformably, to its position on the plan of the yard, for a store house. Want of means to increase the number of the former description, and timely preservation from decay of valuable timber, which otherwise might have been greatly exposed, have induced the partial change. A permanent bridge across the timber dock, which unites the north and south divisions of the yard, and renders communication between them easy and rapid, has been completed; and a temporary coal-house, for the stowage of large quantities of coal for steamers, has been also put up.

--664--

It is intended to erect hereafter, when a more convenient situation can be fixed, a permanent one, with all the conveniences of a railway and car, for despatch and economy. The launching slip No. 48, commenced in the last year, is now in progress, and the materials which have been contracted for are now under delivery, and will soon be on the designated spot.

At Pensacola, store house No. 22 and the improvement in timber shed No. 1 have been finished within the year. A water tank has also been completed, and several objects pertaining to the convenience and accommodation of business. Store house No. 25, timber shed No. 26, a coal house for steamer's coal, ship house A and building slip connected with it, and a temporary and permanent wharf, are in progress, so far as the delivery, collection, and arrangement of materials, according to the plans for improving this new but important establishment, go. A quantity of stone and brick and materials of wood are now in the yard, and more are coming in as fast as they can be transported; and, within the ensuing twelve months much, it is expected, will be done towards the construction of the above works. The three first named objects will be finished in the spring. The difficulty of procuring workmen, and the apprehension of sickness, have necessarily retarded operations at this yard; but it is believed that the collection of much material, the knowledge that constant employment will be afforded, and the confidence acquired by actual experience of the greater degree of health to be procured in that climate than is generally supposed, will afford strong inducements to mechanics to report in numbers to a place where their services will for a long time be required. With the present means, and those in anticipation, much, under a skillful chief engineer, whose services will constantly be required, may be effected.

A commencement of the works at the Memphis navy yard has been made, by surveying, laying off, and examining the various portions which must be first taken in hand. An estimate of the expense of these works, including many others, to be carried on as time and means may allow, has been made by the engineer attached to the yard. Upon a selection of such as were of more immediate necessity, an advertisement was issued calling upon persons for offers to perform the work. Specifications for the government of the bidders were directed to be given by the engineer to all such as called for them; and, under the advertisement, with the information given, many proposals were received. At the appointed time, these were opened, in the presence of three gentlemen, who had been requested to attend; and, after a close and most careful examination, the work was assigned to the lowest bidder for each specific item or job of work. One or two have, it is understood, declined their allotted portion; but contracts will be forwarded to the others for signature, and it is expected that, in a short time, the successful bidders will be ready to commence operations. The whole amount of work thus allotted is about $150,000, which is less than the sum now at the disposal of the department for this desirable and important work. The remainder, however, and the further sum now asked for, may be advantageously disposed of, without doubt, in the course of the next fiscal year. A little delay to ascertain how substantially the improvements which have just been provided for are to be constructed, and how much of them may be performed in a given time, will add much to a proper knowledge of the manner in which further progress may be made, and what it may be most desirable to take up next in order. As this is an entirely new

--665--

establishment, it is contemplated to divide the whole into a number of classes—1st, 2d, 3d, &c.,—according as the wants of each may be most urgent.

At Sackett's harbor a bulk head or break-water, for the security of the point on which a ship is under construction, has been built, and the ship house, which required repairs, has been put in good order, to preserve it from decay.

The last item which I shall have occasion to mention is the dry dock at New York. It is advancing as rapidly as a due regard to its proper construction, and the means applied to it, will allow. Order and regularity are observable in the arrangement of its details, and it is believed that an economical and steady employment of the mechanics will in a short time produce an appearance and result that will be gratifying to the department. It was begun originally under Mr. Courtenay, on the 1st of October, 1841; was continued to 1st August, 1842, when the works were suspended. During that period, the sum of $35,264.75 was expended for every purpose. The works were again resumed on the 10th of October, 1844, under General McNeill. Between that time and the 1st of April, when he was succeeded by the present engineer, Mr. Sanger, the sum of $114,671.83 was expended. Since the first of April, of the present year, up to the first of October, to which time the engineer's report is made up, the sum of $51,236.75 has been expended. The sums of these three expenditures form an aggregate of $201,168.50; which has been expended on the dock for all purposes connected therewith, from its commencement in October, 1841, to the 30th of September last. To continue the work through the succeeding fiscal year, the engineer thinks the sum of $2250,400 may be profitably appropriated, and that sum, less $400, has therefore been inserted, for that purpose, under the proper head. I forward with this the report of W. P. S. Sanger, esq., the chief engineer, which gives a specific, clear, and concise view of the whole subject, and will enable you to ascertain with precision the progress and condition of the whole work. The little time which has elapsed since its receipt has prevented the making of a copy; I have therefore to request that it may be returned at your convenience, that it may be preserved for reference.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. WASHINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

Hon. Geo. Bancroft,

Secretary of the Navy.

--666--

Schedule of the papers which accompany the report of the Chief of the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks to Secretary of the Navy, for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

Y. & D.—A.—General estimate for yard docks.

Y. & D. No. 1.—Receiving vessels, in detail, being part of the first item in general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 2.—Recruiting stations, in detail, being part of the first item in general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 3.—Officers and others, at yards and stations, in detail.

Y. & D. No. 4.—Improvements and repairs of navy yards, &c.

Y. & D. No. 5.—Statement showing the sums which make up the first and second items in general estimate.

Y. & D. No. 6.—Improvements and repairs at hospitals and magazines.

Y. & D. No. 7.—For the support of the Bureau.

--667--

Y. & D.—A.

GENERAL ESTIMATE FOR YARDS AND DOCKS.

Estimated amounts that will be required for the naval service for the year ending June, 1847, so far as coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, in addition to the unexpended balance which may remain in the Treasury 1st July, 1846.

                                                                                                                                                                                             Estimated for the year ending June 30 1847. Estimated for the year ending June 30, 1846.
1st. For the pay of commission, warrant, and petty officers, (see paper Y. & D. No. 5.) $404,486.00 $527,452.00
2d. For the pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several navy-yards and stations, (see paper Y. & D. No. 5.) $69,470.00 $72,270.00
3d. For improvements and necessary repairs in navy-yards, &c., including dry dock at New York, (see paper Y. & D. No. 4,) $612,915.65 $1,379,223.39
4th. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, (see paper Y. & D. No. 6,) $29,006.50 $177,612.77
5th. For magazines, (see paper Y. & D. No. 6,) $800.00 $825.09

6th. For contingent expenses which may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

For the freight and transportation of materials and stores for yards and docks; for printing and stationery; for books, maps, models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire-engines, and for machinery of every description; for the repair of steam engines in yards; for the purchase and maintenance of horses and oxen; for carts, timber-wheels and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for coals and other fuel; for candles and oil for the use of navy-yards and shore stations; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; and for no other object or purpose whatever

$150,000.00 $150,000.00
Total $1,266,678.15 $2,307,383.16

BUREAU OF THE YARDS AND DOCKS,

                        November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--668--

Y. & D. No. 1.

RECEIVING VESSELS.

Estimate of the number and pay of officers and others required for six receiving vessels, for the year ending 30th June, 1847, if no alteration it made in the number of vessels, or in their respective complements.

                                                 Boston        New York    Philadelphia         Baltimore     Norfolk    New Orleans    Total     Aggregate amount                            
Commanders 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 $12,600
Lieutenants 4 4 2 2 4 2 18 27,000
Masters 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 6,000
Pursers 1 1     1   3 7,500
Surgeons 1 1     1   3 7,200
Assistant surgeons 1 1     1   3 3,600
Passed midshipmen 3 3     3   9 6,750
Midshipmen 6 6 3 3 6 3 27 9,450
Clerks 1 1     1   3 1,500
Boatswain's mates 1 1     1   3 2,400
Gunners 1 1     1   3 2,400
Carpenters 1 1     1   3 2,400
Boatswain's mates 2 2 1 1 2 1 9 2,052
Gunner's mates 1 1     1   3 684
Carpenter's mates 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1,368
Quartermasters 2 2     2   6 1,296
Masters-at-arms 1 1     1   3 684
Ship's corporals 1 1     1   3 540
Ship's stewards 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1,296
Officer's stewards 2 2 1 1 2   9 1,944
Surgeon's stewards 1 1     1   3 648
Ship's cooks 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 1,296
Officer's cooks 2 2 1 1 2 1 9 1,620
Seamen 22 22 4 2 22 4 76 10,944
Ordinary seamen 40 40 8 4 40 9 141 16,920
Landsmen and apprentices 40 40     40 4 124 10,416
                 
Estimated in 1845 139 139 25 19 139 30 491 140,508
Estimated in 1844 143 143 19 19 143 30 516 165,766

BUREAU OF THE YARDS AND DOCKS,

November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--669--

 

Y. & D. No. 2.

RECRUITING STATIONS.

Estimate of the pay of officers attached to recruiting stations, for the year ending 30th June, 1847, if no alteration is made in the number of stations.

                                        Boston  New York  Philadelphia Baltimore  Norfolk  New Orleans  Total    Aggregate amount
Commanders 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 $12,600
Lieutenants 2 2 1 1 2 1 9 13,500
Surgeons 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 10,500
Midshipmen 2 2 2 2 2 2 12 4,200
                 
Estimated in 1845 6 6 5 5 6 5 33 40,800
Estimated in 1844 6 6 6 6 6 6 *42 52,850

    *Including 6 at Charleston.

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

    November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

__________

Y. & D. No. 3.

Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy yards and stations, for

the year ending 30th June, 1847.

No. PORTSMOUTH, N.H.                                                                            Pay.                Aggregate
  NAVAL.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Master 1,100  
3 Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Boatswain 700  
1 Gunner 700  
1 Carpenter 700  

--670--

No.   PORTSMOUTH, N.H. -continued                                                                          Pay                 Aggregate.            
1 Sailmaker 700  
1 Purser 2,000  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
      $18,576
       
  Ordinary.    
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
6 Seamen, at $144 each 864  
12 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,440  
      2,532
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,400  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Foreman and inspector of timber 700  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 400  
1 Porter 300  
      7,650
       
  Total   28,758

 

No.  

BOSTON.                                                                                               

Pay                                

Aggregate.  
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Professor 1,200  
4 Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Boatswain 800  
1 Gunner 800  
1 Carpenter 800  

--671--

No.                                   BOSTON-Continued                                                                                          Pay.                                               Aggregate                      
1 Sailmaker 800  
1 Purser 2,500  
1 Clerk to purser 500  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
      $26,576
  Hospital.    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
Hospital steward 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each 240  
Washers, at $96 each 192  
1 Cook 144  
      3,636
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Measurer and inspector of timber 1,050  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 1,050  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 600  
1 Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper 500  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      11,180
       
  Total   41,394

NOTE.-The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the marines also.

--672--

No.                                                        NEW YORK.                                                                                                            Pay.                                   Aggregate.            
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Professor 1,200  
Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Boatswain 800  
1 Gunner 800  
1 Carpenter 800  
1 Sailmaker 800  
1 Purser 2,500  
1 Clerk to purser 500  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 360  
1 Steward (surgeon's) 360  
      $27,080
  Hospital.    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 Apothecary 420  
1 Hospital steward 360  
1 Matron 250  
5 Nurses, at $120 each 600  
2 Cooks, at $144 each 288  
2 Washers, at $168 each 336  
1 Gardener 300  
1 Gate-keeper 460  
2 Boatmen, at $108 each 216  
      6,880
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper $1,700  
1 Naval Constructor 2,300  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 1,050  
1 Clerk of the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 1,050  
      43    

--673--

No.                                    NEW YORK-Continued.                                                                                                          Pay.                                    Aggregate.          
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper $600  
1 Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper 500  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      $11,180
       
                                                              Total   $45,140

NOTE.-The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines.

No.                                           PHILADELPHIA.                                                                                                         Pay.                                           Aggregate.       
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants at $1,500 each 3,000  
1 Master 1,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
3 Passed midshipmen at $750 each 2,250  
2 Midshipmen at $350 each 750  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Boatswain 700  
1 Gunner 700  
1 Carpenter 700  
1 Purser 2,000  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
      21,176
  Naval Asylum and Hospital.    
1 Captain 3,500  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Secretary 900  
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Hospital steward 360  
2 Nurses at $120 each 240  
1 Washer 168  
1 Cook 120  
      9,488

--674--

No.                                               PHILADELPHIA-Continued                                                                                            Pay.                         Aggregate.        
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper $1,250  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 Clerk of the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1  Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 400  
1 Porter 300  
      $7,700
       
                                                              Total   $38,364

NOTE.-The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the receiving vessel and to the marines.

No.                                                     WASHINGTON.                                                                                                          Pay.                 Aggregate.      
  Civil.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
Master 1,000  
1  Surgeon 1,800  
1  Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
1  Midshipmen, at $350 each 700  
1  Chaplain 1,200  
1 Boatswain 700  
1 Gunner                                                                        700  
1 Carpenter 700  
1 Purser 2,000  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
1 Steward, (surgeon's) 360  
      $19,086
  Ordinary.    
1 Boatswain's mate 228  
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
10 ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,200  
      1,656

--675--

No.                                               WASHINTON-Continued.                                                                                            Pay.                        Aggregate.   
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper $1,700  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      6,680
       
                                                                   Total   $27,422

NOTE.-The surgeon is also required to attend to the hospital, when necessary.

No.                                                       NORFOLK.                                                                                                                   Pay.                              Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,00 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Professor 1,200  
4 Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Boatswain 800  
1 Gunner 800  
1 Carpenter 800  
1 Sailmaker 800  
1 Purser 2,500  
1 Clerk to purser 500  
1 Steward assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 360  
  Hospital.   $26,720
1 Surgeon 2,250  

--676--

No.                                              NORFOLK-Contined.                                                                                                             Pay.                         Aggregate.  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each $1,900  
1 Hospital steward 360  
1 Matron 250  
1 Porter or gate-keeper 216  
5 Nurses, at $108 each 540  
2 Cooks, at $120 each 210  
2 Washers, at $96 each 192  
Boatmen, at $108 each 432  
1 Servant 120  
Boys in dispensary 192  
      $6,692
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 1,050  
1 Clerk of the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 1,050  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 600  
1 Clerk (3d) to the storekeeper 500  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      11,180
                                                                   Total   44,592

NOTE.-The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend tot he marines.

No.                                                            PENSACOLA.                                                                                                                   Pay.                        Aggregate.       
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters at $1000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
3 Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 2,250  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  

--677--

No.                                     PENSACOLA-Continued.                                                                                 Pay.                                 Aggregate.                
1 Boatswain 700  
1 Gunner 700  
1 Carpenter 700  
1 Sailmaker 700  
1 Purser 2,500  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
      $22,776
  Ordinary.    
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Carpenter 700  
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
2 Boatswain's mates, at $228 each 456  
10  Seamen, at $144 each 1,440  
60  Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 7,200  
      $11,524
  Hospital    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 Hospital steward 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each 192  
1 Cook 144  
      $4,586
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 Porter 300  
      8,050
                                                            Total   46,936

NOTE:--The surgeon of the yard is also to attend to the marines near the yard, and to such persons in the yards as the commander may direct.

--678--

No.                                                          MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE.                                                                                      Pay.                                Aggregae.        
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Master 1,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Boatswain 700  
1 Carpenter 700  
1 Purser 2,000  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward 216  
      $11,776
  Ordinary.    
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
2 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 240  
      468
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,250  
1 Clerk of the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Porter 300  
      3,350
                                                                Total   15,594
No.                                                                 STATIONS.                                                                                                             Pay.                          Aggregate.     
  SACKETT'S HARBOR.    
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Master's mate, (warranted) 450  
      $1,950
  FOR GENERAL DUTY.    
1 Principal steam engineer 2,500  
      2,500

--679--

RECAPITULATION.

                                                            Naval.                     Ordinary.                   Hospital.                          Civil.                   Aggregate.     
Portsmouth, N.H. $18,576 $2,532   $7,650 $28,758
Boston 26,576   $3,636 11,180 41,392
New York 27,080   6,880 11,180 45,140
Philadelphia 21,176   9,488 7,700 38,364
Wahington 19,086 1,656   6,680 27,422
Norfolk 26,720   6,692 11,180 44,592
Pensacola 22,776 11,524 4,586 8,050 46,936
Memphis, Tennessee 11,776 468   3,350 15,594
Sackett's Harbor 1,950       1,950
General duty       2,500 2,500
           
               Total 175,716 16,180 31,282 69,470 292,648

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

November 22, 1845

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

__________

Y.&D. No.4

Estimate of the amounts that will be required for making the proposed improvements and repairs in the several navy-yards, for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

Navy yard at Portsmouth, N. H.

For wall for landing wharf at smithery F, and filling in                                                                                  $1,705.50                                    
For cistern near mast and boat house      2,000.00
For granite gun-skids and road to grave-yard      1,132.00
For reparis of all kinds      4,000.00
   
      $8,837.50

Navy-yard at Boston.

For drain and iron fram for dry-dock pumps, and set of keel blocks                                                        $2,740.00                                        
For pipes for drain and rain water, and waste steam                                  3,000.00     
For completing wharf No. 66, between 1 & 39                                  9,000.00
For completing reservoir                                  1,000.00
For wall on southwest side of site 51, filling in that part of yard, &c.                                  3,860.00
For repairs of all kinds                                 10,000.00
                                 $29,600.00

--680--

Navy-yard at New York.

Towards continuation of cob-wharf                                                                                       $15,000.00
Towards extension of coal-house (70 feet)     4,318.00
Towards repairing and replanking bridge    3,000.00
Towards repairs of all kinds    8,000.00
Towards building stone foundation under frigate Sabine  18,000.00
   
  $48,318.00
For dry-dock 250,000.00

Navy-yard at Philadelphia.

For extension of and moving ship house G                                                                  $5,000.00        
For repairs of all kinds   3,000.00
   
  $8,000.00

Navy-yard at Washington.

For anchor forges (5) -removing small forge in anchor ship                                      $2,664.00           
For chain cable forges (12) in hydraulic proving machineshop 2,890.00
For the completion of laboratory buildings            5,106.15
For repairs of all kinds            2,500.00
   
          $13,160.15

Navy-yard at Norfolk.

Towards store house No.13, to be used as timber-shed                                                                                           $18,000.00
Towards launching slip, and quay walls  12,000.00
Towards repairs of all kinds    7,000.00
  $37,000.00

Navy-yard at Pensacola.

Towards four warrant officers' houses                                                                                                                 $20,000.00
Towards cisterns at timber sheds Nos.20 and 26, and store-  
   house No.25  27.000.00
Towards saw mill  28,000.00
Towards lime house    6,000.00
Towards blacksmith's shop  21,000.00
Towards addition to coal-house    8,000.00
Towards repairs of all kinds    7,000.000
  $117,000.00

--681--

Sackett's Harbor.

For repairs of all kinds                                                                                                                                   $1,000.00

Navy-yard at Memphis.

For the continuation of the necessary improvements at this yard                                                                     $100,000.00

RECAPITULATION.

Portsmouth, N.H.                                                                                                                       $8,837.50                  
Boston  29.600.00
New York  48,318.00
Dry-dock, (New York) 250,000.00
Philadelphia     8,000.00
Washington   13,160.15
Norfolk   37,000.00
Pensacola 117,000.00
Sackett's Harbor      1,000.00
Memphis 100,000.00
  $612,915.65

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

              November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

__________

Y. & D. No. 5.

Statement showing the several items going to make up the sums of $404,486 and $69,470; being the first and second items in the general estimate from the Bureau of Yards and Docks, (marked Y. & D. A.)

 

FIRST ITEM.

Required for receiving vessels, (see Y. & D. No. 1)                                                                                    $140,508.00

Required for recruiting stations, (see Y. & D. No. 2)                                                                                    $40,800.00

Required for the naval, ordinary, and hospital branches at navy-yards and stations, (see Y. & D. No. 3)

                                                                                                                                                           223,178.00

                                                                                                                                                         $404,486.00

SECOND ITEM.

Required for the civil branch at navy-yards and stations, (see Y.& D. No. 3)                                                  $69,470.00

 

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

                     November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,  

Chief of Bureau.

--682--

 

Y. & D. No. 6.

Estimate of the expenses necessary for the improvement and repairs of the naval hospitals at the several stations for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

Hospital at Boston.

Building for coal-house, repairing out-houses and wall in  
    rear of main building, &c., &c. $2,420.000                                                                                        

Hospital at Boston.

For completing small-pox hospital           $10,000.00                                                                                                              
For repairs to hospital, quarters, &c.     3,000.00
  $13,000.00

Hospital at New York.

For fence round garden, and repairs to hospital buildings $2,667.00                                                                                       

Hospital at Pensacola.

For centre building at hospital, and galleries to connect buildings  $7,409.50                                                                               
For engine-house     510.00
For repairs of hospital, quarters, &c.    3,000.00
  $10,919.00

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

                        November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--683--

Y. & D. No. 7.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Yards and Docks for the year ending June 30, 1847, under the act of Congress approved August 31, 1842.

Commodore L. Warrington, chief of burearu                                $3,500.00                                                                                             
William G. Rdgely, chief clerk      1,400.00
Stephen Gough, clerk      1,000.00
William P. Moran, clerk         800.00
Civil engineer       2,000.00
George F. de la Roche, draughtsman       1,000.00
Charles Hunt, messenger          700.00
Contingent expenses          500.00
                             Total    $10,900.00

BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS,

                           November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON,

Chief of Bureau.

--684--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY.

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY, November 8, 1845.

SIR: In compliance with your instructions of 8th October last, I have the honor to submit, herewith, estimates for the service of this bureau for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. M. CRANE.

HON. GEORGE BANCROFT,

Secretary of the Navy

__________

Schedule of papers containing estimates for the naval service, prepared by the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

A. Estimate of the expenses of the bureau.

B. Estimate of the pay of officers on ordnance duty.

C. Estimate of the ordnance and ordnance stores for the general service of the navy.

D. Statement of the cost or estimated value of the ordnance and ordnance stores on hand at the several navy-yards 1st July, 1815. and the receipts and expenditures for the year ending 30th June, 1845.

E. Statement of the labor performed at the different navy-yards, and cost thereof.

F. Estimate of the amount required under the head of "Hydrography" for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

__________

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography from 1st July, 1846, to 30th June, 1847.

For salary of chief of the bureau per act of August 21st, 1842                      $3,500.00                            
For salary of one clerk, at $1,200 per annum, per act of August    1,200.00
    31st, 1842  
For salary of two clerks, at $1,000 per annum, per act of August    2,000.00
    31st, 1842  
For salary of draughtsman, at $1,000 per annum, per act of   
    August 31st, 1842    1,000.00
For salary of messenger, at $700 per annum, per act of August  
    31st, 1842       700.00

--685--

For contingent expenses.

For blank books and stationery                                                           $260.00                                     
For miscellaneous items  140.00
For labor  120.00
  $520.00
  $8,920.00

SUBMITTED:

One clerk, as book-keeper, $1,000.

NOTE.-The clerk submitted is absolutely necessary. The business of the bureau cannot be performed without this additional aid.

W. M. CRANE.

__________

B.

Estimate of pay of officers on ordnance duty, from 1st July, 1846, to 30th June, 1847.

1 captain at $3,500 per annum                                                                                                                $3,500.00
2 commanders at $2,100 per annum each 4,200.00
4 liutenants, at $1,500 per annum each 6,000.00
  $13,700.00

W. M. CRANE

__________

C.

Estimate of ordnance, ordnance stores, and small arms, for the general service of the navy, from 1st July, 1846, to 30th June, 1847.

100 guns, 32-pounders, of about 57 cwt. each, at 6 1/2 cents per lb.                                                                          $41,496.00
70 guns, 32-pounders, of about 51 cwt. each, at 6 1/2 cents per lb. 25,989.60
20 guns, 32-pounders, of about 46 cwt. each, at 6 1/2 cents per lb. 6,697.60
80 guns, 32-pounders. of about 32 cwt. each, at 6 1/2 cents per lb.  18,636.80
270 gun carriages, with implements complete, at $150 40,500.00
2,000 barrels of powder, at $12.50 25,000.00
1,000 pistols, at $5 5,000.00
2,000 swords, at $4 8,000.00
Copper powder-tanks for 1 ship-of-the-line 7,000.00

--686--

For cannon locks, flannel for cylinders, battle and magazine lanterns, materials for percussion caps, and for all other articles of ordnance stores                                                                                 $158,000.00

For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:

Drawings and models; postage paid by the bureau, and also by officers inspecting ordnance and ordnance stores; traveling expenses of officers in inspecting ordnance and ordnance stores; hire of agents, and rent of store-houses for ordnance and ordnance stores on the northern lakes; advertising in the public newspapers; transportation of ordnance and ordnance stores, and for no other purpose whatever                                                                                                                       $35,500.00

                                                                                                                        $371,820.00

W. M. CRANE.

__________

D.

Statement of the cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy yards at the close of the fiscal year, June 30, 1845, of articles received and expended from July 1, 1844, to June 30, 1845, and the stores on hand at that period, (June 30, 1845,) under the appropriation for increase, repairs, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission, coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

 

Navy-yards, &c.                          Value on hand July 1, 1844       Receipts.                        Expenditures.                    Value on hand June 30, 1845.
Portsmouth $104,480.72 $9,320.53 $26,316.11 $87,485.14
Boston 283,125.64 64,455.16 23,690.89 323,909.91
New York 705,112.16 173,056.63 193,916.92 684,251.87
Philadelphia 77,764.96 901.40 2,903.16 75,763.20
Washington 78,833.75 42,517.25 43,646.22 77,704.78
Norfolk 453,801.59 97,964.77 116,129.58 435,636.78
Pensacola 21,306.30      
On the lakes 7,023.25     7,023.25
         
                       Total  1,731,448.37 390,400.49 409,738.79 1,712,110.07


W. M. CRANE.

--687--

 

E.

Statement of the number of days' labor, and the cost thereof from 1st July, 1844, to 30th June, 1845, at the respective navy-yards, chargeable to the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

Navy-yards                                              Number of days labor.                      Cost of labor.                    Average pay per day.                                                     
Portsmouth 284 $382.66 $1.34 3/4
Boston 659 1/2 1,145.04 1.73 5/8
New York 6,021 8,346.95 1.38 5/8
Philadelphia 4 6.00 1.50
Washington 6,226 8,785.31 1.41 1/10
Norfolk 5,771 1/2 8,806.83 1.53 1/2
Pensacola      
       
                          Total 18,966 27,472.79 1.44 7/8

W. M. CRANE

__________

F.

Estimate of the amount required for the naval service under the head of hydrography, for the year ending 30th June, 1847.

 For the purchase and repair of instruments for the navy                                                                      $10,000.00
For the purchase of books and charts 7,000.00
For engraving, printing, backing and binding the same 5,000.00
For pay of lithographer and for working lithographic  
  press, including chemicals, paper, &c. 1,200.00
For fuel and lights 1,500.00
For one watchman, at $40 per month 480.00
For one porter, at $25 per month 300.00
For workmen to repair instruments 720.00
For models, and drawings 1,000.00
For setting in grass and planting trees on grounds 1,000.00
For warning building 1,200.00
For postage, stationery,freight, and drayage, and incidental  
  expenses 1,500.00
For erecting house for superindent 5,000.00
  $35,900.00

 

--688--

Appropriation for books, maps, charts, &c., for year ending 30th of                                                                           
 June, 1846 $25,500.00
Appropriation to balance expenditures, &c., (last clause of contigent)  
  for year ending 30th June, 1846 17,202.82
  $42,702.82

Officers to be employed.

Seven lieutenants, at $1,500 each                                                                                                                          $10,500.00
Three professors of mathematics, at $1,200 each 3,600.00
Six passed midshipmen, at $750 each 4,500.00
  $18,600.00

W. M. CRANE.

__________

HYDROGRAPHICAL OFFICE,

                                    Washington, October 20, 1845.

SIR: The sphere of usefulness of this office has been greatly increased, since its connexion with the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

The increase of its business has been attended on one hand with many advantages to the public service, and with a degree of economy on the other that could not be anticipated.

The circumstance of having the instruments for the navy purchased by the quantity, after careful trial or proof, instead of by retail, where and as they happened to be wanted, and without such trial or proof, has contributed in no small degree to lessen their cost, and to secure for the navy instruments of much better quality.

The same remarks apply to charts with remarkable force. These are delivered in Washington at their London and Paris prices.

But while this much has been done, much more remains to be done.

The second nation of the world in maritime importance, it is remarkable how little we have contributed to the general stock of that kind of nautical information without which our vessels could not cross the seas—without which our commerce could not exist. Always borrowing heretofore, it is time we should become lenders at least of a proportional part of this, information. This office may contribute somewhat to this end.

We are dependent, not only upon the English and French admiralty for the charts and information by which our vessels navigate the more distant seas, but even of our own waters. As yet, an American man-of-war cannot enter the capes of Virginia, or approach this city, the capital of the Union, without applying to the hydrographical office of England for the chart on which to shape her course. The only charts of the northern lakes that we have were procured from the English, and through the courtesy of the admiralty office. Charts are now being compiled from materials in this office, which, it is believed, will add something to the general stock of nautical information. Some of these will be published in the course of the year, for which estimates of small amount are included under the head of charts, in the statement hereunto annexed, and marked A.

               44

--689--

Nor is this all. Without the English Nautical Almanac, or the nautical ephemeris of some other European nation, our vessels which are now abroad might not find their way home. This office affords the means of wiping off so much of the reproach as is due to us as a nation, on this account; for, with the means already at hand, nearly all the requisite data for a nautical ephemeris of our own are obtainable.

With the view of obtaining the requisite data for this purpose, a series of observations for the preliminary determinations has been undertaken, and is now in progress.

We have a full corps of observers for all the instruments except one, already organized. They are at work day and night, whenever the state of the weather is suitable for astronomical observations. Though the observers came without experience, and the instruments were new to them, they have acquired a knowledge and a skill in the use of them which already imparts no small degree of confidence to results. They are attentive and zealous in the performance of their duties. I refer with much satisfaction to the assistance which the officers associated on duty with me have-afforded me, by a hearty co-operation, not only in conducting the observations, but also in the investigation of formulae, and in the discussion of observations, many of them requiring laborious and tedious calculations, involving mathematical attainments of a high order. The fact that all these assistants are officers of the navy, speaks well for the degree of scientific attainments which do exist in this branch of the public service, and will, it is hoped, serve to correct the impression, which seems to be almost general, that navy officers, because they have not the advantages of an academic education, are therefore not qualified for conducting the scientific details of duties connected with their profession.

The labor and difficulties of bringing an establishment of this kind— the first of its kind in the country—into complete and successful operation, are by no means light or few. It is a work of time, as well as of patient, untiring diligence.

I took charge of this office a year ago, when everything was new; much removing to be done, and some things to be undone. The timepieces, without which astronomical observations cannot be made, had not arrived, (nor have they all been yet received.) All the instruments had to be dismounted, their fastenings removed, re-cemented, and mounted anew. A new pier had to be erected for the mural, which was finally completed only a few weeks ago. The observers were unpracticed and without experience. They had to learn. The forms and figures, and sources of error, peculiar to the instruments, had to be examined, and rules for corrections investigated; formulae for a great variety of problems had to be proposed, and a number of tables, some of them voluminous, had to be completed to facilitate in the reduction of those formulae. Owing to these circumstances, we shall not be able to date our first volume of observations with the commencement of the year.

It is proposed to publish them as soon after the end of the year as practicable.

If we attempt to compute the "American Nautical Almanac"—and this we can do at no greater expense than we pay the English for computing theirs or us—from our own data, it is highly desirable that the data should be wholly American.

If we borrow one element of the work from foreign observatories, it would

--690--

be more creditable to borrow the whole. If we use the declinations as established at Greenwich, let us use their right ascensions also. The same data will necessarily give the same results; and if we suffer other people to procure these for us, or a part of them, let us not attempt anything ourselves, but continue to allow them to make the calculations also.

Now, this office affords all the means of obtaining the requisite data for calculating an ephemeris, except one. And upon that one depend the correctness and accuracy of the whole; and that is, atmospherical refraction. If there be in the corrections applied to an observation an uncomputed error of refraction, the celestial object, whatever it be, goes forth with an erroneous position, and every observer, in whatever part of the world, who attempts to determine his latitude or longitude from that object, gets an erroneous result.

The instrument proposed is a forty-eight inch German meridian circle, of Ester's best make, and of a peculiar construction, to be mounted in the prime vertical. After it has answered its object here, the instrument will have lost none of its value; for it can then be turned in the meridian, and used with good effect, both for declination and right ascension; thus combining within itself the scope and powers of both the meridian transit and the mural circle, which cost, including their mountings, not less than $8,000. This instrument can be bought for $4,500, including reversing apparatus and two collimators; and one observer can obtain the same results with it in the meridian, which it would require two to do with the mural and transit. In addition, six other collimators are required for the instruments already here.

Estimates for these purposes, amounting to six thousand dollars, are submitted in statement A.

The estimates (A) on account of this office for the supply of the navy for the year commencing July 1, 1846, with nautical books, charts, and instruments, amount to $47,400. They are based upon the supposition of there being forty-two vessels in commission that year. Three chronometers are allowed to each vessel, by regulation. These vessels, therefore, require one hundred and twenty six chronometers, at $300 each—$37,800. There are ashore and afloat one hundred and twenty-five chronometers. Taking the wear and tear of this instrument to be ten per cent., there will be required, on account of chronometers alone, $4,080. The average cost of all other instruments is $900 per vessel, of which there are afloat a supply for thirty-nine vessels, and on shore a complete set for six more—equal to $40,500. The wear and tear upon these instruments exceeds that upon chronometers, and is taken at twenty per cent.—$8,100. Hence the item of $12,180 on account of instruments.

The average cost of nautical books and charts is about $500 per vessel. They are worth little or nothing at the end of a three-years cruise. Their wear and tear, therefore, may be taken at thirty per cent, a year, of which there are ashore and afloat forty sets, or $20,000; thirty per cent. upon which, including the two additional vessels, makes the estimate, under this head, $7,000, as per statement A.

 

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. R MAURY,

Lieutenant United States Navy.

COM. W. M. CRANE,

Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

--691--

REPORT FROM BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS.

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs,

November 21, 1845.

SIR: I have the honor to transmit, herewith, estimates made in conformity with your instructions for the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1847, for that part of the naval service which is required to be estimated in this bureau; with statements showing the disposition of the vessels which belong to the navy, as they were distributed on the 1st ultimo; and reports of the estimated value of articles received and expended for, and the amount and cost of labor upon, objects connected with this bureau during the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1845. The estimated value of articles on hand at the different navy yards, at the commencement and close of the last fiscal year, is also shown in the same table with the receipts and expenditures.

A schedule of these estimates and reports is annexed, for convenience of reference.

The amounts asked for the steamers building under contract by Mr. Stevens and by Mr. Tomlinson will be required to meet engagements of the department, when those vessels shall be completed, and which, by the contracts, should be done before the close of the next fiscal year.

The inducements for presenting for your consideration the special estimate (D) are, in part, stated in the note appended to it. The important interests which are connected with our whale fishery and general commerce in the Pacific, and the advantages which may be anticipated from the annual visits of our vessels of war to the many and distant ports of that ocean, to which our merchant vessels resort for trade or supplies, seem to require that the vessels employed there should, with slight exceptions, be numerous in proportion to their aggregate force, and at the same time of sufficient capacity, like our larger classes of sloops of war, to perform, long cruises without inconvenience to their crews. The same classes of vessels are also particularly adapted for service in the home squadron, and for some of the other stations.

In support of the reasons stated in the note for commencing a frigate, there can be little doubt of the advantage of being able to increase promptly the number of our ships for service, if circumstances should require it. It has also been well ascertained by our own experience, as well as by that of other nations, that vessels built under cover, and left sufficiently open to secure proper ventilation, may be preserved quite as long and as perfectly as the materials could be in any other form. The decay which has taken place in some parts of our ships that have been long on the stocks, was owing to the vessels having been built under the expectation that they were to be launched immediately, and consequently were too far completed to leave good ventilation. No decay of any importance has been found in those which were commenced, and left sufficiently open after it was decided to leave them on the stocks till they should be wanted.

There are now five covered building slips which are unoccupied in the several yards, and it might, perhaps, be considered good policy to occupy more of them than has now been proposed. The frames, and most of the other necessary material for bringing them forward as fast as may be desired, are already on hands.

--692--

Since the last annual estimates were presented, the brig Oregon, which was purchased abroad for service in the exploring expedition; the brig Pioneer, which was originally built for that expedition: the steamer Poinsett, which was transferred from the War to the Navy Department, have been sold, according to the direction of the department, and the proceeds paid into the treasury by the navy agents.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. MORRIS,

Chief of the Bureau.

Hon. GEORGE BANCROFT,

Secretary of the Navy.

__________

SCHEDULE.

A.—Estimate for the expenses of the bureau and the persons connected with its duties.

B.—Estimate for the pay of persons proposed to be employed in vessels in commission, receiving vessels excepted.

C.—Estimate for the increase, repair, &c., of the navy,

D.—Special estimate submitted for new vessels.

E.—Estimate for enumerated contingent.

F.—Statement of vessels in commission.

G.—Statement of vessels on the stocks, or building.

H.—Statement of vessels in ordinary.

I.—Statement of receipts and expenditures, and value of stores on hand.

K.—Statement of the number of days' work and cost, expended on objects under the direction of this bureau.

--693--

A.

Estimate of the amount required for the expenses of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, for the year ending June 30, 1847, as authorized by the acts of Congress approved August 31, 1842, and March 3d, 1845.

                                                                                     Estimate for the year ending June 30, 1847. Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1846.
For salaries of the chief of the bureau,    
  assistant constructor, and draughts    
   man, clerks, and messenger $13,100.00 $13,100.00
Contiengent expenses of the Bureau.   [Included in the
    apporpriation for
For blank books, binding, stationery,   Navy Departm't.]
  printing, and labor 320.00  
For miscellaneous items 180.00  

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS, November 21, 1845.

B.

Estimate of the pay of the commission, warrant, and petty officers and seamen, including the engineer corps of the navy, which will be required for the vessels proposed to be kept in commission, receiving vessels excepted, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.

                                                                                 Estimate for the year ending June 30, 1847. Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1846.
For vessels in commission $1,588,034.00  
For salary of chief naval constructor 3,000.00  
For salary of engineer in chief 3,000.00  
  1,594,034.00  

NOTE.—The estimate under this head for the year ending June 1846, was for $2,149,728.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                           November 21, 1845.

--694--

C.

 

The amount which will be required for objects under the direction of this bureau, payable from the appropriation for increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and for wear and tear of vessels in commission, for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1847, is estimated as follows, viz:

                                                                                   Estimate for the year ending 30th June, 1847. Appropriated for the year ending 30th June, 1846.
For repair of vessels in ordinary and for wear and     
  tear of vessels in commission, including fuel for    
  steamers, and hemp $1,050,000.00 $1,040,880.00

NOTE.—In addition to the probable wants for repairs, and the wear and tear of the service, the contracts with Mr. R. L. Stevens for a steamer building at Hoboken, New Jersey, and with Mr. Tomlinson for one building at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, will expire before the close of the next fiscal year.

If these vessels should be completed as required by the contracts, there would be required, in addition to the amounts already appropriated by Congress for them, a further sum of $338,000 for payments to Mr. Stevens, and of $50,000 to complete the payments to Mr. Tomlinson.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                                                 November 21, 1845.

__________

D.

Special estimate submitted for consideration.

For comleting the sloop-of-war Albany                                                                                                              $65,000
For completing the sloop of-war Germantown 125,000
Forbuilding and equipping a brig to replace the Enterprise, (sold) 75,000
Commencing a frigate to replae the Guerriere, (broken up) 150,000
                                                                               Total $415,000

NOTE.—The Albany is so far advanced that, unless she is completed soon, it will be expedient to remove some parts of the work, which has been done to prevent premature decay; and it is believed the demands of the current service for this class of vessels will justify the completion of this ship and the Germantown.

Experience has proven the great convenience of having one of the smallest class of armed vessels on each of the principal stations, and the present number in service is insufficient to supply them, and the sum necessary to build and equip one is presented.

--695--

The amount asked to commence a frigate is supposed to be sufficient to put up a frame, and place the hull in a situation from which it could be completed soon, if required, on any emergency; and at the same time the materials will be as well, if not better preserved, than if they were left in their unwrought state. It is but a continuation of the former policy of the country, the soundness of which appears to be well established.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                                             November 21, 1845.

 

E.

The amount necessary to meet the expenditures under these items of "enumerated contingent," which are payable for objects under the direction of this bureau, is estimated, for the fiscal year ending 30th June, 1847, at $210,000.

The same amount was estimated for the present year.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                                             November 21, 1845.

F.

Statement of the vessels belonging to the navy which were in commission 

                               on the 1st of October, 1845.

                              Four ships-of-the-line.

The Columbus, on foreign service.

Pennsylvania,                                   Receiving vessels.

North Carolina,                                 Receiving vessels.

Ohio,                                               Receiving vessels.

                              Seven frigates.

The Constitution,                                 Employed cruising.

Savannah,                                          Employed cruising.

Raritan,                                              Employed cruising.

Cumberland,                                       Employed cruising.

Potomac,                                            Employed cruising.

Congress,                                           Preparing for foreign service.

Columbia,                                          Preparing for foreign service.

                              Fifteen sloops-of-war.

The Saratoga,                                    Employed cruising.

John Adams,                                     Employed cruising.

Boston,                                             Employed cruising.

Vincennes,                                        Employed cruising.

--696--

The Warren,                                           Employed cruising.

Falmouth,                                               Employed cruising.

Cyane,                                                    Employed cruising.

Levant,                                                   Employed cruising.

Portsmouth,                                            Employed cruising.

Plymouth,                                               Employed cruising.

St. Mary's,                                              Employed cruising.

Jamestown,                                            Employed cruising.

Yorktown,                                              Employed cruising.

Marion,                                                  Employed cruising.

Ontario, employed as receiving vessel.

              

                              Five brigs.

The Porpoise,                                        Employed cruising.

Somers,                                                Employed cruising.

Truxton,                                                Employed cruising.

Bainbridge,                                            Employed cruising.

Lawrence,                                              Employed cruising.

 

                              Five schooners.

The Shark, cruising.

Flirt,                                                        Despatch vessels.

Onkahye,                                                 Despatch vessels.

Experiment, receiving vessel.

Wave, lent to coast survey

                             

                              Six steamers.

The Mississippi,                                          In the Gulf of Mexico.

Princeton,                                                  In the Gulf of Mexico.

Michigan, on the upper lakes.

Col. Harney, on the coast of Florida.

Gen. Taylor, navy-yard, Pensacola.

Engineer, navy-yard, Norfolk.

                             

                              Four store-ships.

 

The Relief,                                             Transporting stores to the different squadrons, &c.

Erie,                                                      Transporting stores to the different squadrons, &c.

Lexington,                                             Transporting stores to the different squadrons, &c.

Southampton,                                        Transporting stores to the different squadrons, &c.

 

                              RECAPITULATION.

4  ships-of-the-line.

7 frigates.

15 sloops.

5 brigs.

5 schooners,

6 steamers.

4 store-ships.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS

                                                           November 21, 1845

--697--

G.

 

Statement of vessels on the stocks at the several navy-yards, or building at other places, on the 1st of October, 1845.

 

               At Kittery, Maine.

 

The Alabama, a ship-of-the-line.

The Santee, a frigate.

 

               At Charlestown, Mass.

 

The Virginia, a ship-of-the-line.

The Vermont, a ship-of-the-line.

 

               At Brooklyn, N. Y.

 

The Sabine, a frigate.

The Albany, a sloop-of-war.

 

               At Philadelphia, Penn.

 

The Germantown, a sloop-of-war.

 

               At Gosport, Va.

 

The New York, a ship-of-the-line.

The St. Lawrence, a frigate.

 

               At Pittsburg, Penn.

 

An iron steamer, building by contract.

 

               At Hoboken, N. J.

 

An iron steamer has been contracted for.

 

               At Sackett's Harbor.

 

The New Orleans, a ship-of-the-line.

 

               RECAPITULATION.

 

5 ships-of-the-line.

3 frigates.

2 sloops.

2 iron steamers.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                                            November 21, 1845.

--698--

H.

Statement of the vessels belonging to the navy, which were in ordinary on the 1st of October, 1845.

 

               At Charlestown, Mass.

 

The Franklin, a ship-of-the-line.

The Independence, a razee.

The United States, a frigate.

              

               At Brooklyn, N. Y.

 

The Macedonian, a frigate.

The Dale, a sloop.

The Fulton, a steamer.

              

               At Philadelphia, Penn.

 

The Water-witch, a steamer.

 

               At Washington, D. C.

 

The Union, a steamer.

 

               At Gosport, Va.

 

The Delaware, a ship-of-the-line.

The Brandywine, a frigate.

The Constellation, a frigate.

The Vandalia, a sloop-of-war.

The St. Louis,      "             "

The Fairfield,      "            "

The Decatur,       "             "

The Preble,          "             "

The Perry, a brig.

The Phoenix, a despatch schooner.

 

               RECAPITULATION.

 

2  ships-of-the-line.

1 razee.

4 frigates.

6 sloops-of-war.

1 brig.

1 despatch schooner.

3 steamers.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                                             November 21, 1845.

--699--

I.

Statement of the cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy yards, July 1, 1844; of articles received and expended from June 30, 1844, to June 30, 1845; and of those remaining on hand July 1, 1845, which are under the direction of the Bureau of Construction Equipment, and Repairs.

Navy-yards.                        On hand July 1, 1844                  Received.                     Expended.                        On hand July 1, 1845.
Portsmouth $570,129.78 $62,852.74 $72,278.53 $560,703.99
Charlestown 1,759,038.20 281,506.41 272,167.76 1,768,376.85
Brooklyn 1,257,075.23 280,738.56 253,193.98 1,284,691.81
Philadelphia 464.353.28 24,738.56 31,173.92 457,971.89
Washington 597,862.19 207,354.12 247,405.49 557,810.82
Gosport 1,582,781.23 307,691.61 261,523.83 1,628,949.01
Pensacola 62,244.85 25,591.38 16,183.94 71,652.29
             Total 6,293,484.86 1,190,527.25 1,153,927.45 6,330,084.66

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                      November 21, 1845.

__________

K.

Statement of the number of days' labor, and its cost, from July 1, 1844, to July 1, 1845, for the respective navy-yards, for building, repairing, or equipping vessels of the navy, or in receiving or securing stores and materials for these purposes.

Navy-yards.                        No. days' labor.                       Cost of labor.                      Average per deim.              
Portsmouth 8,253 $11,552.72 $1,399.00
Charlestown 29,887 48,815.00 1,633.00
Brooklyn 51,331 78,312.25 1,525.00
Philadelphia 8,341 11,598.50 1,390.00
Washington 78,218 113,303.81 1,448.00
Gosport 112,661 163,683.44 1,452.00
Pensacola 2,279 3,223.66 1,414.00
                     Total            290,970 430,489.38 1,479.00

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

                                           November 21, 1845.

--700--

ESTIMATES FROM THE BUREAU OF "PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING,” 1846 AND 1847.

 

Estimate of provisions required for the United States navy for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1846, and ending June 30, 1847.

 

One ration per day for 7,500 petty officers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen, and boys, in the naval service, is 7,500 X 365 days x 20 cents per ration, equal to                                                                                         $547,500.00

One ration per day for 718 commission and warrant officers, "attached to vessels for sea service," is 718 X 365 days X 20 cents per ration, equal to                                                                                                        $52,414.00

One ration per day for 718 marines, including officers "attached to vessels for sea service," is 718 x 365 days x 20 cents per ration, equal to                                                                                                                           $52,414.00

                                                                                                                              $652,328.00

Appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1846, for "provisions"                                   $615,828.00

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending June 30, 1847, for "provisions"                  $652,328.00

 

NOTE.—Although the ration is calculated at twenty cents, and the actual first cost of it is about fourteen cents, yet various causes concur to swell it sometimes beyond the estimated cost, and to cause the appropriation to fall short. Two of these causes are within the reach of correction by law. Owing to the perishable nature of almost all the articles composing the ration, and the severe tests to which they are subjected, by being sent to every variety of climate, and sometimes necessarily kept for a long period on hand, added to the practice never to allow any but sound and wholesome food to be issued, considerable quantities are condemned, frequently; not because they are not edible, but because they are not so good as the seamen have a right to expect. These condemned provisions are sold sometimes at very nearly their original cost, and the proceeds of these sales accrue, not to the appropriation for provisions to which they properly belong, but to the treasury.

Again, each person entitled to a ration, is allowed to relinquish the spirit part of it, and to draw in lieu nearly three times its value in money. This money is taken from the appropriation for provisions, so that the government pays to the seaman, as a premium for temperance, a large sum annually; which sum, instead of being taken from the treasury, is subtracted from the appropriation for provisions, and goes to swell the aggregate cost of the ration.

 

BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING,

            November 22, 1815.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

__________

 

Clothing for the navy.

No appropriation is asked under this head. The sums appropriated at different times since the establishment of the bureau, though less in the

--701--

aggregate than the original estimate, have been found sufficient to get the system of clothing the seamen adopted by the bureau in healthful operation. A sufficient quantity of clothing made up is on hand, and a sum of money in the treasury to its credit sufficient to carry on the operations of the bureau; and it is hoped and believed, that unless there should occur unforeseen and unavoidable losses to a large amount, or the naval force should be very considerably increased, there will be no further occasion for assistance to this fund by appropriation from the treasury.

 Appropriated for the year ending 30th June, 1846, for "clothing for the navy"-                          $60,000.00

Asked to be appropriated for the year ending 30th June, 1847, for "clothing for the navy”        $000.00

 

BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING, November 22, 1815.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

Estimate of the expense of the Bureau of "Provisions and Clothing" for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1846, and ending June 30, 1847.

For compensation to the chief of the bureau                                                                                                    $3,000.00 
For compensation to the chief clerk of the bureau    1,400.00
For compensation  to one clerk at $1,200 per annum    1,200.00
For compensation to one clerk at $800 per annum       800.00
For compensation to one messenger at $700 per annum       700.00
  [The above salaries are provided by the act of 31st August,  
1842, re-organizing the Navy Department.]  
For compensation to a clerk, provided by the act of 3d March,  
     1845, at $1,200 per annum   1,200.00
   $8,300.00
Contingent.  
For printing, blank books, binding and stationery  $  450.00
For miscellaneous items      200.00
For one laborer at $10 per month      120.00
   $  770.00

--702--

Appropriated for the year ending 30th June, 1846.        Asked to be apporpriated for the year ending 30th June, 1847
For compensation to the For compensation to the
   chief of the bureau,     chief of the bureau,
   clerks, and messenger,     clerks, and messenger,
   provided by law                  $8,300.00     provided by law                           $8,300.00
Contingent, included in Contingent                                           770.00  
    the general estimate for  
    the Navy Department             700.00  
                                           $9,070.00                                                       $9,070.00
   

BUREAU OF PROVISIONS AND CLOTHING,

        November 22, 1845.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK.

--703--

REPORT FROM THE BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.

BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY,

October 23, 1845.

SIR: I have the honor to report the following statement of the fiscal condition of the surgical department of the navy, in obedience to your order of the 30th ultimo.

The amount of the appropriation for surgeons' necessaries and appliances on hand on the 30th of June, 1845, in the treasury of the United States, was         —           —           —           $1,506.10

Amount appropriated by the act of Congress for surgeons’ necessaries and appliances for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1845               —           —           —                                       $30,000.00

Aggregate                                          $31,506.10

There has been expended for surgeons' necessaries and appliances, including what remains in the hands of navy agents to meet approved bills on the first of October, 1845                  $6,406.22

Balance on hand                                                                                                                                            $25,099.88

The expenses estimated for the support of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for the year commencing July 1, 1846, are $7,470, (see table A.)

The expenses estimated for surgeons' necessaries and appliances for the naval service, including the marine corps, for the next fiscal year, commencing as above, are $45,120, (see table B.)

The surgical departments of vessels afloat, navy yards, and the marine corps, are thus estimated for. The naval asylum and the several hospitals derive their support from the hospital fund exclusively.

This fund, on the first of October, 1845, amounted to one hundred and seventy-five thousand seven hundred and twenty-three dollars and thirty cents. The hospital fund has considerably diminished during the last year, in consequence of the expenditure for improvements, authorized in 1844, as well as the increased number of pensioners in the naval asylum. The improvements made by Commodore Morgan during the last year on the naval asylum grounds have been extensive. Houses for the governor and surgeon, walls for the southern and eastern part of the grounds, a cemetery, and stables, have all been erected during the last year.

In consequence of the diminution of the fund, notwithstanding your directions limiting the expenditures which had been ordered in 1844, I again submit to your consideration the propriety of an appropriation to defray the expenses of the buildings which are now erecting for the benefit of our sailors.

The number of assistant surgeons is now entirely inadequate to supply the demands which are made upon them. There are at present required to fill the various situations ashore and afloat, sixty-nine. The number necessary to fill vacancies, and to complete the organization, according to the estimates, is ninety-two.

The great want of assistant surgeons is justly complained of by our commanders afloat. This deprivation is particularly noticed by those who are cruising in climates where their services are essentially demanded.

--704--

It is particularly important that those assistant surgeons who have seen five years' service should have a few months to prepare themselves at our public colleges for their examinations. This privilege has been denied them for the last few years, inconsequence of their continued public employment.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

THO. HARRIS.

Hon. George Bancroft,

         Secretary of the Navy.

__________

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery for the year commencing July 1, 1846, under an act of Congress, approved 31st of August, 1842.

Salary of chief of the bureau                                                                                              $2,500           
Salary of assistant to chief  1,400
Salary of clerks and messenger  2,700
  $6,600

Contingent expenses.

Labor                                                                                                                              $120     
Blank books and stationery  500
Miscellaneous items  250
  $870
Total required $7,470

THO. HARRIS.

__________

B.

Estimated expenses for the naval service during the year, commencing July 1, 1846, so far as coming under the cognizance of this bureau.

FOR GENERAL SERVICE.

1 razee                                                  $1,200                               is    $1,200                    
7 32-pounder frigates  1,100 is  7,700
1 24-pounder frigate  1,050 is  1,050
7 32-pounder sloops     800 is  5,600
8 24-pounder sloops     800 is  6,400

                  45

--705--

3 16 gun sloops                                                                               

$750               

is    

$2,250           

5 brigs

 600

is

 3,000

Mississippi and Princeton

1,300

is

 1,300

5 second and third class steamers

 300

is

 1,500

4 store ships

 300

is

 1,500

2 despatch schooners

 250

is

    500

4 receiving vessels

 500

is

 2,000

1 receiving vessel

 200

is

    200

7 navy yards

 350

is

 2,450

1 naval school at Annapolis for the      

first year

 800

is

   800

1 navy yard, Memphis

 500

is

   500

       
     

37,650

Total estimate A    

 7,470

     

$45,120

THO HARRIS.

__________

C

Statement showing the number of assistant surgeons required for duty during the year commencing July 1, 1846; estimated upon the force to be employed.

                                                         FOR BUREAU OF MEDICINE AND SURGERY.                                                                                                          
One assistant surgeon, as assistant to the chief 1
                                                         FOR GENERAL SERVICE.  
Nine frigates, each to have two assistant surgeons 18
Eighteen sloops of war, each one 18
Five brigs, each one 5
Two despatch schooners, each one 2
Four store ships, each one 4
Seven steamers, six to have assistant surgeons 6
                                                      FOR SPECIAL SERVICE.                    
Four navy yards, each to have one assistant surgeon, (besides a surgeon)  4

Norfolk

1

New York

1

Boston

1

Philadelphia (including receiving vessels and marine barracks)

1

Three receiving vessels, each to have (beside surgeon) 1 assistant surgeon:  

At Boston

1

At New York

1

At Norfolk

1
Six hospitals (besides a surgeon each)to have assistant surgeons:  

Near New York

2

--706--

 

Near Boston                                                                                                                                       1               
Near Norfolk 2
Near Philadelphia (asylum) 1
Near Pensacola 2
   
Total number of assistant surgeons required or duty 69
Incurably ill, now on the register-two insanity, and one paralysis 3
For study, preparatory to examination for promotion 7
For relaxation on leavae after long cruising, 1/12 of whole number 7
For temporary illness and other transient casualities, 1/2 of whole number 6
Total required 92
Total number of assistant and passed assistant surgeons authorized by law of August 4th, 1842  
  67
Number necessary to fill vacancies, and complete the organization according to estimates for the year to   
    commence July 1st, 1846 25

THO. HARRIS.

NOTE.----Since the date of my report, the returns from the office of the Fourth Auditor, made up to the 1st of November, exhibit a larger amount of appropriations on hand, under the head of "Surgeons' necessaries and appliances," than was shown at that time. This discrepancy is explained by the recent settlements in the Fourth Auditor's office, by which settlements sums that were credited to different navy agents have reverted to the special appropriations from which they were drawn. The monthly statement, dated November 1, is as follows:

Surgeons' necessaries and appliances —    —            $41,677.48

This, excess of balance, $16,577.60, above that which is shown in my report, remaining on hand, should be deducted from the estimates for the medical department of the service afloat for the fiscal year commencing July 1, 1846.

Thus deducted, the estimates are for                                                                            

Surgeons' necessaries and appliances                         $21,072.40

Bureau of medicine and surgery                                   $7,470.00

Total estimate                                                         $28,542.40

 

THO. HARRIS.

The Hon. GEORGE BANCROFT,

                       Secretary of the Navy.

--707--

Detail estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the Marine corps of the United States, from July 1, 1846, to June 30, 1847, inclusive.

RANK AND GRADE.    Number.

 

PAY.                                                              

     

SUBSISTENCE.

       
    Pay per month. Extra pay per month.  Number of servants at $8 per month. Number of servants at $7 per month. Total.                        Number of rations per day, at 20 cts. per ration. No. extra or double rations .d day at 20 cts. p.r. Total.                                                                                Aggregate.                                     
Brig. gen. commandant 1 $104     3 $1,500 12 12 $1,752.00 $3,252.00
Lieutenant colonel 1 60     2 888 5 5 730.00 1,618.00
Majors 4 50     2 3,072 4 4 2,336.00 5,408.00
Adjutant and inspector 1 60   2   912 4   292.00 1,204.00
Paymaster 1 60   2   912 4   292.00 1,204.00
Quartermaster 1 60   2   912 4   292.00 1,204.00
Assistant quartermaster 1 50   1   696 4   292.00 988.00
Captains comm'ding post                    
  and at sea 7 50     1 4,788 4 4 4,088.00 8,876.00
Captains 3 40     1 1,692 4   876.00 2,568.00
First lieut'nts command-ing guards or detachments at sea

 

 

2

 

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1,128

 

 

4

 

 

4

 

 

1,168.00

 

 

2,296.00

First lieutenants 17 30     1 7,548 4   4,964.00 12,512.00
Second lieutenants

 

20

 

25

   

 

1

 

7,680

 

4

 

 

5,840.00

 

13,520.00

Sergeant major 1 17     1 204       204.00
Quartermaster sergeant

 

1

 

17

 

20

   

 

444

 

 

   

 

444.00

Drum and fife majors

 

2

 

16

 

 

   

 

384

     

 

384.00

Orderly serg'nts and sergeants of guards at sea

 

 

34

 

 

16

     

 

 

6,528

     

 

 

6,528.00

Orderly ser'nts emloyed as clerks to brig. general, adjutant, and inpsector, paymaster and quartermaster

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

16

 

 

 

20

   

 

 

 

2,592

     

 

 

 

2,592.00

Sergants 40 13       6,240       6,240.00
Corporals 80 9       8,640       8,640.00
Drummers and fifers 60 8       5,760       5,760.00
Privates 1000 7       84,000       84,000.00
Hospital steward 1 18       216 1   73.00 289.00
Clerk to paymaster 1         650       650.00
Additional rations to officers for 5 yers' service

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

181

 

13,133.00

 

13,133.00

Bounty for re-enlistment

 

124

 

 

      1,736      

 

1,736.00

Two months' pay for unexpired time of former enlistment

 

124

       

 

1,736

     

 

1,736.00

Two months' pay for unexpired time of former enlistment

 

124

   

at 19 c.

1

 

 

 

   

 

1,437.16

 

1,437.16

Two months' clothing for unexpired time of former enlistment

 

124

             

 

620.00

 

620.00

Officers; servants at $8.50 per month for clothing and rations

 

69

             

 

7,038.00

 

7, 038.00

Undrawn clothing                 6,000.00 6,000.00
            150,858     51,223.16 202,081.16

Respectfully submitted.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE MARINE CORPS, Paymaster's Office, October 22, 1845.

GEO. W. WALKER, Paymaster M. Corps.

--708--

Estimate of the expenses of the Quartermaster's department of the marine corps for one year from July 1, 1846.

There will be required for the Quartermaster's department of the marine corps, for one year, commencing on the 1st July, 1846, in addition to the balances then remaing on hand, the sum of three hundred and seventeen thousand six hundred and twenty0two dollars and eighty-two cents for the following purpolse, viz:  
  $45,077.20
1. For provisions 46,787.50
2. For clothing 16,274.12
3. For fuel  
4. For military stores, pay of armorers repair of arms, accoutrements, ordnance  
    stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments 2,300.00
5. For transportation of officers and troops, and expenses of recruiting 8,000.00
6. For repairs of barracks, and rent of temporary barracks
6,000.00
7. For contingencies, viz: freight, ferriage-toll, wharfage, cartage, compensarion to judges  advocate, per diem for attending courts martial and courts of deceased marines, printing, stationery, forage, postage, pursuit of deserters, candles, oil, straw, furniture, bed-sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, carpenter's tool, keep of a horse for the messenger, and of matton, washerwoman, and porter at hospital

 

 

18,184.00

*8. For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erecton of barracks at Charlestown, Mass.

50,000.00

 * For same at Brooklyn, New York    50,000.00
 * for same at Gosport, Virginia 50,000.00
* To commerce erection of barracks at Pensacola 25,000.00
   
  317,622.82

*V*These items are omitted in the general estimate of the Secretary of the Navy, inasmuch as they do not appear to be of present necessity.

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,

Quartermaster Marine Corps.

__________

Estimated--Continued.

Provisions--for whom required.                                               Enlisted men.  Washer women. Matron. Servants. Clerks and hospital attendant. Total.      Rations per day, at 19 cents. Rations per day, at 20 cents. Amount.      
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, matron, and washerwomen

 

512

 

34

 

1

 

 

 

 

547

 

1

 

 

 

$37,934.45

Clerks, hospital attendant, and servants       68 10 78   1 5,694.00
Bounty for re-enlistments, per act of March 2, 1833, two months' rations

 

125

       

 

125

 

 

1

 

1,448.75

                  45,077.20

--709--

Estimate--Continued.

Clothing-for whom required.                              Enlisted men. Clerks. Servants. Total.   Amount.
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates,  at $33 per annum  1,156     1,156 $38,148.00   
Paymaster's clerk and officers' servants, at $33 per annum   1 68 69 2,277.00
300 watch-coats, at $8. 50 each         2,550.00
2,500 flannel shirts, at $1.25 each         3,125.00
Bounty for re-enlistments, per act of March 2, 1833, two months' clothing

 

125

   

 

125

 

687.50

          46,787.50
Fuel-for whom required. FUELFOR EACH.       TOTAL.    
  Number. Cords. Feet.  Inches.  Cords.  Feet.   Inches.       
Commandant 1       36 4  
                                South of latitude 39              
Lieutenant colonel 1       26    
Major 1       26    
Captains 3 21 2   63 6  
Staff                                  3 26     78    
Lieutenants 14 16 4   231    
                                 North of latitude 39              
Majors 3 29     87    
Captains 2 23 6   47 4  
Staff 1       29    
Lieutenants 12 18 4   222    
                                South of latitude 40.              
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen

 

370

 

1

 

4

 

 

555

   
                                North of latitude 40.              
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen

 

239

 

1

 

5

 

 

388

 

3

 
                                North of latitude 43.              
Captains 1       24 4 8
Lieutenants 2 19 1 4 38 2 8
                              Headquarters, Washington.              
Paymaster's clerk 1       2 2 8
Hospital matron 1       1 4  
Officers of commandant and staff and commanding officer 5 7     35    
Guard-room and at navy-yard 2 21     42    
Mess-room 1       3 4  
Armory 1       30    
Hospital 1       33    

--710--

Estimate--Continued.

Fuel--for whom required.                           FUEL FOR EACH.          TOTAL.                
  Number Cords.  Feet.   Inches.   Cords.    Feet.   Inches.  
           Norfolk, Va., and Pensacola.              
Commanding officer's offices 2 7     14    
Guard-rooms 2 21     42    
Hospitals 2 16 4   33    
Mess-rooms 2 3 4   7    
  Philladelphia, New York, and Charlestown, Mass.              
Commanding officers' and assistant quartermasters' offices

 

4

 

8

    32    
Guard-rooms 3 24     72    
Hospitals 3 18 4   55 4  
Mess-rooms 3 4     12    
             Portsmouth, N. H.              
Commanding officer's office 1       8 5 4
Guard-room 1       25    
Hospital 1       19 1 4
Mess-room 1       4 1 4
                                                                  Cords         2,324 7  
Which, at $7 per cord, is $16,274.12              

--711--

ABSTRACT OF OFFERS

MADE

TO FURNISH NAVAL SUPPLIES,

COMING

UNDER COGNIZANCE

OF THE

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS.

EXHIBITING,         

In schedules, from No. 1 to 15, inclusive, those which have been rejected as               well as those which have been accepted, between January 1 and November             22, 1845: reported in conformity with the act of Congress of March 3,                     1843.

 

SCHEDULE No. 1.

Schedule of offers to furnish mast and spar timber at Gosport, Va., under advertisement of George Loyall, navy agent.

                                Offers.   

                                                                             

   Sloops.          Frigates            
  Price per cubic Price per cubit foot.      Aggregate  amount.
Edward H. Herbert, (accepted) 30 cents 33 cents $4,065.30
Jno. Petty and T. Sivalls          45 do                 45 do 5,891.40
C. Miller          35 do                 35 do 4,682.20

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, Norfolk, April 10, 1845.

GEORGE LOYALL, Navy Agent.

Offers opened in presence of—

R. GATEWOOD,

T. B. WEST.

__________

Schedule of offers to furnish 13,500 cubic feet of yellow pine plank stocks at Gosport, Va., under advertisement by George Loyall, navy agent, April 2, 1845.

                                       Offers.                                                       Cubic feet.      Price per foot.                        Aggregate amount.
Christopher Miller, (accepted) 13,500 14 3/4 cents $1,991.25
John Petty 13,500 15 3/4  do 2,126.25
Wm. M. Willey 13,500 17   do 2,295.00
Thos. Williams 13,500 19 3/4  do 2,662.25

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, Norfolk, May 1, 1845.

GEORGE LOYALL, Navy Agent.

Offers opened in presence of— 

THOS. B. WEST,

R. GATEWOOD.

__________

Schedule of offers to furnish 200 barrels of ropemakers' tar at the navy yard at Charlestown, Mass., under advertisement by J. Vincent Browne, navy agent, December 13, 1844.

                                                               Offers.                                                                                                               

 

Price.                              
F.W. Pearson & Co., (accepted) $2.72 per barrel.
Albert G. Browne 2.75    do
Mayhew & Hamlen 3.24   do

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, Boston, January 10, 1845.

This is to certify that the above proposals, viz: F. W. Pearson & Co., Albert G. Browne, and Mayhew & Hamlen, were all the proposals received at this office up to 12 o'clock (noon) of this day; and that, F. W. Pearson & Co. being the lowest, the contract is awarded to them.

J. VINCENT BROWNE, Navy Agent.

Offers opened in presence of— 

JNO. B. NICOLSON,

SETH J. THOMAS.

--713--

[Advertisement—Schedule No, 2.]

 

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE,

New York, March 13, 1845.

Sealed proposals, endorsed "Proposals for Naval Supplies," will be received at this office until the 11th day of April next, at 3 o'clock, p. m., for supplying the following specified articles for the use of the naval service for the quarter ending the 30th day of June next. The contractor will also be required to deliver, upon the requisition of the commander of the Brooklyn navy yard, or the navy agent, such further supplies of the same specified articles as the wants of the service may call for during said quarter, in addition to the quantities named.

The contractor is to deliver these supplies at the navy yard into the custody of the naval store-keeper, in appropriate packages, free of all expenses and charges for transportation. Those called for in this advertisement will be required by the first day of May next; and all subsequent requisitions must be supplied within ten days from the date of each requisition. Every article must be of the best quality in all respects. Samples of the required articles may be seen on application to the naval store keeper, at the navy yard, Brooklyn.

These supplies will be subjected to the inspection of such officers of the navy yard as the commandant thereof may designate. All rejected articles must, upon notice to the contractor, be immediately removed from the navy yard, and others of a satisfactory character be forthwith delivered in lieu thereof. A failure on the part of the contractor to comply with these conditions, will justify the agent in purchasing in open market to supply any deficiencies; and the contractor and his sureties will be held liable for any loss the department may sustain by reason of any such failure.

Bonds in two-thirds of the estimated amount of each contract will be required, with two satisfactory sureties, whose name must be submitted with the proposals. Ten per cent. of the amount on each delivery will be withheld as collateral security for the faithful fulfillment of the contract, until the expiration thereof.

Proposals must embrace one entire class of articles, and be endorsed according to its number. A form of offer will be shown to applicants.

 

CLASS No. I—Hardware, &c.

3 cooper's adzes, each.

6 carpenter's adzes, each.

24 wood axes, each.

1 dozen brass door bolts, 5 inches, per dozen.

2 do       do           do           4            do       do

1 do       do           do           3 1/2      do       do

1 do       do           do           6           do       do

1 do each, brass buttons, 2 and 2 3/4 inches, per dozen.

3  bevils, steel tongue, each.

3 drill boxes and bows, with drills.

2  patent balances (Dearborn's) to weigh 500 lbs. each.

3  butcher's cleavers, each.

2 dozen brass bulkhead bolts, 6 inches, per dozen.

2 do       do           do           do           5 do       do.

1 do       do           do           do           4 do       do.

2 do       do flush   do           3 1/2      do           do.

--714--

6 dozen tin candlesticks fitted with lamps, per dozen.

72 Firmer chisels, handled, assorted, each.

36 Socket do       do           do           do.

10 pounds red chalk, per pound.

300 do white chalk, per pound.

3 companion stop-cocks for hose, each.

6 armorer's compasses, each.

6 dozen straight brass castors, per dozen.

20 pounds sash cord, per pound.

6 brass dividers, 8 inch, each;

3 drill stocks, press, each.

12 pounds coarse emery, per pound.

2 dozen plate escutcheons, 2 inch, per dozen.

3  do      do          do           1 3/4 do       do.

12 do     do           do           1 5/8 do      do.

6 do       do           do           1 3/8 do      do.

3 do       do           do           1 1/8 do      do.

12 do     brass eyes,              3/8 do        do.

1 pound escutcheon pins, 1/2 to 3/4 inch, per pound.

24 sets French escritoire trimmings, per set.

1 dozen pit saw files, 10 inch, per dozen.

6 do three-square files, from 4 to 8 inch, per dozen.

12 sets table fastenings, per set.

6 carpenter's gouges, each.

36 socket gouges, handled, each.

6 bundles Coopers flags, per bundle.

2 dozen French fitches, per dozen.

6 griddles, each.

6 dozen brass cabin hooks, 6 inch, eyes complete, per dozen.

1 do       do           do           4 do       do           do.

1 do       do           do           3 do       do           do.

2 do       do           do           2 1/2 do                do           do.

6 do brass screw hooks, per dozen.

6 pairs iron butt hinges, 5 inch, per dozen pair.

6 do       do           do           3             do           do.

6 do       do           do           2 1/2      do           do.

4 dozen pairs      do           2             do            do.

48 broad hatchets, handled, (cast steel) each.

1 dozen pairs brass butt hinges, 4 1/2 X 5 inches, per dozen pair.

4 do       do           do           3 1/2 X 3 1/2       do           do.

6 pairs   do           do           3 X 3      do          do.          do.

6 do       do           do           2 1/2 X 2 1/2       do           do.

5 dozen pairs brass do      2 X 2                       do           do.

1 do       do           do           5                        do           do.

1 do       do           do           4 1/2                  do           do.

4 do       do           do           2 1/2                  do           do.

12 tinner's hammers, each.

6 wrench hammers, each.

6 dozen brass hooks and eyes, 2 1/2 inches, per dozen.

1 do pairs table butts, 2 X 4 do per dozen pairs.

1 do       do           do           2 1/2 X 5              do.

1 do       do           do           1 3/4 X 3 1/2        do.

1 do       hooks for lamps, 3 inches, brass, per dozen.

--715--

1 dozen hooks for lamps, 2 inches, brass, per dozen.

6 marking irons, each.

2 bundles Russia sheet iron, No. 12, per pound.

10 do     hoop iron, 1 1/8 inch and under, per pound.

12 gridirons, each.

6 waffle irons, each.

6 dozen brass knobs, 3/4 inch, per dozen.

3 do       do           7/8         do           do.

6 cheese knives, each.

18 copper tea kettles, 6, 8, and 10 quarts, each.

6 pallet knives, each.

6 fish kettles, each.

6 putty knives, each.

12 dozen mahogany knobs, 2 inches, per dozen.

12 do     do           do           1 3/4      do           do.

6 do       do           do           1 1/2      do           do.

3 do       do           do           1 1/4      do           do.

2 do       do           do           1            do           do.

6 do       do           do           3/4 db    do.

2 do       do           do           7/8         do           do.

6 do       iron padlocks,     2 1/2      do           do.

5 do double faced cupboard locks, 4 inch, per dozen.

2 do closet locks, 6 inch,                               do           do.

1 do closet locks, 5 inch,                               do           do.

6 do closet locks, 4 inch,                               do           do.

8 do iron drawer locks, 2 3/4 inch,                 do           do.

6 do brass drawer locks, 2 1/2 inch,              do.

1 do brass drawer locks, 2 inch,    do            do.

1 do brass drawer locks, 1 1/2 inch,              do.

1 do iron chest locks,                    do.          do.

1 do iron desk locks,                     do.          do.

12 cooks' ladles, iron, long handles, each.

5 dozen chalk lines, per dozen.

10 tape lines, 100 feet, each.

2 rolls sheet lead, 4 1/2 pounds per fool, per pound.

2 do       do           5 pounds per foot, per pound.

2 do       do           4 pounds per foot, per pound.

2 do       do           3 1/2 pounds per foot, per pound.

20 lengths lead pipe, from 1/2 to 3 inch, per pound.

1 1/2 dozen iron locker locks, per dozen.

1 dozen brass sideboard locks, 3 1/2 inch, per dozen.

36 upright mortice locks, 4 1/2 inch, each.

12 mortice closet locks, 2 1/2 inch, each.

25 2d. and 3d. clout nails, assorted, per M.

50 pounds 6d clout nails, per pound.

50 do     4d clout nails, per pound.

1 do       3/4 inch clout nails, per pound.

2 do       1            do           do per pound.

2 do       1 1/4      do           do per pound.

2 do       1 1/2      do           do per pound.

2 do       1 3/4      do           do per pound.

1 M 3/4 inch brads, per M.

--716--

1 M 5/8 inch brads, per M.

1 M 1/2 inch brads, per M.

200 pounds 3d iron cut nails, per pound.

200 do   4d           do do     per pound.

1600 do 12d        do do     per pound.

500 do 20d          do do     per pound.

300 do 30d          do do     per pound.

500 do 40d          do do     per pound.

400 do each 5 and 6 inch, cut spikes, per pound.

10 do 6d iron wrought nails, per pound.

300 do 8d            do           do           per pound.

200 do 10d          do           do           per pound.

300 do 12d          do           do           per pound.

200 do 40d          do           do           per pound.

100 do wrought copper sheathing nails, per pound.

200 do   12d iron boat nails,           per pound.

200 do   10d        do           do           per pound.

200 do   8d          do           do           per pound.

10 do     6d          do           do           per pound.

10 do     4d          do           do           per pound.

100 do   3d          do           do           per pound.

200 do   3d copper nails,                     per pound.

100 do   4d           do           do           per pound.

200 do   5d           do           do           per pound.

300 do   6d           do           do           per pound.

100 do   8d           do           do           per pound.

10 do     10d        do           do           per pound.

10 do     20d        do           do           per pound.

200 do   20d        do           do           per pound.

12 long jointers, carpenter's D I, each.

24 pincers, each.

15 bake pans, each.

9 moulding planes, each.

500 pounds nail rods, per pound.

30     do copper boat rivets, per pound.

6 compass saws, each.

6 wood saws, framed, each.

3 whip saws, each.

2  dozen brass sash pulleys, per dozen.

24 C. S. shovels, each.

6 trying squares, each.

3  hand shears, each.

400 pounds steel blister, (L) per pound.

100      do German steel, per pound.

300      do best cast steel, per pound.

3 butcher's steels, each.

6 spades, C. S. each.

2 tinner's shears, each.

4 bread scales and beams, large with set of weights, per set

25 pounds brass solder, per pound.

12 iron squares, each.

4 iron stakes, per pound.

--717--

4 tinner's edging stakes, per pound.

4 planishing stakes, per pound.

12 clamp screws, wood, each.

1 brass square, each.

24 flat brass sash springs, per dozen.

10 pounds 3/4 inch wrought copper tacks, per pound.

10 do     7/8 do do do        do           do           per pound.

10 do     14 ounce iron tacks, per pound.

25 do     thread, assorted, per pound.

12 do     shoe thread, per pound.

200 do   India tin, per pound.

25 do     3/8 inch brass wire, per pound.

100 do   1/2 inch brass wire, per pound.

4 sets lead weights, 1 ounce to I pound, per set.

4 sets iron weights, 1 to 28 pounds, per set.

1 pound 1-16 inch copper wire, per pound.

100 pounds 5-16 do do per pound.

20 do     1/4 do do per pound.

20 do     3/8 do do per pound.

Sheets, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2 (6 sheets brass, per pound.)

Nos.       16, 18, 20, 22, 25, (6 sheets brass, per pound.)

Iron screws--per gross.

Nos.    3-in.   2-in.   1 3/4 in. 1 1/2 in. 1 1/4 in. 1 in. 3/4 in. 5/8 in. 1/2 in. 3/8 in.
  Gross Gross Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross.
4             3 3 5 1
5           1 4 5 5 1
6           1   5 3 1
7         2 1 5 5 3 1
8         3 2 10 5 3 1
9   1 2 3 3     5    
10         5   10 7    
11   3 4     15 10 4    
12           15 10 2    
13   4 5   5 5 5      
14     5   5   3      
15   5   10 2   2      
16 1 5 7 8 3 2 2      
17     5 5   2        
18 1 5 5 5 3 5        
20   5 3 3            
24 1 5 2 2            

--718--

Brass screws--per gross.

Nos. 3-in.   2-in.   1 3/4 in. 1 1/2 in. 1 1/4 in. 1-in.   3/4-in.   5/8-in.   1/2-in.   3/8-in.   3 1/2-in.  2 1/2-in. 
  Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross. Gross.
4             2 2 2 1    
5           1 2 2 2 1    
6           2 2 2 2 1    
7         1 2 2 2 2 1    
8       1 1 2 5 5 3 1    
9     1 2 3   5 5 3 1    
10 1 1 1 3 3 4 5 5 2 _ 1  
11   2         3 3        
12           4 3 3 1      
13   3 3   5 4 3 2        
14         5 3 2 2        
15   3 5 5 3 4 1 1        
16   2 5 4 3 3 1 1        
17   1 3 4 2 3            
18   2 3 5 1 2            
20   1 2 3                
24   1 1 1                

 

CLASS No. 2—Ship Chandlery.

2 dozen hair tar brushes, long handles, per dozen.

3  dozen hair tar brushes, short handles, per dozen,

2  dozen dashing brushes, per dozen.

8 dozen whitewash brushes, No. 12, per dozen.

3  smith's bellows, 30 inches, each.

40 yards of baize, green, per yard.

600 comp'n sheave brushes, assorted, per pound.

12 silver calls, each.

12 pounds crocus, per pound.

600 pounds cotton batts, best, per pound.

15 yards hair cloth, 24 inch, per yard.

5 yards hair cloth, 28 inch, per yard.

5  yards hair cloth, 30 inch, per yard.

10 yards bottle green broadcloth, per yard.

45 yards fearnaught, per yard.

2 dozen sail hooks, per dozen.

300 sheets horn, large middle, per sheet.

1,000 pounds houseline, tarred, per pound.

1 jack screw, large size, each.

50 hand lead lines, 1 inch, 30 fathom, per pound,

100 sides bellows leather, per side.

25 sides W. O. tanned, pump leather, per pound.

6  pitch ladles, iron handles, each.

48 lamp chimneys, each.

--719--

200 yards white muslin, 36 inch, per yard.

50 yards black muslin, per yard.

6 long reels, with iron spindles, each.

20 dozen C. S. ship scrapers, iron handles, polished, per dozen.

60 pounds whipping twine, per pound.

100 pounds cotton wick, per pound.

15 gross wove lamp wick, per gross.

6 pounds worsted yarn, per pound.

 

CLASS No. 3—Paints, &c.

 

4 dozen paint brushes, (000,) per dozen.

2 dozen paint brushes, (00,) per dozen.

15 pounds Prussian blue, per pound.

100 pounds chrome green, per pound.

6 packs gold leaf, extra, per pack.

50 pounds sugar of lead, per pound.

50 gallons neatsfoot oil, per gallon.

50 gallons bright varnish, per gallon.

25 gallons copal varnish, per gallon.

10 pounds Chinese vermilion, per pound.

200 pounds umber, per pound.

20 gallons best furniture varnish, per gallon.

 

CLASS No. 4—Lumber.

 

1000 barrel hoop poles, large size, per 100.

500 Albany boards, clear, each.

1000 feet             4 inch, dry, clear white pine plank, per M feet.

1500 do                3 do       do           do           do           do

2000 do                2 1/2 do do          do           do           do

4000 do                 box boards                                        do

1000 do                 4 inch, dry, clear, ash plank,          do

1000 do                 3 do       do           do                          do

2000 do                 1 1/2 do do          do                          do

3000 do                 1 1/4 do                do           do                          do

4000 do                 1 do       do           ash boards,         do

100 do                  3/4    do         mahogany do                     per foot.

50 do                    1/2 do    do           do                          do

25 do                    2 do       cherry plank,                      do

25 do                    1 1/2 do                               do                          do

500 do                  7/8 do    do           boards,                               do

50 do                    5/8 do    do           do                          do

50 do                    1/2 do    do           do                          do

1000 do                1/2 do    bird's eye maple,               do

50 do                    maple veneers, assorted,                                do

500 do                  1 inch dry, black walnut boards,   do

500 do                  7/8 do    do           do           do           do

200 do                  1/2 do    do           do           do           do

200 do                  crotched walnut veneers,                               do

500 do                  5/8 inch, cedar boards,                    do

--720--

CLASS No. 5—Yellow pine spar timber.

 

3 pieces 50 feet long, to work 16 inches; per cubic feet.

2 do 70 do do 25 do do

1 do 72 do do 22 do do

1 do 67 do do 14 do do

2 do 77 do do 18 do do

1 do 68 do do 21 do do

2 do 57 do do 16 1/2 do do

2 do 55 do do 12 do do

CLASS No. 6—Stationery, &c.t

9 logbooks, 4 quires each, full bound, each.

40 memorandum books,                  do

24 blank books, 2 quires cup, half bound, do.

3 dozen pieces India rubber, per dozen.

24 bottles black ink, pints, each.

84 do     do half pints,       do.

60 do     red ink do            do.

3 dozen inkstands, lead, par dozen.

4 reams log paper, per dozen.

30 sheets linen drawing paper, 15 medium, 15 double elephant, per sheet.

1 1/4 reams blotting paper, per ream.

6 parallel rulers, 3 12 inches, 3 24 inches, each.

500 slate pencils, per 100.

24 sand boxes, boxwood, each.

1 ream buff envelope paper, per ream.

6 wafer seals, each.

6 letter books, 3 quires each, demi, full bound, each.

18 log slates, double, with hard wood frames, brass hinges, 12 x 16

inches, slate, each.

4 boxes water colors, 2 rows paints, 12 pencils, &c, each.

6 pounds red wafers, 3 large, 3 small size, per lb.

7 dozen paper ink powders, per dozen.

6 ivory pounce boxes, filled, each.

6 round rulers, 2 feet, hard wood, each:

6 flat do                              2 do       do           do.

12 Gunter scales, each.

18 slates 10 x 14 inches, hard wood frames, slate, each.

3 paper knives, each.

6 rolling rules, do

5 dozen pieces silk taste, assorted colors, per dozen.

12 do lead pencils "Monroe's" S and SS, do.

6 ivory paper folders, each.

CLASS No. 7.

2500 yards cotton hammock stuff, 42 inches wide, twilled, per yard.

CLASS No. 8.

100 cords sound oak wood, 4 feet in length, per cord.

JAMES H. SUYDAM,

Navy Agent

                              46

 

--721--

Schedule showing the aggregate sums demanded by different persons to furnish supplies at Brooklyn, N. Y., during the second quarter of 1845, under navy agent's advertisement of March 13, 1845.

Articles.                                   Bidders.                                                                Terms proposed.             Amount.                 
Hardware Wm. N. Clem in conformity with the terms of trhe advertisement. *$2,823.64
  Wm. Aymar & Co.                           ' 3,036.41
  Chas. A. Secor & Co.                           " 3,564.77
  J.W. Stiles                           "               3,355.05 1/2   
  F.R. Lee                           " 3,711.36 3/4
  Storer & Stephenson                            " 3,261.27
Ship chandlery J.W. Stiles                            " 1,076.56
  W. Aymar & Co.                           " *854.07
  Chas. A. Secor & Co.                            " 1,184.85
  Storer & Stephenson                             " 1,137.89
  Tyson & Judah                             " 1,282.20
Paints Storer & Stephenson                             " 312.12
  Tyson & Judah                             " 344.75
  Chas. A. secor & Co.                             " *294.58
  Wm. Aymar & Co.                            " 350.75
Lumber Jos. Grice                            " 884.00
  Abn. Dureyer                            " 1,211.01
  Martin E. Thompson                            " 868.55
  Jacob Dureyer & Son                           " 1,163.01
  Brown, Ogden & Co.                            " *868.54
Spar  timber Jos. Grice                            "                               *1,382. 96
Stationery David Felt & Co,                           " *199.98
  Lambert & Lane                           " 277.25
  Wm. A. Wheeler                           " 300.81
  George F. Nesbitt                           " 289.95
  R. Root & Co.                           " 306.27
Hammock stuff John Travers                           " *1,500.00
Oak wood John Travers                           " 512.50
  Wm. Turmure                           " *480.00
  M.E. Thompson                            " 630.00
  S. Warren                            "        587.00
  Coe D. Jackson                            " 548.00
  John H.Jackson                            " 550.00

* Accepted

Offers opened in presence of --     

Wm. L. HUDSON

JAMES A. COFFIN

April 11, 1845.

--722--                                                                                                     

[Advertisement.—Schedule No. 3.]

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

April 18, 1845.

Sealed proposals (endorsed proposals for hemp) will be received at this bureau until the 31st day of May next, for furnishing and delivering at the navy-yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, on or before the 1st day of July, 1846, four hundred tons of water rotted hemp.

This hemp must be equal to the Riga Rein hemp now at the navy yard, Charlestown. In deciding upon offers, preference will be given to American hemp, if offered at equal or lower price than may be asked for foreign hemp. The hemp must be subject to inspection and approval at the navy yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, by persons to be appointed, by and under instructions from this bureau, and none will be received which shall not pass such inspection.

Persons who may wish to furnish hemp perfectly free from tow, and ready for spinning, can forward separate proposals for such hemp; which hemp, if the proposals should be accepted, must, like the other, be subject to inspection and approval at said navy yard before it will be received.

Persons making offers must state the price asked per ton of 2,240 pounds, delivered at said navy yard, and must forward with them an obligation from two persons of sufficient property to become sureties for the fulfillment of the contract to be entered into, in one-third the amount of said contract.

To diminish the hazard to contractors of forwarding hemp from the western states, which may not be of proper quality, or sufficiently well prepared, the Secretary of the Navy has appointed two agents, who will, when requested, inspect hemp that may be prepared and intended to fulfill contracts to be made under this advertisement. One of these agents will inspect the hemp that may be sent to Louisville, Kentucky, and the other that which may be sent to St. Louis, in Missouri. These agents will be furnished with samples of the Riga Rein hemp, excepting for hemp fully prepared for spinning, and with the means of testing the strength of hemp, and will be ready to give all information in their power, to enable contractors to have their hemp properly prepared, and to ascertain the strength and character of it, before the expense of sending it to the navy yard is incurred. It must be distinctly understood, however, that the inspection and opinion of these agents is merely to diminish the risk to contractors, by furnishing useful information. The only inspection by which the hemp can be finally received and paid for will be that at the navy yard where it is to be delivered.

In addition to the bends which will be required for the faithful performance of the contract, ten per centum will be deducted from the amount of all bills for deliveries, and retained until the completion of the contract, as additional security for its performance. The remaining ninety per centum will be paid within thirty days after bills, duly approved, shall be presented to the navy agent at Boston, Massachusetts.

--723--

SCHEDULE No. 3.

Schedule of offers to furnish four hundred tons of hemp at the navy yard at Charlestown, Massachusetts, under advertisement by the bureau of April 18, 1845.

No.        Offers.                                              No. of tons offered.  Rate per ton. Amount.       Total.            Remarks.                
1 Thomas B. Curtis, of Boston 400 $215.00   $86,000.00 Rita Rein.
2

Francis Cox, of Boston, 1st

            2d.                    3d.

100

50

250

195.00

230.00

219.00

$19,500.00

11,500.00

54,750.00

85,750.00

1st. American hemp.

2d.America, perfectly free from tow, ready for spinning.

3d. Conditioned, that if American can be procured, or as much as can be procured, shall be delivered; the balance or otherwise the whole, to be equal to the Riga Rein.

 

3 Wiliam Lang, of Boston               400 218.80   87,520.00 Riga Rein.
4 Mayhew & Hamlen, of Boston 400 219.97   87,998.00 Riga Rein.

*Accepted.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS, June 10, 1846.

The state of the bids being such, that the bureau conceived the interests of the government would be promoted by offering to Mr. Curtis (his offer being the lowest for a portion of the hemp) a contract for 250 tons, and wrote to him to that effect on the 4th instant. He, however, declined the offer by letter of the 7th instant. The bureau then taking the aggregates of the several bids into view, and that of Francis Cox. No. 2, being the lowest, the contract was awarded to him for the 400 tons.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK,

For Commodore C. Morris.

Offers opened June 2, 1845, in presence of—

C. MORRIS,

W. B. SHUBRICK,

J. H. REILY.

--724--

[Advertisement— Schedule No. 4 .]

Proposals for flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

May 13, 1845.

Proposals, sealed and endorsed, will be received at this bureau until 3 o'clock p. m., of the 16th June next, for furnishing and delivering the following quantities of flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and flax and cotton twine, viz:

Flax canvass.

                                                                                               Weights to be borne.                              
  Strips across. Strips lengthwise.
  lbs. lbs.
600 bolts of No.1, each bolt to weigh 42 lbs. avoidupois 470 316
450   do of No.2,      do       do          38            do 420 280
450   do of No.3,      do       do          35            do 370 250
450   do of No.4,      do       do          32            do 340 230
600   do of No.5,      do       do          29            do 320 216
150   do of No.6,      do       do          26            do 300 200
100   do of No.7,      do      do           23            do  280 193
100   do of No.8,      do      do           20            do 300 213

Cotton canvass.

200 bolts of No. 4, each bolt to weigh 38 pounds avoirdupois.

200 do of No. 5, do           do           36           do

100 do of No. 6, do           do           34           do

100 do of No. 7, do           do           32           do

90 do of No. 8,    do          do           30           do

90 do of No. 9,    do          do           28           do

90 do of No. 10, do           do           26           do

Cotton hammock and bag stuff.

300 bolts hammock stuff, each bolt to weigh 100 pounds avoirdupois.

240 bolts bag stuff, each bolt to weigh 75 pounds avoirdupois.

Twine.

3,600 pounds flax twine.

2,400 pounds cotton twine.

--725--

The flax canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 40 running yards. Strips to test the strength of the flax canvass will be one inch wide, except for No. 8, which will be one and a quarter inch wide.

The cotton canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The hammock stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The bag stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The twine must conform in size, number of threads, and in other respects, to the requisitions which shall be made from the respective navy yards.

200 bolts No. 1 flax canvass.

100 bolts No. 2 do                            do

95 bolts No. 6 do                              do

15 bolts No, 7 do                              do

40 bolts No. 8 do                              do

400 lbs. flax sewing twine.

70 bolts No. 4 cotton canvass.

70 bolts No. 5 do                              do

10 bolts No. 6 do                              do

5 bolts No. 8 do                               do

60 bolts hammock stuff.

20 bolts bag stuff.

250 pounds cotton sewing twine.

To be delivered at the navy yard at Philadelphia.

One-fourth of the remaining quantities of the different numbers of canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and of the quantities of twine, to be delivered at each of the navy yards at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and Brooklyn, New York ; and the remainder at the navy yard at Gosport, Virginia. Proposals to be made separately for the flax canvass, cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine; and separate proposals will be received and considered for the quantities to be delivered at each of the navy yards named. The proposals for all the canvass and hammock and bag stuff must be by the bolt, and not by the yard.

One-half the quantity to be delivered to each of said navy yards must be delivered on or before the 1st December next, and the remainder on or before the 1st of May, 1846.              

               Flax canvass.

The warp and filling to be spun exclusively from long, well-dressed flax, water rotted, and of the very best quality, without any mixture of shorts or tow. The yarns to be evenly spun and properly twisted; the warp to be rather more twisted than the filling; the yarns to be boiled in a solution of the best American pot ashes, in the proportion of seven pounds of ashes to every hundred pounds of green yarn, and one gallon of water to every pound of green yarn, then to be thoroughly washed and rinsed in pure water, and carefully dried. The yarns to be thus prepared between April and November. No deleterious substance, starch, tallow, glue, paste, nor any description of weaver's dressing, to be used in the manufacture. All cylindering, calendering, pressing, and beating is strictly prohibited.

--726--

The cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine, must be of the best quality of materials and workmanship, and, with the flax canvass, be subject to such tests and inspection as the chief of the said bureau may direct or authorize; and be in all respects to his satisfaction, or to the satisfaction of the respective commandants of said navy yards. A blue thread to be placed at such distances from each selvage of all the canvass as may be directed in the contract.

All deliveries must be at the risk and expense of the contractor; and the articles must conform to the stipulations and conditions of the contracts to be entered into—proof of which must be furnished to the satisfaction of the commandant of the yard.

Bonds, with two approved sureties, in one-half the estimated amounts of the contracts, will be required, and ten per centum in addition will be withheld from the amount of each payment to be made, as collateral security for the faithful performance of the contract, which will not be paid until the contract shall have been fully complied with in all respects.

The bureau reserves the right to reject all oilers from persons who have heretofore failed to fulfill contracts.

Two persons, whose responsibility must be certified by some navy agent, commandant of a navy yard, or other person known to the chief of the bureau, must state upon the offer their readiness to become sureties for the persons offering, if their bid should be accepted.

--727--

SCHEDULE No. 4.

Schedule of offers to furnish flax canvass, under advertisement by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs, May 13, 1845.

Bolts.

CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.

American Hemp Company, of Paterson, N. Jersey.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

Amos Briggs & Co.

Wm. Brand.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

100 of No. 1

$18.00

$1,800.00

$14.10

$1,410.00

$14.50

$1,450.00

$17.85

$1,785.00

88 of No. 2

$17.00

$1,496.00

$13.50

$1,188.00

$13.50

$1,188.00

$16.90

$1,487.20

113 of No. 3

$16.00

$1,808.00

$12.75

$1,440.75

$12.50

$1,412.50

$15.75

$1,779.75

113 of No. 4

$15.00

$1,695.00

$12.25

$1,384.25

$11.50

$1,299.50

$14.75

$1,666.75

150 of No. 5

$14.00

$2,100.00

$11.00

$1,650.00

$10.50

$1,575.00

$13.45

$2,017.50

14 of No. 6

$13.00

$182.00

$10.90

$152.60

$9.50

$133.00

$12.60

$176.40

22 of No. 7

$12.00

$264.00

$10.75

$236.50

$9.00

$198.00

$11.75

$258.50

15 of No. 8

$11.00

$165.00

$10.50

$157.50

$8.50

$127.50

$10.85

$162.75

 

 

$9,510.00

 

$7,619.60

 

$7,383.50

 

$9,333.85

--728--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

 

Bolts.

CHARLESTOWN, MASSACHUSETTS.

Lewis Timberlake.

E. J. Higgins.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

William Lang.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

100 of No. 1

$17.50

$1,750.00

$19.00

$1,900.00

$13.75

$1,375.00

$15.20

$1,520.00

88 of No. 2

$16.50

$1,452.00

$18.50

$1,628.00

$12.50

$1,100.00

$14.00

$1,232.00

113 of No. 3

$15.50

$1,751.50

$18.00

$2,034.00

$11.75

$1,327.75

$13.00

$1,469.00

113 of No. 4

$14.50

$1,638.50

$17.50

$1,977.50

$10.75

$1,214.75

$12.50

$1,412.50

150 of No. 5

$13.50

$2,025.00

$17.00

$2,550.00

$10.00

$1,500.00

$11.50

$1,725.00

14 of No. 6

$12.50

$175.00

$16.50

$231.00

$9.25

$129.50

$10.50

$147.00

22 of No. 7

$11.50

$253.00

$16.00

$352.00

$8.75

$192.50

$10.90

$239.80

15 of No. 8

$10.50

$157.50

$15.00

$225.00

$8.25

$123.75

$10.66

$159.90

 

 

$9,202.50

 

$10,897.50

 

*$6,963.25

 

$7,905.20

* Accepted.

--729--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

 

Bolts.

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

American Hemp Company,
of Paterson, N. Jersey.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

Amos Briggs & Co.

William Brand.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

100 of No. 1

$16.00

$1,600.00

$14.10

$1,410.00

$11.00

$1,400.00

$17.35

$1,735.00

88 of No. 2

$15.00

$1,320.00

$13.50

$1,188.00

$13.00

$1,144.00

$16.40

$1,443.20

113 of No. 3

$14.00

$1,582.00

$12.75

$1,440.75

$12.00

$1,356.00

$15.25

$1,723.25

113 of No. 4

$13.00

$1,469.00

$12.25

$1,384.25

$11.00

$1,213.00

$14.25

$1,610.25

150 of No. 5

$12.00

$1,800.00

$11.00

$1,650.00

$10.00

$1,500.00

$13.00

$1,950.00

14 of No. 6

$11.00

$154.00

$10.90

$152.6

$9.00

$126.00

$12.20

$170.80

22 of No. 7

$10.00

$220.00

$10.75

$236.5

$8.50

$187.00

$11.25

$247.50

15 of No. 8

$9.00

$135.00

$10.50

$157.5

$8.00

$120.00

$10.50

$157.50

 

 

$8,280.00

 

$7,619.60

 

$7,076.00

 

$9,037.50

--730--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

 

Bolts.

BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

Lewis Timberlake.

E. J. Higgins.

John Trovers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

William Lang.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

100 of No. 1

$16.00

$1,600.00

$19.00

$1,900.00

$13.50

$1,350.00

$15.20

$1,520.00

88 of No. 2

$15.00

$1,320.00

$18.50

$1,628.00

$12.25

$1,078.00

$14.00

$1,232.00

113 of No. 3

$14.00

$1,532.00

$18.00

$2,034.00

$11.50

$1,299.50

$13.00

$1,469.00

113 of No. 4

$13.00

$1,469.00

$17.50

$1,977.50

$10.50

$1,186.50

$12.50

$1,412.50

150 of No. 5

$12.00

$1,800.00

$17.00

$2,550.00

$9.75

$1,462.50

$11.50

$1,725.00

14 of No. 6

$11.00

$154.00

$16.50

$231.00

$9.00

$126.00

$10.50

$147.00

22 of No. 7

$10.00

$220.00

$16.00

$352.00

$8.50

$187.00

$10.90

$239.80

15 of No. 8

$9.00

$135.00

$15.00

$225.00

$8.00

$120.00

$10.66

$159.90

 

 

$8,280.00

 

$10,897.50

 

*6,809.50

 

$7,905.20

* Accepted.

--731--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

Bolts.

PHILADELPHIA.

American Hemp Company,
of Paterson, N. Jersey.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

William Brand.

Lewis Timberlake.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

200 of No. 1

$18.00

$3,600.00

$14.10

$2,820.00

$17.85

$3,570.00

$17.50

$3,500.00

100 of No. 2

$17.00

$1,700.00

$13.50

$1,350.00

$16.90

$1,690.00

$16.50

$1,650.00

95 of No. 6

$13.00

$1,235.00

$10.90

$1,035.50

$12.60

$1,197.00

$12.50

$1,187.50

15 of No. 7

$12.00

$180.00

$10.75

$161.25

$11.75

$176.25

$11.50

$172.50

40 of No. 8

$11.00

$440.00

$10.50

$420.00

$10.85

$434.00

$10.50

$420.00

 

 

$7,155.00

 

$5,786.75

 

$7,067.25

 

$6,930.00

--732--

SCHEDULE No. 4-Continued.

 

Bolts.

PHILADELPHIA.

E. J. Higgins.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

William Lang.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

200 of No. 1

$19.00

$3,800.00

$13.50

$2,700.00

$15.20

$304.00

100 of No. 2

$18.50

$1,850.00

$12.25

$1,225

$14.00

$1,400.00

95 of No. 6

$16.50

$1,567.50

$9.00

$855.00

$10.50

$997.50

15 of No. 7

$16.00

$240.00

$8.50

$127.50

$10.90

$163.50

40 of No. 8

$15.00

$600.00

$8.00

$320.00

$10.66

$426.40

 

 

$8,057.50

 

*$5,227.50

 

$6,027.40

* Accepted.

--733--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

Bolts.

GOSPORT, VIRGINIA.

American Hemp Company, of Paterson, N. Jersey.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

William Brand.

Lewis Timberlake.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

200 of No. 1

$16.25

$3,250.00

$14.10

$2,820.00

$17.85

$3,570.00

$17.50

$3,500

174 of No. 2

$15.25

$2,653.50

$13.50

$2,349.00

$16.90

$2,940.60

$16.50

$2,871.00

224 of No. 3

$14.25

$3,192.00

$12.75

$2,856.00

$15.75

$3,528.00

$15.50

$3,472.00

224 of No. 4

$13.25

$2,968.00

$12.25

$2,714.00

$14.75

$3,304.00

$14.50

$3,248.00

300 of No. 5

$12.25

$3,675.00

$11.00

$3,300.00

$13.45

$4,035.00

$13.50

$4,050.00

27 of No. 6

$11.25

$303.75

$10.90

$291.30

$12.60

$340.20

$12.50

$337.50

41 of No. 7

$10.25

$420.25

$10.75

$440.75

$11.75

$481.75

$11.50

$471.50

30 of No. 8

$9.25

$277.50

$10.50

$315.00

$10.85

$325.50

$10.50

$315.00

 

 

$16,740.00

 

$15,119.05

 

$18,525.05

 

$18,265.00

--734--

SCHEDULE No. 4—Continued.

 

Bolts.

                                          GOSPORT, VIRGINIA.

E. J. Higgins.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

William Lang.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

200 of No. 1

$19.00

$3,800 00

$14.00

$2,800.00

$15.20

$3,040.00

174 of No. 2

$18.50

$3,219.00

$12.75

$2,218.00

$14.00

$2,436.00

224 of No. 3

$18.00

$4,032.00

$12.00

$2,688.00

$13.00

$2,912.00

224 of No. 4

$17.50

$3,920.00

$11.00

$2,464.00

$12.50

$2,800.00

300 of No. 5

$17.00

$5,100.00

$10.25

$3,075.00

$11.50

$3,450.00

27 of No. 6

$16.50

$445.50

$9.50

$256.50

$10.50

$283.50

41 of No. 7

$16.00

$656.00

$9.00

$369.00

$10.90

$446.90

30 of No. 8

$15.00

$450.00

$8.50

$255.00

$10.66

$319.80

 

 

$21,622.50

 

*$14,126.00

 

$15,688.20

* Accepted.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS, June 21, 1845.

The offer of John Travers, president of the Phoenix Manufacturing Company, being the lowest for flax canvass at each or the yards named, is therefore accepted.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK,

For Commodore C. Morris.

    Offers opened June 18, 1845, in presence of—

W. B. SHUBRICK,

J. H. REILY,

E. CHAPMAN.

--735--

[Advertisement—Schedule No. 5.]

Proposals for flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

May 13, 1845.

Proposals, sealed and endorsed, will be received at this bureau, until 3 o'clock, p. m., of the 16th June next, for furnishing and delivering the following quantities of flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and flax and cotton twine, viz:

 

               Flax canvass.

                                                                                                         Weights to be borne.

                                                                                                         Strips across.       Strips lengthwise.

                                                                                                         lbs                         lbs

600 bolts of No. 1, each bolt to weigh 42 lbs. avoirdup           470                       316

450 do   No. 2,     do           do           38           do                          420                       280

450 do   No. 3,     do           do           35           do                          370                       250       

450 do   No. 4,     do           do           32           do                          340                       230                                     

600 do   No. 5,     do           do           29           do                          320                       216

150 do   No. 6,     do           do           26           do                          300                       200                                                    

100 do   No. 7,     do           do           23           do                          280                       193       

100 do   No. 8,     do           do           20           do                          300                       213

               Cotton canvass.

200        bolts of No. 4, each bolt to weigh 38 lbs. avoirdupois.

200        do           No. 5,     do           do           36           do.

100        do           No. 6,     do          do           34            do.

100        do           No. 7,     do           do           32           do.

90           do          No. 8,     do           do           30          do.

90           do          No. 9,     do           do           28          do.

90           do         No. 10,   do           do           26            do.

 

               Cotton hammock and bag stuff.

300 bolts hammock stuff, each bolt to weigh 100 lbs. avoirdupois.

240 bolts bag stuff, each bolt to weigh 75 lbs. avoirdupois.

 

               Twine.

3,600 lbs. flax twine.

2,440 lbs. cotton twine.

--736--

The flax canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 40 running yards. Strips to test the strength of the flax canvass will be one inch wide, except for No. 8, which will be 1 1/4-inch wide.

The cotton canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The hammock stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The bag stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The twine must conform in size, number of threads, and in other respects, to the requisitions which shall be made from the respective navy yards.

200 bolts No. 1 flax canvass.

100 do   No. 2      do.

95 do     No. 6      do.

15 do     No. 7      do.

40 do     No. 8      do.

400 lbs. flax sewing twine.

70 bolts No. 4 cotton canvass.

70 do     No. 5      do.

10 do     No. 6      do.

5 do       No. 8      do.

60 do     hammock stuff.

20 do     bag stuff.

250 lbs. cotton sewing twine.

To be delivered at the navy yard at Philadelphia.

One-fourth of the remaining quantities of the different numbers of canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and of the quantities of twine, to be delivered at each of the navy yards at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and Brooklyn, New York; and the remainder, at the navy yard at Gosport, Virginia. Proposals to be made separately for the flax canvass, cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine; and separate proposals will be received and considered for the quantities to be delivered at each of the navy yards named. The proposals for all the canvass, and hammock and bag stuff, must be by the bolt, and not by the yard.

One-half the quantity to be delivered to each of said navy yards must be delivered on or before the 1st of December next, and the remainder on or before the 1st of May, 1846.

               Flax canvass.

The warp and filling to be spun exclusively from long, well-dressed flax, water-rotted, and of the very best quality, without any mixture of shorts or tow. The yarns to be evenly spun and properly twisted; the warp to be rather more twisted than the filling; the yarns to be boiled in a solution of the best American pot-ashes, in the proportion of seven pounds of ashes to every hundred pounds of green yarn, and one gallon of water to every pound of green yarn, then to be thoroughly washed and rinsed in pure water, and carefully dried. The yarns to be thus prepared between April and November. No deleterious substance, starch, tallow, glue, paste, nor any description of weaver's dressing, to be used in the manufacture. All cylindering, calendering, pressing, and beating is strictly prohibited.

               47

--737--

The cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine, must be of the best quality of materials and workmanship, and, with the flax canvass, be subject to such tests and inspection as the chief of the said bureau may direct or authorize; and be in all respects to his satisfaction, or to the satisfaction of the respective commandants of said navy yards. A blue thread to be placed at such distances from each selvage of all the canvass as may be directed in the contract.

All deliveries must be at the risk and expense of the contractor, and the articles must conform to the stipulations and conditions of the contracts to be entered into; proof of which must be furnished to the satisfaction of the commandant of the yard.

Bonds, with two approved sureties, in one-half the estimated amounts of the contracts, will be required; and ten per centum in addition will be withheld from the amount of each payment to be made, as collateral security for the faithful performance of the contract, which will not be paid until the contract shall have been fully complied with in all respects.

The bureau reserves the right to reject all offers from persons who have heretofore failed to fulfill contracts.

Two persons, whose responsibility must be certified by some navy agent, commandant of a navy yard, or other person known to the chief of the bureau, must state upon the offer their readiness to become sureties for the persons offering, if their bid should be accepted.

--738--

SCHEDULE No. 5.

Schedule of offers to furnish cotton canvass, under advertisement by the bureau of May 13, 1845.

Bolts.

                                                           CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

John H. Pearson.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

33 of No. 4

$14.00

$462.00

$10.50

$346.50

$9.50

$313.50

$10.50

$346.50

$10.75

$354.75

33 of No. 5

$13.50

$445.50

$10.25

$338.25

$9.00

$297.00

$10.00

$330.00

$10.25

$338.25

23 of No. 6

$13.00

$299.00

$10.00

$230.00

$8.50

$195.50

$9.50

$218.50

$10.00

$230.00

25 of No. 7

$12.50

$312.50

$9.75

$213.75

$8.00

$200.00

$9.00

$225.00

$9.50

$237.50

22 of No. 8

$12.00

$264.00

$9.50

$209.00

$7.50

$165.00

$8.50

$187.00

$9.25

$203.50

23 of No. 9

$11.50

$264.50

$9.25

$212.75

$7.00

$161.00

$8.00

$184.00

$8.75

$201.25

23 of No. 10

$11.00

$253.00

$9.00

$207.00

$6.50

$149.50

$7.50

$172.50

$8.25

$189.75

 

 

$2,300.50

 

$1,787.25

 

*$1,481.50

 

$1,663.50

 

$1,755.00

* Accepted.

--739--

SCHEDULE No. 5—Continued.

Bolts.

                                                       BROOKLYN, NEW YORK.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

John H. Pearson.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

33 of No. 4

$14.00

$462.00

$10.50

$346.5

$9.25

$305.25

$10.50

$346.50

$10.75

$354.75

33 of No. 5

$13.50

$445.50

$10.25

$338.25

$8.75

$2[]8.75

$10.00

$330.00

$10.25

$338.25

23 of No. 6

$13.00

$299.00

$10.00

$230.00

$8.25

$189.75

$9.50

$218.50

$10.00

$230.00

25 of No. 7

$12.50

$312.50

$9.75

$243.75

$8.00

$200.00

$9.00

$225.00

$9.50

$237.50

22 of No. 8

$12.00

$264.00

$9.50

$209.00

$7.50

$165.00

$8.50

$187.00

$9.25

$203.50

23 of No. 9

$11.50

$264.50

$9.25

$212.75

$7.00

$161.00

$8.00

$184.00

$8.75

$201.25

23 of No. 10

$11.00

$253.00

$9.00

$207.00

$6.50

$149.50

$7.50

$172.50

$8.25

$189.75

 

 

$2,300.50

 

$1,787.25

 

*$1,459.25

 

$1,663.50

 

$1,755.00

* Accepted.

--740--

SCHEDULE No. 5—Continued.

Bolts.

                                                              PHILADELPHIA.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

John H. Pearson.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

70 of No. 4

$14.00

$980.00

$10.50

$735.00

$9.25

$647.50

$10.50

$735.00

$10.75

$752.5

70 of No. 5

$13.50

$945.00

$10.25

$717.50

$8.75

$612.50

$10.00

$700.00

$10.25

$717.50

10 of No. 6

$13.00

$130.00

$10.00

$100.00

$8.25

$82.50

$9.50

$95.00

$10.00

$100.00

5 of No. 8

$12.00

$60.00

$9.50

$47.50

$7.50

$37.50

$8.50

$42.50

$9.25

$46.25

 

 

$2,115.00

 

$1,600.00

 

*$1,380.00

 

$1,572.50

 

$1,616.25

* Accepted.

--741--

SCHEDULE No. 5—Continued.

Bolts.

 

                    GOSPORT, VA.

 

 

Mayhew & Hamlen.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

John Travers, president of the
Phoenix Manufacturing Company.

John H. Pearson.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

Price per bolt.

Amount.

64 of No. 4

$14.00

$896.00

$10.50

$672.00

$9.50

$608.00

$10.50

$672.00

$10.75

$688.00

64 of No. 5

$13.50

$864.00

$10.25

$656.00

$9.00

$576.00

$10.00

$640.00

$10.25

$656.00

44 of No. 6

$13.00

$572.00

$10.00

$440.00

$8.00

$374.00

$9.50

$418.00

$10.00

$440.00

50 of No. 7

$12.50

$625.00

$9.75

$487.50

$8.00

$400.00

$9.00

$450.00

$9.50

$475.00

51 of No. 8

$12.00

$612.00

$9.50

$484.50

$7.50

$382.50

$8.50

$433.50

$9.25

$471.75

44 of No. 9

$11.50

$506.00

$9.25

$407.00

$7.00

$308.00

$8.00

$352.00

$8.75

$385.00

44 of No. 10

$11.00

$484.00

$9.00

$396.00

$6.50

$286.00

$7.50

$330.00

$8.25

$363.00

 

 

$4,559.00

 

$3,543.00

 

*$2,934.50

 

$3,295.50

 

$3,478.75

* Accepted.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

June 21, 1845.

The offer of John Travers, president of the Phoenix Manufacturing Company, being the lowest at each of the yards named, is therefore accepted.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK,

For Commodore C. Morris.

        Offers opened June 18, 1815, in presence of—

W. B. SHUBRICK,

J. H. REILY,

E. CHAPMAN.

--742--

 

[Advertisement—Schedule No. C]

 

Proposals for flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

May 13, 1845.

Proposals, sealed and endorsed, will be received at this bureau until 3 o’clock, p. m., of the 16th of June next, for furnishing and delivering the following quantities of flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and flax and cotton twine, viz:

               Flax Canvass.

                                                                                                         Weights to be borne.

                                                                                                         Strips across.       Strips lengthwise.

                                                                                                         lbs                         lbs

600 bolts of No. 1, each bolt to weigh 42 lbs. avoirdupois    470                       316

450 do   No. 2,     do           do           38           do                          420                       280

450 do   No. 3,     do           do           35           do                          370                       250       

450 do   No. 4,     do           do           32           do                          340                       230                                     

600 do   No. 5,     do           do           29           do                          320                       216

150 do   No. 6,     do           do           26           do                          300                       200                                                    

100 do   No. 7,     do           do           23           do                          280                       193       

100 do   No. 8,     do           do           20           do                          300                       213

 

               Cotton Canvass.

200        bolts of No. 4, each bolt to weigh 38 lbs. avoirdupois.

200        do           No. 5,     do           do           36           do.

100        do           No. 6,     do           do           34           do.

100        do           No. 7,     do           do           32           do.

90           do           No. 8,     do           do           30           do.

90           do           No. 9,     do           do           28           do.

90           do           No. 10, do           do           26           do.

               Cotton Hammock and Bag stuff.

300 bolts hammock stuff, each bolt to weigh 100 lbs. avoirdupois.

240 bolts bag stuff, each bolt to weigh 75 lbs. avoirdupois.

               Twine.

3,600 lbs. flax twine.

2,440 lbs. cotton twine.

--743--

The flax canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 40 running yards. Strips to test the strength of the flax canvass will be one inch wide, except for No. 8, which will be one and a quarter inch wide.

The cotton canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The hammock stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The bag stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The twine must conform in size, number of threads, and in other respects, to the requisitions which shall be made from the respective navy yards.

200 bolts No. 1 flax canvass.

100 do   No. 2      do.

95 do     No. 6      do.

15 do     No. 7      do.

40 do     No. 8      do.

400 lbs. flax sewing twine.

70 bolts No. 4 cotton canvass.

70 do     No. 5      do.

10 do     No. 6      do.

5 do       No. 8      do.

60 do     hammock stuff.

20 do     bag stuff.

250 lbs. cotton sewing twine.

To be delivered at the navy yard at Philadelphia.

One-fourth of the remaining quantities of the different numbers of canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and of the quantities of twine, to be delivered at each of the navy yards, Charlestown, Massachusetts, and Brooklyn, New York; and the remainder at the navy yard, Gosport, Virginia. Proposals to be made separately for the flax canvass, cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine; and separate proposals will be received and considered for the quantities to be delivered at each of the navy yards named. The proposals for all the canvass and hammock and bag stuff must be by the bolt, and not by the yard.

One half of the quantity to be delivered to each of said navy yards must be delivered on or before the 1st December next, and the remainder on or before the 1st of May, 1846.

Flax Canvass.

The warp and filling to be spun exclusively from long, well dressed flax, water-rotted, and of the very best quality, without any mixture of shorts or tow. The yarns to be evenly spun and properly twisted; the warp to be rather more twisted than the filling; the yarns to be boiled in a solution of the best American pot ashes, in the proportion of seven pounds of ashes to every hundred pounds of green yarn, and one gallon of water to every pound of green yarn, then to be thoroughly washed and rinsed in pure water, and carefully dried. The yarns to be thus prepared between April and November. No deleterious substance, starch, tallow, glue, paste, nor any description of weaver's dressing, to be used in the manufacture. All cylindering, calendering, pressing, and beating, is strictly prohibited.

The cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine, must be of the

--744--

best quality of materials and workmanship, and, with the flax canvass, be subject to such tests and inspection as the chief of the said bureau may direct or authorize; and be in all respects to his satisfaction, or to the satisfaction of the respective commandants of said navy yards. A blue thread to be placed at such distances from each selvage of all the canvass as may be directed in the contract.

All deliveries must be at the risk and expense of the contractor; and the articles must conform to the stipulations and conditions of the contracts to be entered into; proof of which must be furnished to the satisfaction of the commandant of the yard.

Bonds, with two approved sureties, in one half the estimated amounts of the contracts, will be required, and ten per centum in addition will be withheld from the amount of each payment to be made, as collateral security for the faithful performance of the contract, which will not be paid until the contract shall have been fully complied with in all respects.

The bureau reserves the right to reject all offers from persons who have heretofore failed to fulfill contracts.

Two persons, whose responsibility must be certified by some navy agent, commandant of a navy yard, or other person known to the chief of the bureau, must state upon the offer their readiness to become sureties for the persons offering, if their bid should be accepted.

--745--

Schedule of offers to furnish hammock and bag stuff, under advertisement by the bureau of May 13, 1845.

CHARLESTOWN,  MASS.        
Bolts. Jno. Travers, president Phenix ManufacturiCompany.                      John H. Pearson.                             
  Price Amount. Price Amount
60 bolts of hammock stuff                                  

$27.25

 

$1,635.00

 

$28.00

 

$1,680

 

55 bolts of bag stuff  20.75  1,141.25  20.50  1,127.50
    *2,776.25   2,807.50

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

Bolts.                                   Jno. Travers, president Phenix Manufacturing   John H. Pearson.  
  Price Amount. Price. Amount                
60 bolts of hammock stuff $27.00 $1,620.00 $28.00 $1,680.00
55 bolts of bag stuff  20.50  1,127.50 20.50 1,127.50
    *2,747.50   2,807.50

PHILADELPHIA, P.A.

Bolts.                                  Jno. Travers, president Phenix Manufacturing Company.   John H. Pearson.  
 

Price

 

Amount

                                                

Price.

 

Amount

            

60 bolts of hammock stuff 

       

$27.00

 

$1,620.00

 

$28.00 

 

$1,680.00   
55 bolts of bag stuff  20.50      410.00  20.50      410.00
    *2,030.00   2,090.00

*Accepted.

--746--

GOSPORT, VA.

Bolts.                                             Jno. Travers, president Phenix Manufacturing Company.   John H. Pearson.  
 

Price.  

 

Amount.   

                                               

Price.

 

Amount

 

120 bolts of hammock stuff $27.50 $3,300.00

 

$28.00

 

 

$3,360.00    

110 bolts of bag stuff  21.00  2,310.00  20.50  2,255.00
         
    *5,610.00   5,615.00

* Accepted.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS,

June 21, 1845.

The offer of John Travers, president of the Phenix Manufacturing Company, being the lowest for hammock and bag stuff at each of the yards named, is therefore accepted.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK,

For Commodore C. Morris.

 

                               Offers opened June 18, 1845, in presence of— 

W. B. SHUBRICK,

J. H. REILY,

ED. CHAPMAN.

--747--

[Advertisement—Schedule No. 7.]

Proposals for flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine.

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS, May 13, 1845.

 

Proposals, sealed and endorsed, will be received at this Bureau until 3 o'clock, p. m., of the 16th of June next, for furnishing and delivering the following quantities of flax and cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and flax and cotton twine, viz:

Flax canvass.

                                                                                                        Weights to be borne.

                                                                                                         Strips across.       Strips lengthwise.

                                                                                                         lbs                         lbs

600 bolts of No. 1, each bolt to weigh 42 lbs. avoirdupois      470                       316

450 do   No. 2,     do           do           38           do                          420                       280

450 do   No. 3,     do           do           35           do                          370                       250       

450 do   No. 4,     do           do           32           do                          340                       230                                     

600 do   No. 5,     do           do           29           do                          320                       216

150 do   No. 6,     do           do           26           do                          300                       200                                             

100 do   No. 7,     do           do           23           do                          280                       193       

100 do   No. 8,     do           do           20           do                          300                       213 

               Cotton canvass.

200        bolts of No. 4, each bolt to weigh 38 lbs. avoirdupois.

200        do           No. 5,     do           do           36           do.

100        do           No. 6,     do          do           34           do.

100        do           No. 7,     do           do           32           do.

90           do           No. 8,    do           do           30           do.

90           do           No. 9,    do           do           28           do.

90           do           No. 10,   do           do           26           do.

               Cotton hammock and bag stuff.

300 bolts hammock stuff, each bolt to weigh 100 lbs. avoirdupois.

240 bolts bag stuff, each bolt to weigh 75 lbs. avoirdupois.

               Twine.

3,600 lbs. flax twine.

2,440 lbs. cotton twine.

The flax canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 40 running yards. Strips to test the strength of the flax canvass will be one inch wide, except for No. 8, which will be one and a quarter inch wide.

--748--

The cotton canvass to be 20 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The hammock stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The bag stuff to be 42 inches wide, and each bolt to contain 50 running yards.

The twine must conform in size, number of threads, and in other respects, to the requisitions which shall be made from the respective navy yards.

200 bolts No. 1 flax canvass.

100 do   No. 2      do.

95 do     No. 6      do.

15 do     No. 7      do.

40 do     No. 8      do.

400 lbs. flax sewing twine.

70 bolts No. 4 cotton canvass.

70 do     No. 5      do.

10 do     No. 6      do.

5 do       No. 8      do.

60 do     hammock stuff.

20 do     bag stuff.

250 lbs. cotton sewing twine.

To be delivered at the navy yard at Philadelphia.

One-fourth of the remaining quantities of the different numbers of canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and of the quantities of twine, to be delivered at each of the navy yards at Charlestown, Massachusetts, and Brooklyn, New York; and the remainder, at the navy yard at Gosport, Virginia. Proposals to be made separately for the flax canvass, cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine; and separate proposals will be received and considered for the quantities to be delivered at each of the navy yards named. The proposals for all the canvass, and hammock and bag stuff, must be by the bolt, and not by the yard.

One-half the quantity to be delivered to each of said navy yards must be delivered on or before the 1st of December next, and the remainder on or before the 1st of May, 1846.

               Flax Canvass.

The warp and filling to be spun exclusively from long, well-dressed flax, water-rotted, and of the very best quality, without any mixture of shorts or tow. The yarns to be evenly spun and properly twisted; the warp to be rather more twisted than the filling; the yarns to be boiled in a solution of the best American pot ashes, in the proportion of seven pounds of ashes to every hundred pounds of green yarn, and one gallon of water to every pound of green yarn, then to be thoroughly washed and rinsed in pure water, and carefully dried. The yarns to be thus prepared between April and November. No deleterious substance, starch, tallow, glue, paste, nor any description of weaver's dressing, to be used in the manufacture. All cylindering, calendering, pressing, and beating is strictly prohibited.

The cotton canvass, hammock and bag stuff, and twine must be of the best quality of materials and workmanship, and, with the flax canvass, be subject to such tests and inspection as the chief of the said bureau may direct or authorize; and be in all respects to his satisfaction; or to the satisfaction

--749--

of the respective commandants of said navy yards. A blue thread to be placed at such distances from each selvage of all the canvass as may be directed in the contract.

All deliveries must be at the risk and expense of the contractor; and the articles must conform to the stipulations and conditions of the contracts to be entered into; proof of which must be furnished to the satisfaction of the commandant of the yard.

Bonds, with two approved sureties, in one half of the estimated amounts of the contracts, will be required, and ten per centum in addition will be withheld from the amount of each payment to be made, as collateral security for the faithful performance of the contract, which will not be paid until the contract shall have been fully complied with in all respects.

The bureau reserves the right to reject all offers from persons who have heretofore failed to fulfill contracts.

Two persons, whose responsibility must be certified by some navy agent, commandant of a navy yard, or other person known to the chief of the bureau, must state upon the offer their readiness to become sureties for the persons offering, if their bid should be accepted.

--750--

SCHEDULE No. 7

Schedule of offers to furnish flax and cotton twine, under advertisement of May 13, 1845.

Quantities.

CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

John H. Pearson.

William Lang.

American Hemp Company.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

800 pounds of flax twine

$0.27

$216.00

$0.35

$280.00

$0.25

†$200.00

$0.33

†$264.00

538 pounds of cotton twine

$0.26

$139.88

$0.21

$120.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

*$355.88

 

$409.12

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

John Travers, president
Phenix Manufacturing Company.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

800 pounds of flax twine

$0.26

†$208.00

 

 

 

 

538 pounds of cotton twine

 

 

$0.23

†$123.74

$0.30

†$161.40

* Accepted.         † Informal offers—offering for one description only.

--751--

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

                   BROOKLYN, N. Y.

John H. Pearson.

William Lang.

American Hemp Company.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

800 pounds of flax twine

$0.27

$216.00

$0.35

$280.00

$0.25

†$200.00

$0.33

†$264.00

538 pounds of cotton twine

$0.26

$139.88

$0.24

$129.12

 

 

 

 

 

 

*$355.88

 

$409.12

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

                 BROOKLYN, N. Y.       

John Travers, president
Phenix Manufacturing Company.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

800 pounds of flax twine

$0.26

†$208.00

 

 

 

 

538 pounds of cotton twine

 

 

$0.23

†$123.74

$0.30

†$161.40

* Accepted.                        † Informal offers—offering for one description only.

--752--

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

PHILADELPHIA.

John H. Pearson.

William Lang.

American Hemp Company.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

400 pounds of flax twine

$0.27

$108.00

$0.35

$140.00

$0.25

†$100.00

$0.33

†$132.00

250 pounds of cotton twine

$0.26

$65.00

$0.24

$60.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

*$173.00

 

$200.00

 

 

 

 

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

PHILADELPHIA.

John Travers, president
Phenix Manufacturing Company.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

400 pounds of flax twine

$0.26

†$104.00

 

 

 

 

250 pounds of cotton twine

 

 

$0.23

†$57.50

$0.30

†$75.00

* Accepted.                        † Informal offers—offering for one description only.

--753--

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

GOSPORT, VA.

John H. Pearson.

E. J. Higgins & Brother.

William Lang.

American Hemp Company.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

1,600 pounds of flax twine

$0.27

$432.00

$0.28 3/4

$160.00

$0.35

$560.00

$0.25 1/2

†$408.00

1,074 pounds of cotton twine

$0.26

$279.24

$0.21

$237.76

$0.24

$257.76

 

 

 

 

*$711.24

 

$717.76

 

$817.76

 

 

* Accepted.                        † Informal offer—offering for one description only.

--754--

SCHEDULE No. 7—Continued.

Quantities.

GOSPORT, VA.

Mayhew & Hamlen.

John Travers, president
Phenix Manufacturing Company.

S. J. Dickey & Brothers.

A. G. Jaudon.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

Price.

Amount.

1,600 pounds of flax twine

$0.33

*$528.00

$0.26

*$416.00

 

 

 

 

1,074 pounds of cotton twine

 

 

 

 

$0.23

*$247.02

$0.30

*$322.20

* Informal offers—offering for one description only.

 

BUREAU OF CONSTRUCTION, EQUIPMENT, AND REPAIRS, June 21, 1845.

 

The offer of John H. Pearson being the lowest at each of the yards named, is therefore accepted.

W. BRANFORD SHUBRICK,

For Commodore C. Morris.

Offers opened June 18, 1845, in presence of-

W. B. SHUBRICK,

J. H. REILY,

ED. CHAPMAN.

--755--

[Advertisement.—Schedule No. 8.]

               Supplies for the Navy.

Proposals, in duplicate, sealed and endorsed "supplies," will be received by the navy agent, at his office, 85 Water street, until 3 o'clock, p. m., of Tuesday the 3d of June next, for the following enumerated articles, to be delivered on or before the first day of August next, at the navy yard, Brooklyn, subject to such inspection as the commandant may direct, and to be in all respects to his satisfaction and approval. The contractor shall be bound to furnish any further quantity of the articles enumerated that may be required from him, during the fiscal year ending the 30th of June, 1846, at the contract prices, on receiving five days previous notice. The proposals must embrace the whole of a class, made separately, and will be decided separately. Ten per cent, is to be reserved on all deliveries, until the contract is complete. Payments will be made within thirty days after the presentation of the bills to the navy agent duly approved. No offer will be received which does not state a price for each and every article of a class. Persons whose offers are accepted must be ready to execute contracts in three days after being notified, or the agent to have the right to contract with the next lowest bidder.

Bonds, in the penal sum of one third the amount of the contract, with two-sureties, will be taken.

The prices only to be extended, and no mistakes will be considered.

               CLASS No. 1—Ship chandlery.

15 pieces wide white bunting, per piece.

15 do     do           red         do           do

15 do     do           blue       do           do

1 do       do           green     do           do

1 do       do           yellow   do           do

20 do     worsted binding,                               do

30 do     webbing, 2 inches wide    do

40 dozen hickory brooms, per dozen.

25 do     corn brooms,                      do

4 do       palm irons,                         do

8 do       mounted palms,                 do

14 do     iron handled C. S. ship scrapers, (polished,) per dozen.

10 gross woven lamp wicks, per gross.

200 bath bricks, each.

5 dozen wood hanks, per dozen.

100 sheets large middle horn, each.

3 pitch ladles, each.

18 china bowls and fixtures for water closets, each.

500 sail needles, per hundred.

500 sewing needles           do

500 seaming        do           do

100 marline         do           do

200 4-thread       do           do

100 6-thread       do           do

100 8-thread       do           do

--756--

100 roping needles, per hundred.

250 yards green baize, per yard.

50 do     fearnought,          do

150 do   white muslin,      do

12 bundles cooper's flags, per bundle.

20 pounds borax, per pound.

1200 do                tallow,                  do

60 do     thrums,                 do

1100 do beeswax,             do

25 do     assorted sewing thread, per pound.

1000 do tarred houseline,               do

100 do                  marline               do

750 do   do           hambroline.         do

400 fathoms 1 1/4 inch bonnet line, do

3 1 1/4 inch deep sea lead lines, 150 fathoms each, per pound.

1 1 do    coasting                              do 120   do                          do

3 1 do    coasting                              do 100   do                          do

50 1 do hand                                   do 30     do                          do

70 log lines, 80 fathoms each,                                                     do

25 dozen large fishing lines, assorted, per dozen.

30 barrels pitch, per barrel.

30 do     tar, per barrel.

20 do     white turpentine, per barrel.

2 do       Florence oil, (sweet) per gallon.

1 do       neat's-foot oil, per gallon.

2 do       fish oil, per gallon.

3 tape lines, (100 feet each) each.

3 cooks' ladles, iron, long handles, each.

500 pounds white chalk, per pound.

3 boatswain's silver calls, each.

150 pounds curled hair, horse, per pound.

130 sides bellows leather, per side.

200 do   rigging   do           do

200 do   best heavy W. O. tanned pump leather, per pound.

25 bolts light ravens duck, per bolt.

4 do       bleached Russia sheeting, per bolt.

               CLASS No. 2—Copper.

50 sheets 14 ounces cold rolled sheathing copper, per pound.

300 pounds 3/4 inch composition nails, per pound.

300 do   1             do           do           do           do

100 do   copper stem lead nails, per pound.

7 sheets 20 pound brazier's copper, per pound.

15 do     24           do           do           do           do

2 do       28           do           do           do           do

10 do     30           do           do           do           do

10 do     32           do           do           do           do

10 do     34           do           do           do           do

10 do     38           do           do           do           do

6 do       40           do           do           do           do

300 pounds 3d. cut copper nails, per pound.

300 do   4d           do            do     do           do

--757--

600 pounds 6d. cut copper nails, per pound.

200        do 8d. do do        do           do

200        do 20d. do do      do           do

200        do cast copper rivets, per pound.

10           do copper wire, No. 10, per pound.

10           do do     do           No. 17, do

10           do do     do           No. 18, do

10           do do     do           No. 19, do

200        do 3/8 inch copper wire, do

200        do 1/4 inch do do do

2 casks No. 10 zinc, per pound.

50 pounds brass wire. No. 1, per pound.

50           do do     do No. 2,              do

50           do do     do No. 3,              do

50           do do     do No. 4,              do

10           do do     do No. 6,              do

10           do do     do No. 7,              do

10           do do     do No. 9,              do

10           do do     do No. 10,            do

10           do do     do No. 12,            do

10           do do     do No. 14,            do

600        do India twine, per pound.

4             boxes tin plates, 14 X 20, per box.

3             do X middle tin, per box.

6 lengths 1 inch milled lead pipe, per pound.

6 do 1 1/2 inch    do           do           do

6 do 2 inch do     do           do           do

12 do 2 1/2 inch  do           do           do

250 pounds 20d. wrought copper nails, per pound.

250 do 30d. do    do           do           do          

30 do brass solder, per pound.

               CLASS No. 3—Iron, &c.

2000 pounds 3/8 inch American square, iron, per pound.

2000 do 5/16 inch             do           do           do           do

1200 do 3/8 inch              do           round     do           do

300 do nail roads, per pound.

6 bundles Russia sheet iron, No. 16, per pound.

6 sheets 5/16 inch boiler iron, per pound.

100 pounds 3/4 inch hoop iron, per pound.

400      do 7/8 inch do     do           do

1200    do 1 inch do do   do

600     do 1 1/3 inch do   do           do

500        do best cast steel, per pound.

300        do best German steel,       do

500        do blister steel, (L) per pound.

50           do spring steel, per pound.

               CLASS No. 4 &—Iron, nails, &c.

800 pounds 3d. iron cut nails, per pound.

1400   do 4d.    do                          do

--758--

1800 pounds 6d. iron cut nails, per pound.

4500      do 8d.        do      do

4700      do 10d.      do      do

1600      do 12d.     do       do

1500      do 20d.     do       do

1300      do 30d.     do       do

100        do 40d.     do        do

1000      do 6 inch cut spikes, iron, per pound.

1500      do 8d. wrought nails,   do                  do

1000      do 10d. do                 do                   do

1000      do 12d.  do                do                    do

50           do 5d.    do           boat nails, iron, per pound.

50           do 8d.    do           do           do           do

50           do 10d. do            do           do           do

100        do 12d. do             do           do           do

100        do 20d. do             do           do           do

500        do 5d. brad head nails,     do           do

400        do 6d.    do                     do           do

500        do 8d.    do                     do           do

500        do 10d.  do                     do           do

400        do 12d. do                      do           do

20 thousand 1/2 inch iron cut brads, per thousand.

30           do 5/8    do           do                    do

20           do 3/4    do           do                    do

55           do 1       do           do                    do

88           do 1 1/4 do           do                     do

53           do 1 1/2 do           do                    do

25           do 3d. clout nails                           do

               CLASS No. 5—Brushes, &c.

20 dozen 0000 paint brushes, per dozen.

6 dozen 000        do                          do

6 dozen 00           do                          do

20 dozen No. 5. sash tools, per dozen.

1  dozen varnish brushes,                              do

8 dozen hand scrubbing brushes, per dozen.

4 dozen clamp do              do handled, per dozen.

12 dozen whitewash         do No. 12             do

6 dozen camel's hair pencils, per dozen.

1 dozen long handled brooms,       do

12 dozen French fitches,                 do

3  dozen long handled tar brushes, per dozen.

4  dozen short do               do           do

1 dozen hair dusting brushes         do

4 dozen painter's              do           do

1 dozen sable hair            do           do

               CLASS No. 6—Paints, &c.

200 pounds chrome green, per pound.

100 pounds do    yellow                  do

--759--

200 pounds umber,           per pound.

3000 pounds Spanish brown          do

20 pounds terra de sienna                              do

200 pounds sugar of lead                               do

150 gallons bright varnish, per gallon.

80 gallons copal                do                          do

50 gallons Japan               do                          do

20 gallons furniture           do                         do

200 feet 10 X 12 double glass, per foot.

200 feet 10 X 14                do                          do

200 feet 12 X 16                do                          do

               CLASS No. 7—Wood.

320 cards of sound oak wood, 4 feet in length, per cord.

               CLASS No. 8—Lumber.

2 M superficial feel 4 inch seasoned white pine plank, clear, per foot.

2 M superficial feet 3 inch seasoned while pine plank, clear, per foot.

6 M superficial feet 2 1/2 inch seasoned white pine plank, clear, per foot.

24 M superficial feet 2 inch seasoned white pine plank, clear, per foot.

32 M superficial feet 1 1/4 inch seasoned white pine plank, clear, per foot.

4 M superficial feet 1 1/4 inch seasoned white pine plank, clear, per foot.

42 M superficial feet 1 inch seasoned white pine boards, clear, per foot.

15 M superficial feet 3/4 inch seasoned white pine boards, clear, per foot.

20 M superficial feet 5/8 inch seasoned white pine boards, clear, per foot.

3 M superficial feet 5/8 inch seasoned white wood boards, clear, per toot.

25 M superficial feet 1/2 inch seasoned white wood boards, clear, per foot.

30 M superficial feet box board, per foot.

1500 merchantable Albany plank, each.

600 merchantable Albany boards, each.

5 M superficial feet 4 inch clear seasoned ash plank, per foot.

4 M superficial feet 3 inch clear seasoned ash plank, per foot.

20 M superficial feet 2 inch clear seasoned ash plank, per foot.

20 M superficial feet 1 3/4 inch clear seasoned ash plank, per foot.

29 M superficial feet 1 1/2 inch clear seasoned ask plank, per foot.

19 M superficial feet 1 1/4 inch clear seasoned ash plank, per foot.

5 M superficial feet 1 inch clear seasoned ash boards, per foot.

18 M superficial feet 2 inch clear seasoned yellow pine plank, per foot. ,

18 M superficial feet 1 1/2 inch clear seasoned yellow pine plank, per foot.

1 1/2 M superficial feet 1 inch clear seasoned yellow boards, per foot.

500 feet 3 1/2 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 3 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 2 1/2 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 1 3/45 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 1 1/2 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 1 inch mahogany, per foot.

500 feet 3/4 inch mahogany, per foot.

300 feet 1/2 inch mahogany, per foot.

1,500 superficial feet mahogany timber, per foot:

--760--

200 feet 2 inch cherry, per foot.

100 feet 1 1/2 inch cherry, per foot.

700 feet 1 inch cherry, per foot.

1,000 feet 7/8 inch cherry, per foot.

300 feet 5/8 inch cherry, per foot.

200 feet 1/2 inch cherry, per foot.

500 feet 1 1/2 inch birdseye maple, per foot.

100 feet curled maple veneers, assorted, per foot.

1,000 feet cedar boards, per foot.

200 feet 4 X 4 inches black walnut joists, per foot.

200 feet 4 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

400 feet 3 1/2 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

500 feet 3 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

500 feet 2 1/2 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

200 feet 2 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

500 feet 1 3/4 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

300 feet 1 1/2 inch black walnut plank, per foot.

5,000 feet 1 inch black walnut boards, per foot.

5,000 feet 7/8 inch black walnut boards, per foot.

1,500 feet 1/2 inch black walnut boards, per toot.

200 crotched black walnut veneers, each.

1,500 ash barrel staves, per thousand.

               CLASS No. 9—Spar timber, &c.

13 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 40 feet long, to work 15 inches, per cubic foot.

4 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 50 feet long, to work 20 inches, per cubic foot.

5 sticks yellow pine spar limber, 48 feet long, to work 16 to 18 inches, per cubic foot.

2 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 64 feet long, to work 20 inches, per cubic foot.

2 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 56 feet long, to work 20 inches, per cubic foot.

2 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 60 feet long, to work 23 inches, per cubic foot.

2 sticks yellow pine spar timber, 55 feet long, to work 23 inches, per cubic foot.

300 cubic feet Long Island locust, to average 12 inches diameter, and none less than 9 inches, per cubic foot.

350 inches round ash timber, large size, per inch.

               CLASS No. 10—Hardware, &c.

2 cooper's adzes, handled, each.

2 carpenter's adzes, handled, each.

2 dozen socket chisels, handled, per dozen.

2 dozen firmer gouges, handled, per dozen.

2 dozen socket gouges, handled, per dozen.

1 dozen carpenter's steel compasses, per dozen.

1/2 dozen cooper's callipers, per dozen.

--761--

1/4 dozen brass dividers, 8 inch steel points, per dozen.

4 dozen C. S. claw hammers, handled, per dozen.

3 dozen C. S. large hatchets, handled, per dozen.

1/2 dozen pallet knives, per dozen.

1/4 dozen putty knives, per dozen.

12 dozen chalk lines, per dozen.

2 dozen 2 fold 2 foot rules, per dozen.

1/4 dozen gouging-rods, per dozen.

2 dozen C. S. shovels, per dozen.

2  dozen wood-bench screws, per dozen.

1/2 dozen wood clamp screws, per dozen.

1 cooper's long jointer, one.

1 cooper's short jointer, one.

6 foreplanes, each.

3  carpenter's long jointers, each.

3 carpenter's short jointers, each.

1  cooper's block plane, one.

2  dovetail saws, each.

6 compass saws, each.

2 woodsaws framed, each.

2  whipsaws, each.

6 keyhole saws, each.

6 handsaws, each.

6 can shaves, each.

3 trying squares, each.

3 butcher's steels, each.

12 sets 6-inch iron bed screws, each.

20 reams sand paper, assorted, ream.

10 pounds iron-tinned rivets, per pound.

6 sets iron weights, one ounce to seven pounds, per set.

6 sets lead weights, one ounce to one pound, per set.

1 Dearborn's patent balance, to weigh 500 pounds.

2 dozen 6-inch brass barrel door-bolts, per dozen.

3 dozen 5-inch brass barrel door-bolts, per dozen.

3 dozen 4-inch brass barrel door-bolts, per dozen.

2 dozen 6-inch brass bulkhead-bolts, per dozen.

2 dozen 5-inch brass bulkhead-bolts, per dozen.

1 dozen 4-inch brass bulkhead-bolts, per dozen.

2 dozen 3 1/2-inch brass flush-bolts, per dozen.

1 1/2 dozen 3-inch brass blind-bolts, per dozen.

1 1/2 dozen 4-inch brass blind-bolts, per dozen.

20 dozen 2-inch brass buttons, per dozen.

20 dozen 2 3/4-inch brass buttons, per dozen.

3 dozen 1 1/2-inch straight brass castors, per dozen.

1 dozen sets table fastenings, per dozen.

24 dozen 3/8-inch brass screw eyes, per dozen.

2 dozen 3-inch brass hooks for lamps, per dozen.

2 dozen 2-inch brass hooks for lamps, per dozen.

12 dozen 3/4 inch brass shutter-knobs, per dozen.

2 dozen 7/8 inch brass shutter-knobs, per dozen.

6 dozen 3/4-inch brass screw sash-knobs, per dozen.

3 dozen 7/8-inch brass screw sash knobs, per dozen.

--762--

4 dozen 3/4-inch brass flush rings, per dozen.

4 dozen 1-inch brass flush rings, per dozen.

4 dozen 1 1/4-inch brass flush rings, per dozen.

2 dozen No. 4 brass sash rollers, per dozen.

12 dozen brass curtain rings, 1/2 and 3/4-inch, per dozen.

50 dozen flat brass sash springs, per dozen.

1  dozen composition stop-cocks, 3/4 to 1 1/2-inch, per dozen.

1 1/2 dozen composition cocks for water closets, per dozen.

30 sets escritoire trimmings, per set.

2 pounds escritoire escutcheon pins, 1/2 to 3/4-inch, per pound.

10 pounds sash-cord, per pound.

4 dozen 2 1/2-inch plate escutcheons, per dozen.

6 dozen 2-inch plate escutcheons, per dozen.

4 dozen 1 3/4-inch plate-escutcheons, per dozen.

6 dozen 1 5/8-inch plate escutcheons, per dozen.

4 dozen 1 3/8-inch plate escutcheons, per dozen.

4 dozen 1 1/8-inch plate escutcheons, per dozen.

4 dozen 2 1/2-inch brass cabin-hooks, per dozen.

12 dozen 6-inch brass cabin-hooks, per dozen.

6 dozen axe handles, per dozen.

6 dozen sledge handles, per dozen.

6 dozen hammer handles, per dozen.

12 dozen blank keys, assorted, per dozen.

2 sheets No. 11 brass, per pound.

4 do       No. 12 do             do.

2 do       No. 14 do             do.

2 do       No. 16 do             do.

2 dozen pairs, 4 1/2 x 5 inches, brass butt hinges, per dozen.

4 do       do 3 1/2 X 3 1/2 do           do           do           do.

3 do       do 2 1/2 X 2 1/2 do           do           do           do.

4 do       do 2 X 2               do           do           do           do.

1 do       do 5                      do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 4 1/2                               do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 4                      do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 3 1/2                               do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 3                      do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 2 1/2                               do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 2                      do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 1 1/2                               do           do           do           do.

2 do       do 2 X 4 inches, brass table butt hinges, per dozen.

1 do       do 2 1/2 X 5 do   do                          do           do.

2 do       do 1 3/4 X 3 1/2 do            do                     do           do.

1 do       do 5 inch iron butt hinges, per dozen.

3 do       do 4 do do do.

2 do       do 3 1/2 do          do           do.

5 do       do 2   do             do           do.

6 do       3/4 inch mahogany knobs, do.

6 do       7/8      do                   do           do.

6 do       1 3/4   do                   do           do.

6 do       2        do                   do           do.

6 do       2 1/2  do                   do           do.

18 do     1       do                   do           do.

--763--

18 dozen 1 1/4 inch mahogany knobs, per dozen.

18 do     1 1/2      do           do.                         do.

3 do       2 3/4 inch brass padlocks, assorted keys, per dozen.

12 do     2 1/2 inch iron    do                                 do           do.

15 do     3             do           do                             do           do.

1 do       No. 4 mortice knob ketches                       do.

1 do       2 1/4 inch cupboard ketches, with keys,     do.

10 do     5 do double faced cupboard locks,                            do.

2 do       6 do closet locks, per dozen.

4 do       5 do       do                          do.

4 do       4 do       do                          do.

12 do     2 3/4 do iron drawer locks, per dozen.

2 do       2 1/2 do brass     do           do.

2 do       2 do       do           do           do.

1 do       1 1/2 do do          do           do.

6 do       iron chest locks, per dozen.

2 do       iron desk locks, do.

2 do       3 1/2 inch brass sideboard locks, per dozen.

6 do       4 1/2 inch upright mortice locks, do.

4 do       2 1/2 inch mortice closet locks, do.

10 pounds 1 inch clout nails, per pound.

10 do     1 1/4 do                do                          do.

10 do     1 1/2 do                do                          do.

10 do     1 3/4 do                do                          do.

30 M No. 8 iron cut tacks, M.

50 do     10        do           do     do.

20 do gimp tacks, M.

20 do lace do      do.

10 do 3/4 inch copper tacks, cut, M.

6 do 7/8                do           do           do           do.

6 do 1    do           do           do           do.

2 do 1 1/4 do        do           do           do.

6 do 3/4 do          do           do           wrought, M.

6 do 7/8 do          do           do           do           do.

3 dozen wood rasps, dozen.

3 do whip saw files, do.

6 do hand             do do.

3 do crosscut       do do.

2 do 8 inch rat tail files, dozen.

3 do 3/4 inch 3 square do               do.

               CLASS No. 11—Stationery &c.

3 log books, 4 quires, half bound, each.

6 dozen memorandum books in leather, faint lined, dozen.

6 do       do       do 1/2 bound with loops, lined, dozen.

4 do 2 quire cap blank books, 1/2 bound, dozen.

2 do 1    do do    do           do           do           do.

4 do pieces India rubber, usual square pieces dozen.

4 do pint bottles black ink, dozen.

8 do 1/2 do do     do           do       do.

2 do 1/2 do do     red         do         do.

--764--

3 dozen lead inkstands, with covers, dozen.

2 do 2 blade pen-knives, (Rodgers' best) dozen.

1 ream log paper, ream.

20 do faint lined cap paper, best quality, ream.

20 do   do      letter          do        do           do.

1 do   do       folio post     do        do           do.

6 reams best buff envelope paper, ream.

1 ream best quality blotting paper, ream.

10 dozen boxes Gillot's eagle per 1 dozen in a box, dozen,

12 boxes Pardow's pens, holders, 1 gross in a box, box.

10 lbs. best red sealing wax, lb.

3 ivory paper folders, each.

2 wafer seals, each.

1 dozen camel's hair pencils, dozen.

2 24 inch parallel rules, each.

2 rolling rulers, each.

1000 No. 60 quills, best, M.

1 dozen boxwood sandboxes, dozen.

4 do    1/2 pint papers black sand, dozen.

12 double log slates, hard frames, brass hinges, slate 12 X 16 inches clear, each.

6 slates, 12 X 14 inches clear, hard wood frames, each.

1 gross red tape, best quality, gross.

1 dozen pieces silk taste, assorted colors, dozen.

3 cases mathematical instruments, each.

2 boxes water colors, 3 rows, pencils, &c, complete, each.

2 lbs. red wafers, large and small, lb.

3 dozen best quality black ink powder, dozen.

6 ivory pounce boxes, filled, each.

2 Gunter's scales, each.

2 3 quire demi, full bound, letter books, each.

PROSPER M. WETMORE,

Navy Agent.

--765--

SCHEDULE No. 8.

Schedule showing the aggregate sums demanded by different persons to furnish supplies at Brooklyn, N. Y., by August 1, 1845, and such additional quantities of the same, as may be required during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846, under advertisement by navy agent at New York, of May 6, 1845.

Bidders.                                      Articles.                                      Terms proposed. Amount.                       
Charles A. Secor & Co. Ship chandlery Terms in conformity with the advertisemen. $3,518.09 1/2
Hurry & Swann Do   4,293.30
Tucker, Cooper, & Co. Do   3,804.04 1/2
J.W. Stiles Do   3,711.25
Storer & Stephenson Do   3,656.52
Wm. Aymar & Co. Do   *3,387.58
Elias Hicks, jr. Do   3,679.10
Tyson & Judah Do   3,490.15
Tucker, Cooper, & Co. Copper   2,345.40
Frederick R. Lee Do   2,325.20
Wm. Aymar & Co. Do   *2,140.60
D.M. Wilson & Co. Iron and steel   *683.50
Frderick R. Lee Do   708.00
D.M. Wilson & Co. Nails   1,612.33
Alpheus Fobes Do   1,518.14
J.W. Stiles Do   1,707.06
Tucker, Cooper, & Co. Do   1,499.29
John Acosta Do   *1,455.26
Wm. N. Clem Do   1,464.32
Frederick R. Lee Do   1,549.08
Tucker, Cooper, & Co. Brushes   460.60
Wm. Aymar & Co. Do   456.82
J.W. Stiles Do   509.05
John A. Kennedy Do   *417.79
John A. Kennedy Paints   *500.50
Wm. Aymar & Co.                          Do                          508.60
Tucker, Cooper, & Co. Do   536.70
John Travers Oak wood   *1,600.00
J.W. Stiles Do   1,680.00
Wm. A. Turmure Do   1,840.00
Joseph Grice Lumber   11,762.10
Brower, Ogden, & Co. Do   13,214.85
Baker, Wells, & Co. Do   11,912.40
G.K. Woodruff Do (declined after acceptancea)   10,143.62 1/2
Lewis S. Corryell Do (offers for part of the lumber only)   0.00
Joseph Grice Spar timber   *5.38
Badger & Peck Do          †   6.35 1/2
Frederick R. Lee Hardware   *1,548.69
Wm. N. Clem Do   1,642.01
Wm. Aymar & Co. Do   1,748.79 1/2
Charles A. Secor & Co. Do   1,673.17 1/2
J.W. Stiles Do   1,586.29 1/2
Wm. A. Wheeler Stationery   486.08
David Felt & Co. Do   404.34
Lambert & Lane Do   *403.50

        *Accepted.                                                                                           † Price per foot

 

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, New York, June 4, 1845.

                                    Offers opened by

W. L. HUDSON,

TOWNSEND HARRIS,

TUNIS CRAVEN.

--766--

SCHEDULE No. 9.

Schedule for supplies at the navy yard Charlestown, Mass., under advertisement of J. H. Wright, navy agent, of May 5, 1845.

Articles                       Bidders.                                                      Terms proposed  Amount                         
Timber Mayhew & Hamlen   $1,615.85
Do Joseph L. Ross   1,455.00
Do William Lang   1,433.50
Do George Adams   *1,422.00
Do George Foster    
Do Amos Holt (offers for only a part of the timber)†   0.00
Lumber Mayhew & Hamlen‡   68.04
Do Joseph L. Ross   *74.70
Do William Lang   77.76
Do Harrod & Fernald   97.20
Ship chandlery William Lang   *3,281.80
Do Gregerson & Sumner   3,288.44
Do Horner & Leighton   3,313.95
Do Horton, Cordis & Co.   3,357.49
Do F.W. Pearson   3,493.13
Do Mayhew & Hamlen   3,435.30
Do George Adams   3,511.52
Hardware William Lang   *3,880.04
Do Horton, Cordis, & Co.   3,884.09
Do Charles Scudder & Co.   3,947.26
Do Mayhew & Hamlen   4,240.84
Do George Adams   4,403.78
Do F.E. Wellington   4,824.25
Do Lucious Beach   5,089.91

*Accepted.          † This bid not being in full was not calculated.        ‡ Withdrawn.

    Offers opened and signed by —

JOHN B. NICOLSON,

J. H. MARSHALL.

--767--

[Advertisement—Schedule No. 10.]

 

Proposals for ship chandlery, hardware, timber, fire wood, lignumvitæ, oar-rafters, and lumber. 

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, May 19, 1845.

Sealed proposals in duplicate will be received until 12 o'clock, on the 16th of June next, for the delivery at the navy yard of the following articles of ship chandlery: Hardware, timber, fire wood, lignumvitæ, oar rafters, and lumber—required for the fiscal year ending the 30th June, 1846. The whole to be delivered on or before the 1st day of September next, except the spar timber, which must be delivered on or before the 1st of December next. Persons offering to be bound to furnish any additional quantity of the enumerated articles of ship chandlery—hardware and fire wood— which may be required of them prior to 30th June, 1846, on receiving fifteen days' notice.

The offers must be made for each class separately, according to its number, (in duplicate,) and be so endorsed, and on no account be mixed up with any other class. The price of each and every article in the offer must be distinctly stated and carried out, for the full amount of the whole quantity, and be correctly added up at foot, for the total amount of the offer expressed in words at length, in order that a fair comparison may be made.

All the articles are to be of the best quality, and must pass inspection at the yard; and, in case of failure to deliver in time, the government to be authorized to supply the deficiencies at the cost of the contractor.

Bond and security will be required in one third of the estimated amount of the contract, and 10 per cent will be deducted from all bills until it is fulfilled.

Offers will be positively rejected, if not in exact conformity with the advertisement.

               CLASS No. 1—Ship chandlery.

15 bolts No. 1 raven's duck.

10 bolts No. 2 raven's duck.

60 barrels tar.

50 barrels pitch.

10 barrels turpentine.

1,000 corn brooms.

1,200 hickory brooms.

45 lbs. emery, 3 sizes.

250 yards fearnaught.

2,790 lbs. best heavy brown wrapping paper for sheathing.

240 whitewash brushes.

20 varnish brushes

325 paint brushes, 0000 size.

325 paint brushes, 000 size.

100 sash tools, (brushes,) assorted.

108 camel-hair brushes.

240 scrubbing brushes.

--768--

96 clamp brushes.

108 hand brushes.

96 tar brushes.

85 bolts red bunting, 19 inches wide.

75 bolts white bunting, 19 inches wide.

60 bolts blue bunting, 19 inches wide.

25 bolts yellow bunting, 19 inches wide.

25 bolts green bunting, 19 inches wide.

15 bolts black bunting, 19 inches wide.

320 bath bricks.

5 lbs. bristles.

3,000 lbs. of cotton bats.

280 lbs. white chalk.

8 glazier's diamonds.

600 yards coarse flannel, 7/8 wide.

50 lbs. dry flags.

180 lbs. glue.

750 sheets horn.

228 mounted palms.

18 silver calls.

1  ream emery paper, half of each of Nos. 1 and 2.

36 yards jack chain.

56 hides of rigging leather.

900 lbs. of pump leather.

60 sides of bellows leather.

22 fides hose leather.

2 skins of buff leather.

57 chalk lines, 60 feet in length.

4 tape lines of 50 feet in length.

4 tape lines of 100 feet in length.

350 fishing lines, 6 thread, assorted, up to cod lines.

150 lbs. spun lamp wick.

144 wove lamp wicks.

20 glass lamp chimneys.

180 log lines, 6 thread, 60 fathoms each.

50 hand lead lines, 12 thread, 30 fathoms each.

30 cod lines, 6 thread, 30 fathoms each.

260 yards white muslin or cotton.

60 pitch mops.

1,000 sewing needles.

1,500 W. L. seaming needles.

1,000 tabling needles,

600 roping and holing needles, assorted.

350 marling needles.

20 pincers.

20 pliers.

1,000 sheets sand paper, (best glass sand Nos. 1 and 2, half of each.)

20 sail prickers.

15 sail-rubbers.

1 gauging rod.

9 shears, assorted.

3 tinner's shears.

40 gallons sweet oil.

100 gallons neat's-foot oil.

--769--

500 ship's scrapers.

9 dressed sheep-skins.

15 pounds borax.

70 do spelter solder.

60 do brass do

2,500 pounds soap.

14 sail stabbers.

245 pounds signal halliards stuff, 9, 12, and 15 thread, one-third each.

50           do assorted sewing thread.

50           do shoe thread.

75           do thrums.

750        do beeswax.

4,000     do sheet zinc, 8, 12, and 14 ounces per foot.

16           do rotten stone.

10 large tin bread-scales.

20 small tin bread-scales.

10 flat wood meat-scales.

20 sets iron weights, from half ounce to seven pounds.

100 pounds packing yarn.

4 deck lanterns.

100 barrels limestone.

500 pounds putty.

25 barrels coal tar.

               CLASS No. 2—Hardware.

1 dozen large brass cocks.

20 do handsaw files.

5 do flat ward tiles.

4 do half round files.

4 do 14 inch flat bastard files.

4 do half round bastard files.

30 polishing files, assorted.

60 iron shovels.

50 boat hooks.

24 cupboard locks.

12 brass padlocks.

60 iron padlocks.

24 brass draw locks.

24 chest locks.

1,000 pounds iron cut spikes, 6 and 8 inches, half of each.

1,000 do sheathing nails.

Iron cut nails—1,000 pounds of 30d.

Do                         1,000 do of 20d.

Do                         1,500 do of 12d.

Do                         1,500 do of 10d.

Do                         1,500 do of 8d.

Do                         1,500 do of 6d.

Do                         1,000 do of 4d.

Iron cut finishing nails—1,000 pounds of 6d.

Do          do           do 1,000               do of 4d.

Cut copper nails—500 pounds of 30d.

--770--

Cut copper nails—500 pounds of 20d.

Do                         do 750 do of 12d,

Do                         do 750 do of 10d.

Do                         do 750 do of 8d.

Do                         do 750 do of 6d.

Do                         do 500 do of 3d.

Copper tacks—60,000, 16 ounce.

Iron brads—140,000 2 inch.

Do          140,000 1 1/2 inch.

Do          150,000 1 1/4 inch.

Do          140,000 1 inch.

Do          130,000 3/4 inch.

Do          120,000 5/8 inch.

Do          120,000 1/2 inch.

Iron tacks—150,000 16 ounce.

Do          150,000                8             do

Do          150,000 6            do

Do          150,000 4            do

Wrought iron nails—1,000 pounds 12d.

Do          do           800        do           10d.

Do          do           750        do           8d.

Do          do           750        do           6d.

Do do 600 do 4d.

Screws, iron—100 gross of inch, each No. 9, 10, and

Do          do           100 do of 5/8 inch, each No. 5 and 6.

Do          do           100 do of 1/2 inch, each No. 5 and 6.

Do          brass      100 do of 1 1/4 inch, each No. 10, 11, 12, and 13.

Hinges, brass—60 pairs 4 X 4 inches, draw rivets of brass wire

Do          do           80 do 2 1/2 X 5/8 brass pins.

Do          do           30 do 3 1/2 X 2 1/2 brass pins.

24 dozen brass hat hooks, 1 1/2 to 2 inches long.

8             do brass door, hooks, 6 inches, strong.

3             do brass door hooks, 5 inches, strong.

3             do brass door hooks, 4 inches, strong.

10 carpenter's adzes.

10 cooper's do

6 flat adzes.

Socket chisels—1 dozen each, cast steel, 3/4, 1, 1 1/2, 2, 2 1/2 inches.

Mortising chisels—1 dozen each of cast steel, 1/2, 5/8, 3/4, 1 inch.

Firmer chisels, cost steel, 10 sets, (1 dozen each, assorted.)

Spike gimlets, (handled) 5 dozen each, 3/8, 4-8, 9-16, best.

Nail gimlets, 1 gross best quality, assorted.

Socket gouges, 60—12 of 3/4; 12 of 1 inch; 12 of 1 1/4; 12 of 1 1/2, and 12 of 2 inches.

50 house carpenter's hatchets.

50 cast steel claw hammers.

20 butcher's knives.

10 cheese knives.

12 butcher's steels.

Cast steel—50 pounds of 1/4; 50 of 1/2; 100 of 3/4; 200 of 7/8; 300 of 1; 300 of 1 1/4 inch, and 200 pounds of 1 1/2 inch square.

10 boxes double cross tin, 12 x — inches

--771--

Patent "Sloat augers," viz: 2 dozen each, 5/8, 3/4, 7/8, and 1 inch.

1,500 pounds block tin.

2 gross handled brad awls, assorted.

1 gross shoe awls, handled, assorted.

2  anvils, — pounds each.

20 sets bitts and braces, best quality.

6 breast stocks.

36 bevels.

18 bung borers, assorted.

18 tap borers, assorted.

10 patent balances, to weigh 500 pounds each.

Iron compasses, 4, 5, and 6 inches; 1 dozen each size.

18 pair brass dividers.

"Patent pod augers," cast steel, viz: four dozen each, of 5/8, 3/4, 7/8, and 1 inch, and two dozen each, 1 1/8, 1 1/4, 1 3/8, 1 1/2 inch.

24 drill boxes and bows.

24 gauges, (wood screw heads.)

12 spar calipers.

12 marking irons, (cooper's.)

24 plane irons, 2 inch and 2 1/4, double cast steel, one half of each size.

5 jack screws.

16 drawing knives, from 8 to 12 inch, (cast steel,) one half of each size.

18 pallet knives.

12 rounding knives.

12 sail knives.

24 putty knives.

12 glue kettles.

18 8 gallon pitch kettles.

48 carpenter's rules, double jointed.

24 wood rasps, 12 and 14 inches, one half of each size.

12 iron spades.

24 pair steelyards, to weigh 150 pounds each.

30 spoke shaves.

30 oil stones, 3 to 5 pound pieces.

12 grindstones, 20 to 24 inches.

25 iron squares.

10 saw sets.

12 brass squares.

6 bread sieves.

12 screw plates and taps.

12 rag stones.

12 bench vices.

22 hand vices.

500 brass curtain rings.

5 hand drills.

50 pounds of iron wire, No. 3.

50           do           do           No 4.

50           do           do           No. 6.

50           do           do           No. 6.

50           do           do           No. 7.

50           do           do           No. 8.

50           do           do           No. 9.

--772--

50 pounds of iron wire, No. 10.

50           do           do           No. 11.

50           do           do           No. 12.

50           do           do           No. 13.

50           do           do           No. 14.

100        do           do           No. 15.

50           do           do           No. 16.

50           do           do           No. 17.

50           do           do           No. 18.

30 pounds, No. 16, annealed copper wire.

5 dozen hand saws.

1 do       panel do

1 do       sash do

1 do       compass do

1 do       tennon do

1 do       whip do

1 do       cross cut do

2 do       wood do

1 do       keyhole do and pad.

1 do       dovetail do.

               CLASS No. 3—Timber.

4 main and 4 foretop-masts, for a line-of-battle-ship

4 main and 4 foretop-gallant-masts, for a line-of-battle-ship

4 main and 4 foretop-masts, for frigates.

6 main and 6 foretop gallant-masts, for frigates.

2 main and 2 foretop-masts, for schooners.

2 main and 2 foretop masts, for brigs.

Dimensions will be furnished on application to the commandant of the navy yard. To be of the best long leafed, fine grained Carolina yellow pine. Price per cubic foot.

               CLASS No. 4—Firewood.

150 cords best oak wood.

300 cords best heart pine wood.

               CLASS No. 5—Staves and headings.

5,000 pipe staves, 4 feet 8 inches long, 3 1/2 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

6,000 hhd. staves, 3 feet 6 inches long, 3 1/2 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

4,000 barrel staves, 2 feet 6 inches long, 3 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

1,500 hhd. heading, 2 feet 6 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

1,500 barrel heading, 1 foot 6 inches long, 6 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

All to be of white oak, and seasoned.

 

               CLASS No. 6—Lignumvitæ.

 

Two tons lignumvitæ, not less than 15 inches in diameter.

Four tons lignumvitæ, not less than 12 inches in diameter.

Two tons lignumvitæ, not less than 9 inches in diameter.

Two tons lignumvitæ, not less than 8 inches in diameter.

--773--

Two tons lignumvitæ, not less than 5 inches in diameter. (Best quality.)

Two tons lignumvitæ, not less than 7 inches in diameter.

               CLASS No. 7—Oar rafters.

30 oar rafters, 25 feet long.

50, 20 feet long.

50, 19 feet long.

200, 18 feet long.

200 oar rafters, 17 feet long.

250, 16 feet long.

250, 15 feet long.

200, 14 feet long, (of the best white ash.)

The 25 feet rafters, the looms to be 4 1/2 inches square; the blades at the ends 6 1/2 X 2 inches.

The 20 feet rafters down to 18 feet, the looms 3 3/4 inches square, the blades 5 3/4 X 1 3/4 inches at the ends.

The 17 to 14 feet rafters to be 3 1/2 inches square at the looms; the blades 5 1/2 X 1 1/2 inches at the ends.

All to be of the best white ash, well seasoned.

               CLASS No. 8—Lumber.

2,000 feet best seasoned white ash plank, 2 inches thick, and not less than 14 feet long.

2,000     do           do           do           1 3/4      do                                         do           do.

2,000     do           do           do           1 1/2      do                                         do           do.

1,000     do           do           do           12 to 16 feet long, 20 inches wide and 1 1/2 thick.

3,000 feet best seasoned white, ash plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide and 1 1/2 thick.

2,000 feet best seasoned white ash plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 20 inches wide, and 1 1/4 thick.

2,000 feet best seasoned white ash plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, and 1 1/4 thick.

4,000 feet best seasoned white ash plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 14 to 20 inches wide, and 1 1/8 thick.

8,000 feet 2 inch white ash plank, not less than 18 inches wide.

8,000 do 1 1/2 do do, not less than 18 inches wide.

6,000 do 1 1/4 do do , not less than 18 inches wide.

3,000 feet. 1 inch white ash boards.

               All to be well seasoned and of the best quality.

1,000 feet 3 inch black walnut plank, best seasoned.

1,000 do 2 1/2     do           do,          best seasoned.

1,000 do 2           do           do,          best seasoned.

2,000 do 1 inch black walnut boards, best seasoned.

1,000 do 3/4        do           do,          best seasoned.

*4,000 feet cypress plank, 15 to 25 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, 1 3/8 inch thick.

*8,000 feet cypress plank, 15 to 25 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, 1 1/4 inch thick.

*13,000 feet cypress boards, 15 to 25 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, 1 inch thick.

               * All to be quartered stuff, free from sap, bad knots, or other defects.

--774--

*3,000 feet cypress boards, 15 to 25 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, 5/8 inch thick.

4,000 feet elm plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 2 1/2 inches thick.

4,000 feet elm plank, 12 to 16 feet long, 2 feet wide, and 2 inches thick.

4,000 feet elm boards, 15 to 20 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, and 1 inch thick.

2,000 feet elm boards, 15 to 20 feet long, 8 to 10 inches wide, and 3/4 inch thick.

All to be well seasoned and of the best quality.

100 best split hickory capstan bars, 14 feet long, butt to square 6 inches.

100 do                  do           do do     13           do           do           5 do.

100 do                  do           do do     11           do           do           4 1/2 do.

200 best split hickory hand-spikes, 6 feet long, butt to square 4 1/2 inches.

100 do                  do           do do     5 1/2      do           do           3 1/2 do.

All the small ends to be two-thirds the size of the butts.

GEORGE LOYALL,

Navy Agent.

* All to be quartered stuff, free from sap, bad knots, or other defects

--775--

SCHEDULE No. 10.

Schedule of offers for supplies at the navy yard at Gosport, Va., under advertisement of navy agent, May 19—offers received June 16, 1845.

Articles                Bidders.                                                           Terms proposed. Amount.                        
    Terms in conformity with the advertisement.  
Ship Chandlery               Higgins & Brother                               *$11,384.96
Hardware Higgins & Brother   *8,306.97
Mast timber John B. McLoud   *2,458.76
Do John Petty   2,664.04
Do Ed. H. Herbert   2,735.73
Do John Nash   3,076.20
Fire-wood William Ottely   *952.00
Do Taylor Sivalls   1,050.00
Do M. Herbert   1,080.00
Do Ed. H. Herbert   1,125.00
Do W.H. Hanbury   1,200.00
Staves and heading             

John Tunis     

 

  *632.50
Do John Petty   842.50
Lignumvitae John Tunis   *1,050.00
Oar Rafters H.V. Niewayer   556.87
Do John McLemey   795.82
Do Geo. H. Wilson   1,012.50
Do R. Vermillion   1,113.75
Lumber John Talbot   *3,225.00
Do John Petty   3,817.50

* Accepted.

        Offers opened in presence of—

R. GATEWOOD,

T. B. WEST.

--776--

[Advertisement—Schedule No. 11.]

               Proposals for Lumber.

NAVY AGENCY, Philadelphia, April 23, 1845.

Sealed proposals, endorsed " Proposals for Lumber," will be received at this agency, until 12 o'clock, M., of Monday, the 26th day of May, 1845, to furnish and deliver at the navy yard, Philadelphia, on or before the first of August next, subject to the inspection, measurement and approval of such persons as the commandant of the yard may direct on its delivery:

2,000 feet of 3 inch while pine panel plank.

10,000   do 2       do           do           do.

9,000     do 1 1/3 do          do           do.

8,000     do 1 1/4 do          do           do.

20,000   do 1       do           do           boards.

8,000     do 5/8    do           do           do.

3,000     do 5/8                   poplar boards.

200 running feet of poplar, 8 inches square.

6,000 feet of 2 inch ash plank.

4,000     do 1 1/2                               do.

4,000     do 1                 do. boards not less than 20 inches wide.

1 piece of black walnut, 8 inches square, 10 feet long.

500 feet of 3 inch black walnut plank.

2,000 do 2           do                          do.

2,000 do 1           do                          boards.

500 do 5/8           do                          do.

1,000 do 2           cherry plank.

1,000 do 1           do boards.

A reservation of 10 per cent. will be made from all bills presented for payment until the contract is complied with.

SAMUEL D. PATTERSON,

Navy Agent.

--777--

Schedule of offers for furnishing lumber at the navy yard at Philadelphia, under advertisement of April 23, 1845, by Samuel D. Patterson, navy agent.

Bidders.                                                                      Terms proposed.   Amount.                      Remarks.                                                                                
  Terms in confirmity with the advertisement.    
John Nolan   *2,631.44  
S.M. Leiper   2,471.87  
John Williams & Son   *2,459.83  
Young & Randolph   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
Joseph Manning   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
Jacob Price   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
George Schnable   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
G.E.P. Baker   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
A.B. Hamilton   0.00 Informal, Offering for a part of the lumber only.
Henry Church   2,850.00  
W.H. Gunnell   3,444.50  
Samuel M. Leiper   2,463.60  

* Accepted.

MAY 27, 1845.

        Offers opened in presence of—

P. BARRY HAYES,

C. MASON.

--778--

[Advertisement—Schedule No. 12.]

Glass for the Navy.

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE,

Boston, May 14, 1845.

Sealed proposals, endorsed "Proposals for Glass," will be received at this office until 12 o'clock (noon) of Friday, 20th day of June next, for supplying the United States navy at this station, and delivering the same at the navy yard, Charlestown, Massachusetts, on or before the 15th day of August next, the following descriptions of glass, viz:

210 circular clear glass plates, 7 inches diameter and 1 inch thick, even thickness, square edges.

420 clear glass plates, 7 inches diameter, 1 1/2 inches thick, even thickness and square edges.

24 clear glass bull's eyes, each, 8 inches, 10 inches, and 12 inches diameter, for magazine lights.

The glass above mentioned must be subject to such inspection as the commandant of the navy yard may direct, and to his entire satisfaction, or it will not be received. No proposal will be considered unless the party proposing is known, or gives a reference known to the navy agent. The lowest bidder will be notified of the acceptance of his proposal through the post office, and he will be required to enter into contract for the delivery of the glass, with satisfactory bond for the faithful performance thereof. Payment will be made at this office within thirty days after the presentation of approved bills; 10 per cent. to be retained until the completion of the contract.

ISAAC HULL WRIGHT.

Navy Agent.

--779--

SCHEDULE No. 12.

Schedule of proposals received by Isaac Hull Wright, navy agent for the port of Boston, for circular glass plates and glass bull's eyes; under advertisement of May 14, 1845.

Articles advertised for.                                                                             Offer of Mayhew & Hamlen  Offer of Jos. N. Howe, agent New England Glass Company. Offer of Joseph Smith and Wm. Cains. Remarks.                                                                         
210 circular clear glass plates, 7 inches in diameter, and 1 inch thick each $2.00 $1.83 $2.00  
420 circular clear glass plates, 7 inches in diameter, and 1 1/2 inch thick do 2.00 2.32 2.50

 Terms in conformity with advertisement.

 

 

 

 

24 clear glass bull's eyes, 8 inches in diameter do 2.00 4.50 5.00  
24 clear glass bull's eyes, 10 inches in diameter do 2.00 7.00 7.00  
24 clear glass bull's eyes, 12 inches in diameter do 2.00 10.00 9.00  
Aggregate of each bid *1,404.00 † $1,572.60 1,974.00  

* Declined entering into contract.                               † Accepted.

 

        Offers opened and signed by 

S. B. WILSON, Commander.

                                             J. H. MARSHALL, Lieutenant.

--780--

SCHEDULE No. 13.

Schedule of offers to furnish brazier's and boiler copper, and composition sheathing nails, at. the navy yard at Gosport, Va.; under advertisement by George Loyall, navy agent, of the 14th of March, 1845.

Bidders.                              Articles advertised for.                                 Amount.                 Terms proposed. 
  12 sheets brazier's copper, 50 ounce, 600 pounds    
  15 do do 60 ounce, 900 pounds,    
  15 do do 70 ounce, 1,050 pounds,    
  10 do do 80 ounce, 600 pounds,    

E.J. Higgins &

Brother

3,350 pounds, at 30 cents per

pound

   
 

5 sheets boiler copper, 4-16 inch,

722 pounds,

$425.40 Terms in confirmity with advertisement.
  6 do do 3-16 inch, 696 pounds                
  1,418 pounds, at 30 cents per pound       
 

500 pounds 2 1/2 inch composition sheathing nails,

 

$3,135.00  
 

500 pounds 2-inch do do

 

   
 

1,000 pounds 1 1/2 inch do do     

 

   
 

2,000 pounds 1 3/8 inch do do

 

   
 

5,000 pounds 1 -inch do do

 

   
 

4,000 pounds 3/4-inch do do

 

   
 

11,000 pounds, at 28 1/2 cents per

 

   
    4,565.40  

April 12, 1845.

Offers opened in presence of—                    R. GATEWOOD.

                                                                           T. B. WEST.

--781--

SCHEDULE No. 14.

Schedule showing the aggregate sums demanded by different persons to furnish supplies at the Washington navy yard, under advertisements by W. B. Scott, navy agent, of the 12th and 21st May, 1845.

Articles.         Bidders.                                Terms proposed. Amount.                    Remarks.                                                   
    Terms in confirmity with the advertisement.    
Iron Horner & Leighton   $3,806.25 Accepted.
Do George Adams   3,867.50  
Do S. and P.T. Ellicott   0 Informal; ofering for only a part of the iron.
Copper Horner & Leighton   30 cts. per lb. Accepted this offer by lot.
Do George Adams   30 cts per.lb.  
Paints Charles Stott   878.80 Accepted.
Do R.S. Patterson   89.50  
Do O. Whittlesey   96.55  
Do Farquhar & Morgan   97.25  
Do E.A. Hoskins   94.00  
Do
B.M. Toland
Terms in confirmity with the advertisement. 0.00 Informal; offering for only a part of the paints.
Ash logs Philip Otterback   900.00 Accepted.
Do W.H. Gunnell   0.00 Informal; offering for only a part of the logs
Hardware, miscellaneous articles, and stationery Campbell & Coyle   758.46 Offers for hardware only.
Do do do E. Lindsley   1,106.03 Offers for all.
Do do do Woodward & king   849.92 Accepted for all but stationery.
Do do do Simeon P. Smith   1,064.08 Offers for all.
Do do do George Adams   988.80 Offers for all.

Do do do
Z.D. Gilman   155.44 Offers for miscellaneous articles only.
Do do do Wm. Fischer   46.45 Accepted; ofers for stationery.
Do do do Garrett Anderson   57.47 Offers for stationery.

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, Washington.

            Offers opened by-                          

                                W. B. SCOTT,

                                                                                          THEODORE KANE.

                                                                                          H. FORREST.

--782--

SCHEDULE No. 15.

Schedules of officers to furnish supplies at the navy yard at Gosport, Va., under advertisement by George Loyall, navy agent, (originals sent to the bureau by him September 12, 1845.)

TERMS IN CONFORMITY WITH THE ADVERTISEMENT.

No.1

Schedule offers to furnish boat knees, cypress boards, and slaves.

 

No.2

Schedule offers to furnish yellow pine timber, cypress posts, and white pine boards.

 

No.3

Schedule offers to furnish deck and screw bits, sloat augers, braces, pins & c.

 

No.4

Schdule offers to furnish jack screws, magazine lights, and airport glasses.

 

Bidders.

 

Amount.                

 Bidders.

 

Amount.

 

Bidder.  

 

Amount.                

Bidder.

 

Amount. 

           

W.C. Burroughs

 

*$358.00

 

John Tunis

 

$546.84

 

Higgins & Brother

 

*2,343.26 

 

Higgins & Brother

 

*414.00

 

John Talbot 560.90 John Talbot 552.22        

* Accepted.

NAVY AGENT’S OFFICE, Norfolk, August 20, 1815.

GEORGE LOYALL, Navy Agent.

Offers opened in our presence—                                                                             R. GATEWOOD,

                                                                                                                                       T. B. WEST.

--783--

A.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying small stores at the navy yard at Charlestown, Massachusetts, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Articles.                       Bradley & Richrdson.     George Adams.*    William Lang.    Horner & Leighton.    G.J.F. Bryant.    
                             
Brushes, shaving each $0.08 $0.08 $0.04 $0.10 $0.02
scrubbing do .48 .48 .32 .45 .40
shoe do .14 .15 .15 .15 .27
clothes do .20 .20 .21 .15 .25
Buttons, navy, vest per gross 2.50 2.50 3.00 2.50 3.60
coat do 3.50 3.50 .50 1.00 8.00
dead-eye do .13 .20 .20 .21 .25
Blacking per dozen boxes .50 .50 .50 .45 .69
Beeswax, in 1/4 pound cakes per dozen boxes per lb. .37 .37 .38 .45 .40
Combs, coarse per doz. .58 .58 .60 .60 .95
fine do .88 .87 1.00 .90 1.50
Cotton, sewing, on spools do .30 .35 .20 .25 .30
Handerkerchiefs, cotton each .08 .07 .10 .10 .12
silk do .56 .58 .60 .50 .80
Knives, jack do .16 2/3 .17 .25 .25 .25
Looking-glasses do .08 .07 .11 .08 .22 
Mustard, in 1/4 pound bottles per doz .60 .60 .90 .20 .90
Needles, sewing, assorted per M .45 1.00 .10 .75 1.00
Pepper, black and red per doz .62 .58 .90 .40 .90
Razors, in single cases each .25 .25 .33 .25 .25
Razor straps do .09 .07 .11 .08 .25
Ribbon, Hat per piece .25 .50 .60 .72 .60
Soap, salt water per lb. .05 1/2 .05 .10 .06 1/2 .25
shaving, in cakes per doz .18 .18 .12 .18 .25
Scissors each .15 .15 .25 .25 .25
Silk, sewing per lb. 3.25   .20 1.00 4.50
Spoons each .02 .02 .04 .04 .03
Thread, black, white, and blue per lb. .62 .62 .75 .75 .74
Tape, white per doz .18 .20 .15 .25 .25
Thimbles each .01 .01 1/4 0.4 .04 .03

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--784--

A—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying small stores at the navy yard at Brooklyn, New York, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Articles.                                     Samuel Suydam. E.J. Higgins Francis P. Sage. Powell & Vining. John Acosta. Henry S. Wyckoff. Cor. V.S. Gibbs.* Henry Suydam, sen.
Brushes, shaving each $.0.07 $0.01 $0.06 $0.08 $0.10 1/2 $0.06 $0.07 1/2 $0.15
scrubbing do 0.17 0.25 0.50 0.11 0.18 1/2 0.50 0.13 0.50
shoe do 0.17 0.12 0.50 0.12 1/2 0.18 0.50 0.13 0.25
clothes do 0.25 0.12 0.25 0.34 0.40 0.25 0.26 0.25
Buttons, navy, vest per gross 4.00 1.50 1.68 1/2 4.50 4.18 3/4 1.00 3.75 4.00
coat do 9.00 1.00 0.50 9.00 9.28 0.50 5.25 0.25
dead-eye do 0.31 0.10 0.11 0.25 .0.37 0.11 0.28 0.35
Blacking, in boxes per doz 0.62 0.75 0.20 1.00 0.87 0.20 0.67 1.00
Beeswax, in 1/4 pound cakes per ib 0.44 0.40 0.66 0.36 0.48 1/2 0.66 0.37 1/2 0.56
Combs, course per doz 1.12 0.58 0.30 0.75 1.36 0.30 0.92 1.50
fine do 1.15 0.90 0.62 1/2 0.94 1.23 62 1/2 1.05 2.00
Cotton, spools do 0.75 0.12 0.10 0.38 0.73 0.10 0.48 0.50
Handkerchiefs, cotton each 0.19 0.06 0.50 0.25 0.16 0.50 0.15 0.25
silk do 1.00 1.10 0.25 0.56 1.05 0.25 0.70 0.25
Looking-glasses do 0.25 0.20 0.12 0.17 0.25 0.12 0.15 0.10
Knives, jack do 0.25 0.40 0.40 0.21 0.29 0.40 0.23 1/2 0.40
Kettles, mess do 1.25 0.37 1/2 0.95 0.84 1.21 0.45 1.15 0.62
Mustard, in 1/4 pounds bottles per doz 1.05 0.90 0.88 1.00 1.12 0.88 0.67 1.25
Needles, sewing,assorted per M 1.56 0.75 0.12 1.00 1.70 0.12 1.10 1.25
pans, mess per doz 2.12 1/2 3.75 2.00 8.50 11.50 0.75 7.00 1.50
tin do   1.40 1.25 1.75 1.44 0.25 1.45 1.50
Pots, tin do 1.50 1.40 1.50 1.31 1.40 0.25 1.45 1.50
Pepper, black and red, in 1/4 pound bottles do 0.75 0.90 0.60 0.63 0.92 0.60 0.70 1.25
Razors, in single cases each 0.25 0.38 0.31 0.24 0.29 0.31 0.26 0.30

--785--

A-Continued.

Articles                                                      Samuel Suydam. E.J. Higgins Francis P. Sage. Powell & Vining. John Acosta. Henry S. Wycoff. C.V.S. Gibbs.* Henry Suydam, sen.
Razor strips each   $0.25 $0.14 $0.12 1/2 $0.16 $0.20 $0.12 1/2 $0.18 $0.15
Ribbon, hat per piece 0.47 0.70 0.70 0.50 0.52 0.70 0.55 0.70
Soap, salt water per lb 0.05 0.07 0.08 1/2 0.05 1/2 0.06 0.081/2 0.06 1/4 0.07 1/2
shaving, in cakes per doz 1.25 0.06 0.50 0.56 0.71 0.16 0.43 3/4 0.50
Scissors each   0.37 0.75 0.25 0.23 0.75 0.16 0.75
Silk, sewing per lb 7.00 0.75 10.00 8.00 7.90 10.00 6.00 0.50
Thread, black, white, and blue do 1.20 0.75 2.50 0.85 1.20 1.50 0.89 1/4 2.00
Tape per doz 0.60 0.45 1.05 0.38 0.45 0.05 0.46 0.75
Thimbles each 0.08 0.01 0.03 0.01 1/2 0.02 1/2 0.01 0.02 1/2 0.04
Spoons do 0.03 1/2 0.03 0.04 0.04 0.04 1/2 0.01 0.03 3/4 0.04

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--786--

Abstract of proposals received for supplyong small stores at the navy yard at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                                                Articles                                                                                                                                   Shadrach Hill.*
Brushes, shaving per doz $0.81
             scrubbing do 2.25
             shoe per doz pair 3.50
             clothes       per doz 3.00
Buttons, navy, vest do .50
               coat do .75
              dead-eye do .03
Blacking, in boxes do .75
Beeswax in 1/4 pound cakes per lb .45
Combs, coarse per doz 1.25
               fine do 1.37 1/2
Cotton, spools do .50
Handkerchiefs, cotton do .50
            silk do 14.00
Knives, jack do 2.25
Kettle, mess do 11.00
Looking glass do 1.75
Needles per M 1.50
Pan, mess per doz 9.50
           tin        do 2.00
Pots, tin do 1.60
Razors do 5.00
Razor strips do 2.00
Ribbon, hat per piece .55
Soap, salt water per lb .75
          shaving, in cakes per doz .75
Scissors do 3.50
Silk, sewing per lb 8.00
Thread, black, white, and blue do 1.00
Tape per doz .50
Thimbles do .25
Mustard, in tin boxes do 1.50
Pepper, black do 1.25
            red do 1.37 1/2

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing. July 31, 1845.

--787--

A--Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for suplying small stores at the navy yard at Gosport, Virginia, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                     Articles                                                                                           E.J. Higgins, and Bro.* H.B. Reardon. Bonsal and Bro. Edward P. Tabb.
Brushes, shaving each $0.04 $0.03 $0.05

$o

0.06 1/4

scrubbing

do .08

.15

.12 .18 3/4

shoe

do .09 .11 .10 .12 1/2

clothes

do .08 .10 .25 .25
Buttons, navy, vest per gross 1.00 3.00 5.00 8.50

coat

do 1.00 3.00 5.00 8.50

dead-eye

do .10 .20 .10 .25
Blacking per doz boxes .50 .70 1.00 .87
Beeswax, in 1/4 pound cakes per lb .30 .33 .35 .50
Combs, course per doz .58 1.00 1.00 .88

fine

do 1.00 1.12 1.00 1.00
Cotton, spools of do .10 .20 .12 .45
Handkerchiefs, cotton each .06 .07 1/2 .12 .10

silk

do .60 .75 .60 .60
Knives, jack do .25 .23 .25 .20
Kettles, mess do .30 .50 .60 .87
Looking-glasses do .05 .10 .10 .12 1/2
Mustard, in 1/4 pound bottles per doz .90 1.00 1.00 1.00
Needles, sewing, assorted per M .50 1.00 1.00 1.00
Pans, mess per doz 3.00 .50 6.00 9.00

tin

do 1.25 1.50 1.50 2.00
Pots, tin do 1.25 1.12 1.50 1.50
Pepper, black and red, in 1/4 pound bottles do .90 1.00 1.00  
Razors, in single cases each .30 .25 .25 .25
Razor straps do .08 .16 .20 .17
Ribbon, hat per piece .55 .50 .65 .44
Soap, salt water per lb .06 .06 1/4 .06 1/2 .07

shaving, in cakes

per doz .02 .40 .25 .25
Scissors each .20 .27 .25 .25
Silk, sewing per lb .65 1.00 1.00 8.00
Spoons each .02 .03 1/4 .02 1/2 .03
Thread, black, white, and blue per lb .60 .65 .70 .80
Tape per doz pieces .25 .15 .12 .25
Thimbles each .00 1/2 .01 .01 .01 1/2

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845

--788--

A--Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying small stores at the navy yard at Pensacola, Florida, during the fiscal year endingJune 30, 1846.

                                             Articles                                                                    J.M. Stanard.* John R. Brookes.
Brushing, shaving each $0.08 2/3 $0.09

scrubbing

do .25 .25

shoe

do .18 3/4 .18 3/4

clothes

do .20 .37 1/2
Buttons, navy, vest per gross 1.00 6.00

coat

do 2.00 8.00

dead-eye

do .37 1/2 .30
Blacking, boxes of per doz .75 .84
Beeswax, in 1/4 pound cakes per doz .37 1/2 .30
Combs, coarse per doz 1.00 .84

fine

do 1.25 1.08
Handkerchiefs, cotton each .05 .06 1/4

silk

do .20 .30
Knives, mess do .18 3/4 .15 1/2
Kettle, mess do 1.00 1.10
Looking-glasses do .25 .25
Mustard, in 1/4 pound bottles per doz 2.00 1.80
Needless, sewing, assorted per M .50 .60
Pans, mess per doz 12.00 12.00

tin

do 2.50 2.10
Pepper, black and red, in 1/4 pound bottles do .70 .36
Razors, in single cases each .50 .35
Razor straps do .18 3/4 .20
Ribbon, hat per piece 1.00 .95
Soap, salt water per lb .06 1/2 .07

shaving, in cakes

per doz .50 .50
Scissors each .20 .17
Silk, sewing per lb 5.00 6.00
Thread, black, white, and blue do 1.25 1,00
Tape, pieces per doz .10 .10
Thimbles each .00 1/2 .01
Spoons do .03 1/2 .03

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--789--

B.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard and station at Portsmouth. New Hampshire, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                                           Names                                                                                                 Beef per pound. Vegetables per pound.
Thomas Currier*                                                                                                                         5 cents           2/5 cent.                

*Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

__________

B--Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard and station at Charlestown, Massachusetts, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                       Names.                                                                          Beef per pound Vegetables per pound Kind offered for.
John Gordon* 5 cents 7/8 cent  
Potter & Leland 5 1/2 cents 1 cent  
William W. Smith 6 1/2 cents 1 cent Potatoes.
Do   2 cents Beets.
Do   2 cents. Carrots
Do   2 cents. Onions
Do   1 1/2 cent Turnips
Do   2 cents Cabbages
Do   3 cents. Beans.
Do   3 cents Peas.

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--790--

B—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard and station at Brooklyn, New York, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                             Names                                                        Beef per pound Vegetables, per pound.
R. Markle 5 1/2 cents 1 cent.
H.D. Loomis 4 cents 1 1/2 cent.
H.B. Tickenor    
John Conrey* 3 1/2 cents 0.99 cent.
James H. Pinkney 3.74 cents 1 cent
George Haws 3.95 cents. 1 cent.
Peter Valentine 3 3/4 cents 1 1/4 cent
T.M. Jenkins & B. Weeks 3 3/4 cents 1 1/4 cent
George Montgomery 4 cents 1 cent
George H. Cornell 5.96 cents 1 1/2 cent
Samuel F. Smith 3.88 cents 1 cent
Joseph P. Flynn 5 cents 1 1/4 cent
John Chappel, jr. 5 1/2 cents 1 1/2 cent

*Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845

__________

B---Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard and station at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                                             Names.                                                                         Beef, per pound.     Vegetables, per pound.
David Woelpper 5 cents 2 1/2 cents.
Thomas Higgins* 4.2 cents 1.37 cent.

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--791--

B—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States naval station at Baltimore, Md., with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Names.                                                                                     Beef, per pound.         Vegetables, per pound.
George W. Pappler* 4 1/2 cents 2 cents.
J.M. Turner 4 1/2 cents 2 cents

*Accepted--Bids being equal, decided by lot.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

__________

B--Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard at Washington. D. C, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Names.                                                                         Beef, per pound.         Vegetables, per pound.
Philip Otterback 5 1/2 cents 5 1/2 cents
Thomas McDonnell 5 cents  
James Rhodes 4 3/4 cents  
S.J. Little 4 1/2 cents 4 1/2 cents
John Little 3 1/2 cents 2 cents
Charles Unger* 3 1/4 cents 2 cents

*Accepted

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--792--

B—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United Stales navy yard and station at Gosport, Va., with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

                                        Name.                                                                                        Beef, per pound.                                    Vegtables, per pound.             
William Ward* 6 1/2 cents 2 cents. †

* Accepted                   † 75 cents per bushel for potatoes.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

__________

B—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying the United States navy yard and station at Pensacola, Florida, with fresh beef and vegetables during the fiscal year ending June 30,  1846.

                                           Names.                                                                                  Beef, per pound.                      Vegetables, per pound.
William Mc Voy* 6 cents 3 1/2 cents
Joseph Gonzales 7 cents 4 cents
Francis Morento 6 & 11 4 1/2 & 4

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--793--

C.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying clothing and clothing materials

vertisement of the Bureau of Provisions

Names.                                      Residence.                          Blue cloth pea jackets. 1.75 Blue flannel shirts.  
    Men's                         Boys'.             Men's.                  Boys'.                
Nathaniel Gale Boston $7.75 $6.25 $1.50 $1.30
Harvey Caswell New York  8.75  7.75  1.75  1.65
Samuel Pleasants Philadelphia  7.90 6.90  1.55  1.45
John Ashton jr. Do  8.99 7.45  1.79  1.59
Jacob Sleeper Boston *6.50 *4.00 *1.55 *1.40
Milton & Slocomb Do  9.00  8.25  1.74  1.50
Mayhew & Hamlen Do  6.00  5.47  1.47  1.37
Cornelius V.S. Gibbs New York        
B.S. Hurxthall Do  6.70  5.30  1.50  1.38
John G. Vose Do        
Charles K. Sutton Do        
James M. Meade Do        
Wm. P. Merrick Do        
George Adams Boston  6.50  5.56  1.60  1.50
Henry Habermehl Philadelphia        
Thereon E. Clark Boston        
A. Mellen & Co. New York        
Bemjamin W. How Do        
Aaron Jones Germantown        
Grant & Barton New York  7.30  6.00  1.64  1.50
J.H. Tarbell Boston        
William Lang Do  6.47  5.55  1.57  1.47
Mellon & Hopkins Do        
Epaphias Kibby, jr. Do        
Thomas R. Fisher Germantown        
T.P. Gustin New York        
Caleb D. Hunking Lynn, Mass.        
John G. Flagg Boston        
James Baker Do        
Edward Montgomery Philadelphia        
John Cocke & Co. Portsmouth, Va.        
John B. Cronin New York  7.00  5.67  1.56  1.44
Orville Stowe Boston        
Samuel P. Merrill Do        
Thomas Tarbell & Co. Do        
W.H. Solomon & Co. New York  5.25  5.00  1.90  1.70

*Accepted

--794--

C.

for the navy, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846, under an ad-and Clothing, dated April 11, 1845.

Blue-flannel, wool-dyed. Blue flannel, under-shirts.   Blue flannel, pierce-dyed. Russia linen frocks.   Russia linen trowsers.   Black silk hdkfs.
Per yard.             Men's.                  Boys'                             Per yard.                       Men's                  Boys'.             Men's             Boys'.                         Each.         
$0.45 $0.75 $0.65 $.0.40 $0.80 *$0.70 *$0.62 *$0.55 $0.80
    .45  1.45  1.35    .43    .90    .87    .90    .87 .97
  *.42  1.12  1.02   *.37         .87 1/2     .82 1/2     .70    .64    .74
   1.30  1.10    1.25  1.05    .90    .75  
   .42   *.75    *.60    .40    .85    .70    .60    .50    .75
   .45    .85    .82    .40  1.10  1.00    .67    .62    .74
   .38 1/2  1.00    .90    .36    .84    .79    .62    .43    .65
                 
   .38  1.00 .90    .36    .84    .79    .62    .43    .65
                 
                 
                 
                 
   .48        .40    .88    .80    .68    .60    .75
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
   .42  1.20    .95    .39    .94    .85    .68    .49    .75
                 
  .42 1/2    .87    .70    .40    .85    .75    .65    .57    .73
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
   .40  1.14    .92    .37    .89    .82    .65    .46    .70
                 
                 
                 
                 
   .45    .80    .75      .85    .80    .70    .65    .65

*Accepted

--795--

C--

                                   Name.                                                              Residence.               Woolen stockings.   Woolen socks.           
    Men's.                  Boys'.     Men's                       Boys'.          
Nathaniel Gale Boston        
Harvey Caswell New York $0.60 $0.60             $0.30 $0.30
Samuel Pleasants Philadelphia        
John Ashton, jr. Do        
Jacob Sleeper Boston    .45    .45    .28    .28
Milton & Slocomb Do    .45    .40    .30    .25
Mayhem & Hamlen Do    .35    .34    .23    .22
Cornelius V.S. Gibbs New York    .34 1/2    .34 1/2    .22 5/8    23 5/8
B.S. Hurxthall Do    .45    .45    .30    .30
John G. Vose Do        
Charles K. Sutton Do        
James M. Meade Do        
Wm. P. Merrick Do.        
George Adams Boston    .35    .34    .25    .23
Henry Habermehl Philadelphia        
Thereon E. Clark Boston        
A. Mellon & Co. New York        
Benjamin W. How Do        
Aaron Jones Germantown   *.35  *29.17  *22.4-5   *.19 1/4
Grant & Barton New york        
J.H. Tarbell Boston        
William Lang Do    .34    .33    .22    .20
Mellen & Hopkins Do        
Epaphias Kibby, jr. Do        
Thomas R. Fisher Germantown    .35 5-12   .35 5-12    .21 2/3    .21 2/3
Caleb D. Hunking Lynn, Mass.        
John G. Flagg Boston        
James Baker Do        
Edward Montgomery Philadelphia    .40    .40    .24     .24
John Cocke & Co. Portsmouth, Va.        
John B. Cronin New York    .50    .50    .38    .38
Orville Stowe Boston        
Samuel P. Merrill Do        
Thomas Tarbell & Co. Do        
W.H. Solomon & Co. New York        

*Accepted

NOTE.—In the several instances where a proposal appears lower than the accepted offer, the individual making such offer either positively declined, failed to enter into contract, or to comply with the conditions of the advertisement; when the supply was offered to the next lowest bidder, according to law; and where two or more bids were equal, it was decided by lot.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--796--

Continued.

Pumps.           Mattresses.     Blankets.         Hats.                Russia linen. Blue dungaree. Blue nankeen.
Men's. Boys'.         Each Men's. Boys'.          Men's Boys'.         Per yard. Per yard. Per yard.
          $0.35 $0.31 $0.29 $0.12 $0.18
                *.16   *.13 1/2     *.9
      $1.98 $1.98        .29    .12 1/2    .12
                   
$0.95  0.08  *4.40  1.90  1.90    .40    .40    .18    .12  1.20 a piece
 1.10    .90  5.50  *1.75  *1.75    .35    .32    .26    .12 1/2    .10
   .74 3/4   .69 3/4  4.57  1.78 1/2  1.71 1/2    .29 3/4    .29 3/4    .23 1/2     .11 3/4     .10 3/4
  .79 3/4    .73 1/2    1.79 3/4            
  .88    .88  4.25  1.65  1.65    .40    .40    .21    .12 1.00 a piece
  .78    .50                
 *.79    *.48                
   .75    .58                
   .78 1/2    .47 1/2                
   .80    .75  4.90  1.80  1.80    *.29    *.29    .25    .12 1/2    .11 1/2
   .75    .70                
     4.89  1.97 1/2  1.90          
     4.62 1/2              
.89 1/2    .89 1/2                
     4.75  1.75  1.75       25 & 23    .13  1.25 a piece
           1.68 1/2  1.68 1/2          
   .77    .70  4.70  1.75  1.66    .30    .30 23 1/2 & 24    .11 3/4    .11
     4.99              
   .74    .62                
                   
   .77    .60                
   .84 1/2    .84 1/2                
     4.24              
 1.05    .60                
                   
                   
                 .24    .12 1/2  
     4.50  1.70  1.70    .50    .50    .22    .12  1.00 a piece
             .31 1/2    .31 1/2      
     5.12 1/2              
         1.85  1.75        
     5.00            .18    .12     .6

*Accepted

--797--

D.

Abstract of proposals received for furnishing "navy supplies" at the navy

Names.                                Residence              Floor, per bbl.  Biscuit            Whiskey, per gall. Sugar, per lb.  Tea, per lb. 
      Tight casks. Flour barrels.      
John Aosta New York $5.55     $0.29 1/2 $8.95 $0.54 1/2
E.J. Higgins Norfolk 7.00     .30 .9 1/2 .50
Martin Curren Philadelphia 6.00       .9  .45
Hyatt & Stump Baltimore 5.70     .33 .8 .49
Samuel Pleasants Philadelphia 6.00       .8 3/4 .45
John K. Graham Do.       .28 .9 3/4 .55
Thomas Brown Georgetown, DC 5.99 4.20 3.52      
Thomas J. Davis Do 5.90          
William Yeaton Alexandria, DC 5.75     .27 .9 .60
G. Schnabel Lewisburg, Pa. 7.62 1/2     .33    
George L. Thomas Alexandria, Va. 5.94       8.35 .55
James O. Sheldon New York 5.59     .28 7/8 8 15-16 49 5/8
James H. Barney Baltimore 6.00     .26    
George Jackson Do   3.67 3.37      
Gurdon K. Tyler Do   3.66 3.36      
E.G. Brown Georgetown, DC 5.70 4.05 3.55      
G.W.Gibbs & Brothers New York       *.27 1/2   .44
D.M. Branch Richmond 5.50          
John S. Williams Baltimore 5.48 3.90 3.65      
Martin E. Thompson New York            
William Underwood Boston            
Melchor B. Mason Baltimore 5.50     .28 *.7 1/2 .43
Mayhem & Hamlen Boston         .10  
Flynn &Herr Philadelphia 6.00     .30    
John P. Arcularius New York           .49
William H. Bigelow Do 6.23       .9 3/8 .75
Peter Hewitt Alexandria, DC   3.75 3.37 1/2      
E. Corning & Son New York            
Thomas B. Smith Philadelphia            
Dean, Green & Co. Boston            
Alex B. Hanson Frederick, md.       .40    
Silas Pierce Boston            
Samuel Clayton & Sons Baltimore            
Joseph B. Glover & Co. Boston 5.45 4.10 3.99 .27 8.95 .43
Thomas Wattson & Sons Do   3.70 3.30      
William Lang Do *5.20     .29 .8 1/4 *.40
J.H. and G.S. Curtis Do            
George Browne Do 7.25 4.15 3.50 .28 .9 .51

* Accepted.

Note.—In the several instances where a proposal appears lower than the accepted offer, the ply with the conditions of the advertisement; when the supply was offered to the next lowest

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--798--

D.

 yard at Charlestown. Mass., during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Coffee, per lb. Cocoa, per lb. Butler, per lb. Molasses, per gall. Beans, per bush. Vinegar, per gall. Pickles, per lb. Raisins, per lb. Dried apples, per lb.
$0.07 7/8     $0.39 3/4 $1.81 $0.10 1/2   $0.11 5/8 $0.04 7/8
    .10 0.13 0.19 0.37 1.60 0.11 0.08 0.13 0.06
   0.09   0.15 1/2 0.37   0.12 0.05   0.05 3/4
   0.08     0.32 1.45 0.14      
   0.09   0.16 0.35 1.62 1/2 0.12 0.05 0.12 1/2 0.05
   0.08 3/4     0.37 1/2   0.10 1/4 3.98   0.05 1/2
   0.08 1/2 8 & 16 0.20 0.36 3/4 1.65 0.12 1/2   0.12 1/2  
        2.12 1/2 0.25      
   0.08 1/2

0.09 1/4

& 0.17

  0.35 1.67     0.12 1/4 4.98
  0.07 15-16   0.17 7/8 0.34 3/8 1.74     0.10 7-16 4.11-16
      0.35          
  0.08 5/8   0.15   1.70 *0.09 0.04 0.10 7/8 *0.03 7/8
    0.16   1.58       0.04 1/8
                 
    0.17 1/2   2.00 0.10 3/4 0.04 1/2 0.14 0.04 1/2
            0.04    
  0.08 1/2     0.35          
   0.07     0.32       0.11 1/2 0.04 1/4
    0.09 3/8     0.36   0.09 1/2   0.12  
  *0.08 1/2              
            0.04 1/8    
    0.18            
              0.12 1/2  
                 
    0.16 1/4           0.05 3/8
  0.07 3/4 0.11 0.18 0.30 2.00 0.09 1/2 0.04 1/2 0.11 3/4 0.05 1/4
  0.07 3/4 0.16 0.14 0.29 1.38 0.09 0.04 0.09 3/4 0.04
            *4 & 3    
  0.09 0.20 0.16 0.34 2.00 0.09 0.06 1/2 0.10 1/2 0.04

* Accepted.

individual making such offer either positively declined, failed to enter into contract, or to comp bidder, according to law; and where two or more bids were equal, it was decided by lot.

--799--

D—

Abstract of proposals received for furnishing "navy supplies" at the navy

Name.                                Residence                Flour, per bbl. Biscuit     Whiskey, per gall. Sugar, per lb. tea, per lb.
      Tight casks. Flour bbls.      
John Acosta New York $5.48     $0.28 1/2 $0.08 7/8 $0.53 1/2  
E.J. Higgins Norfolk  6.10     *0.26  0.09   0.45
M. Curren Philadelphia  6.00        0.09  0.45
Hyatt & Stump Baltimore  5.49      0.30  0.08  0.45
Samuel Pleasants Philadelphia  5.75        0.08 3/4  0.45
John K. Graham Do        0.27 1/2  0.09 3/4  0.55
Thomas Brown Georgetown, DC  5.95  4.10  3.45      
Thomas J. Davis Do  5.80          
G. Schnabel Lewisburg, Pa.  7.50      0.32    
George I. Thomas Alexandria, DC  5.83        0.08 1-5  0.56
James O. Sheldon New York *5.83      0.27 7/8  8.15-16  0.49 3/8
James H. Barney Baltimore  6.00      0.26    
George Jackson      3.45  3.13      
Gurdon K. Tyler Do    3.57  *3.27      
E.G. Brown  Georgetown, DC  5.60  3.72  3.31      
G.W. Gibbs & Brothers New York        0.36 7/8   *0.42 1/2
D.M. Branch Richmond  5.50          
John S. Williams Baltimore  5.46  3.84  3.59      
Martin E. Thompson New York            
W. Underwood Boston            
Melchor B. Mason Baltimore  5.50      0.28  *0.07 1/4  0.43
Flynn & Herr Phildelphia  6.00      0.30    
John P. Arcularius New York            0.49
William H. Bigelow Do  6.23        0.09 3/8  0.75
Peter Hewlett Alexandria, DC    3.75  3.37 1/2      
E. Corning & Son New York            
Thomas B. Smith Philadelphia            
Dean, Green, & Co. Boston            
Alex. B. Hanson Frederick, Md.        0.40    
Silas Pierce Boston            
S.S. Williams Philadelphia    3.93  3.68  0.28 1/2    
John Doughty Do            
Robert Spier, Jr. New York    3.97  3.31      
Joseph L. Sanford Do    3.98  3.48      
H. Suydam, sen Do            0.56
H.S. Wyckoff Do          0.09  
William Yeaton Alexandria, DC  5.80      0.27  0.09  0.62 1/2

*Accepted.

Note.—In the several instances where a proposal appears lower than the accepted offer, the ply with the conditions of the advertisement; when the supply was offered to the next lowest

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--800--

Continued.

yard at Brooklyn, N. Y, during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Coffee, per lb. Cocoa, per lb. Butter, per lb. Molasses, per gall. Beans, per lb. Vinegar, per gall. Pickles, per lb. Raisins, per lb. Dried apples, per lb.
*$0.07 7/8     $0.39 1/2 $1.78 $0.09 1/2   $0.11 5/8 $0.04 7/8
  0.08 $0.11 $0.16 *0.34  1.47  0.09  0.08  0.12  0.07
  0.09    0.15  0.35    0.12  0.05    0.05 3/4
  0.08      0.32  1.35  0.14      
  0.08 3/4    *0.15  0.35  1.62  0.12 1/2  0.04 1/2  0.12 1/2  0.04 3/4
  0.08 3/4      0.37 1/2    0.10 1/4  3.95    0.05 1/2
         2.15  0.25      
 7.98 9 & 16    0.34 1/3  1.61 1/2      0.12 3/8  4.95
 7 15-16    0.16 7/8  0.34 5/8  1.74      *0.10 7-16 47-16
                 
       0.34 1/3  1.61 1/2      0.12 3/8  4.95
7 15-16    0.16 7/8  0.34 5/8  1.74      *0.10 7-16 47-16
       0.35          
 0.08 1/2 8 1/4 & 16 1/4  0.15 7/8    1.70  *0.08 3/4  0.03 7/8  0.10 3/4  *0.03 7/8
     0.16    *1.45        0.04 3/8
     0.17    1.87  0.10 1/4  0.04 1/4  0.13 1/2  0.04 1/2
             0.04    
 0.08 1/2      0.35          
 0.09 3/8      0.36    0.09 1/2    0.12  0.05 7/8
  *8 & 16              
                 
     0.18            
               0.12 1/4  
           0.09 1/2    0.12  0.04 1/2
             *0.03 3/4    
 0.08 1/2  0.08 1/2 & 0.16  0.20  0.37  1.60  0.12 1/2    0.12 1/2  0.05 3/4

*Accepted

individual making such offer either positively declined, failed to enter into contract, or to com-bidder according to law; and where two or more bids were equal, it was decided by lot.

               51

--801--

D—.

Abstract of proposals received for furnishing "navy supplies" at the navy-

Names.                        Residence.    Flour, per bbl. Biscuit   Whiskey, per gall. Sugar, per lb. Tea, per lb.
      Tight casks. Flour bbls.      
John Acosta New York $5.55     $0.29 $0.09 $0.54 1/2
E.J. Higgins Norfolk *5.19       *.24 1/2   8.73     .43
Martin Curren Philadelphia   6.00         0.09     .45
Hyatt & Stump Baltimore   5.70         .31   0.08     .49
Samuel Pleasants Philadelphia   6.00          8 3/4     .45
John K. Graham Do        0.27  0.9 3/4     .55
Thomas Brown Georgetown, DC  5.70  3.89  3.35      
Thomas I. Davis Do  5.50          
William Yeaton Alexandria, DC  5.85      0.26  0.09  0.65 1/2
G. Schnabel Lewisburg, Pa.  7.25      0.35    
George I. Thomas Alexandria, DC  5.50        8.45  0.58
James O. Sheldon New York  5.43      0.27 7/8  9 3-16  0.49 5/8
James H. Barney Baltimore  6.00      0.26    
George Jackson Do    3.47  3.17      
Gurdon K. Tyler Do    *3.39 *3.311      
E.G. Brown Georgetown, DC  5.30  3.61  3.28      
G.W. Gibbs & Brothers New York            
D.M. Branch Richmond  5.25          
John S. Williams Baltimore  5.43  3.75  3.50      
Martin E. Thompson New York            
William Underwood Boston            
Melchor B. Mason Baltimore  5.50      0.28  *0.07 1/2  *0.43
Flynn & Herr Philadelphia  6.00      0.30    
John P. Arcularius New York            0.49
William H. Bigelow Do  6.23        0.09 3/4  0.75
Peter Hewitt Alexandria, DC    3.62 1/2  3.12 1/2      
E. Corning & Son New York            
Thomas B. Smith Philadelphia    3.93  3.68  .028 1/2    
Dean, Green, & Co. Boston            
Alex B. Hanson Frederick, Md.        0.040    
Silas Pierce Boston            
S.S. Williams Philadelphia    3.93  3.68  0.28 1/2    
John Doughty Do            
E.P. Holden Baltimore  3.99  3.47        
Robert Cruit Washington, DC            
H.B. Reardon Norfolk          0.09 3/4  0.55
S. Clayton & Sons Baltimore            

* Accepted.

Note.—In the several instances where a proposal appears lower than the accepted offer, the ply with the conditions of the advertisement; when the supply was offered to the next lowest

NAVY DEPARTMENT, Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--802--

Continued.

yard at Gosport, Va., during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Coffee, per lb. Cocoa, per lb. Butter, per lb. Molasses, per gall. Beans, per bush. Vinegar, per gall. Pickles, per lb. Raisins, per lb. Dried apples, per lb.
*$0.07 7/8     $0.39 3/4 $1.80 $0.10 1/2   $0.11 3/4 $0.04 7/8
   0.08 1/4  *0.11  0.15  *0.34 *1.31  0.09 1/2  0.08   0.12 1/2    0.06
   0.09    0.16   0.36     0.12  0.04 3/4     0.05 3/4
  0.08       0.35  1.37 1/2   0.015      
  0.08 3/4     0.16   0.35  1.62 1/2   0.012   0.05  0.12 1/2   0.05
  0.08 3/4       0.37 1/2    0.10 1/4  *3.98     0.05 1/2
                 
  0.08 1/2  8 7-10, 16 5-10   0.20   0.36 3/4   1.57   0.12 1/2    0.12 1/2   0.05 1/2
          2.20       0.28  
  8.20 0.09 1/2 & 0.16 1/2    0.35 1/2  1.49      0.12 1/2   0.04 1/2
8 3-16    0.18 7/8   0.35 7/8  1.79     *10 11-16   0.04 11-16
        0.35          
 0.08 3/4     0.16       *0.09   0.04 1/2   0.11   0.04
      0.16    1.40        *39-10
      0.18    2.12 1/2  0.11 1/4   0.04 3/4  0.15   0.04 3/4
              0.04 1/2    
 0.08 1/2       0.35          
 0.09 3.8       0.36    0.09 1/2     0.12   0.05 1/2
   0.08 1/2 & 0.16 1/2              
      0.18            
               0.14  
           0.09 1/2    0.12   0.04 1/2
              0.04    
    *13 9-10    1.56         0.06 1/4
 0.09 1/4                 0.06 1/4
      0.16             0.05 1/2

* Accepted.

individual making such offer either positively declined, failed to enter into contract, or to com-bidder, according to law; and where two or more bids were equal, it was decided by lot.

--803--

E.

Abstract of proposals received for supplying tobacco at the navy yards at Boston, Mass., Brooklyn, N. Y, and Gosport, Va., during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1846.

Names.                        Residence.             At Boston.     At Brookleyn.        At Gosport             
    Price per lb. Price per lb Price per lb.
Mayhew & Hamlen Boston 14 15-16 cents    
C.V.S. Gibbs New York 22 5/8  do 19 2/3  do 19 2/3  do
David Pesoa Philadelphia 22 95-100  do 22 95-100  do 22 95-100  do
D.M. Branch Richmond, Va. 27  do 27  do 27  do
C.A. Hall & Co. Manchester, Va. 20  do 20  do 20   do
Poitiaux Robinson Richmond, Va. 25  do 25  do 25 do
Rambant, Pace, & Field Petersburg, Va. 22  do 22  do 22  do
E.J. Higgins & Brother Norfolk, Va. 19 1/2   do 19 1/2  do 18 1/2  do
David E. Booker Lynchburg, Va. 25  do 25  do 25  do
Hobson Johns* Danville, Va. 14 9-10  do 14 9-10  do 14 9-10  do
John Kettlewell Baltimore 24  do 24  do 24  do
H.B. Dickinson Richmond, Va. 24 1/2  do 24 1/2  do 24 1/2  do
William Lang Boston 16  do    

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--804--

F.

Abstract of proposals received for "Navy Beef for 1846," under the advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated June 26, 1845.

Names.                         Residence.             At Boston.      At New York.    At Norfolk.       
    First delivery. Second delivery. First delivery. Second delivery. First delivery. Second delivery.
    Price pr. bbl. Price pr. bbl. Price pr. bbl. Price pr.  bbl. Price pr. bbl. Price pr. bbl.
E. Wilson & Co. Cincinnati $8.00 $8.20 $8.00 $8.20    
Myers & McKibbin Pittsburg   8.87  8.90  8.87  8.90   8.87  8.90
C. Valentine & Co. Boston   8.47  8.63  8.97  9.23  9.50  9.75
Jesse C. Shaw Troy, N.Y.   9.31  9.17  9.10  8.98  9.43  9.29
Julius Wadsworth Chicago, Ill. *7.95  8.20  7.95  8.20 *7.95 *8.20
W.M. Buel Carey, O.    8.70    8.30    9.12
Jos. S. Machin New York 10.39 10.39 10.29 10.29 10.37 10.37
William Griffin Madison, Ind. 10.75 10.75 10.75 10.75 11.00 11.00
E.A. & W. Winchester Boston 10.47 10.47 10.73 10.73 10.73 10.73
Henry Walker Washington, D.C.      9.70  9.70  9.37  9.37
John Walker Washington, D.C. 11.85 11.73 11.85 11.73 11.85 11.73
E.B. Olds New York  8.50  8.50  8.50  8.50   8.50  8.50
Mayhew & Hamlen Boston  9.49  9.49      9.79  9.79
James Moore Zanesville, O.           11.45
Townsend Fraser Washington, D.C.  9.83  9.83  9.97  9.97  9.75  9.75
G. Schnabel Lewisburg, Pa. 10.90 10.90 10.31 10.31 10.80 10.80
J.D. Hall Washington, D.C.  8.65  8.65  8.65  8.65  8.65  8.65
J. Rattle & Co. Cuyahoga, O.   10.50   10.25   10.75
H.N. Barstow Cleveland, O. 10.15 10.35  9.95 10.30 10.30 10.70
John Baldwin Washington, D.C. 10.24 10.35 10.38 10.45 10.47 10.60
Van Brunit & Adams Baltimore  9.15  9.15  8.35  8.35  9.35  9.35
S. Hudson & Co. Boston 11.00 11.00 11.92 11.00 11.94 11.91
Hiram Slocum Troy, N.Y.  7.95 *7.85 *7.37 *7.38  8.50  8.50
T.J. & C.H. Godman Madison, Ind.      8.75  9.00    
Story & Hasford Poughkeepsie, N.Y.  8.75  8.75  8.62 1/2  8.50  8.87 1/2  8.87
E.R. Burneston Baltimore 10.47 10.47 10.35 10.35 10.41 10.41
John A. Wheeler Cleveland, O.    9.00    8.75    9.00

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, Sept. 1, 1845.

--805--

G.

Abstract of proposals received for navy beef under the advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated July 8, 1845.

Names.                             Residence.                   At Boston.       At N. York    At Norfolk.      
    Price per bbl. Price per bbl. Price per bbl.
C.V.S. Gibbs New York   $11.00  
Alpheus Fobes Do.    10.50 $11.50
C. Valentine & Co. Boston $10.37    
E.A. &W. Winchester Do.   0.97  10.97  10.97
Samuel Stott Washington, D.C.     9.87 1/2  10.00
John Sinclair Do.   9.95   9.75   9.69
Mayhem & Hamlen Boston   9.74    10.00
John Rattle & Co. Cuyahoga, Ohio  10.25   9.75  
J.S. Machin New York  11.39  11.37  11.21
Hiram Slocum Troy, N.Y.   *8.50   8.50  *8.50
Jesse C. Shaw Do.    9.41   9.17   9.61
D. Mahoney Albany, N.Y.    9.50   9.00  10.50
Ed R. Burneston Baltimore  11.33  11.19  10.97
J.G. Hayden Washington, D.C.  15.90  15.75  15.45
Hubbard, Chenery, & Co. New York    10.47  11.70
James R. Rose Do.   8.50  *8.75  10.00
Joseph Murphy Do.   8.50  *8.25   9.25
John W. Jones Washington, D.C.     9.50   9.50
Van Brunt & Adams Baltimore   9.93   9.37   9.93
Townsend Fraser Washington, D.C.   9.95   9.75   9.69
Henry Walker Do.    10.00   9.12
Michael Hatchnick Albany, N.Y.   8.00   7.50  
John Walker Washington, D.C.  10.65  10.65  10.65
S.S. Williams Philadelphia  10.17  10.17  10.45

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, Sept. 1, 1845.

--806--

H.

Abstract of proposals received for "navy pork for 1846," under the advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated June 26, 1845.

Names.                               Residence               At Boston.     At N. York.         At Norfolk.       
    First delivery. Second delivery. First delivery. Second delivery. First delivery. Second delivery.
    Price pr. bbl.        Price pr. bbl. Price pr. bbl. Price pr bbl. Price pr. bbl. Price pr. bbl.
E. Wilson & Co. Cincinnati $11.88 $12.08 $11.80 $12.00    
Myers & McKibbin Pittsburg  12.87  12.90  12.87  12.90  $12.87 $12.90
C. Valentine & Co. Boston  11.93  12.23  12.47  12.95  13.47  13.67
Jesse C. Shaw Troy, N.Y.  12.41  12.17      12.71  12.59
Julius Wadsworth Chicago, Ill.  12.95  12.45  12.95  12.45  12.95  12.45
W.M. Buel Carey, O.        12.87    
Warren & Prout New Orleans  15.00  15.50  15.00  15.50  15.00  15.50
Jos. S. Machin New York  12.85  12.85  12.69  12.69  12.81  12.81
Wm. Griffin Madison, Ind.  13.00  13.00  13.00  13.00  13.50  13.50
E.A. & W. Winchester Boston  13.97  13.97  14.47  14.47  14.47  14.47
Henry Walker  Washington, D.C.      12.46  12.46  12.46  12.46
L. Cadwell Troy, N.Y.      13.00  12.47    
John Walker Washington, D.C  13.95  14.46  13.95  14.46  13.95  14.46
E.B. Olds New York  13.00  13.00  13.00  13.00  13.00  13.00
Mayhew & Hamlen Boston  13.00  13.00      13.59  13.59
James Moore Zanesville, O.        !2.98  12.74  12.88
Townsend Fraser Washington, D.C.  13.26  13.26  13.10  13.10  13.44  13.44
G. Schnabel Union county, Pa.  13.00  13.00  12.50  12.50  12.95  12.95
J.D. Hall  Washington, D.C.  12/19  12.19  12.19  12.19  12.19  12.19
S.R. Anderson Gallatin, Tenn.      14.00  14.50  14.00  14.25
J. Rattle & Co. Cuyahoga, O.    14.75    14.25    15.50
H.N. Barstow Cleveland, O.  13.90  14.30  13.10  14.15  14.30  14.65
Finely & Gaines Covington, Ky.  14.69  14.90  14.69  14.90  14.69  14.90
W.R. Thomas Do.  13.45  13.45  13.45  13.45  13.45  13.45
Thereon E. Clark Boston  11.88  11.88  11.88  11.88  12.21  12.24
Van Brunt & Adams Baltimore  13.93  13.93  13.61  13.61  13.93  13.93
S. Hudson & Co. Boston  13.95  12. 90  13.95  12.60  13.95  13.48
John Baldwin Washington, D.C. *11.25 *11.38 *11.38 *11.50 *11.50 *11.62 1/2
Hiram Slocum Troy, N.Y.  12.00  12.00  12.25  12.25    
Story & Hasford Hyde Paek, N. Y.  15.00  15.00  14.50  14.50  14.50  14.50

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, Sept. 1, 1845.

--807--

I.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Pensacola, Florida, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated January 20, 1845.

Names.                                             Class of vessel.              Where.                 Price per bbl.
Mayhew & Hamlen (Not named) Boston 64 cents.
Alexander Jones Brig Mary A. Jones Baltimore 70 cents.

NOTE.—But one of the above proposals being in conformity with the advertisement, and the price being considered too high, it was not accepted; and the public interests not admitting of further delay, the navy agent at Boston, under the authority of the department, chartered the bark Trident, at 50 cents per barrel.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

I—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Rio de Janeiro, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated March 10, 1845.

Names.                                       Class of vessel.                    Where.                             Price per bbl.     
J.S. Wharton (Not named) Philadelphia 82 cents.
Joseph P. Wheeler Ship Corsair Boston 98 cents.
Wm. W. Pratt Ship Marianna New York 98 cents.
Coffin & Weld Bark Wessacumcon Boston 89 cents.
J.M. Cress "       Ellanor † Philadelphia 73 cents.
B.F. Dwight Ship Charlotte † Boston 79 cents.
William Lang "      Tennessee Boston 81 cents
John Elwell & Co. "      Jas. Edward New York 98 cents.
W.P. Walker Bark Florence Boston 86 2/3 cents.
Daniel Deshon "       Orlof Boston 90 cents.
John M. Bandel "        Margaret Hugg Baltimore 95 cents.
S.S. Williams Ship Robert G. Shaw* Philadelphia 79 cents.
Mayhew & Hamlen Bark  Mary Boston 83 cents.

*Accepted.                                       

† Declined, or did not pass examination.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--808--

I—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Macao, China, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated May 1, 1845.

Names.                                             Class of vessel.                             Where.                          Price per bbl.
      $    cts.
Bates & Co. Bark Olger Boston   1.00
Jas. Huckins Ship Concord Boston     .69
S.S. Williams  "     Euphrasia Boston      .87
W. Lang Bark Douglas Boston       .82 1/2
S.N. Reynolds Ship Columbo Philadelphia       .84
Mayhew & Hamlen  "     Concordia Boston       .78 1/2
C.V.S. Gibbs  "      J.Q. Adams New York    1.23
Lewis Ashmun  "     Leonora Boston      .80
Milton & Slocomb   "    Leonora Boston      .98

NOTE.—The makers of the above proposals having failed to present their vessels for the requisite examination, or, if so presented, they having failed to pass, and the public interests not admitting of further delay, the navy agent at Boston, under the authority of the department, chartered the ship Medora for the purpose.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

I—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Pensacola, Florida, under an advertisement of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated May 10, 1845.

Names.                                       Class of vessel.                              Where.                                Price per bbl.
Mayhew & Hamlen Bark Huma Boston 44 1/2 cents
Sam'l W. Reynolds Bark Grecian Philadelphia 58 cents
S.S. Williams Brig Calcutta Philadelphia 63 cents

NOTE.—Neither of the above vessels was accepted; and the navy agent at New York was authorized by the department to advertise for a vessel, and to accept the lowest offer, provided the vessel was suitable for the service. This he did, and chartered the brig St. Mary.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1845.

--809--

I—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Pensacola, Florida, (under an advertisement of the navy agent at New York, by authority of the department, dated June 20, 1845.

Names.                                    Class of vessel.             Where.                             Price per bbl.
John Elwell & Co. Brig Dt. Mary* New York 72 cents.
Wm. Wyllys Pratt Brig R.W. Brown New York 87 cents
E.B. Hurlbut & Co. (Not named) New York 79 cents.

*Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

    Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, July 31, 1815.

I—Continued.

Abstract of proposals received for the transportation of naval stores to Pensacola, Florida, under an advertisement of the navy agent at New York, by direction of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, dated September 22, 1845.

Names.                                     Class of vessel.                            Where.                                Price per bbl.     
Nesmith & Walsh Bark Avola Brooklyn, N.Y. 40 cents
W.W. Pratt Brig Iwenona New York 49 cents
Brown & Wilson Ship Hartford (Not stated) 70 cents
Mayhew & Hamlen Bark Francis Burr New York 59 cents.
John Elwell & Co. Bark Loretto Fish New York 43 cents
John Elwell & Co. Bark Baltic New York 30 cents
John Elwell & Co. Bark Loretto Fish  New York 32 cents
E.D. Hurlbut & Co.* Brig Ann Welsh New York 27 cents

* Accepted.

NAVY DEPARTMENT,

     Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, October 23, 1845.

--810--

No. 12.

Scale of offers to furnish at the navy yard at Brooklyn, N. Y., or at Ellis' Island, N. Y., one hundred thousand pounds of refined sulphur, for the Navy ,under advertisement of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, dated December 4, 1844, to be delivered by the first day of May, 1845.

No. Names.                                                                  Price per pound.  
1* Jeffries & Catterfield, New York 1  875/1000
2 Ernest Feidler, 33 Broad Street, New York 2  1/4 cents
3 W.F. Clough, Fulton Works, Jersey City, N.J. 2 cents.

* Accepted.

Offers opened in presence of—

JOSEPH P. MCCORKLE,

G. Harrison.

No. 1 is accepted for all the refined sulphur at the rate of one cent and eight hundred and seventy-five thousands of a cent (1 875/1000) per pound.

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY,

January 7, 1845.

W. M. CRANE.

--811--

No. 13.

Scale of offers to furnish flannel for cylinders, under the advertisement of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, dated March 27, 1845; one-third of each width and color to be delivered at each of the navy-yards at Boston, New York, and Norfolk by the 1st day of August, 1845.

No.  Names.                              

White flannel—
3,160 yds. 22 inches wide;
8,438 yds. 19 1/2 do
317 yds. 17 do
264 yds. 13 do

Blue flannel—
6,942 yds. 22 inches wide;
23,870 yds. 19 1/2 do
635 yds. 17 do
619 yds. 16 do
Red flannel—
8,201 yds. 22 inches wide;
16,209 yds. 19 1/2 do
1,315 yds. 17 do
220 yds. 16 do
Remarks.             
1

Jacob Sleeper,

Boston

31 1/4 cents per yard 31 1/4 cents per yard 31 1/4 cents per yard    Offers for a particular
   sample sent. The offer of
   this gentleman was      finally
accepted, and he entered
into contract on the sample
furnished him.
2

M. H. Simpson,

Boston

40  do 40  do 40  d0  
3

Samuel Pleasants,

Philadelphia

26  do 26  do 26 do Declined entering into contract.
*4

A. B. Snow,

Boston

23  do 23  do 23  do Declined entering into contract.
5

George Adams,

Boston

26  do 26  do 26  do Declined entering into contract.
6

E. J. Higgins &

Brother, Norfolk

32  do 36 3/4  do 31 3/4  do  
7

William Lang,

Boston

28  do 28  90 28  d0 Declined entering into contract.
8

Mayhew &

Hamlen, Boston

24 1/4  do 24 1/4  do 24 1/4  do Declined entering into contract.

*  Accepted.

 

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY, May 2, 1845.

 

Number 4 is accepted for all the flannels for cylinders, at 23 cents per yard.

 

W. M. CRANE.

 

Offers opened in presence of--

JOSEPH P. McCORKLE,

G. HARRISON.

--812--

No. 14.

Scale of offers to furnish pistols, swords, and copper powder-flasks, under the advertisement of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, dated April 23, 1845; to be delivered on or before the 4th day of June, 1846, at the navy-yards near New York and Boston.

No.  Names.                                                     1,200 pistols. 1,200 swords 1,200 copper powder-glasks.
1 Henry Deringer, Philadelphia $4.98 each    
2 George Adams, Boston     $0.83 each
3 N.P. Ames, Cabbotville, Massachusetts  5.50 each $4.00 each  1.00 each
4 Asa H. Waters & Co., Millbury  5.72 each    

BUREAU OF ORDNANCE AND HYDROGRAPHY, June 5, 1845.

No. 1 is accepted for the pistols, at $4.98 cents each.

No. 2 is accepted for the powder-flasks, at 83 cents each.

No. 3 is accepted for the swords, at $4 each.

W. M. CRANE.

 

Offers opened in presence of—

JOSEPH P. McCORKLE,

G. HARRISON.

--813--

Abstract of offers (embracing as well those which are rejected as those which are accepted) received for furnishing articles coming under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, made in conformity to the act of Congress approved March 3, 1843.

 

BITUMINOUS COAL.

Names of bidders.    PLACES OF DELIVERY                                          Remarks.        Expiration of contract.
  Portsmouth, N.H.                   Boston.     New York.      Philadelphia.    Washington.    Norfolk.      Pensacola       
A. J. Wooldridge   *$0.26     *$0.20L. *$0.19 L.              Per bushel  
           $0.17 A.  $0.16 A      
Jas. Smith   $0.37 1/2 $0.33 1/3   $0.027     do  
          $0.25        
Thos. Macubbin   *$0.29 $0.30   $0.20 1/2     do  
Wm. Young, jr.   $0.30 $0.30   $0.25     do

Oct. 31,

1845.

William W. Davis   $0.30 $0.30   $0.19     do  
    $0.33              
                   
William W. McKaig   $0.35 $0.30   $0.21     do  
Boyd & Frothingham              

Informal

Offers

 
                Cannelton  
Peter Berry         $0.19 1/2     Per bushel  
Thomas Hunter         $0.19     do  
W.H. Bradley         $0.25     do  
          $0.24        
                   
C.M. Thruston         $0.20     do  
John Bing         $0.18     do  
Philip W. Lowry               Informal  
N.P. Barnes         $0.19     Per bushel  

--815--

Hoblitzell & Hoffman                                               $0.18 3/4                                                                                     

              Oct.31

1845.    

Wm. Smithia     $.018   do  "
Reuben Harley     $0.20   do  "
J.M. Smith     *$0.17 1/2   do  "
John Neff            "
       $0.24   do  "

ANTHRACITE.

*E. F. Size & Co.                        $7.00                                                                                                                         Per ton of 2,240 lbs.         Oct. 31, 1845               

†George Browne

 

$5.25

$5.74

          Do     "
†Mayhew & Hamlen  

$5.49 1/2

$5.74

        $9.57 Per ton     "
Lewis S. Corryell   $6.70                             

*$4.80

  $5.45

$4.45     $7.80 Do     "
John McClintock   *$6.00           Do   "
S. S. Williams  

$6.50

$7.00

        *$7.00 Do   "
Boyd & Frothingham   $5.75 white ash coal. Propose as substitutes in lien "Beaver Meadow" coal, required.          
Do   $5.75 Lehigh coal.                "          
Do   $6.00 red ash coal.                "          

* Accepted.                        † Declined entering into contract.

--815--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

STATIONERY AND BOOKS.

Names of bidders.                                  Philadelphia        Norfolk.           Remarks.      Expiration of contract.
John C. Clark *$1,500.00   Estimated Dec.31, 1845.
C. Hall & Co   *$2,538.94   Dec. 31, 1845.
R. C. Barclay      3,132.20   Dec 31, 1845.
C. Hall & Co.         696.95 Additional books Dec 31, 1845.
R. C. Barclay        *541.63 Additional books Dec 31, 1845.

PROVENDER AT NORFOLK.

Names of bidders.          Hay, per cwt.  Hominy, per bushel. Oats, per bushel. Remarks. Expiration of contract.
B. B. Motley *$0.75 *$0.53 *$0.25    
I.J. Bagley       .75       .55      .30    
W. H. Garnett & Co.       .78       .58      .23    

* Accepted.

--816--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

BUILDING MATERIALS AT PENSACOLA.

Articles.                     NAMES of bidders           Remarks.            Expiration of contract.
  Geo.-Willis. J. M. Standard. John Campbell.* J. B. Todd.      C. C. Keyser.    
Plastering hair $0.22 $0.75 $1.50 $0.50 $0.50 Per bushel. August 28, 1845.
Lime   2.50   3.00   3.00   2.00   3.50 Per bushel.  
Cement   2.30   3.00   3.50   2.75   do.  
Bricks   9.99    10.00     Per thousand.  
10-penny cut nails   0.05     .5 3/4   0.06  0.05 1/2  0.05 3/4 Per pound.  
White lead   2.20  †$.08   2.20 †$.08  2.25 Per KEG.  
Linseed oil  0.80  1.00  0.94  0.90  0.90 Per gallon.  
Umber  0.07  0.09  0.13  0.20  0.08 Per pound.  
Verdigris  0.40  0.50  0.50  0.45  0.50 do.  
Litharge  0.07  0.09  0.13  0.09  0.10 do.  
Putty  0.05  0.08  0.10  0.06  0.07 do.  
Spirits turpentine  0.50  0.60  0.75  0.60  0.75 Per gallon.  
Chrome green  0.45  0.60  0.55  0.65 ‡$3.55 Per pound.  
Chrome yellow  0.20  0.30  0.34  0.50  1.75  do.  
Window glass, 12 by 16  3.25  4.50  3.25  4.50  3.75 Per box.  
Windown glass, 10 by 12  2.75  3.50  3.25  4.00  2.75 do.  
Black paint  6.20 †$0.08 †$0.09 †$0.08  2.25 Per keg.  
Cut nails, assorted  0.05  0.05 3/4  0  0.05 1/2  0.05 3/4 Per pound.  
Spikes  0.05  0.05 3/4  0.06  0.05 1/2  0.05 3/4 do.  
One-and-a-half inch screws  0.50  0.50  0.50  0.45  0.50 do  
Pump tacks  

  .62 1/2B.

  .37 1/2I.

 0.10   0.08  0.015  Per paper.  
Sprigs    0.25  0.12  0.15  0.15  do.  
Block tin  0.25  0.35  0.35  0.27  0.27 Per pound.  

* Accepted.                        † Per pound.                       ‡ Per box.

--817--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

BUILDING MATERIALS AT PENSACOLA.

Names of bidders.        Bricks.   Lime.      Cement.       Yellow pine lumber. 14 0z. sheet copper 1-inch round iron. 7/8 inch round iron. 2 by 3/4 inches flat irion. Railroad iron. 12 by 24 inches Dutchess slate. Expiration of contract.
  Price per M. Price per bbl. Price per bbl. Price per M ft. Price per lb. Price per lb. Price per lb. Price per lb. Price per lb. Price per square  
George Willis $8.39 $1.75 $2.62 $11.75 $0.35 $0.06 1/2  $0.06  $0.06  $0.03   Feb. 1, 1845.
J. M. Standard *7.45 *1.40 *2.30  9.85 *0.30 *0.05 1/2 *0.05 1/2 *0.05 1/2 *0.05 1/2 *9.50  
Joseph Quiggles    1.85  2.62                
John Hunt       11.50              
C. C. Keyser        9.98              
W. L. Williams       *8.45              
F. Christian  8.49                    
L. Bonifay  8.50                    
Joseph Forsyth    1.50  2.00                

*Accepted.

--818--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

LUMBER AT PENSACOLA.

Names of bidders.           Permanent wharf          Repairs of hospital.      Repairs of all kiknds.      Expiration of contract.   
John Hunt $17 per M. $12 per M. $12 per M. Aug.28, 1845.
Forsyth & Simpson *$16 per M. *$12 per M. *$12 per M.  

LUMBER AT PENSACOLA-Continued.

Names of bidders.                                    For storehouse. For timber shed. Expiration of contract.
John Hunt $17 per M. $17 per M. Nov. 29, 1845
J. Forsyth *$16 per M. *$16 per M.  

BUILDING MATERIALS AT PENSACOLA.

Articles.                          NAMES OF BIDDERS.                Remarks.          Expiration of contract.   .
  B.F. McGee.*  Geo. Willis.    J. Campbell.        
White pine plank $48.00 $48.00 $50.00 Per M feet Nov.29, 1845
Window glass, 10 by 12 $3.15 $4.50 $3.25 Per box  
Putty $0.07 $0.07 $0.08 Per pound  
White lead $0.08 English 14 $0.08 3/4 Per pound  
    American 8 1/2      
Black paint $0.08 $0.07 $0.09 Per pound  
Linseed oil $0.90 $0.90 $0.94 Per gallon  
12-penny cut nails $5.50 $5.50 $6.00 Per keg  
10-penny cut nails $5.50 $5.50 $6.00 Per keg  
9-penny cut nails $5.50 $5.50 $6.00 Per keg  
10-penny wrought nails $13.00 $13.00 $13.00 Per keg  
Store locks $3.00 $2.20 $3.00 Each  
Silver $1.00 $1.25 $1.06 Per ounce  
Cows' horns $0.01 $0.02 $0.10 Each  
Bricks (hard burned) $10.00 $9.98 $10.00 Per M.  

PINE WOOD, AT WASHINGTON.

Names of bidders                                          Price per cord. Expiratin of contract.
P. Otterback $2.74  
S.Flood $2.39  
Henry Queen $2.36  
Wm. Yeaton $2.37 1/2  
John Hopkins $2.59  
Levi Buick *$2.33 1/2  
W.S. Colquhoon $3.49  
Henry Walker $2.46  

* Accepted.

--819--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

BUILDING MATERIALS-AT NEW YORK.

Names of bidders.        Round hemlock logs. White pine logs.
White pine logs.
Stone. Remarks. Expiration of contract.
  Price per log Price per log. Price per cubic foot. Price per ton.    
A. Fobes     $0.21     Aug. 1, 1845.
Wm. Trull, Jr. $1.49 *$2.48 $0.29 1/2      
Albert Bennett $1.68          
J.D. Stephenson $1.87 1/2 *$2.00 & $4.00        
J. H. Brady $1.75 $1.75        
G. H. Woodruff $1.50 Short $3.25 $0.22      
Henry Kip       $0.65    
T.R. Hopkins & H. Pierce $1.62 $2.10 $0.19 $0.44    
W. W. Wright *$1.48 $2.50 $0.27      
Walter L. Cutting       $0.60    
Thomas Hassard & Co.       $0.68    
T. M. Ferguson       $0.56    
Evanen Allison       $0.45    
W. E. Dennis       $0.58    
Wm. Rowland       $0.53    
Alfred Noxen $1.95 $3.90 $0.25 $0.60    
Jacob Dubois       $0.37 Did not appear.  
Henry Dubois       $0.40 Did not appear.  
Abram Hines       $0.35 Did not appear.  
P.J. Thomas & Co. L. feet 9 L. feet 12 $0.24      
Daniel Knowlton (1)       $0.49    
Wm. Eginton       $0.42    
Wm. Beard       $0.44    
Bartlett Smith       $0.55    
P. Moore       $0.53    
Blasins Moore       $0.48    
Samuel S. Randall       $0.67    
Campbell & Moody $1.68 3/4 $2.00 *$0.18      
Daniel Knowlton (2)       *$0.37    

*Accepted

--820--

Abstract of offers—Continued.

BUILDING MATERIALS—AT PENSACOLA.

Names of bidders.

   

Granite. 

     

           

Bricks.   

                        

  Remarks.           Expiration of contract.  
  Four feet long,6 to 8 inch, thick. Tablet, 1.6 by 9 inches, various lengths. Building stone. Door-heads, 7.4 long, 8 by 8 inches. Window-heads, 5.7 long, 8 by 6 inches. Window-sills, 4-6 long, 5 by 8 inches Blocks, 18 inches thick 18 inches wide, 5ft. & upwards in length. Face. Hard burned.    
  Per yard. Per foot. Per yard. Per head. Per head. Per sill Per yard. Per M. Per M.    
Ellis & Mayo $17.50 $0.81 $15.75 $4.69 $3.74 $3.50 $18.75        
Colburn & Eames $18.00 $0.80 $14.75 $4.63 $3.75 $3.50 $18.00        
Geo. M. Lanman $18.50 $3.20 $16.00 $4.50 $4.00 $3.87 1/2 $23.00        
Emery, Gantt,  and others $15.00 $0.98 $12.00 $3.43 $2.30 $1.70 $25.00        
Andrew Ellicott *$17.50 *$0.95 *$12.00 *$3.20 *$2.10 *$1.80 *$20.00 $19.00 $12.50    
Mayhew & Hamlen $18.50 $0.75 $13.00 $5.00 $4.00 $3.50 $19.00 $21.00 $13.50    
Elliott O.D. Poor $10.50 $0.90 $5.90 $2.50 $2.30 $1.75 $12.30 *$16.87 1/2 *$10.90    
Lewis S. Coryell $11.00 $1.00 $5.70 $3.12 1/2 $0.43 1/2 $0.41 1/2 $12.70 $15.00 $9.00    
Bartlett Smith informal             $15.00 $13.00    
Edward Merrill informal                    
G.P.F. Bryant informal             $15.00 $9.95    
William Easby     $10.00 informal              
William Lang informal                    
P. Lincoln & Co.               $27.00 $17.00    
Warren B. Thomas               $20.00 $13.50    
William Yeaton               $18.00 $17.00    
C.L. Coltman               $17.30 $11.75    
R. Coltman               $17.50 $11.00    
Lewis Gibson informal                    
J. Hunt               $20.00 $12.00    
Nicholas S. Wood.               $25.00 $16.00    

* Accepted.

NOTE.—In the several instances where a proposal appears lower than the accepted offer, the individual making such offer either positively declined, failed to enter into contract, or to comply with the conditions of the advertisement; when the supply was offered to the next lowest bidder, according to law.

    BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS, November 22, 1845.

L. WARRINGTON, Chief of bureau.

--821--

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 

Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, December 1, 1845.

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that contracts for supplying medicines, hospital stores, and dispensary furniture, for one year, to the naval stations at Boston and New York, have recently been made by this bureau.

A copy of the advertisements, a statement of the bids which were received, and the names of the parties with whom the contracts were made, I herewith transmit.

The contract for furnishing the naval station at Boston with medicines, hospital stores, and dispensary furniture, was given to C. Allen Browne, and the contract for the naval station at New York to Messrs. Schieffelin, Son, & Co.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully,

THO. HARRIS.

Hon. GEORGE BANCROFT,

Secretary of the Navy.

__________

A.

Sealed proposals for furnishing medicines, hospital stores, and dispensary furniture, for the naval station at New York, for one year, will be received at the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, in the city of Washington, D. C., until 3 p. m., 1st of October next, at which time they will be opened in the presence of witnesses. The contract will be given to the lowest bidder, after an examination and comparison shall have been made, when the party whose bid has been accepted shall be duly notified.

Persons wishing to bid will be supplied at the office of the Navy Agent, New York, with lists of such articles as are required.

The articles must be all of the best quality, and the price at which the bidder proposes to furnish them must be affixed to each. Every article must be bid for, and informality in the bids will cause their rejection.

Accompanying these bids, to be endorsed as follows: "Sealed proposals for Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Washington, D. C," it is expected that each bidder will send satisfactory evidence of his ability to comply with the contract.

__________

B.

Sealed proposals for furnishing medicines, hospital stores, and dispensary furniture, for the naval station at Charlestown, Massachusetts, for one year, will be received at the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, in the city of Washington, D. C, until 3 p. m., 1st of November next, at which time they will be opened in the presence of witnesses. The contract will be given to the lowest bidder, after an examination and comparison shall have been made, when the party whose bid has been accepted shall be duly notified.

Persons wishing to bid will be supplied at the office of the Navy Agent, Boston, with lists of such articles as are required.

--822--

The articles must be all of the best quality, and the price at which the bidder proposes to furnish them must be affixed to each. Every article must be bid for, and informality in the bids will cause their rejection.

Accompanying these bids, to be endorsed as follows: "Sealed proposals for Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Washington, D. C.," it is expected that each bidder will send satisfactory evidence of his ability to comply with the contract.

__________

C.

Statement of the bids received from New York and Boston for supplying the naval stations at those places for one year with medicines, hospital stores, and dispensary furniture.

NEW YORK.

Messrs. Schieffelin, Son, & Co.                                  $261.43 1/8                                                                 
Samuel Bowne $307.45

The bid of John Milhan was rejected, in consequence of an informality; having failed to bid for every article contained on the list, as required by the advertisement.

 

BOSTON.

C. Allen Browne                                                           $242.75                                                                
Messrs. Kidder & Co. $256.94
Trull & Miller $282.30
Charles B. Rogers $354.74
Messrs. J. & J.E. Stevens $430.69

--823--

REPORT FROM THE PENSION OFFICE

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.

SIR: In compliance with the third section of the act of Congress of the 10th of April, 1832, entitled "An act for the regulation of the navy and privateer pension and navy hospital funds," I transmit herewith the following lists:

1. A list of invalids who receive pension on account of wounds or injuries received while in the line of their duty in the United States navy.

2. A list of persons who draw pensions in consequence of wounds or other injuries received while serving on board of private armed vessels.

3. A list of widows of officers, seamen, and marines who were killed or died while in the United States navy, and who now draw pensions under the act of June 30, 1834, granting five years' pensions to widows in certain cases.

4. A list of widows whose pensions have been renewed for the term of five years, under the act passed on the 3d of March last.

I also transmit an estimate of the amount of funds which will be required to pay invalid, privateer, and widows' pensions, in the fiscal year ending on the 30th June, 1847.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. L. EDWARDS,

Commissioner of Pensions.

Hon. GEO. BANCROFT, 

Secretary of the Navy.

--824--

Pensions paid to orphans.

Names of children.        Names of their fathers and their rank. Monthly pension. Commencement and termination of pension.

Act March 3, 1817.

Mary Elizabeth Drake

Thomas Davis, master's mate $10.00 From, April 26, 1820, when her mother, Sarah Davis, married a second husband, to the 6th of Jan, 1825, when the five years expired.

Act June 15, 1844.

Frderick A. Bacon

Frederick A. bacon, passed midshipman $12.50 From April 25, 1843, when his mother died, to the 1st of May, 1844, when the five years expired.

PENSION OFFICE, NOVEMBER 4, 1845

J.L. EDWARDS,

Commissioner of Pensions.

--825--

A list of widows whose pensions have been renewed under the act of March 3, 1845, entitled "An act renewing certain naval pensions for the term of five years."

Names of the widows.       Names of their husbands  Their husbands rank. Monthly allowance. Time to which they are to be paid.
Annis, Sally John Seaman $6.00  
Brown, Lydia James Carpenter $10.00  
Beale, Emily George Purser $20.00  
Bainbridge, Susan William Captain $50.00  
Berry, Sarah William Boatswain $10.00  
Baldwin, Elizabeth H. Isaac Captain's clerk $12.50  
Birchmore, Juliana William Surgeon $32.50  
Boughan, Elizabeth K. James G. Lieutenant $25.00  
Babbit, Maria William D. Surgeon $25.00  
Buck, Elizabeth Peter Musician mar. $4.00  
Burchstead, Nabby Benjamin B. Carpenter $10.00  
Boyd, Mary . Thomas J. Surgeon $30.00 Commencing Mar.26, 1844, and terminating March. 26, 1849.
         
Cassin, Eliza Joseph Purser $20.00  
Cook, Franes F. John A. Lieutenant $25.00  
Cuvillier, Maria J. John B. Musician M. Corps. $4.00  
Clunet, Ann M. Peter Serg't M. Corps. $4.00  
Cotton, Rebecca A. William  Purser's steward $9.00 Commenced August 3, 1830, and terminated August 3, 1835.
         
Caldwell, Elizabeth J. Charles H. Lieutenant $25.00  
Cocke, Eliza W. William H. Lieutenant $25.00  
Carter, Harriet Nathaniel Lieutenant $25.00  
Cloud, Eliza M. Caleb W. Assist. surgeon $15.00  
Cassin, Fanny Joseph Lieutenant $25.00  
Chauncey, Catharine Isaac Captain $50.00 Commencing Jan.28, 1845, and terminating Jan. 28, 1850.
         
Coz, Ellen James S. Pd. misdshipman $12.50  
Cowell, Abigail John G. Sailingmaster $20.00  
Carter, Leah Charles G. Music'n m. corps. $44.00  
Cook, Sarah Ann Andrew B. Surgeon $35.00  
Dix, Ellen John Surgeon $27.50  
Daggett, Laura P. Samuel Gunner $10.00  
Dill, Lamatie Eli Boatswain $10.00  
Eaton, Susan David Gunner $10.00 Commencing Feb. 28, 1845, and terminating Feb.. 22, 1850.
         
Elbert, Harriet Ann Samuel Master $20.00  
Evans, Dorothy M. James Boatswain $10.00  
Forrest, Mary T. Dulany Lieutenant $25.00  
Freemoody, Catherine Elie Ordin'ry seaman $5.00  
Ford, Mary Daniel Carpenter $9.00  
Gamble, Hannah L. Joh M. Major m. corps $25.00  
Grayson, Eliza Alfred Capt. m. corps. $20.00  
Griffin, Mary Larkin Surgeon $30.00  
Green, Margaret F. Elliot Carpenter $10.00  
Gardner, Sophia John M. Master comm'dt $30.00  
Gardner, Ann Francis Gunner $10.00  
Grover, Olive William Ordin'ry seaman $5.00  
Goodwin, Joan John Seaman $6.00  
Henley, Eliza John D. Captain $50.00  
Hardy, Diana Isaac Seaman $5.00  
Hoffman, Theresa John Music'n m. corps. $4.00  
Hoffman, Phebe W. Beekman V. Captain $50.00  
Hazen, Hannah Benjamin Seaman $6.00  
Hail, Anne R. Isaac Sailmaker $10.00  
Hunt, Sara A. Clement S. Purser $20.00  

--826--

List of widows whose pensions have been renewed—Continued.

Names of the widows.          Names of their husbands. Their husbands' rank. Monthly allowance. Time to which they are to be paid.
Hobbs, Cornelia Hubbard H. Lieutenant $25.00  
Hamersley, Phebe George W. Lieutenant $25.00  
Higgins, Sarah James Seaman $6.00  
Hatch, Maty R. Robert Pilot $20.00  
Haraden, Susan Nathaniel Master comm'dt $30.00  
Jameson, Mary Skiffington S. Midshipan $9.50  
Jones, Elizabeth John Marine $3.50  
Johnson, Maria T. Thomas  Carpenter's  mate $9.50  
Jenkins, Ellen John Seaman $6.00  
Jones, Mary Cave Chaplain $20.00  
Jones, Abigail Richard Cook $9.00  
Kissam, Harriet J. Benjamin P. Surgeon $30.00  

Kitchen, Abigail
George Seaman $6.00  
King, Catharine C. George  Serg't marines $6.50  
Lawrence, Julia M. James Captain $50.00  
Lippinscott, Susanna Caleb Ordin'ry seaman $5.00  
Lewis, Frances M. William Master comm'dt $30.00  
Lent, Sarah Ann Abraham Sailmaker $9.50  
Lagoner, Elizabeth Manuel Seaman $6.00  
Low, Lydia Thomas Yeoman $7.50  
McCauley, Mary James Capt. marines $20.00 Commencing Mar, 5, 1814 and terminating Mar.5, 1849.
         
Maury, Eliza John M Lieutenant $25.00  
McMurtrie, Elizabeth William Purser $20.00  
Montgomery, Phebe Alexander, M. Surgeon $25.00  
McGee, Rebecca John Marine $3.50  
McCullough, Ann G. Alexander Saiingmaster $20.00  
Mix, Ann Marvine P. Commander $30.00  Commencing Feb. 8, 1844, and terminating Feb. 8, 1849.
         
McNelly, Mry Joshua Gunner $10.00  
Moulton, Jane William Seaman $6.00  
Martin, Ann Jonathan Quarter-gunner $9.00  
Martin, Elizabeth Joseph Boatswain $10.00  
McPherson, Mary E. Joseph S. Master comm'dt $30.00  
Neale, Mary Benjamin I. Lieutenant $25.00  
Navarro, Margaret David Sailmaker $10.00  
Newcomb, Rhoda Henry S. Lieutenant $25.00  
Oliver, Eliza A. John Gunner $10.00  
Pottenger, Frances William Lieutenant $25.00  
Page, Maria James Surgeon $25.00  
Pearce, Eliza L. George Lieutenant $25.00  
Peaco, Georgiana A. John W Surgeon $25.00  
Patch, Nancy Nicholas Seaman $6.00  
Perry, Lucretia M. Nathaniel M. Purse $20.00  
Proctor, Mary Charles Steward $9.00  
Porter, Eliza C. John Master comm'dt $30.00  
Patterson, George Ann Daniel T. Captain $50.00 Commencing Aug. 25, 1844 and terminating Aug.25, 1849.
         
Perry, Elizaberh C. Oliver H. Captain $50.00  
Parcells, Margaret George Sailmaker $10.00  
Rodgers, Minerva John Captain $50.00 Commencing Aug. 1, 1843, and terminating Aug.1, 1848.
         
Rinker, Catharine Samuel  Sailingmaster  $20.00   
Ray, Catharine S.M.  Hyde  Surgeon $35.00  
Rodgers, Anna M. George U. Captain $50.00  
Ross, Ann J. Andrew 1st lieut. marines $15.00  
Russell, Mary William Serg't marines $6.50  

--827--

List of widows whose pensions have been renewed—Continued.

Names of the widows.      Names of their busbnds.  Their husbands' rank. Monthly allownce. Time to which they are to be paid.
Roberts, Elizabeth Nelson V. 1st serg't marines $8.00  
Stinger, Rebecca S. John Landsman $4.00 Commencing July 15, 1844, and terminating July 15, 1849.
         
Sardo, Ann Eliza Joseph Music'n m. corps. $4.00  
Spence, Mary C. Robert T. Captain $50.00  
Sherbourne, Louisa Jonathan W. Lieutenant $25.00  
Sanders, Harriet H. James Lieutenant $20.00  
Smart, Eleanor John Seaman $6.00  
Sevier, Elizabeth A. Alexander G. Capt. marines $20.00  
Stone, Mary William Seaman $6.00  
Stivers, Ann Maria Stephen D. Landsman $4.00 Commencing April 22, 1844, and terminating April 22, 1849.
         
Stephenson, Ann William Sailingmaster $20.00  
Stellwagon, Mary Daniel S. Sailingmaster $20.00  
Shaw, Mary B. John Captain $50.00  
Smith, Mehitable Jesse Lieutenant $25.00  
Thompson, Emma C.B. Charles C.B. Captain $50.00  
Tingy, Ann E. Thomas Captain $50.00  
Trenchard, Elizabeth Edward  Captain $50.00  
Trapnell, ELizabeth Joshua Private m. corps. $3.50  
Temple, Lucy R. William T. Lieutenant $25.00  
Thomas, Frances A. John L. Lieutenant $25.00  
Trusty, Jane Samuel Snip's cook $9.00  
Ulrick, Hannah George Sailingmaster $20.00  
Van Horn, Lydia Jesse Private marines $3.50  
Weed, Julia Elijah J. Qu'mr m. corps. $30.00 Commencing Mar.5, 1843, and terminating Mar.5, 1848.
         
Wise, Catharine George S. Purser $20.00  
Winn, Rebecca Timothy Purser $20.00  
Woolsey, Susan C. Melancton T. Captain $50.00  
White, Elizabeth Benjamin Master-at-arms $9.00  
Wilcox, Marvel Sylvester Carpenter's mate $9.50  
Wares, Charlotte Samuel Sailingmaster $20.00  
Waldo, Sarah V. Charles F. Master $20.00  
Wood, Edna Maria Harry P. T. Pd. midshipman $12.50  
Worth, Margaret C. Algernon S. Lieutenant $25.00

 

 

137 pensioners; amount required to pay them, $32,418.

NOTE.—All pensions under the act of March 3, 1845, commence on the first of September, 1842, unless otherwise mentioned in the column of remarks.

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.

J. L. EDWARDS, Commissioner of Pensions.

--828--

Alphabetical list of widows who are now on the pension roll under the acts of June 30, 1834, and June 15, 1844, granting five years' pensions, complete to the 4th of November, 1845.

Names of the widows.      Names of their husbands. Their husbands' rank. Monthly allowance. Time to which they are to be paid.
Arlett, Mary E. John C. Marine $3.50 Commencing March 5, 1842, and terminating March 5, 1847.
Adee, Amelia K. Alvey A. Surgeon $30.00 Commencing February 22, 1844, and terminating April 14, 1846.
Armistead, Catharine L. Francis N. Lieutenant of marines $15.00 Commencing April 14, 1841, and terminating April 14, 1846.
Anderson, Emma James Passed midshipman $12.50 Commencing December 29, 1840, and terminating Dec. 29, 1845.
Barry, Mary Thomas Master $20.00 Commencing June 28, 1842, and terminating June 28, 1847
Boerum, Emily William Commander $30.00 Commencing November 2, 1842, and terminating Nov. 2, 1847
Bowie, Cicele James K. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing December 25, 1843, and terminating Dec. 25, 1848.
Baab, Christine Philip Marine $3.50 Commencing December 6, 1843, and terminating Dec. 6, 1848.
Boggs, Margaret M. David Sergeant of marines $8.00 Commencing April 17, 1845, and terminating April 17, 1850.
Crawford, Mary David R. Passed midshipman $25.00 Commencing July 26, 1841, and terminating July 26, 1846.  Increased from $12.50 per month, under the act of March 1, 1843.
Claxton, Rodolphine Alexander Captain $50.00 Commencing March 7, 1841, and terminating March 7, 1846.
Carpenter, Ann Jacob Gunner $10.00 Commencing March 8, 1842, and terminating March 8, 1847.
Cox, Emma M. John W. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing December 7, 1842, and terminating Dec 7, 1847.
Collinson, Catharine Francis Seaman $6.00 Commencing September 29, 1843, and terminating Sept. 29, 1848.
Conway Fanny S. Edwin Assistant surgeon $17.50 Commencing March 20, 1843, and terminating March 20, 1848.
Chandler Elizabeth E. John R. Surgeon $30.00 Commencing July 28, 1841, and terminating July 28, 1946.
Crow, Margaret Ann Benjamin Sailmaker $10.00 Commencing March 31, 1845, and terminating March 31, 1850.
Clark, Marget T. James H. Purser $20.00 Commencing SEptember 19, 1844, and terminating Sept. 19, 1849.
Downs, Martha L. Albert E. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing March 20, 1843, and terminating March 20, 1848.
Dallas, Mary B. Alexander J. Captain $50.00 Commencing June 3, 1844, and terminating June 3, 1849
Dennison, Susan John Sergeant of marines $6.50 Commencing December 9, 1844, and terminating Dec. 9, 1849.
Forrest, Ann H. Andrew Orderly srg't of marines $8.00 Commencing February 18, 1844, and terminating Feb. 18, 1849.
Griffith, Cornelia M. Alberto Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing December 20, 1842, and terminating Dec. 20, 1847.
Hart, Sarah Ann Benjamin F. Purser $20.00 Commencing November 2, 1842, and terminating Nov.2, 1847.
Hull, Ann M.H. Isaac Captain $50.00 Commencing February 13, 1843, and terminating Feb 13, 1848.
Hofford, Mary Lawrence Quartermaster $8.00 Commencing November 16, 1842, and terminating Nov.16 1847.
Handy, Henrietta Levin Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing September 14, 1842, and terminating Sept. 14, 1847.
Hume, Barbara E. Ebenezer J. Segeant of marines $6.50 Commencing September 14, 1842, and terminating Sept.14, 1847
Hooe, Elizabeth M.A.G. George M. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing April 10, 1845, and terminating April 10, 1850.
Huston, Pamelia James G.  Yeoman $12.50 Commencing December 21, 1844, and terminating Dec. 21, 1849.
Kennedy, Mary E. Edmund P. Captain $50.00 Commencing March 28, 1844, and terminating March 28, 1849.

--829--

Alphabetical list of widows—Continued.

Names of the widows.           Names of their husands.      Their husbands' rank.     Monthly allowance. Time to which they are to be paid.
Kennon, Britania W. Beverly Captain $50.00 Commencing February 28, 1844, and terminating Feb. 28, 1849.
Lyne, Elizabeth B. William B. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing May 1, 1841, and terminating May 1, 1846.
Leckie, Martha James M. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing November 12, 1842, and terminating Nov. 12, 1847.
Larramee, Abby Benjamin, alias Jno. Brown Boatswain $10.00 Commencing June 1, 1844, and terminating June 1, 1849.
Lockert, Margaret James M. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing April 10, 1845, and terminating April 10, 1850.
Lemon, Martha Neal C. Boatswain's mate $9.50 Commencing August 14, 1845, and terminating August 14, 1850.
Mack, Catharine Jeremiah Gunner $10.00 Commencing December 17, 1842, and terminating Dec. 17, 1847.
McCreery, Matilda George M. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing March 20, 1843, and terminating March 20, 1848.
Morrice, Mary Ann Davis F. Ship's steward $9.00 Commencing August 2, 1841, and terminating August 2, 1846.
Marbury, Maty Alexander H. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing December 6, 1843, and terminating Dec. 6, 1848.
Newman, Miriam S. William D. Commander $30.00 Commencing October 9, 1844, and terminating October 9, 1849.
Nugent, Jane John Private of marines $3.50 Commencing August 12, 1845, and terminating August 12, 1850.
Overman, Elizabeth John  Carpenter $10.00 Commencing March 19, 1845, and terminating March 19, 1850.
Pease, Almira Levi Carpenter $10.00 Commencing May 12, 1842, and May 12, 1847.
Palmer, Ann Morris Orderly serg't of marines $8.00 Commencing October 13, 1841, and terminating Oct. 13, 1846.
Pinkham, Lydia Alexander B. Commander $30.00 Commencing November 1, 1841, and terminating Nov. 1, 1846.
Palmer, Cornelia Morris Drummers of marines $4.00 Commencing February 28, 1845, and terminating Feb. 28 1850.
Ridgeway, Mria Ebenezer  Commander  $30.00 Commencing November 1, 1841, and terminating Nov. 1, 1846.
Riley, Esther Thomas Gunner $10.00 Commencing March 14, 1845, and terminating March 14, 1850.
Sproston, Jane George S. Surgeon $35.00 Commencing January 21, 1842, and terminating January 21, 1847.
Snowman, Julia Samuel Seaman $6.00 Commencing October 5, 1841, and terminating October 5, 1846.
Stevens, Eliza Thomas H. Captain $50.00 Commencing January 21, 1841, and terminating January 21, 1846.
Swann, Julia C. William S. Lieutenant $25.00 Commencing March 20, 1843, and terminating March 20, 1848.
Smith, Delilah Loman Carpenter $10.00 Commencing May 31, 1844, and terminating May 31, 1849.
Shubrick, Esther M. Edward R. Captain $50.00 Commencing March 12, 1844, and terminating March 12, 1849.
Thomas, Margaret M. Richard Carpenter $10.00 Commencing December 20, 1842, and terminating Dec. 20, 1847.
Tatem, Mry Ann Robert S. Master $20.00 Commencing January 3, 1844, and terminating January 3, 1849.
Voorhees, Harriet Ralph Commander $30.00 Commencing July 27, 1842, and terminating July 27, 1847.
Wainwright, Mria M. Robert D. Lieut. colonel m. corps $30.00 Commencing October 6, 1841, and terminating October 6, 1846.
Wilson, Mary Jane Enoch Armorer $9.00 Commencing July 27, 1841, and terminating July 27, 1846.
Warren, Martha Nahum Master $20.00 Commencing June 10, 1843, and terminating June 10, 1848.
Wood, Mary John Quarter-gunner $7.50 Commencing December 23, 1842, and terminating Dec. 23, 1847.

--830--

Williams, Elizabeth William F. Seaman  $6.00   Commencing August 17, 1842, and terminating August 17, 1847.
Wood, Elizabeth Owen Marine $3.50 Commencing May 9, 1843, and terminating May 9, 1848.
White, Mary Ann Samuel  Carpenter  $10.00 Commencing August 20, 1843, and terminating August 20, 1848.
Wilkinson, Susan, who was the widow of the James Fossett Ordinary seaman $5.00 Commencing March 22, 1842, and ending Sept. 3, 1813, when she was married to John Wilkinsson, her present husband.

Number of widows 67.                    Annual amount of their pensions $15,762.

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.                                        J. L. EDWARDS, Commissioner of Pensions.

--831--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners, complete to the 4th of November, 1845.

Names of pensioners.               
Rank.                      
Commencement of pension. Monthly pension. Act of Congress under which allowed.
Samuel Abbott Seaman Mar.1, 1815 $5.00 April 23, 1800
Zephanian Allen Marine Mar. 1, 1801 $3.00 do
George Adams Quarter gunner Dec. 31, 1836 $4.62 1/2 do
George Alexander Ordinary seaman July 19, 1814 $8.00 do
William Adams Seaman July 25, 1838 $3.00 do
Joseph Ashley Ordinary seaman Dec. 18, 1835 $2.50 do
James Allcom Sailingmaster Dec. 18, 1835 $20.00 do
Robert Andrews Quarter gunner Aug. 1, 1829 $4.50 do
Thomas Austin Yeoman Dec. 7, 1838 $7.50 do
John Adams Seaman Feb. 17, 1836 $6.00 do
Alexander Adams Seaman Oct. 6, 1812 $3.00 do
Gabriel Anderson Seaman Aug. 19, 1835 $1.50 do
John Anderson Ca[tain of hold Oct. 21, 1841 $1.87 1/2 do
James Allen Seaman June 2, 1843 $4.00 do
William Allen Seaman Jan.1, 1839 $5.00 March 1, 1843.
Samuel T. Anderson Chaplain July 1, 1844 $20.00 April 23, 1800.
Nathan Burr Quarter gunner Dec. 30, 1814 $4.50 do
Samuel Bryant Seaman Mar. 5, 1830 $3.00 do
John Brown Seaman July 1, 1839 $6.00 do
Luke Brown Seaman July 5, 1834 $3.00 do
John Bevins Quarter gunner Feb. 21, 1837 $7.50 do
Isaac Bassett Ordinary seaman May 15, 1814 $5.00 do
John Bostrom Quarter gunner May 30, 1834 $3.00 do
Federick Boyer Ser't marine corps Sept. 5, 1834 $2.25 do
James Bird Seaman Nov. 7, 1828 $6.00 do
John Burnham Master's mate Dec. 10. 1813 $9.00 do
John Butler Seaman Nov. 22, 1815 $5.00 do
John Berry Master-at-arms Mar. 18, 1835 $4.50 do
John Brown, 4th Seaman Aug. 31, 1825 $3.00 do
Edward Berry Seaman July 4, 1837 $4.50 do
James Bantam Ordinary seaman July 5, 1833 $4.00 do
James Bell Seaman Aug.23, 1823 $6.00 do
Godfrey Bowman Seaman Sept. 10, 1813 $6.00 do
Jonathan Bulkley Midshipman June 17, 1834 $9.00 do
Edward Barker Marine May 18, 1836 $3.50 do
John Baxter Seaman Feb. 28, 1819 $6.00 do
Peter Borge Captain's steward May 19, 1834 $6.00 do
John Brumley Seaman Sept. 1, 1826 $6.00 do
William Barker Marine July 1, 1802 $6.00 do
William Baggs Marine Mar. 1, 1814 $3.00 do
George Boyle Seaman Nov.21, 1837 $4.00 do
John Bruce Quarter gunner Nov. 1, 1826 $9.00 do
William Bain Quarter gunner Oct. 22, 1833 $3.50 do
David C. Bunnell Seaman April 27, 1813 $3.00 do
Thomas Bowden Quartermaster Dec. 7, 1837 $4.00 do
Henry S. Baker Seaman Dex. 11, 1838 $4.50 do
Robert Berry Seaman June 22, 1829 $6.00 do
Joseph Barrett Quarter gunner April 17, 1813 $9.09 do
John Bennett Seaman Dec. 14, 1814 $6.00 do
James Blake Ordinary seaman July 26, 1822 $5.00 do
Alfred Batts Ordinary seaman Oct. 24, 1833 $5.00 do
George Bennett Ordinary seaman Sept. 16, 1839 $2.50 do
Lemuel Bryant Ordinary seaman Aig. 1, 1814 $8.00 do
Samuel Bosworth Seaman July 3, 1823 $6.00 do
James Barker Quartermaster April 20, 1836 $8.00 do
Thomas Bartlett Seaman Nov. 24, 1834 $6.00 do
Edmund Brett Marine June 12, 1815 $3.00 do

--832--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.                    Rank.                               Commencement of pension.    Monthly pension.    Act of Congress under which allowed.
Robert Butler Quarter gunner April 30, 1835 $3.75 April 23, 1800
Robert Blair Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 $6.00 do
Samuel Butler Quarter gunner Aug. 28, 1815 $8.00 do
Thomas Buchanan Marine June 4, 1829 $3.00 do
John Benson Cook Jan.20, 1844 $9.00 do
Thomas Butler  Captain foretop Aug. 11, 1844 $5.62 1/2 do
Patrick Byrnes Private marine corps May 6, 1843 $2.62 1/2 do
John Burns Ordinary seaman Oct. 29, 1841 $5.00 do
Thomas J. Clark Captain's mate April 27, 1839 $2.37 1/2 do
Horace Carter Landsman Feb. 26, 1837 $2.00 do
John Clark Boatswain's mate Jan. 15, 1838 $7.12 1/2 do
Robert Carson Ordinary seaman June 25, 1821 $5.00 do
Leonard Chase Ordinary seaman Aug. 1, 1828 $5.00 do
John Clements Seaman Dec. 29, 1812 $6.00 do
Michael Collins Seaman April 22, 1834 $4.50 do
Abraham Caswell Ordinary seaman Sept. 30, 1838 $2.50 do
Daniel H. Cole Marine Dec. 27, 1833 $3.00 do
William Cook Cabin cook June 30, 1836 $4.50 do
James Cole Seaman May 1, 1823 $5.00 do
John Conklin Seaman Dec. 31, 1837 $3.00 do
David Christie Marine Jan. 1, 1811 $4.00 do
Enos B. Childs Midshipman April 2, 1823 $9.50 do
Nathaniel Covill Quarter gunner Jan. 1, 1832 $9.00 do
Nathaniel Chapman Quarter gunner June 10, 1815 $9.00 do
George Cornell Carpenter's mate Sept. 10, 1813 $9.00 do
John C. Champlin Seaman May 21, 1831 $6.00 do
John Clark Seaman May 31, 1825 $3.00 do
Thomas R. Clark Ordinary seaman Feb. 18, 1823 $3.75 do
John Cole Ordinary seaman Feb. 6, 1832 $5.00 do
Edward Cardevan Seaman Feb. 28, 1836 $3.00 do
Francis Covenhoven Ordinary seaman June 22, 1807 $3.75 do
Robert Cathart Seaman Sept. 20, 1816 $6.25 do
John Collins Seaman Feb. 9, 1813 $6.00 do
William Chappell Boatswain's mate June 7, 1843 $9.50 do
Thomas Cummins Ordinary seaman July 12, 1843 $5.00 do
James Cummings Ordinary seaman May 16, 1844 $2.50 do
William Dumbar Seam May 31, 1840 $4.50 do
Richard Dunn Seaman Jan. 1, 1829 $6.00 do
James Dixon Seaman Nov. 11, 1835 $3.00 do
Daniel Danvers Marine Oct. 22, 1835 $3.00 do
Stillman Dodge Ordinary seaman May 1, 1831 $3.33 1/3 do
Timothy Donegan Ordinary seaman April 27, 1837 $2.50 do
William Dunn Gunner Oct. 8, 1835 $10.00 do
Joseph Dalrymple Seaman Feb. 24, 1814 $4.50 do
Owen Deddolph Gunner June 25, 1814 $5.00 do
Matthias Douglass Seaman April 23, 1814 $10.00 do
James Dunham Gunner July 4, 1828 $5.00 do
John Daniels Quartermaster Sept. 7, 1816 $3.00 do
John Dunn Marine July 1, 1818 $3.00 do
John Davidson Lieutenant Mar. 1, 1801 $20.00 do
Samuel Daykin Marine Oct. 22, 1834 $3.00 do
John Diragen Seaman Dec. 22, 1815 $5.00 do
James Darley Ordinary seam Mar. 1, 1838 $5.00 do
William Darrington Yeoman Oct. 18, 1841 $3.75 do

--833--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.                Rank.                     Commencement of pension.     Monthly pension.            Act of Congress under which allowed.
Jesse D. Davis Ordinary seaman Sept. 2, 1843 $5.00 April 23, 1800
James Duffy Seaman Dec. 1, 1842 $2.50  Feb. 13, 1845
Joseph Dumell Quartermaster May 10, 1845 $3.00 April 23, 1800
Thomas Edwards Quartermaster Jan. 1, 1823 $9.00 do
Standish F. Edwards Seaman May 11, 1837 $3.00 do
Francis Elliott Marine April 20, 1838 $3.50 do
Ebenezer Evans Seaman Mar. 2, 1813 $6.00 do
Jesse Elam Marine Aug. 1, 1828 $6.00 do
William Evans Marine May 1, 1827 $3.00 do
Abner Enos Master's mate June 4, 1814 $6.00 do
Gardner Edmonds Ordinary seaman June 4, 1814 $5.00 do
James Eddo Captain forescastle Jan. 16, 1835 $1.75  do
Thomas English Ordinary seaman May 14, 1832 $5.00 do
George Edwards First class boy May 21, 1837 $4.00 do
Henry Edgar Boatswain's mate Sept. 10, 1843 $9.50 do
Nicholas F. Farrell Marine May 10, 1830 $3.00 do
William Farrell Seaman June 4, 1829 $6.00 do
Alfred Fisher Seaman May 15, 1835 $5.00 do
Warren Fogg  Marine June 1, 1813 $0.087 1/2 do
Jack Flood Seaman July 7, 1837 $6.00 do
Andrew W. Fleming Seaman Dec. 20, 1839 $4.50 do
Robert Forsaith Marine May 18, 1799 $3.00 do
William Flagg Lieutenant Oct. 31, 1800 $18.75 do
John Fallerhee Landsman Aug. 1, 1827 $4.00 do
George Fitzgerald Seaman Oct. 11, 1838 $2.00 do
Michael Fitzpatrick Master-at-arms June 4, 1829 $9.00 do
Moses French Seaman Aoril 14, 1834 $6.00 do
Peter Foley Marine June 27, 1837 $3.50 do
William Fitzgerald Seaman Dec. 31, 1836 $6.00 do
John Falvey Seaman Aug. 29, 1842 $3.00 do
Henry Fry Purser Jan. 1, 1838 $20.00 Aug. 29, 1842
George Fields Gunner's mate Jan. 28, 1841 $4.75 April 23, 1842
L.C.F. Fatio Midshipman Mar. 25, 1805 $2.37 1/2 do
Benjamin Franklin Seaman Jan. 1, 1840 $6.00 June 1, 1842
James Frazier Seaman Mar. 19, 1814 $6.00 April 23, 1800
Robert Finney Ordinary seaman Oct. 21, 1844 $3.75 do
William M. Goodshall Seaman July 15, 1825 $6.00 do
Chester Goodell Ordinary seaman July 15, 1825 $6.00 do
James Good Seaman Jan.1, 1829 $12.00 do
Anthony Gerome Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 $6.00 do
William Gregory Marine May 28, 1830 $4.00 do
Samuel H. Green Quartermaster Jan. 1, 1819 $9.00 do
John Geyer Seaman April 6, 1815 $6.00 April 2, 1816.
Daniel Gardner Ordinary seaman Mar. 28, 1814 $2.50 April 23, 1800.
John Grant Seaman May 20, 1813 $6.00 do
William Gunnison Ordinary seaman Nov. 24, 1833 $5.00 do
James Glass Serg't marine corps Oct. 24, 1836 $3.25 do
James Grant Seaman April 9, 1829 $8.00 do
John Granso Catain main top M. 3, 1838 $3.50 do
Peter Green Seaman April 3, 1827 $5.00 do
William Gillen Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 $6.00 do
Jeremiah Gardner Ordinary seaman Jan. 14, 1818 $5.00 do
Richard Gilbody Ordinary Seaman Jan. 14, 1826 $4.00 do
Amaziah Goodwin Seaman Jan. 1, 1840 $6.00 do
Joseph H. Goodwin Seaman Nov. 13, 1843 $6.00 do
William Gebhardt Seaman Oct. 14, 1844 $6.00 do
John Grant Ordinary seaman July 1, 1831 $4.00 do
James Hatch Quarter gunner July 1, 1814 $12.00 do
William Herringbrook Seaman Feb. 18, 1814 $6.00 do
John Hogan Seaman Mar. 4, 1830 $3.00 do
John J. Hardy Seaman June 25, 1813 $6.00  do

--834--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.                       Rank.                                Commencement of pension. Monthly pension.   Act of Congress under which allowed.
John Harris Quarter gunner Aug. 1, 1827 $4.50 April 23, 1800
John Hussey Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1832 $5.00 do
Simon Hillman Ordinary seaman July 3, 1815 $4.00 do
Elijah L. Harris Marine Sept. 25, 1833 $3.00 do
John Hamilton Seaman May 1, 1827 $6.00 do
John Hoxie Seaman Aug. 15, 1800 $8.50 do
Samuel F. Holbrook Carpenter Sept. 30, 1820 $5.00 do
Isaac Harding Seaman May 9, 1834 $5.00 do
Garret Hendricks Seaman Aug. 9, 1834 $6.00 do
Uriah Hanscomb Ordinary seaman Oct. 16, 1799 $6.00 do
John Hall Quartermaster Oct. 20, 1830 $4.50 do
Roswell Hale Ordinary seaman Dec. 25, 1819 $5.00 do
Thomas Huntley Seaman Aug. 31, 1837 $5.00 do
Ephraim Hathaway Landsman June 15, 1838 $4.00 do
Alexander Hamilton Boatswain's mate May 31, 1838 $7.12 1/2 do
William Hamilton Seaman July 1, 1829 $6.00 do
Joshua Howell Ordinary seaman  June 30, 1836 $5.00 do
Elias Hughes Ordinary seaman Aug. 28, 1837 $5.00 do
Robert Hazlett Musician m. corps Dec. 12, 1836 $2.00 do
Henry Hampton Ordinary seaman June 14, 1830 $1.66 2/3 do
John Hamilton Seaman Oct. 5, 1837 $6.00 do
William Hampson Marine Aug. 29, 1842 $2.62 1/2 do
Martin Higgins Coal heaver Dec. 14, 1842 $2.50 do
Charles Hays Seaman July 17, 1843 $4.50 do
Samuel Hanton Sailmaker's mate Jan. 3, 1845 $4.75 do
Henry H. holm, alias Chas. Holm Ordinary seaman Aug. 16, 1815 $2.50 do
John Henry Ordinary seaman July 3, 1845 $2.50 do
Michael Johnson Seaman Jan. 31, 1812 $3.00 do
David Jenkins Seaman Aug. 1, 1828 $6.00 do
Richworth Jordan Seaman Mar. 15, 1836 $6.00 do
Gilbert Jones Ordinary seaman June 30, 1815 $2.50 do
James Jackson Seaman Mar. 4, 1816 $5.00 do
William Jones Boy Aug. 24, 1814 $2.25 do
Thomas Irwin Private m. corps Jan. 31, 1837 $1.75 do
Lewis Jones Seaman Oct. 27, 1835 $6.00 do
John Joyce Ordinary seaman Aug. 30, 1839 $3.75 do
Ichabod Jackson Seaman Jan. 25, 1837 $4.50 do
John Johnson Seaman Mar. 28, 1814 $6.00 do
Joseph Jackson Cook Oct. 29, 1839 $4.50 do
Joseph Jennett Captain of mizen top June 12, 1838 $2.33 1/2 do
Thomas Jackson, 2d Quartermaster June 1, 1813 $9.00 do
Sylvester Jameson Seaman Aug. 1, 1828 $6.00 do
Edward Ingram Boatswain April 1, 1831 $5.00 do
James Jeffers Ordinary seaman Dec. 7, 1805 $6.00 do
Henry Jackson Captain of foretop Sept. 20, 1836 $3.75 do
Henry Irwin Marine Feb. 20, 1837 $1.75  do
John Jones Seaman Sept. 16, 1842 $3.00 do
Jacob Johnson Quarter gunner Nov. 22, 1843 $3.75 do
James Jones Seaman April 20, 1844 $6.00 do
John Johnson Seaman May 9, 1845 $6.00 do
John Johnson, 3d Seaman Mar. 21, 1845 $6.00 do
Nicholas Kline Sergeant m. corps. Jan. 1, 1832 $5.00 do
William C. Keene Master-at-arms Sept. 10, 1813 $9.00 do
William Kinnear Marine April 3, 1834 $3.00 do
Daniel Kleiss Ordinary seaman May 6, 1829 $5.00 do
Andrew Key Boatswain's mate July 9, 1839 $19.00 do
James Kelly Marine Aug. 24, 1814 $4.50 do
John Kiggan Ordinary seaman April 30, 1838 $2.50 do
John Kenney Quarter gunner July 1, 1825 $4.50 do
George Kensinger Master-at-arms May 22, 1819 $9.00 do

--835--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.          Rank.                            Commencement of pension.        Monthly pension.         Act of Congress under which allowed.
Thomas Kelly Seaman Ap'l 25, 1815 $4.00 April 23, 1800
Joseph Kelly Seaman Oct. 31, 1835 $4.50 do
John Keegan Quartermaster Mar. 27, 1830 $6.00 do
John P. Kidder An apprentice Mar. 1, 1842 $1.75 do
John Luscomb Ordinary seaman Jan. 15, 1838 $2.50 do
John Lang Seaman July 27, 1837 $6.00 do
Edward Libbis Ordinary seaman June 11, 1836 $1.66 2/3 do
John Lewis Boatswain's mate Jan. 1, 1832 $9.00 do
John Lovely Seaman Ap'l 23, 1835 $6.00 do
James Lloyd Marine April 5, 1834 $2.00 do
Isaac Langley Ordinary seaman Dec. 1, 1814 $5.00 do
John Lloyd Marine June 8, 1819 $3.00 do
John Lagrange Seaman Nov.30, 1834 $4.50 do
Robert Lewis Steward Sept. 5, 1830 $6.75 do
Richard Lee Quartermaster July 1, 1820 $6.00 do
Timothy Lane Cook Mar. 25, 1816 $8.00 do
Peter Lewis Ordinary seaman July 30, 1837 $5.00 do
John Leonard Seaman July 1, 1829 $9.00 do
John G. Lanman Quarter gunner June 20, 1836 $7.50 do
John Lynch Quartermaster Dec. 7, 1838 *$18.00 do
Nathaniel Lord Quartermaster Feb. 26, 1843 $4.50 do
Edward Martin Seaman Mar. 3, 1837 $3.00 do
Jacob Marks Marine June 30, 1810 $0.43 3/4 do
Richard Merchant Marine June 30, 1824 $1.75 do
James Mount Serg't marine corps. June 7, 1837 $4.87 1/2 do
James Moses Purser's steward Ap'l 23, 1816 $9.00 do
James MxDonald Corp'l marine corps. Dec. 31, 1816 $2.25 do
Joseph Marks Seaman May 1, 1827 $6.00 do
Edward Myers Seaman May 27, 1837 $6.00 do
Thomas Murdoch Seaman June 30, 1836 $6.00 do
William McKeever Ordinary seaman Oct. 14, 1835 $2.50 do
John Munroe Seaman July 22, 1835 $4.50 do
John Meigs Seaman July 1, 1819 $10.60 do
John McGarr Steward Nov. 11, 1832 $4.50 do
Archibald Moffatt Ordinary seaman June 1, 1832 $5.00 do
Enoch M. Miley Quarter gunner Mar. 28, 1814 $8.00 do
Peter McMahon Ordinary seaman Nov. 2, 1807 $6.00 do
Samuel Meade Seaman Oct. 19, 1837 $3.00 do
Andrew Mattison Seaman Sept. 10, 1813 $5.00 do
Patrick Murphy Ordinary seaman Oct. 19, 1836 $5.00 do
Giles Manchester Ordinary seaman May 1, 1827 $5.00 do
James Merrill Ordinary seaman Oct. 23, 1819 $5.00 do
Colton Murray Boatswain's mate Aug. 1, 1831 $9.00 do
John McMahon Ordinary seaman July 9, 1836 $5.00 do
George Marshall Gunner Mar. 31, 1825 $2.50 do
Matthias McGill Seaman May 28, 1814 $8.00 do
John Myrick Gunner Aug. 7, 1837 $5.00 do
John Metzer Seaman Feb. 26, 1839 $3.00 do
John Moore Seaman Jan. 9, 1838 $4.50 do
James McDonald Seaman Dec. 31, 1826 $3.00 do
John Malprine Landsman Feb. 1, 1815 $3.00 do
Patrick McLaughlin Ordinary seaman Nov. 1, 1815 $5.00 do
John Myers Seaman Nov. 1, 1828 $6.00 do
Samuel McIsaacs Boy July 30, 1814 $5.00 do
William Moran Seaman Dec. 5, 1815 $6.00 do
Enos Marks Ordinary seaman Feb. 16, 1815 $5.00 do
John Hy McNeale Seaman June 1, 1832 $3.00 do
John Mitchell Quartermaster June 11, 1832 $8.00 do
Matthew McMurray Seaman Sept. 1, 1827 $6.00 do
Thomas Miller Seaman Oct. 23, 1829 $4.00 do
John Moore Seaman Dec. 4, 1817 $6.00 do

                *Increased from $9 per month.

--836--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.                   Rank.                      Commencement of pension. Monthly pension.     Act of Congress under whch allowed.
William Middleton Seaman Jan. 1, 1837 $8.00 April 23, 1800
Henry J. Mercier Ordinary seaman May 20, 1837 $1.25 do
John McLaughlin Quarter gunner Oct. 3, 1842 $7.50 do
Joseph Millet Boatswain's mate July 20, 1843 $4.75 do
William McPherson Seaman Jan. 1, 1843 $8.00 do
William McCann Ordinary seaman July 9, 1844 $5.00 do
James Mitchell Seaman June 12, 1844 $3.00 do
John Murray 1st class boy Aug. 10, 1844 $0.87 1/2 do
Daniel McKeever SEaman Dec. 10, 1844 $3.00 do
Augustus Myers Seaman Oct. 14, 1844 $3.00 do
John McKenzie Seaman Oct. 4, 1844 $3.00 do
John A. McDowell Seaman Mar. 19, 1845 $6.00 do
James Nickerson Seaman Jan. 15, 1815 $6.00 do
James Nagle Seaman June 30, 1834 $5.00 do
John F. Noyer Marine July 1, 1826 $.00 do
John Nugent Seaman Aug. 14, 1813 $6.00 do
Francis B. Nichols Midshipman June 1, 1818 $4.75 do
William Napier Corp'l marine corps July 1, 1826 $4.00 do
David Newbury Ordinary seaman Apr. 15, 1836 $2.00 do
William Newton Ordinary seaman Sept. 11, 1814 $1.25 do
John Neilson Quarter gunner Jan. 1, 1832 $9.00 do
John Nicholson Ordinary seaman Aug. 30 1842 $5.00 do
Josiah Needham Quarter gunner May 4, 1842 $7.50 do
John Nelson Seaman July 8, 1845 $4.80 do
Asahel Owens Seaman Jan. 22, 1838 $3.00 do
Samuel Odiorne, Jr. Seaman Dec. 24, 1825 $6.00 do
Isaac Omans Seaman June 26, 1821 $6.00 do
Patrick O'Malley Ordinary seaman Oct. 10,1842 $2.50 do
John Oatman Landsman April 3, 1844 $4.00 do
Stephen Phyfer Ordinary seaman April 4, 1825 $7.00 do
Peter Pierson Seaman Mar. 20, 1836 $6.00 do
James Perry Ship's corporal Sept. 1, 1827  $9.00 do
William Perry  Seaman April 9, 1825 $6.00 do
Charles Pasture Seaman Mar. 4, 1815 $5.00 do
Neal Patterson Seaman July 1, 1820 $8.00 do
John Peterson Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 $5.00 do
Edward Power Ordinary seaman May 27, 1834 $5.00 do
Henry Powell Seaman Feb. 10, 1840 $3.00 do
Usher Parsons Surgeon Feb. 7, 1816 $12.50 do
Thomas B. Parsons Seaman Sept. 1, 1808 $9.00 do
Payne Perry Seaman April 6, 1815 $6.00 April 2, 1816
Joseph Peck Seaman Oct. 19, 1836 $2.50 April 23, 1800
Charles Perry Seaman Nov. 30, 1837 $4.50 do
John Price  Seaman May 11, 1835 $6.00 do
John Piner Ordinary seaman Nov. 6, 1828 $5.00 do
Daniel Peck Seaman July 1, 1829 $6.00 do
John Price Seaman Aug. 30, 1842 $6.00 do
Richard Parker Seaman July 31, 1842 $6.00 do
David Quill Quartermaster Feb. 20, 1815 $5.00 do
Henry Quinnell Seaman Sept. 26, 1845 $2.00 do
John Randall Marine Sept. 2, 1805 $3.00 do
John Roberts Seaman June 1, 1813 $3.00 do
John Robinson Master's mate Jan. 31, 1814 $1.25 do
James Reid Ordinary seaman Jan. 14, 1838 $5.00 do
Thomas Ritchie Seaman May 14, 1839 $3.00 do
James Roberts Quartergunner Apr. 14, 1832 $1.87 1/2 do
Jasper Read Seaman Mar. 28, 1814 $3.00 do
John Rogers Captain's yeoman May 18, 1832 $4.50 do
John Romeo Ordinary seaman April 6, 1838 $5.00 do
John Revel Ordinary seaman Aug. 20, 1833 $2.50 do
Barnet Ragan Landsman June 6, 1838 $2.00 do

--837--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of pensioners.                   Rank.                           Commencement of pension.   Monthly pension. Act of Congress under which allowed.
James Rankin Seaman June 8, 1839 $4.50 April 23, 1800
James Rogers Sailingmaster July 27, 1815 $15.00 do
James C. Reed Ordinary seaman May 5, 1837 $2.50 do
Alonzo Rowley Ordinary seaman Mar. 15, 1836 $5.00 do
Edward Ross Boy Jan. 1, 1827 $3.00 do
Edward Rowland Ordinary seaman Sept. 11, 1814 $5.00 do
Rosnanti Rhodes Seaman Dec. 5, 1815 $6.00 do
Samuel Riddle Seaman June 30, 1836 $3.00 do
B.S. Randolph Midshipman Oct. 7, 1815 $6.00 do
Daniel Riggs Ordinary seaman May 18, 1836 $3.75 do
Samuel Rose Seaman May 24, 1836 $4.50 do
Nathan Rolfe Seaman Dec. 14, 1813 $6.00 do
John Rice Seaman July 19, 1830 $6.00 do
William Robinson Marine June 15, 1817 $6.00 do
John Riley Marine July 1, 1831 $3.00 do
John Richards Quarter gunner Oct. 20, 1829 $9.00 do
Benjamin Richardson Master's mate Oct. 8, 1829 $10.00 do
John Richmond Marine July 31, 1816 $1.75 do
Stephen B. Roath Gunner's mate Aug. 22, 1842 $4.75 do
Robert Ramsey Steward Dec. 30, 1837 $5.00 March 3, 1843
Lewis Reinburg Private m. corps Jan. 28, 1843 $1.75 April 23, 1800
John Reddington Armorer Jan. 30, 1813 $4.50 do
Michael Romain Seaman Jan. 20, 1845 $3.00 do
John Robinson Captain forecastle April 2, 1845 $9.00 do
Edward Rundlett Private marine corps July 29, 1845 $2.62 1/2 do
Charles Rugg Private marine coprs July 3, 1845 $3.50 do
Nathaniel Staples Seaman May 1, 1833 $3.00 do
Patrick Scanton Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1810 $6.00 do
Benjamin Stevens Master's mate June 27, 1814 $10.00 do
Stephen Simpson Mrine Nov. 16, 1835  $3.50 do
William Smith Ordinary saman June 1, 1827 $5.00 do
Eli Stewart Master's mate May 20, 1814 $7.00 do
Harmon Sutton Seaman July 1, 1829 $3.00 do
Thomas J. Still Marine Jan. 1, 1832 $3.00 do
Charles Sheeter Boatswain's mate Nov. 1, 1832 $6.00 do
Thomas Smith Seaman April 5, 1839 $2.00 do
Joseph Smith Boatswain April 6, 1815 $20.00 do
Alfred Smith Ordinary seaman Sept. 27, 1837 $2.50 do
John Stevens Quartermaster May 21, 1834 $4.50 do
Jeremiah Sullivan Seaman June 30, 1837 $6.00 do
Thomas Smith Boatswain April 6, 1815 $20.00 April 2, 1816
Aaron Smith Ordinary seaman Aug. 1, 1828 $2.50 April 23, 1800
William Stockdale Marine July 26, 1816 $6.00 do
William Smart Ordinary seaman July 1, 1829 $5.00 do
John Smith Seaman Aug. 31, 1834 $3.00 do
James Smith Ordinary seaman Dec. 2, 1837 $2.50 do
James Shanklin Ordinary seaman June 1, 1813 $2.50 do
Robert Speddin                 Lieutenant

Dec. 5, 1823 $25.00 do
William Smith Serg't marine corps Jan. 7, 1841 $6.50 March 3, 1837
John Strain Seaman Feb. 28, 1837 $4.50 April 23, 1800
James Spiers Ordinary seaman May 5, 1837 $3.75 do
John Smith Boatswain Dec. 31, 1827 $5.00 do
John Scriver Seaman Apr. 10, 1811 $5.00 do
John Schrouder Seaman June 29, 1819 $6.00 do
Otis Sage Corp'l marine corps Nov. 16, 1835 $4.50 do
Samuel Spooner Ordinary seaman Oct. 15, 1838 $1.66 2/3 do
Jonas A. Stone Seaman April 4, 1829 $9.00 do
Alexander Smith Seaman July 26, 1836 $3.00 do
Thomas Stallings Ordinary seaman Nov. 7, 1826 $2.50 do
Leonard Stevens Serg't marine corps Jan. 27, 1837 $3.25 do
R.S. Suter Midshipman Dec. 16, 1814 $9.50 do

--838--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of prisoners.              Rank.                            Commencement of pension Monthly pension. Act of Congress under which allowed.
James Stockwell Seaman Feb. 28, 1829 $4.50 April 2, 1800.
Charles Smith, 3d Seaman Aug. 19, 1841 $3.00 do
Frederick Smith Capain forecastle June 14, 1842 $7.00 do
Russell Smith Carpenter's mate Aug. 2, 1842 $7.00 do
Charles Staunton Boatswain's mate Feb. 19, 1838 $9.50 do
Samuel Stevens Seaman Aug. 19, 1843 $1.50 do
Nehemiah Shockley Seaman Sept. 18, 1843 $6.00 do
Thomas Smith Ordinary seaman Jan. 23, 1843 $3.33 1/3 do
James Seawell Seaman Aug. 31, 1843 $4.50 do
Isaac Swann Ordinary seaman Aug. 12, 1843 $2.50 do
John B. Smith Seaman May 13, 1844 $6.00 do
Charles Stewart Gunner's mate Ap'l 30, 1844 $.9.50 do
Reuban Sharp alias  Robert Gray Quarter gunner Jan. 13, 1845 $5.62 1/2 do
Edward Smith Ordinary seaman Feb. 25, 1845 $2.50 do
Lewis Thomas Marine May 11, 1839 $2.66 2/3 do
John Tarlton Ordinary seaman May 8, 1833 $4.00 do
James Turnbull Ordinary seaman April 6, 1815 $5.00 April 2, 1816.
Owen Taylor Seaman Aug. 19, 1812 $6.00 April 23, 1800.
Thomas Tindley Seaman April 6, 1815 $3.00 Apri 2, 1816.
John Taylor Quartermaster May 31, 1839 $8.00 April 23, 1800.
Jacob Tonkins Marine May 31, 1810 $3.40 do
Samuel Taylor Ordinary seaman Nov. 30, 1839 $5.00 March 3, 1837.
George Tunstall Seaman Apr. 14, 1836 $3.00 April 23, 1800.
Isaac Thomas  Marine Oct. 30, 1826 $6.00 do
William Thompson Ordinary seaman May 20, 1826 $7.50 do
James Thompson Seaman June 30, 1836 $6.00 do
Julius Terry Ordinary seaman Aug. 31, 1812 $5.00 do
James Tull Serg't marine corps June 29, 1816 $5.00 do
Henry Townsend Ordinary seaman Dec. 18, 1814 $5.00 do
David Thomas Marine Jan. 1, 1806 $3.00 do
Philip Tulley Seaman Jan. 10, 1816 $6.00 do
George Turry  Boatswain Aug. 9, 1839 $3.33 1/3 do
John Thompson Quartermaster May 23, 1844 $2.00 do
George Taylor 1st class boy Jan. 22, 1844 $3.50 do
John Tollom Seaman May 14, 1845 $3.00 do
James Thomas Quartermaster Dec. 12, 1844 $6.00 do
William Taylor Ordinary seaman Feb. 27, 1845 $3.75 do
Benjamin Underwood Ordinary seaman Ap'l 24, 1815 $5.00 do
George Upham Marine July 12, 1816 $3.00 do
John Underwood Carptenter's male  Aug. 16, 1844 $9.50 do
Gabriel Van Horn Marine Dec. 23, 1837 $3.50 do
William Venable Boatswain's mate May 2, 1834 $4.75 do
John S. Vincent Captain of the hold April 5, 1843 $1.75 do
Edward Verry Ordinary seaman June 22, 1842 $5.00 do
William Whitney Seaman Nov. 1, 1818 $8.00 do
John A. Webster Sailingmaster Sept. 13, 1814 $20.00 June 30, 1834.
Peter Woodbury Quartermaster Mar. 18, 1813 $9.00 April 23, 1800.
Robert Woods Seaman Dec. 31, 1836 $3.00 do
Charles W. White Ordinary seaman Feb. 17, 1837 $5.00 do
Reuben Wright Carpenter's mate Aug. 30, 1814 $8.00 do
Caleb J. Wiggins Ordinary seaman May 23, 1814 $3.00 do
Henry R. Williams Yeoman Aug. 2, 1840 $7.50 March 3, 1837.
John Williams Seaman July 1, 1818 $6.00 April 23, 1800.
Joseph Ward Seaman July 1, 1818 $6.00 do
William Williams Marine July 9, 1838 $3.50 do
William S. Welsh Seaman May 1, 1827 $6.00 do
James Wilson Quartermaster July 1, 1817 $9.00 do
James B. Wright Quartermaster May 1, 1831 $9.00 do
Charles Weeks Seaman Feb. 23, 1830 $6.00 do

--839--

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners—Continued.

Names of prensioners.                      Rank.                             Commencement of pension. Monthly pension.
Act of Congress under which allowed.
Francis Williams Landsman Jan. 15, 1838 $1.00 April 23, 1800.
George Wiley Seaman Mar. 1, 1837 $3.00 do
John Waters Seaman Sept. 30, 1838 $3.00 do
James Woodhouse Seaman Mar. 17, 1836 $6.00 do
George Wilson Seaman Mar. 23, 1838 $6.00 do
John Williams Captain foretop Sept. 9, 1836 $1.87 1/3 do
Jack Williams Seaman Mar. 22, 1828 $6.00 do
Daniel Watson Carpenter's mate May 10, 1838 $4.75 do
Charles Wheeler Seaman Oct. 3, 1836 $3.00 do
Henry Ward Quarter gunner May 27, 1833 $9.00 do
Henry Williams Ordinary seaman Mar. 3, 1838 $5.00 do
Soloman White Seaman Feb. 29, 1812 $4.00 do
Thomas Ward Captain foretop Jan. 14, 1835 $7.50 do
William Ward Seaman Aug. 1, 1832 $6.00 do
William Welsh Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1822 $2.50 do
John Wright, 2d Ordinary seaman May 1, 1822 $5.00 do
William A. Weaver Midshipman June 1, 1813 $9.50 do
James Williamson Armorer Sept. 1, 1831 $6.00 do
John Wright Quarter gunner Nov. 7, 1836 $5.62 1/2 do
John Waters Ordinary seaman Ap'l 24, 1824 $5.00 do
James Wines Seaman Mar. 28, 1824 $6.00 do
William Wicks Ordinary seaman Aug. 4, 1813 $4.00 do
Elias Wiley Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 $2.50 do
William Wright Seaman Aug. 31, 1832 $3.00 do
Thomas Welsh Quarter gunner Feb. 26, 180 $12.00 do
Samuel Williams Quartermaster Sept. 1, 1827 $6.00 do
William Wagner Quartr gunner Dec. 3, 1819 $9.00 do
Daniel Whitehorn Quarter gunner June 21 1842 $7.50 do
John Williams Ordinary seaman May 1, 1843 $2.50 do
Joshua Wyman Seaman Nov. 29, 1842 $6.00 do
John Wolfenden Seaman Mar. 3, 1843 $8.58 1/3 do
Charles Williams Ordinary seaman Aug. 4, 1840 $3.75 do
Charles L. Williamson Commander June 18, 1844 $30.00 do
John White Seaman May 30, 1845 $4.50 do
John W. West Lieutenant Nov. 21, 1844 $5.62 1/2 do
Richard G. York Seaman Jan. 13, 1839 $3.00 do

The number of invalid pensioners is 522.   Annual sum to pay them, $33,200.

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.

J. L. EDWARDS,              

Commissioner of Pensions.

--840--

List of persons restored to the roll of privateer pensions, complete up to the 4th of November, 1845.

Names of pensioners.         Rank.                                 Commencement of pension. Monthy pension. Act of Congress under which allowed.
George Albree Cabin boy July 1, 1837 $3.00 June 15, 1814.
William Austin Commander do $15.00 do
David Boomer Seaman do $3.00 do
James Barr, Jr. Captain's clerk do $8.00 do
John Balster Seaman do $2.00 do
Benjamin K. Churchill Captain do $20.00 do
John Cook Seaman do $6.00 do
Edward Cole Seaman Jan. 1, 1837 44.00 do
John Carlow Pilot July 1, 1837 $4.00 do
Lewis De Mott Seaman July 1, 1836 $6.00 do
John Edwards Lieutenant July 1, 1837 $9.00 do
Samuel Elwell Seaman do $4.00 do
James Foot Prize master do $9.00 do
Henry Fletcher Seaman do $4.00 do
Joshua Gamage, jr. Seaman do $3.00 do
Isaac Goodwin Seaman do $5.00 do
Empson Hamilton Marine Jan. 1, 1837 $6.00 do
Edward Hurn Boatswain July 1, 1837 $10.00 do
James Miller Seaman do $6.00 do
John Nants Lieutenant do $12.00 do
Daniel Pickering Carpenter's mate Jan. 1, 1836 $6.00 do
James Rowe Prize master July 1, 1837 $3.33 1/3 do
James Sawyer Prize master Jan. 1, 1837 $10.00 do
Thomas Taylor Gunner's mate July 1, 1837 $6.00 do
Benjamin Upton Commander do $10.00 do
Richard Van Vorst Quarter gunner Jan. 1, 1837 $5.00 do
Nathaniel Weston Seaman July 1, 1837 $3.00 do

27 pensioners.    Amount required to pay them, $2,200.

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.

J. L. EDWARDS,

Commissioner of Pensions.

--841--

An estimate of the amount required to pay navy pensions in the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847.

 

To pay navy invalid pensioners during the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847, the sum of $40,000 will be required; but, as there is now in the treasury a balance of the navy pension fund, amounting to $7,664.60, it will be necessary to appropriate only                                                                                                $32,335.40

To pay the pensions of widows of officers, seamen, and marines, for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1847                                                                                               $12,000.00

To pay the pensions of invalids who were wounded on board of private armed vessels during the late war                                                                                                  $3,000.00

                                                                                                       _________                                                                                                                                  $47,335.40 

J. L. EDWARDS,

Commissioner of Pensions.

PENSION OFFICE, November 4, 1845.

__________

NAVY DEPARTMENT, August 7, 1845.

SIR: The Secretary of War, with the assent of the President, is prepared to transfer Fort Severn to the Navy Department, for the purpose of establishing there a school for midshipmen.

In carrying this design into effect, it is my desire to avoid all unnecessary expense—to create no places of easy service—no commands that are not strictly necessary—to incur no charge that may demand new annual appropriations; but, by a more wise application of moneys already appropriated, and offices already authorized, to provide for the better education of the young officers of the navy. It is my design not to create new offices; but, by economy of administration, to give vigor of action to those which at present are available; not to invoke new legislation, but to execute more effectually existing laws. Placed by their profession in connexion with the world, visiting in their career of service every climate and every leading people, the officers of the American navy, if they gain but opportunity for scientific instruction, may make themselves as distinguished for culture as they have been for gallant conduct.

To this end it is proposed to collect the midshipmen who from time to time are on shore, and give them occupation during their stay on land in the study of mathematics, nautical astronomy, theory of morals, international law, gunnery, use of steam, the Spanish and the French languages, and other branches essential in the present day to the accomplishment of a naval officer.

The effect of such an employment of the midshipmen cannot but be favorable to them and to the service. At present they are left, when waiting orders on shore, masters of their own motions, without steady occupation—young, and exulting in the relief from the restraints of discipline on shipboard.

In collecting them at Annapolis for purposes of instruction, you will begin with the principle that a warrant in the navy, far from being an excuse for licentious freedom, is to be held a pledge for subordination, industry,

--842--

and regularity-for sobriety, and assiduous attention to duty. Far from consenting that the tone of discipline and morality should be less than at the universities or colleges of our country, the President expects such supervision and management as shall make of them an exemplary body, of which the country may be proud.

To this end you have all the powers for discipline conferred by the laws of the United States, and the certainty that the department will recommend no one for promotion who is proved unworthy of it from idleness or ill conduct, or continuing ignorance, and who cannot bear the test of a rigid examination.

For the purposes of instruction, the department can select from among twenty-two professors and three teachers of languages. This force, which is now almost wasted by the manner in which it is applied, may be concentrated in such a manner as to produce the most satisfactory results. Besides, the list of chaplains is so great, that they cannot all be employed at sea, and the range of selection of teachers may be enlarged by taking from their number some who would prefer giving instruction at the school to serving afloat. The object of the department being to make the simplest and most effective arrangement for a school, you will be the highest officer in the establishment, and will be entrusted with its government. It is my wish, if it be possible, to send no other naval officer to the school except such as may be able and willing to give instruction. Among the officers junior to yourself, there are many whose acquisitions and tastes may lead them to desire such situations. For this end the department would cheerfully detach three or four of the lieutenants and passed midshipmen, who, while they would give instruction, would be ready to aid you in affairs of discipline and government. Thus the means for a good naval school are abundant, though they have not yet been collected together and applied. One great difficulty remains to be considered. At our colleges and at West. Point, young men are trained in a series of consecutive years: the laws of the United States do not sanction a preliminary school for the navy; they only provide for the instruction of officers who already are in the navy. The pupils of the naval school being, therefore, officers in the public service, will be liable at all times to be called from their studies, and sent on public duty. Midshipmen, too, on their return from sea, at whatever season of the year, will be sent to the school. Under these circumstances, you will be obliged to arrange your classes in such a manner as will leave opportunity for those who arrive to be attached to classes suited to the stage of their progress in their studies. It will be difficult to arrange a system of studies which will meet this emergency; but, with the fixed resolve which you will bring to the work, and with perseverance, you will succeed.

Having thus expressed to you some general views, I leave you, with such assistance as you may require, to prepare and lay before this department for its approbation a plan for the organization of the naval school at Fort Severn, Annapolis.

The posts to which you and those associated with you will be called are intended to be posts of labor; but they will also be posts of the highest usefulness and consideration. To yourself, to whose diligence and care the organization of the school is entrusted, will belong in a good degree the responsibility of a wise arrangement. Do not be discouraged by the many inconveniences and difficulties which you will certainly encounter, and rely implicitly on this department as disposed to second and sustain

--843--

you under the law in every effort to improve the character of the younger branch of the service.

I am, respectfully, your obedient servant,

GEORGE BANCROFT

Com'r FRANKLIN BUCHANAN,

United States Navy, Washington.

 

--844-

A statement showing the receipts and expenditures of the Navy Pension Fund for the year ending 30th September, 1845, and its condition at that date.

 

I. Balance in the treasury on the 1st of October, 1844.

  Balance due by agents, including advances to same date

$74,455.27

$29,778.21

 
      $104,233.48
       
 

II. Amount received into the treasury since 1st October, 1844, from whom, and on what account, viz: From Secretary of the Navy, for amount of four dividends of the stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown

Appropriation by Congress for invalids and widows

 

Appropriation for the widows and orphans of the officers, seamen and marines, lost in the Grampus and Sea Gull

 

$2,850.00

$58,000.00

 

$10,000.00