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United States. 1834. Annual report of the Secretary of the Navy. Washington: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy, Showing the Condition of the Navy in the Year 1834

Communicated to Congress, With the President's Message, December 2, 1834

23d Congress.] No. 564. [2d Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN 1834.

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, DECEMBER 2, 1834.

Navy Department, November 29, 1834.

To the President of the United States:

Sir:

In laying before you, at this time, a succinct view of the condition of our navy, and its operations during the past year, it affords me great pleasure to state that its gradual increase and improvement are such as might have been anticipated from the ample means for that purpose which have been afforded by the liberal policy of Congress.

All the services required of our naval force have been promptly performed; our commerce has been protected in the remote as well as the neighboring seas; our national character has been sustained at home and abroad, while a large portion of naval officers, seamen, and marines have been kept in active service, under a strict discipline, calculated to fit them for all the duties which may be required of them, whether in defending our property on the ocean from pirates or open enemies, our shores from hostile aggression, or our flag from insult.

An inspection of our navy yards at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, and Norfolk, made in August and September last, in company with the Commissioners of the Navy Board, has afforded me the most satisfactory evidence of our means, in a short time, of increasing our navy to any extent the exigencies of our country may require.

The officers in charge of those stations perform their duties with great ability and zeal; the building and repairing of our ships are conducted with dispatch and economy; and the ample materials on hand for naval purposes are preserved with the greatest care, and by all the means which science and experience can suggest to prevent decay.

Our naval force consists of six ships of the line, and seven frigates now building, for the completion of which, additional appropriations to the amount of $1,527,640 will be required; of five ships of the line, two frigates, and six sloops-of-war in ordinary, requiring repairs which will cost $1,362,000, in addition to the materials on hand for that purpose; and of one ship of the line, four frigates, eight sloops-of-war, and six schooners in commission; in all, twelve ships of the line, thirteen frigates, fourteen sloops-of-war, and six schooners. Besides which, the frames of ships procured, or under contract, for the gradual increase of the navy, and other materials on hand or under contract for that purpose, will afford the means of bringing into the service, as soon as it can probably be required, an additional force of five ships of the line, eleven frigates, seven sloops-of-war, and two schooners, the building of which may be immediately commenced on launching our vessels now upon the stocks.

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Our vessels in commission during the past year have been employed, as heretofore, in protecting our commerce in the Mediterranean, in the West Indies, on the coast of Brazil, and in the Pacific ocean.

The ship of the line Delaware, the frigates United States and Constellation, the sloop-of-war John Adams, and the schooner Shark, have been thus employed in the Mediterranean; and the frigate Potomac, after her return from the Pacific and Indian oceans, was repaired, and sailed on the 20th of last month to join the Mediterranean squadron, from which the frigate Constellation had been ordered to return. This frigate arrived at Norfolk on the 20th instant. The sloop-of-war John Adams returned to the United States in February from the Mediterranean, and sailed again for that station in August last, after receiving necessary repairs.

On the West India station, the sloops-of-war Vandalia, St. Louis, Falmouth, and the schooners Grampus and Experiment, have been employed. The St. Louis returned to Norfolk in July last, where she has been repaired, and from whence she sailed on the 14th instant to resume her station in the West Indies. The Vandalia returned in August last to Norfolk, where she is undergoing considerable repairs, which, it is believed, will be completed early next month, when she will return to the West India squadron.

The sloops-of-war Natchez, Ontario, Erie, Lexington, and Peacock, and the schooners Enterprise and Boxer, composed our squadron on the coast of Brazil. The Erie did not sail for this station until August last. The Lexington returned to the United States in April, and the Peacock in May last. The Enterprise returned in April, and sailed again for the Brazilian station in July last, in which month the Boxer returned to the United States, and, after being repaired, sailed for the Pacific. The Peacock is now undergoing considerable repairs, and is expected to be ready for sea early in February next.

For our station in the Pacific, the frigate Brandywine sailed on the 2d of June last, to co-operate with the sloops-of-war Fairfield and Vincennes, and the schooner Dolphin, and, with the Boxer, now on her way to that station, from which the Falmouth returned on the 1st of February, and, after having been repaired, sailed for the West India station in March last.

Our naval force, consisting of commission and warrant officers, petty officers, seamen, ordinary seamen, landsmen, and boys, amounts to 6,072; and our marine corps, under its new organization, will consist of commissioned officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, to the number of 1,283; making a total of 7,355.

The dry docks at Boston and Norfolk have fully answered the most sanguine expectations that were formed of their usefulness. They are now deemed indispensable to a speedy and economical repair of our larger vessels. But the two already finished are not sufficient for the purposes of our navy. An additional dry dock, at some intermediate point between Boston and Norfolk, would greatly promote the purposes for which our navy is established and maintained. As a site for such additional dry dock, the harbor of New York presents greater advantages than are to be found in any other situation; among which may be enumerated the great commerce of the place, the facilities which the city of New York affords for recruiting seamen and for procuring all materials, as well as for employing skillful mechanics and laborers necessary for repairing vessels.

The experience acquired in making the two dry docks already finished cannot fail to be of great advantage in the construction of a third.

I would respectfully repeat a recommendation of my predecessor, that authority be given to construct two or three steam batteries, as the means of testing the application of steam to the purposes of national defence.

It can hardly be doubted that the power of steam is soon to produce as great a revolution in the defence of rivers, bays, coasts, and harbors, as it has already done in the commerce, intercourse, and business of all classes of men in Europe as well as in America. This subject has already attracted the attention of the maritime powers of Europe; and our honor as well as safety requires that no nation, whose fleets may come in conflict with ours, should be in advance of us in the science and application of this power, upon which the success of our future wars with them may depend.

Should the power of steam, as a means of defence, produce all the effects that may be justly anticipated, it will diminish, in some instances, the necessity of permanent fortifications on our coasts, by substituting those which may be moved from place to place as they may be wanted, and in our own waters become the formidable engines of attack as well as defence. The heavy and cumbrous steam vessels and batteries, with their necessary apparatus and supplies, which may be brought into action with the most powerful effect by a nation near its own shores and harbors, cannot be transported over distant seas and oceans for the purpose of attacking its enemies. Should, therefore, the application of steam become a part of the system of maritime war, it is a consolation to reflect that it will greatly diminish the frequency as well as horrors of such war, inasmuch as it will hold out much greater advantages to the defending than to the attacking party, and take from the aggressor in a great degree his hope of success, and, of course, his motive for action.

I can add nothing to what has been frequently urged in favor of a peace establishment for our navy; but must be permitted to state, what has often been before stated, that the compensation of the commanders of our ships on foreign stations is altogether inadequate to an honorable discharge of their duties. They are compelled to incur expenses beyond the amount of their pay and rations, or decline to receive and return civilities uniformly offered to them on such stations, and upon which our friendly relations with foreign nations may, in some degree, depend.

The course pursued by our officers, under such circumstances, has been such as national as well as professional pride has dictated; and, of course, they frequently return from their tours of service deeply in debt; one evil consequence of which is, that it adds to the inducements of our officers to prefer service on our home stations to service at sea; whereas the pecuniary consideration should always be in favor of the sea service.

Much inconvenience frequently arises from a want of power to make transfers of materials purchased for the navy under certain appropriations, to the purposes of other appropriations, under which they are more immediately wanted. A power to make such transfers, guarded by limitations similar to those imposed upon the power of making transfers of money from certain appropriations to others, would save much time and expense in the building and repairing of our ships.

Under the act of the 30th of June last, for the better organization of the United States marine corps, the appointments of officers authorized by the same have been made; and the additional number of privates required will be recruited with all convenient dispatch.

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So much of the military regulations, for the discipline of the marine corps, as were in force at the passing of the act, and not inconsistent with the same; will continue in force until superseded by regulations which shall be prescribed in conformity with the provisions of the eighth section of that act.

It is believed that the discipline and harmony of the officers and men of the navy proper, and of the marine corps, will be promoted by placing the marine barracks without the bounds of the different navy yards with which they may be connected. This arrangement would create but little additional expense to the government. The marine barracks at Portsmouth, should it be thought proper to retain them as such, are at a sufficient distance, and might be easily separated from that part of the navy yard in which ships are built and repaired, and in which are placed the workshops and stores of that station.

The marine barracks at Boston are within the bounds of the navy yard, but so decayed and dilapidated as not to be worth repairing, and they occupy a space designated for another purpose in the yard. A situation for barracks, sufficiently near the yard, it is said, can be procured upon reasonable terms.

The marine barracks at the navy yard at New York were condemned in 1826 as unworthy of repair. The officers attached to this station have been allowed house rent in lieu of quarters. An appropriation of $30,000 has been made for the erection of marine barracks at that station, and $6,000 for the purchase of a site for the same; but, as yet, the site has not been purchased, nor selected.

At Philadelphia, the barracks are within the navy yard, but unfit for use as such. It will be necessary to construct new barracks at that station.

At Washington, the barracks are not within the bounds of the navy yard.

At Norfolk, the barracks are within the bounds of the navy yard, but inadequate to the accommodation of the force required there. Besides, they are much out of repair; and the commanding officer has been necessarily allowed house rent in lieu of quarters.

At Pensacola, no permanent marine barracks have been prepared. The officers have been allowed house rent, and the men have occupied temporary buildings. It is proper here to observe that the plans of the navy yards, prepared and approved under the act for the gradual improvement of the navy, make no provision for barracks within the navy yards, except at Portsmouth.

Under the first section of the act concerning naval pensions and the navy pension fund, passed the 30th of June last, fourteen, pensions to widows have been renewed, and thirty-seven original pensions have been granted, in pursuance of the provisions of that act. These constitute a heavy charge upon that fund, and require for their payment, annually, the sum of $16,062.

Under the second section of that act, the sum of $141,303.80 has been reimbursed to the fund for the cost of the stock of the Bank of Columbia, heretofore purchased by the commissioners of the fund, with interest thereon from the period at which said bank ceased to pay interest to the time of reimbursement. $141,300 of the amount has been vested in the stock of the Bank of the United States, as authorized by the act of Congress of the 10th of July, 1832. The state of this fund will appear by documents annexed, marked M, M 1 and M 2.

The number of invalid pensioners is now two hundred and eighty-seven. Should all of them claim, which is improbable, the amount required for their annual payment will be $23,321.

The number of widow pensioners, including those under the act of the 30th of June last, is one hundred and nine; and the amount required for their annual payment is $24,023—making the annual charge, according to the present pension roll, $47,254.

From the account of stocks, hereunto annexed, marked M, it will appear that the income of the fund arising from those stocks, and others to be purchased by excess of money on hand, will be about $70,000 per annum. It is believed, therefore, that the fund will be sufficient for all the ascertained claims upon it, under existing laws; and the surplus of next year, which may be estimated at from $15,000 to $20,000, will, it is presumed, be enough to meet the ordinary increase of pensions for several years.

Of the privateer pension fund, the act of Congress of the 19th of June last revived five years' pensions to widows of officers, seamen and marines, slain or lost on board of private armed vessels.

In twenty-eight cases brought to the notice of this Department under this act, more than five years had elapsed from the date when their former pensions expired. They being sustained by satisfactory proof, were settled in the office of the Fourth Auditor, and the accounts certified by the Second Comptroller of the Treasury. The amount to pay these accounts was $15,480. Under the act, twenty-six pensions were renewed; of which, one expired on the 10th day of October last and one on the 28th instant. One will expire on the 4th of March, four on the 1st of February, and nineteen on the 1st of January, in the year 1835. The payments on these, to the 1st of July last, amounted to $11,995.20; and the sum required, to complete five years' pension to each, will be $1,320.80.

In addition to the above, there are thirty-four invalid pensioners on the roll, and the sum necessary to pay them will be 83,016 per annum.

It will be seen in the annexed statement, marked N 1, that the amount in the Treasury on the 1st instant, to the credit of the fund, was $1,261 46
Stock owned by the fund (N) 15,567 05
Total $16,828 51

After paying the claims that have as yet been preferred under the act of the 19th of June last, and it is believed that but few additional claims under the act can now be brought forward, it is estimated that the fund will be sufficient to pay, for four or five years, all the invalid pensions now chargeable to it.

From the statement annexed, marked 0, it will appear that the amount to the credit of the navy hospital fund, on the 1st inst., was $35,559.04. The increase of the fund, arising from deductions in the settlement of accounts in the Fourth Auditor's office, will be nearly $16,000 per annum. The expenditures for several years will probably not exceed $13,000 per annum. This will leave balances not wanted for current expenses. The propriety of authorizing, by law, the investment of such balances in some well-secured, productive stock, is respectfully suggested.

By the statement hereunto annexed, marked P, it appears that, of the appropriations heretofore made for the suppression of the slave trade, there remains in the Treasury a balance of $14,213.91. It is not believed that any further appropriation for this purpose is necessary at this time.

It will be perceived, by the estimates, that nothing is asked on account of the contingent expenses of the Secretary's office of this Department. A proper degree of economy has rendered any appropriation

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for those expenses for the ensuing year unnecessary. This circumstance affords me an apology for stating that some of the officers connected with this Department do not receive an adequate compensation for their services.

The chief clerk of the Commissioners of the Navy Board, and the warrant clerk, and the clerk keeping the register of correspondence of this Department, perform arduous duties, which require talent and experience. Their salaries, respectively, are less than are paid in other departments for services of no greater difficulty and responsibility than theirs, and are inadequate to the decent support of themselves and families.

An estimate for an increase of $100 to the salary of the first, so as to make it $1,700 per annum, and of $400 to the latter, so as to make it $1,400, is respectfully submitted.

The salaries of the chief clerks of the commandants of the navy yards at Boston, New York, Washington, and Norfolk, are evidently below what may be considered a fair compensation for their services. I therefore solicit a small increase of $150 to their salaries respectively, so as to make them $900 each, as stated in the estimates.

The superintendent of the southwest Executive building receives at present but $250, and the two watchmen for the same but $300 each per annum. It is respectfully recommended that an increase of $250 be made to the salary of the superintendent, and of $200 to the salaries of each of the watchmen.

In the report of my predecessor, of the 30th of November last, an estimate of the expense of purchasing and maintaining a lithographic press was submitted, as a means of procuring charts and blank forms for this Department, as well as for the several navy yards and vessels in commission, as also for the purpose of multiplying copies of drawings connected with the survey of the coast. As, in my opinion, the employment of such a press would be a saving of time and money, in the duties now performed by clerks and draftsmen in this Department, and the branches of service connected with it, I respectfully renew the application for the necessary appropriation for this press; and annex hereto copies of the letters of the Commissioners of the Navy Board, and of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes, jr., heretofore laid before Congress, in favor of this application.

The charge of the coast survey, now under the superintendence of Mr. Hassler, was, on the 11th day of March last, transferred from the Treasury to the Navy Department, to which it was thought more properly to belong. I have found this arrangement very onerous, as it imposed upon me new duties, which could not be performed without a careful examination of the accounts of what had heretofore been done on the survey, contained in a voluminous correspondence between the Treasury Department and the superintendent. This arrangement also caused a short interruption in the progress of the work, but which has, nevertheless, been prosecuted with diligence and zeal by those employed in it.

The report of Mr. Hassler, of the 17th of May last, and his supplementary report of the 11th of last month, with the maps, drafts, and sketches accompanying the same, herewith transmitted, show the progress already made in this work under the law of 1832, and its connection with the progress made in the same in the year 1817.

The situation of the base line on the south side of Long Island has been most fortunately selected. As any error in this line would be attended with corresponding errors in the whole work depending upon the same, the utmost care has been taken to have it measured with the greatest possible accuracy.

From what has been done in this survey, we may reasonably hope that this important work will advance with all the aid which science, skill, and industry can give it, and in a manner as honorable to the government, under whose auspices it was begun and has been continued, as it will be useful to the present and to future ages.

The information wanted for accurate and detailed estimates of the necessary appropriations for the continuance of the coast survey cannot easily be obtained until further experience shall enable the officers engaged in it to introduce more system in the detail of duties and expenditures in their work than they have heretofore been able to do.

The sum of thirty thousand dollars was appropriated for this purpose the past year, and it is believed that an equal sum will be wanted for the ensuing year, as stated in the estimates.

Under the act of the 30th of June last, "authorizing the Secretary of the Navy to make experiments for the safety of the steam engine," preparations have been made for testing certain proposed improvements in steam boilers; but no such experiments have been exhibited or communicated to this Department, that could properly form the subject of a report.

Since the last annual report from this Department, the legislature of Pennsylvania have, by their act of the 10th day of April last, ceded to the United States the jurisdiction over the territory now in their possession in the county of Philadelphia, and occupied for the purpose of a naval asylum for sick and disabled seamen, so long as the same shall be used by the Government of the United States for that purpose, with a reservation of the right to lay out a certain street, called Sutherland avenue, through the western part of said ceded territory; and with a proviso that all process, civil and criminal, of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania shall extend into, and be effected within, such territory.

The necessary references to papers and documents, connected with this report, will be found in a schedule hereunto annexed.

I have the honor to be,

With great respect,

Your obedient, humble servant,

MAHLON DICKERSON.

Schedule of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy, to the President of the United States, of November 29, 1834.

1. The letter of the Commissioners of the Navy to the Secretary, transmitting the general and special estimates of the navy, for the year 1835.

A. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy.

B. Estimate for the office of the Commissioners of the Navy.

C. Estimate for the expenses of the southwest Executive building.

D. The general estimate for the navy.

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Detailed estimate:

D, 1. For vessels in commission.

D, 2. For receiving vessels.

D, 3. For recruiting stations.

D, 4. For officers and others attached to navy yards and shore stations, and the abstract or recapitulation.

D, 5. For officers waiting orders and on furlough.

D, 6. For provisions.

D, 7. For improvements and repairs of navy yards, and recapitulation.

E. Special estimate for magazines, hospitals, tanks, lithographic press, and survey of the coast.

E, 1. Lithographic press.

F. Estimates for the marine corps. Detailed estimates, F 1 to 6.

G. List of vessels in commission, of each squadron; their commanders and stations.

H. List of vessels in ordinary.

I. List of vessels building.

K. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual increase of the navy.

L. Report of the proceedings under the law for the gradual improvement of the navy.

M. Statement of the condition of the navy pension fund.

Detailed statements, M 1 and 2.

N. Statement of the condition of the privateer pension fund.

Detailed statements, N 1 and 2.

0. Statement of the condition of the navy hospital fund.

P. Statement of the proceedings under the law for the suppression of the slave trade.

Q. and Q 1. Statement of proceedings under law for surveying the coast.

R. List of deaths.

S. List of resignations.

T. List of dismissions.

No. 1.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 14, 1834.

Sir:

The Board of Navy Commissioners have the honor to transmit, herewith, the estimates (in triplicate) for the expenses upon the following objects, under the direction of the Navy Department, viz: An estimate of the expense of the Navy Commissioners' office, marked B.

The general estimate for the navy, marked D, with detailed estimates for some of the items of the general estimate, marked from D 1 to D 7, inclusively.

A special estimate is also submitted, for the completion of objects which have been heretofore authorized by special appropriation, marked E.

The estimate for the expenses of the marine corps, as exhibited by the colonel commandant of that corps, marked F, with a statement of the probable distribution of the corps, marked F 1, and detailed estimates for some of the items, marked from F 2 to F 6, inclusively.

They also submit reports upon the number, rate, distribution and condition of the vessels in ordinary, marked H; a similar report of the vessels building, marked I; of the proceedings under the laws for the gradual increase of the navy, marked K, and of those under the laws for the gradual improvement of the navy, marked L.

As the amount of the general estimate is greater than the appropriations for the present year, the board respectfully state some of the causes which have produced the increase. The increase in the first item is occasioned by a small increase in the number to be employed, and by a small additional compensation proposed for others.

The increase in the fourth item, which is the largest, has become necessary, principally from the greater deterioration of the vessels which it will be necessary to repair, to furnish the required reliefs for vessels which must return to the United States to discharge their crews.

The board no not propose to depart from a course which has been for some time pursued by them, which has been to limit their estimates under this head to the probable wants for the current year; as they believe it to be good policy in time of peace, and when no sudden increase in force is contemplated, not to repair vessels which might afterwards remain long unemployed.

A small increase is proposed in the seventh item, to meet the current expenses for ammunition, and to gradually replace old, imperfect small arms, by others of approved quality, and of uniform patterns.

The special estimate, E, comprises the amounts which are considered necessary for giving due security and convenient access to the magazines, and for making arrangements to secure the comforts of the sick, and to give proper protection to the public property.

The advantages anticipated from the possession and use of a lithographic press were fully stated in the last annual estimates.

In the estimate for the expenses of the Navy Commissioners' office, marked B, they have proposed an increase of $100 to the salary of their chief clerk, to place him on an equality with other clerks in similar situations; and they feel assured that the nature and extent of his duties, and the manner in which he performs them, justly entitle him to this consideration.

The increased amount required for the support of the marine corps is a necessary consequence of the increase of the corps which was made at the last session of Congress.

Respectfully, &c. &c.,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Mahlon Dickerson,

Secretary of the Navy.

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____________

A.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, for the year 1835.

Secretary of the Navy $6,000
Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818 $8,200  
One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824 1,000  
One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827 1,000  
   10,200
One clerk of navy and privateer pension funds and navy hospital fund, per act of 10th July, 1832. 1,600
Messenger and assistant messenger 1,050
Contingent expenses. The balance remaining unexpended of appropriations for former years, under this head, will be sufficient for the year 1835.  
  $18,850
Submitted:  
For two clerks, $400 additional each, now in receipt of $1,000 each per annum 800
  $19,650

____________

B.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Navy Commissioner's office, for the year 1835.

For the salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy Board $10,500
For the salary of their secretary 2,000
For the salaries of their clerks, draughtsman, and messenger, per acts of 20th April, 1818, 20th of May, 1824, and 2d of March, 1827 $8,450  
Additional to the chief clerk, making his salary equal to that allowed to all other chief clerks of his grade 100  
  8,550
For contingent expenses 1,800
  622,850

___________

C.

Estimate of the sums required for the expenses of the southwest Executive building, for the year 1835.

Superintendent $250
Two watchmen, at $300 each 600
Contingent expenses. The balance remaining unexpended of appropriations of former years, under this head, will be sufficient for the year 1835. $850
Submitted:  
Additional for superintendent $250  
Additional for two watchmen, at $200 each 400  
  650
  $1,500

___________

D.

There will be required for the navy during the year 1835, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1835, the sum of three million six hundred and eighty-nine thousand eight hundred and fifty-one dollars and sixty-seven cents.

1st. For pay and subsistence of the officers of the navy, and pay of seamen $1,505,126 67
2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the several yards 63,110 00
3d. For provisions 450,000 00
4th. For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission 974,000 00
5th. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick 40,000 00

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6th. For improvements and necessary repairs of navy yards, viz:
  At Portsmouth, N. H. $39,925 00  
  At Charlestown, Mass 99,500 00  
  At Brooklyn, N. Y. 46,120 00  
  At Philadelphia 3,520 00  
  At Washington 10,000 00  
  At Gosport, Va. 100,450 00  
  At Pensacola 44,600 00  
  For Sackett's Harbor 500 00  
    $344,615 00
7th. For ordnance and ordnance stores 15,000,00
8th. For defraying the expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz: For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent; traveling expenses of officers and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters, where there are no hospitals, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire and office rent; stationery and fuel to navy agents: for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates, for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers engaged in extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationery of every description, and for books, maps, charts, and mathematical instruments, chronometers, models and drawings; for purchase and repair of fire and steam engines, and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber, wheels and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing of ships-of-war; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and for furniture of officers' houses in navy yards; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries and steam engines; for candles, oil and fuel, for vessels in commission and ordinary; for repairs of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built; and for no other object or purpose whatever 295,000 00
9th. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated 3,000 00
    $3,689,851 67

____________

D, 1.

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1835.

Rank and grade. Ships of the line. Frigates, 1st class. Frigates, 2d class. Sloops, 1st class. Schooners. Total number of each. Total amount of each grade.
1 3 1 11 7
Captains 2 3 1 2   8 $18,360 00
Commanders       11   11 12,938 75
Lieutenants commanding         7 7 8,233 75
Lieutenants 8 18 5 44 14 89    85,885 00
Masters 1 3 1 11   16  10,600 00
Surgeons of the fleet 1 1   2   4 8,045 00
Surgeons     1 9   10 12,098 40
Pursers 1 3 1 11 7 23 15,237 00
Chaplains 1 3 1       3,312 50
Secretaries 1 3       4 4,000 00
Second masters 1         1 662 50
Assistant surgeons 3 6 2 11 7 29 23,722 00
Midshipmen 27 60 16 110 35 248 56,544 00
Boatswains 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Gunners 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Carpenters 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Sailmakers 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Schoolmasters 1 3 1 11   16 6,260 00
Clerks 2 6 1 11   20  6,720 00
Yeomen 1 3 1 11 7 23  4,140 00
Boatswains' mates 6 12 3 22 14 57 12,996 00
Gunners' mates 4 6 2 11 7 30 6,840 00
Carpenters' mates 3 6 2 11 7 29 6,612 00
Masters-at-arms 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Ships' cooks 1 3 1 11 7 23 4,968 00

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D, 1.—Estimate—Continued.

Rank and grade. Ships of the line. Frigates, 1st class. Frigates, 2d class. Sloops, 1st class. Schooners. Total number of each. Total amount of each grade.
Quartermasters 10 21 6 44 21 102 $19,584 00
Quartergunners 18 30 8 44 21 1 21 21,780 00
Captains of forecastle 3 6 2 22 14 47 8,460 00
Captains of tops 9 8 6 44   77 13,860 00
Armorers 1 3 1     5 1,080 00
Coopers 1 3 1     5 1,080 00
Ships' stewards 1 3 1 11 7 23 4,968 00
Officers' stewards 3 9 2 22 7 43 9,288 00
Surgeons' stewards 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Sailmakers' mates 2 3 1     6 1,368 00
Captains of hold 2 6 2 11   21 3,780 00
Officers' cooks 3 9 2 22 7 43 9,288 00
Ships' corporals 2 3 1     6 1,008 00
Coxswains 1 3       4 864 00
Masters of the band 1 3 1     5 1,080 00
Seamen 243 459 3120 605 154 1,581 227,664 00
Ordinary seamen 250 300 70 418 84 1,122 134,640 00
Musicians, 1st class 6 12 3     21 3,024 00
Musicians, 2d class 5 9 2     16 1,920 00
Landsmen 150 180 46 231 56 663 71,604 00
Boys 57 75 20 132 42 326 27,384 00
            4,986 $900,011 40
One hundred and thirty-three passed midshipmen             $52,036 25
Seventy-five midshipmen, who may become entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen, after their examination, in addition to pay as midshipmen             12,243 75
              $964,291 40

___________

D,2.

Estimate of the number, pay, &c., of officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1835, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Boston. New York. Philadelphia. Norfolk. Baltimore. Total. Amount.
Masters commandant 1 1 1   1 4 $4,705 00
Lieutenants 3 3 2 2 3 13 12,545 00
Masters 1 1 1   1 4 2,650 00
Pursers 1 1     1 3 1,987 50
Passed midshipmen 2 2     2 6 2,347 50
Midshipmen 6 6 3 3 6 24 5,472 00.
Boatswains 1 1     1 3 993 75
Boatswains' mates 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,140 00
Gunners' mates 1 1     1 3 684 00
Carpenters' mates 1 1 1   1 4 912 00
Masters-at-arms 1 1     1 3 648 00
Ships' stewards 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,080 00
Officers' stewards 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,080 00
Ships' cooks 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,080 00
Officers' cooks 2 2 1   2 7 1,512 00
Seamen 2 2 2 2 2 10 1,440 00
Ordinary seamen 6 6 4 2 6 24 2,880 00
Boys 10 10 3 2 10 35 2,520 00
Number of persons 42 42 22 15 42 163 $45,676 75

--597—

____________

D, 3.

Estimate of the pay, &c., of the officers attached to recruiting stations, for the year 1835, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Boston. New York. Philadelphia. Norfolk. Baltimore. Total. Amount.
Master commanders 1 1 1 1 1 5 $10,053 75
Lieutenants 2 2 2 2   2 10 9,650 00
Midshipmen 2 2 2 2   2 10 3,192 50
Surgeons 1 1 1 1 1 5 5,425 00
              $28,321 25

____________

D, 4.

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and others, at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1835.

PORTSMOUTH.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Yard                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4   20 20 1   1,412 25
Purser 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Midshipmen 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Gunner 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Carpenter 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $13,937 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenant 1 50 4           $965 00
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Seamen 6 12 1           1,411 50
Ordinary seamen 12 10 1           2,535 00
                  $5,230 75
Civil establishment.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,400 00
Master builder and inspector of                  
timber 1               900 00
Clerk to yard 1               600 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Clerk to master builder 1               300 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $4,450 00
Whole amount                 $23,618 25

Notes.—House rent is estimated for officers, and is to be allowed only in cases where no house is furnished by the government.

Pay and rations of surgeons and their assistants are arranged, under the law of 20th May, 1828.

--598--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

BOSTON.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 15
Master commandant 1 60 5     40 20 2 1,710 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4   20 20 1   1,412 25
Assistant surgeons 2 30 2 $145 16 14   1 1,901 50
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9 1   1,091 75
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 75
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,277 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 12 9   1     651 75
Gunner 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Carpenter 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 25
                  $21,479 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,915 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain's mates 2 19 1           63S 50
Seamen 14 12 1           2,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $18,554 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   $1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14     1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses* 2 10 1           422 50
Washers* 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,902 50
Civil establishment.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber. 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               360 00
Clerk to master builder 1               500 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                   
Whole amount                 $9,060 00
                  $52,996 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are all to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines: one to be always on board the receiving ship.

* When the number of sick shall require them.

--599--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

NEW YORK.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 75
Assistant surgeons 2 30 2 145 16 14   1 1,901 50
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 75
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,277 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 25
                  $22,739 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,950 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain's mates 2 19 1           638 50
Able seamen 14 12 1           3,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $19,589 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   $1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses* 2 10 1           422 50
Washers* 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,902 50
Civil establishment.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               360 00
Clerk to builder 1               560 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $9,060 00
Whole amount                 $55,291 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are all to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines: one to be always on board the receiving ship.

*When the number of sick shall require them.

--600 --

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

PHILADELPHIA.
Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Yard                  
Captain 1 $100 16 $600 65 30 3   $4,066 15
Master commandant 1 60 5 300 40 20 2   2,010 15
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 75
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Surgeon 1 70 4 200 20 20 1   1,732 25
Assistant surgeon 1 40 4 145 16 14 1   1,253 25
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9 1   1,091 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9 1   741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9 1   741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9 1   741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
$16,463 50                  
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenant 1 50 4           $965 00
Boatswain's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Able seamen 4 12 1           941 00
Ordinary seamen 12 10 1           2,535 00
                  $4,760 25
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 20 20 1     $1,412 25
Assistant surgeon 1 35 3 16 14       1 957 00
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses* 2 10 1           422 50
Washers* 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 10 1           211 25
                  $3,684 75
Civil establishment.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,250 00
Master builder 1               2,000 00
Clerk to yard 1               600 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Clerk to master builder 1 25             300 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $6,450 00
Whole amount                 $31,358 50
WASHINGTON.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 75 6   40 20 2   1,982 00
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Master in charge of ordnance 1 40 2           662 50
Chaplain 1 40 2 $200 12 9 1   1,091 75
Surgeon 1 70 4   20 20 1   1,532 25
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 9 1   1,141 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14 1   950 15
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9 1   141 15
Gunner, as laboratory officer 1 20 2 90 12 9 1   141 15
Carpenter 1 20 2 90   12 9 1 141 15
Steward 1 18 1           301 25
Hospital steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $15,901 50

Note.—The surgeon and assistants are all to attend to the yard, receiving vessels and marines.

*When the number of sick shall require them.

--601--

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Ordinary.                  
Boatswain's mate 1 $19 1           $319 25
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Seamen 6 12 1           1,411 50
Ordinary seamen 14 10 1           2,957 50
                  $5,001 50
Civil department.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,100 00
Assistant master builder 1               1,000 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               500 00
Clerk to assistant master builder 1               420 00
Master plumber and camboose maker 1               1,200 00
Master chain cable and anchor maker 1               1,000 00
Engineer 1               800 00
Keeper of the magazine 1               480 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $10,100 00
Whole amount                 $31,609 00
NORFOLK.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 15
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 15
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 15
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 15
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Assistant surgeons 2 40 4 145 16 14   1 2,506 50
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 15
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 15
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 15
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,211 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 15
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 15
Carpent3r 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 25
                  $23,344 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,915 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers. 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain's mates 2 19 1           638 50
Seamen 14 12 1           3,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $19,554 50

Note—The surgeon and assistant surgeons of the yard are all to be required to attend to the duties of the yard, to those of the receiving ship, and to the marines; one to be always on board the receiving ship.

--602 --

D, 4.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 $60 4   20 20 1   $1,412 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2   16 14   1 805 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses* 2 10 1           422 50
Washers* 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,557 50
Civil Establishment.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               1,050 00
Clerk to commandant 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               600 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               360 00
Clerk to master builder 1               500 00
Keeper of magazine 1               480 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $9,690 00
Whole amount                 $56,146 50
PENSACOLA.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5   40 20 2   1,710 00
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 50 2   20 20 1   1,109 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 $145 16 14   1 950 75
Purser 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Chaplain 1 40 2   12 9   1 891 75
Midshipmen 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $16,829 00
Ordinary.                  
Carpenter 1 20 2           $422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Boatswain's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Seamen 10 12 1           2,352 50
Ordinary seamen 10 10 1           2,112 50
                  $5,526 00
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 50 2 200 20 20 1   $1,309 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2   16 14   1 805 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses* 2 10 1           422 50
Washers* 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,455 00

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon to attend to the yard, ordinary, and marines, and receiving vessel, should there be one allowed.

* When the number of the sick shall require them.

--603--

D, 4 —Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Porter 1 $25             300 00
                  $4,000 00
Whole amount                 $29,810 00
BALTIMORE.
Captain 1 $100 8 $300 65 30 3   $3,036 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200         1,165 00
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Purser 1 40 2 200         862 50
Whole amount                 $6,676 50
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Captain 1 $100 8 $300 65 30 3   $3,036 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200         1,165 00
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Purser and storekeeper 1 40 2 200         1, 189 75
Whole amount                 $7,003 75
SACKETT'S HARBOR.
Master 1 $40 2 $200 20 12 1   $1,141 75
FOREIGN STATIONS.
Mahon (navy storekeeper) 1               $1,200 00
Rio do Janeiro (navy storekeeper) 1               1,500 00
                  $2,700 00

ON DUTY AT WASHINGTON, OR FOR GENERAL DUTY.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Stationery per annum. Extra allowance per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Ordnance duty.                      
Captain 1 $100 8               $1,930 00
Lieutenant 1  50 4               965 00
                      $2,895 00
Instrument depot.                      
Lieutenant 1 50 4 $175 20 20 25 1 25 1   $1,948 50
Passed midshipman 1 25 2         50     665 00
                      $2,613 50
Chief naval constructor 1                   $3,000 00
Chief engineer 1                   4,000 00
                      $7,000 00

---604--

RECAPITULATION.

  1st item.
Naval.
1st item.
Ordinary.
1st item.
Hospital.
2d item.
Aggregate.
Civil.
Portsmouth $13,937 50 $5,230 75   $4,450 00 $23,618 25
Boston 21,479 50 18,554 50 $3,902 50 9,060 00 52,996 50
New York 22,739 50 19,589 50 3,902 50 9,060 00 55,291 50
Philadelphia 16,463 50 4,760 25 3,684 75 6,450 00 31,358 50
Washington 15,901 50 5,007 50   10,700 00 31,609 00
Norfolk 23,344 50 19,554 50 3,557 50 9,690 00 56,146 50
Pensacola 16,829 00 5,526 00 3,455 00 4,000 00 29,810 00
Baltimore 6,676 50       6,676 50
Charleston 7,003 75       7,003 75
Sackett's Harbor 1,141 75       1,141 75
Ordnance 2,895 00       2,895 00
Instrument depot 2,613 50       2,613 50
Naval constructor       3,000 00 3,000 00
Civil engineer       4,000 00 4,000 00
Navy storekeepers       2,700 00 2,700 00
  $151,025 $78,223 00 $18,502 25 $63,110 00 $310,860 75

____________

D, 5.

Exhibit of the officers, &c., awaiting orders and on furlough, for the year 1835, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Captain. Master comman-
dant.
Lieute-
nants.
Passed midship-
men.
Midshipmen. Pursers. Surgeons. Assis-
tant sur-
geons.
Chaplains. Masters. Sail-
makers.
Amount.
Awaiting orders 16 12 103   10     5 5 66 4 $211,763 90
On furlough   2 6 2   8 1   6 3   7,322 62 1/2
                        $219,086 52 1/2

____________

D, 6.

Provisions explanatory of the third item of the general estimate for 1835.

4,779 persons in vessels in commission, besides marines embarked.  
511 marines embarked in vessels in commission.  
139 persons in receiving vessels.  
5,489 persons in total, at one ration a day, makes 2,003,485 rations, which, at 25 cents each, is equal to $500,871 25
  From which deduct this sum (which, from the balance that may remain in the Treasury on the 1st of January next, it is presumed will not be required) 50,871 25
  Which leaves The sum asked for in the general estimate. $450,000 00

____________

D, 7.

An estimate for the proposed improvements and repairs of navy yards, for the year 1835.

NAVY YARD NEAR PORTSMOUTH, N. H.
For completing ship house on site No. 4 $31,000 00
For raising the barracks for the ordinary another story 4,000 00
For enlarging and repairing the blacksmith's shop 825 00
For repairing and furnishing a building for a hospital 350 00
For leveling the yard 2,000 00
For repairing docks, wharves, buildings, and all other purposes 1,750 00
  $39,925 00

--605--

NAVY YARD AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.
Towards completing rope walk $50,000 00
Towards building a storehouse, site No. 15 26,000 00
Docks, wharves, and buildings in the yard 8,500 00
Extending quay wall east of the mast house 9,000 00
For making arrangements preparatory to changing the fronts of the officers' houses near the east end of the yard 6,000 00
  $99,500 00
NAVY YARD AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.
For yard wall on Navy street, 500 feet in length $6,000 00
For a quay wall on the north side of timber dock 9,620 00
For preparing a landing place for timber 2,400 00
For filling in low parts of the yard 2,500 00
For making new gate to timber dock and repairing bridge 750 00
For new sills and repairs of foundation to ship house No. 1 4,500 00
For constructing drains and reservoirs for draining the yard 1,500 00
For making mooring buoys and laying down moorings 2,600 00
For repairs to gun block, and securing guns from injury 1,150 00
For mud machine, with steam engine and saws 11,500 00
For repairs of all other docks and buildings, and for all other purposes 3,000 00
  $46,120 00
NAVY YARD AT PHILADELPHIA.
For filling in low places in the yard and smith's shop, paving gutters, graveling road, and completing pavement on Front street $1,450 00
For fitting spouts and drains to No. 5, completing steam boxes, rebuilding chimneys, and repairs in smith's shop, and for fitting hydrants to the smith's and joiner's shops 810 00
For making new skids to guns, and replacing the guns 160 00
For repairs of all buildings, and for all other purposes 500 00
  $3,520 00
NAVY YARD AT WASHINGTON.
Towards completion of wharf $5,000 00
For the repairs of all buildings, and for all other purposes 5,000 00
  $10,000 00
NAVY YARD AT GOSPORT, VA.
For laying the launching slip, and building the quay walls connected with the same $18,200 00
Towards the construction of the timber dock 18,000 00
For building timber shed No. 12 23,600 00
For completing mast house No. 28 11,100 00
For completing houses Nos. 2 and 3 7,450 00
For completing the wall at the south end of the yard 4,850 00
For repairs of docks, wharves, buildings, and all other purposes 11,250 00
  $100,450 00
NAVY YARD AT PENSACOLA.
To complete the wharf $35,000 00
For repairs of all buildings in the yard 2,500 00
For completing stable 3,000 00
Completing navy store 1,600 00
For cisterns 1,500 00
Receiving vessel 1,000 00
  $44,600 00
AT SACKETT'S HARBOR.
For repairs of ship house $500 00

--606--

SUMMARY RECAPITULATION.

Portsmouth, N. H $39,925 00
Charlestown, Mass [99,500 00]
Brooklyn, N. Y [46,120 00]
Philadelphia 3,520 00
Washington 10,009 00
Gosport, Va 100,000 00
Pensacola 44,600 00
Sackett's Harbor 500 00
Total amount $344,615 00

____________

E.

[SUBMITTED.]

A special estimate for objects not embraced in the usual annual estimates for the navy, respectfully submitted for consideration.

FOR MAGAZINES.
To complete the magazines to be built near Boston and New York, to enclose them, and to provide convenient access to them, for the receipt and delivery of powder $7,500 00
HOSPITALS.
To complete the hospitals near Boston, New York, and Pensacola, to build the necessary out-houses and appendages, and to enclose them $20 700 00
For repair of the hospital near Norfolk, and its enclosures and dependencies 1 000 00
For repairing enclosures, and graduating the ground about the Naval asylum near Philadelphia 3,500 00
Total hospitals $25,200 00
TANKS.
To complete the payments which will be due on contracts made under the act of July 10, 1833 $9,000 00
LITHOGRAPHIC PRESS.
For the purchase and use for one year of a lithographic press $1,000 00
SURVEY OF THE COAST.
For the survey of the coast of the United States $30,000 00

___________

E, 1.

Estimate submitted for a lithographic press. For the purchase and use for one year of a lithographic press      $1,000,00

Navy Commissioners' Office,
September 12, 1833.

Sir: The Commissioners have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of yesterday, enclosing a communication from Lieutenant Wilkes upon the subject of a lithographic press for the use of the Navy Department, and requiring an opinion upon the propriety of purchasing one.

The Commissioners are fully of opinion that the possession and employment of such a press would be both useful and economical; as, besides the various uses enumerated by Lieutenant Wilkes, it may, in their opinion, be applied to the printing of all the various forms required by the disbursing officers, and officers of the navy yards, which would at once combine uniformity, which is highly desirable, with a great saving of expense.

The communication of Lieutenant Wilkes is herewith returned.

I have the honor to be,
     With great respect, sir,
           Your obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Levi Woodbury,
     Secretary of the Navy.

_____________

Washington City, August 23, 1833.

Sir: In reply to your letter of the 27th July, I have the honor to report that I have made very many inquiries relative to a lithographic press, the result of which is, that they can be had for from thirty-five to one hundred and fifty dollars, according to the size, goodness and strength of material of which they

--607--

are constructed. This is exclusive of rollers, ink, and stones. The rollers and ink will cost about thirty dollars, and the stones are to be had at ten cents the pound. Presuming your object to be usefulness and economy combined, I submit the following as my estimate of the cost of a suitable one for the printing of charts, viz:

Cost of press $120
Rollers and ink 30
Five hundred pounds of stone, at ten cents 50
  $200

For the maintenance of the press there will be required a printer, and a laborer to assist in working the press when the impressions are striking off. The pay of a printer is from ten to fourteen dollars a week in New York, and no one who understands the art can be had under that price. The laborer's services would only be required occasionally, and it would be, therefore, preferable to hire him when wanted, until the press was in full operation and constantly employed. Therefore, I should estimate the maintenance of the press as follows, for a year:

Lithographic printer, at $50 per month $600
Contingencies, including labor, paper, &c. 100
  $700

So that the purchase and maintenance of the press for the first year would be nine hundred dollars.

I have made many inquiries relative to the cost of the charts that could be printed on a press, for the last ten years, and regret that I have not been able to obtain any information for you, having been informed by the accounting officers that all the accounts of the navy agents and pursers, both at home and abroad, that served in the navy for that time, would have to be consulted, which would require, as they inform me, a period of six months. I am equally at a loss to inform you of the amount that has probably been expended in the service for those purposes.

In the place of this information, I can offer many reasons for the advantages to be derived from such an establishment, which will probably tend to satisfy you that the expenditure would not be thrown away. In the first place, all the charts now on hand might be made serviceable, by correcting the erroneous parts, viz: By annexing to them small lithographs of those parts corrected, which charts cannot now be supplied to our public vessels without endangering the public property in some degree; thus making what is now worthless valuable. In the second place, charts of harbors and coasts might be furnished our vessels on large and accurate scales, (and which are alone published by the English and French hydrographical officers,) that cannot now be bought. Thirdly, errors that had been discovered by navigators, (which are of frequent occurrence,) could be immediately corrected, which the publishers of charts wholly neglect, or are slow in doing, not only on account of the expense in altering the plate, but the loss in not being able to sell the impressions they have on hand. Fourthly, the ease and small expense at which it would enable the government to extend any hydrographical information to the mercantile marine, and to embody at once, in a useful shape, all hydrographical information that may be obtained; it is believed that many disasters to vessels would be prevented by having small sections of charts, showing the situations of dangers, to enable navigators fully to comprehend them; at once serving to dissipate any erroneous description, and making it clear to the most common understanding. The opportunity of obtaining hydrographical information, well authenticated and illustrated on charts, would facilitate the insurance of vessels, and equalize the risk between the insurer and insured. For the want of this information, and nowhere to obtain it sufficiently authenticated, many merchants are now denied this privilege, and others receive it at a large premium. As it is one of the great objects of our government to afford facilities to its commerce, and spread useful information, there are few ways in which more valuable information could be spread, at so small expense, as by the establishment of a lithographic press connected with this office, which would not only receive there the information, but be enabled to put it in immediate circulation, at the same time that it is a great economy in furnishing the navy with charts, and those that cannot be obtained elsewhere. Fifthly, as the coast survey progresses, it would enable the government to issue copies at a little more than the price of the paper, which alone, contrasted with the amount now expending by Congress in the publication of the survey of Narragansett Bay, would have bought and maintained a lithographic press for three or four years. In connection with all this, it might be employed in printing off circulars for the departments. All this, I am of opinion, would occupy a press fully, and could not be obtained by even employing another printer at the press of the War Department, (which would be the same expense, except the first cost of the press,) as the time of printing could not be at our own disposal, which is a material consideration in the success of the operation, being very much influenced by the state of the temperature.

These are some of the prominent objects that have appeared to me to be embraced in your letter, and which I have the honor respectfully to submit to your consideration.

I am, your most obedient servant,

CHARLES WILKES, Jr.
Lieut. U. S. Navy, in charge of Charts, Instruments, &c.

Hon. Levi Woodbury,
     Secretary of the Navy.

___________

F.

General estimate of the expense of the marine corps, for the year 1835.

There will be required for the support of the marine corps during the year 1835, in addition to the balances which may remain on hand on the 1st January, 1835, the sum of two hundred and eighty-seven thousand three hundred and nine dollars and fifty-eight cents.

--608--

Paymaster's department.
1. For the pay of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, and subsistence of the officers of the marine corps $166,749 55  
Quartermaster's department.
2. For the provisions for the non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates serving on shore, servants and washerwomen $33,565 60  
3. For clothing 38,711 25  
4 For fuel 15,166 00  
5. For repair of barracks 3,000 00  
6. For transportation of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, and expenses of recruiting 6,000 00  
7. For medicines, hospital stores, surgical instruments, and pay of matron, and acting hospital stewards 4,139 25  
8. For contingencies, viz: Freight, ferriage, toll, wharfage and cartage; per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry; compensation for officers and men on extra duty; compensation to judge advocates; house rent where there are no public quarters assigned; incidental labor in the Quartermaster's department; expense of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps; printing, stationery, forage, postage on public letters; expenses in pursuit of deserters; candles and oil for the different stations, straw for the men, barrack furniture, bed-sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks and carpenters' tools 17,977 93  
9. For military stores, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, drums, fifes, flags, accoutrements and ordnance stores 2,000 00  
      120,560 03
      $287,309 58

Respectfully submitted.

E. J. WEED, Quartermaster Marine Corps.

____________

F, 1.

Estimated distribution of the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the United States marine corps serving on shore.

Where distributed. Colonel commandant. Lieutenant colonel. Majors. Staff. Captains. First lieutenants. Second lieutenants. Non-commissioned staff. Sergeants. Corporals. Musicians. Privates. Total.
Portsmouth, New Hampshire         1 1 1   4 4 2 41 54
Charlestown     1   1 2 2   5 6 4 75 96
New York     1 1 1 2 2   5 6 4 75 97
Philadelphia     1     2 2   4 4 2 60 75
Head-quarters and navy yard 1     3 1 2 2 4 *12 8 10 70 113
Norfolk, Virginia   1     1 3 3   5 6 4 75 98
Pensacola     1   1 2 2   5 6 4 75 96
  1 1 4 4 6 14 14 4 40 40 30 471 629
For sea service         3 6 6   40 40 30 461 586
Officers' servants                       68 68
Total strength of corps 1 1 4 4 9 20 20 4 80 80 60 1,000 1,283

* This number of sergeants is required at head-quarters, in consequence of three being employed as clerks, one as a messenger, and one in charge of armory.

--609--

____________

F, 2.

Detailed estimate of pay and subsistence of officers, and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates of the marine corps of the United States, for the year one thousand eight hundred and thirty-five.

Rank and grade. Number. Pay. Subsistence. Aggregate amount.
Pay per month. Extra pay per month. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Total. Number of rations per day at 20 cents per rations. Extra rations per day while commanding, at 29 cents per rations. Number of rations per day at 25 cents per rations. Total.
Colonel commandant 1 $75 00     2 $1,044 00 6 6   $876 00 $1,920 00
Lieutenant colonel 1 60 00     2 864 00 5 5   730 00 1,594 00
Majors 4 50 00     2 2,976 00 4 4   2,336 00 5,312 00
Adjutant and inspector 1 50 00     2 744 00 4     292 00 1,036 00
Quartermaster 1 60 00   2   912 00 4     292 00 1,204 00
Paymaster 1 50 00     2 744 00 4     292 00 1,036 00
Assistant quartermaster 1 40 00 $20   1 792 00 4     292 00 1,084 00
Captains, commanding posts at sea 5 50 00     1 3,360 00 4 4   2,920 00 6,280 00
Captains, commanding companies 4 50 00     1 2,688 00 4     1,168 00 3,856 00
First lieutenants, commanding companies and guards at sea 4 40 00     1 2,208 00 4     1,168 00 3,376 00
First lieutenants 16 30 00     1 6,912 00 4     4,672 00 11,584 00
Second lieutenants 20 25 00     1 7,440 00 4     5,840 00 13,280 00
Surgeon 1 70 00     1 912 00     4 365 00 1,277 00
Hospital steward 1 18 00       216 00     1 91 25 307 25
Sergeant major 1 17 00       204 00         204 00
Quartermaster sergeant 1 17 00 20     444 00         444 00
Drum and fife majors 2 16 00       384 00         384 00
Orderly sergeants and sergeants of guards at sea 27 16 00       5, 184 00         5, 184 00
Orderly sergeants, employed as clerks to colonel
commandant, adjutant and inspector,
and quartermaster
3 16 00 20     1,296 00         1,296 00
Sergeants 50 13 00       7,800 00         7,800 00
Corporals 80 9 00       8,640 00         8,640 00
Drummers and fifers 60 8 00       5,760 00         5,760 00
Privates 932 7 00       78,288 00         78,288 00
Clerk to paymaster 1 8 80 20     345 60 1     73 00 418 60
Difference of pay between captain and
first lieutenant, promoted under act of
30th June, 1834, from 1st July, 1834,
to 31st December, 1834
8 10 00       480 00         480 00
Difference of pay between first and second
lieutenants, promoted under act of 30th June,
1834, from 1st July,
1834, to 31st December, 1834
7 5 00       210 00         210 00
Amount required for two months' pay as bounty
for re-enlistment, under act of 2d March, 1833
  125       1,750 00         1,750 00
Amount required for payment of musicians and
privates' retained pay, under act of 2d March, 1833
          1,500 00         1,500 00
Second lieutenants, appointed under act of
30th June, 1834, from 17th October, 1834, to
31st December, 1834
9 25 00     1 697 50 4     547 20 1,244 70
            $144,795 10       $21,954 45 $166,749 55

Respectfully submitted.

C. R. BROOM,
Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, and Paymaster U. S. Marine Corps.

Head-Quarters Marine Corps, Paymaster's Office, Washington, November 12, 1834.

--610--

___________

F, 3.

PROVISIONS.
For whom required. Enlisted men. Washer-women Matron. Servants. Clerks. Total. Rations per day, at 12 cents. Rations per day, at 20 cents. Aggregate amount.
For provisions for non-commissioned officers,  musicians, privates, and washerwomen, serving on shore 581 39 1     621 1   $27,109 80
For provisions for clerks and officers' servants       69 4 73   1 5,329 00
Amount required for two months' rations for each soldier, as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably to the act of March 2, 1833 125         125 1   900 00
Amount required for servants' rations for second lieutenants, from October 17 to December 31, 1834, appointed under the act of June 30, 1834 9         9   1 136 80
Total amount required                 $53,565 60

____________

F, 4.

CLOTHING.
  Enlisted men. Servants. Total amount. Aggregate
For whom required.        
For clothing for the non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $30 a year each 1,156   1,156 $34,680 00
For clothing for officers' servants, at $30 a year each   69 69 2,070 00
Amount required for two months' clothing for each soldier, as premium for re- enlisting, at $5 each 125   125 625 00
Amount required for servants' clothing for second lieutenants, from October 17 to December 31, 1834, appointed under the act of June 30, 1834 9   9 56 25
Paymaster's clerk, clothing for him, at $30 a year       30 00
Amount required for the purchase of 200 watch-coats, at $6.25 each       1,259 00
Total amount required       $38,711 25

___________

F, 5.

FUEL.
  Fuel for each. Total fuel.    
For what purpose required. Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords. Feet. Inches. Number. Aggregate amount.
Colonel commandant 1 36 4   36 4    
Lieutenant colonel, south of latitude 39 degrees 1 26     26      
Majors, south of latitude 39 degrees 1 26     26      
Majors, north of 39 degrees north latitude 3 29     87      
Captains commanding, north of latitude 43 degrees 1 30     30      
Captains, north of latitude 39 degrees 2 23 6   47 4    
Captains, south of latitude 39 deg. commanding a post 1 26     26      
Captains, south of latitude 39 degrees 2 21 2   42 4    
Staff, south of latitude 39 degrees 3 26     78      
Staff, north of latitude 39 degrees 1 29     29      
First lieutenants, north of latitude 43 degrees 1 19 1 4 19 1 4  
First lieutenants, of ten years' standing, north of latitude 39 degrees 4 23 6   95      
First lieutenants, north of latitude 39 degrees 2 18 4   37      
First lieutenants, south of latitude 33 degrees 7 16 4   115 4    
Second lieutenants, north of latitude 43 degrees 1 19 1 4 19 1 4  
Second lieutenants, north of latitude 39 degrees 6 18 4   111      
Second lieutenants, south of latitude 33 degrees 7 16 4   115 4    
Surgeon 1 20 20          
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, north of latitude 40 degrees 264 1 5   429      
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants,                
and washerwomen, South of latitude 40 degrees 414 1 4   621      
Clerk to paymaster 1 2 2 8 2 2 8  
Matron to hospital 1 1 4   1 4    

--611--

F, 5.—Fuel—Continued.

For what purpose required. Number. Fuel for each. Total fuel. Aggregate amount.
Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords. Feet. Inches.
Second lieutenants, appointed under act of June 30, 1834, from October 17 to December 31, 1834 9       45      
Commanding officer's office at Portsmouth, N. H 1   5 4 8 5 4  
Guard room at Portsmouth, N. H. 1       25      
Hospital at Portsmouth, N. H. 1   1 4 19 1 4  
Moss room at Portsmouth, N. H. 1   1 4 4 1 4  
Offices of the commanding officers and assistant quartermasters at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 4 8     32      
Guard rooms at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 3 24     72      
Hospitals at Charlestown, New York, and Philadelphia 3 18 4   55 4    
Mess rooms for officers at Charlestown, Now York, and Philadelphia 3 4     12      
Offices of the commandant and staff, and commanding officers at head-quarters, Norfolk and Pensacola 7 7     49      
Guard rooms at head-quarters, Navy yard, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola 4 21     84      
Hospital at head-quarters, two fires 1 33     33      
Hospitals at Norfolk and Pensacola 2 16 4   33      
Mess rooms for officers at head-quarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola 3 3 4   10 4    
Armory at Washington city 1 30     30      
Total fuel         2,527 5 4 At $6 a cord.
Total amount               $15,166 00

____________

F, 6.

REPAIRS OF BARRACKS.
For what purpose required. Aggregate amount.
For repairs of barracks at Portsmouth, N. H. $300 00
For repairs of barracks at Charlestown 400 00
For repairs of barracks at Philadelphia 400 00
For repairs of barracks at Norfolk, Virginia 400 00
For repairs of barracks at head-quarters and navy yard 1,600 00
Total amount required $3,000 00

Respectfully submitted.

E. J. WEED, Quartermaster Marine Corps.

____________

G.

List of vessels in commission of each squadron, their commanders, and stations.

Class. Names. Flag ships. Commanders of vessels. Commanders of squadrons. Station.
Ship of the line. Delaware Flagship Captain J. B. Nicolson Commodore D. T. Patterson Mediterranean.
Frigate United States   Captain Henry E. Ballard   Mediterranean.
Frigate Potomac   Captain J. J. Nicholson   Mediterranean.
Sloop John Adams   Master Commandant David Conner   Mediterranean.
Schooner Shark   Lieutenant Hiram Paulding   Mediterranean.
Sloop St. Louis Flagship Master Commandant C. S. McCauley Commodore J. D. Henley West Indies.
Sloop Vandalia   Master Commandant Thos. T. Webb   West Indies.
Sloop Falmouth   Master Commandant L. Rosseau   West Indies.
Schooner Grampus   Lieutenant John White   West Indies.
Schooner Experiment   Lieutenant Thomas Paine   West Indies.
Sloop Natchez Flagship Master Commandant J. P. Zantzinger Commodore James Renshaw Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Ontario   Master Commandant William D. Salter   Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Erie   Master Commandant John Percival   Coast of Brazil.
Schooner Enterprise   Lieutenant A. S. Campbell   Coast of Brazil.
Frigate Brandywine Flagship Captain David Deacon Commodore A. S. Wadsworth. Pacific.
Sloop Fairfield   Master Commandant E. A. F. Valette   Pacific.
Sloop Vincennes   Master Commandant John H. Aulick   Pacific.
Schooner Dolphin   Lieutenant Ralph Voorhees   Pacific.
Schooner Boxer   Lieutenant Hugh N. Page   Pacific

--612--

____________

H.

Statement showing the names, distribution, and condition of the vessels in ordinary, on the 1st of October, 1834.

At PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Concord—sloop-of-war, requires to be coppered, and other slight repairs.

Lexington—sloop-of-war, requires considerable repairs.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Columbus—ship of the line, requires large repairs.

Independence—ship of the line, requires very large repairs.

Constitution—frigate, in good order.

Boston—sloop-of-war, requires new coppering, and other slight repairs.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Washington—ship of the line, requires very large repairs.

Franklin—ship of the line, requires very large repairs.

Ohio—hull requires extensive repairs; few of her equipments have ever been provided.

Hudson—frigate, doubtful if fit for sea service; is used as a receiving vessel.

Peacock—sloop-of-war, requires considerable repairs and coppering.

AT PHILADELPHIA.

Cyane—sloop-of-war, condemned for sea service, to be used as a receiving vessel.

Warren—sloop-of-war, requires slight repairs.

Sea Gull—old steam vessel, decayed, unfit for service; her sale is recommended.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

North Carolina—ship of the line, requires middling repairs and coppering.

Guerriere—frigate, requires very large repairs or to be rebuilt.

Java—frigate, unfit for sea service; she is used as a receiving vessel.

__________

I.

Statement of the vessels building at the different navy yards.

Those building under the law for the gradual increase of the navy are distributed as follows:

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

AT CHARLESTOWN, MASS.

Two ships of the line, one frigate.

AT BROOKLYN, N. Y.

Two frigates.

AT PHILADELPHIA.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

AT WASHINGTON.

One frigate.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

One ship of the line, one frigate.

All these vessels are under cover, and in a good state of preservation.

A frigate is also building at Gosport, Virginia, to replace the Macedonian, under a special act of Congress, approved 10th July, 1832.

__________

K.

General statement of the measures which have been taken to carry into effect the laws for the gradual increase of the navy, approved 29th. April, 1816, and 3d March, 1821.

Navy Commissioners' Office, October 1, 1834.

Under the provisions of the acts, the ships of the line Columbus, North Carolina, and Delaware were built and equipped for service some years since.

The ship of the line Ohio was launched, but has never been equipped. The frigates Brandywine and Potomac have been equipped and employed.

Five ships of the line and seven frigates remain upon the stocks in the different yards, all under tight houses, and in a good state of preservation. They are so far advanced, that they may be equipped as soon as crews could be collected for them. There are also many valuable materials on hand at the several yards, belonging to this appropriation, preparatory to the completion and equipment of the vessels; but the amount remaining in the Treasury, $186,613.19, would be insufficient to supply the probable deficiency, as stated in a letter from the board to the Secretary of the Navy, of the 19th June last; but, if the services of these vessels are not expected to be soon required, no immediate appropriation will be necessary for them.

--613--

The vessels which have not yet been launched are at the following navy yards, viz:

At Portsmouth, N. H., one ship of the line and one frigate.

At Charlestown, Massachusetts, two ships of the line and one frigate.

At Brooklyn, N. Y., two frigates.

At Philadelphia, one ship of the line and one frigate.

At Washington, one frigate.

At Gosport, Va., one ship of the line and one frigate.

____________

L.

General statement of the measures which have been adopted under the acts of Congress for the gradual improvement of the navy, approved March 3, 1821, and March 2, 1833.

Live oak frame timber have been delivered under contracts, at the respective navy yards, as follows,

viz:

At Charlestown, Massachusetts, for two ships of the line, two frigates, and one sloop-of-war.

At Brooklyn, New York, for one frigate.

At Philadelphia, for two frigates and one sloop-of-war.

At Washington, for one frigate and one sloop-of-war, together with part of a frame for another sloop-of-war.

At Gosport, Virginia, for two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop-of-war.

A contract has been made for the frame timber of a frigate and a sloop-of-war at the Navy yard near Portsmouth, New Hampshire, of which about 11,304 have been delivered for the frigate, and about 8,284 feet for the sloop-of-war.

Upon a contract for the delivery of the frame of a ship of the line at Brooklyn, New York, none has been delivered, and there is reason to fear that it may be necessary to resort to legal means to obtain a performance of the contract.

The total quantity of live oak timber on hand, under this appropriation, on October 1, 1834, was 397,906 cubic feet, which cost $492,030.45.

There have also been procured, and there were on hand at the above date, the following quantities of other timber:

Of white oak timber, 244,998 cubic feet, which cost $81,150 74
Of white oak plank, 268,929 superficial feet, which cost 13,957 94
Of yellow pine timber, for plank, 217, 182 cubic feet, which cost 74,328 19
Of yellow pine timber, for masts and spars, 57,730 feet, which cost 35,750 37
Of white oak knees, 6,253 in number, which cost 32,852 64
Making a total cost of $238,039 88

The expenditure for labor, in receiving and stowing materials, and for other purposes not herein otherwise enumerated, up to October 1, has been about $138,994.32.

Of the two dry docks authorized, both were so far completed as to be available before the commencement of the last session of Congress.

The one at Charlestown was transferred from the charge of the constructing engineer to that of the commandant of the yard, on September 9th, 1833, and the total cost was $677,089.78.

That at Gosport, Virginia, was transferred to the charge of the commandant of that yard on the 15th of March, 1834, and the cost to that time had been $962,459.19. Some parts of its dependencies were not then fully completed; and there has been since expended the sum of $11,891.50, which, makes the total cost to the 1st of October, 1834, equal to $914,356.69.

Five buildings for the protection of materials have been built and paid for from this appropriation, at a cost of $136,128.34; and some other expenditures for similar purposes have also been made at New York and Philadelphia, at a further expense of about $1,380, making a total for building and preserving materials of about $143,508.84.

Attention has also been given to the selection of public lands, and to other measures for the preservation and cultivation of live oak trees, and an expense has been incurred amounting to about $66,983.84 in the whole; but this subject has been so recently placed under the immediate charge of the board that they are unable to present any detailed statement upon it.

Offers have been recently accepted, and contracts will be soon made, for the white oak and yellow pine timber which is required to complete the hulls of all the vessels for which frames are provided, and for the iron and copper which will be necessary for the same purpose.

It is intended to make early arrangements for procuring materials for the steam vessels authorized by the act, the board having hitherto delayed action upon this subject for the purpose of obtaining information on some important points.

The amounts which have been appropriated, and which are available to the close of the present year, are $4,000,000, and of this sum there remained in the Treasury and in the hands of the navy agents, on the 1st of October, 1834, the sum of $1,218,995.10.

The contracts about to be entered into for timber, iron, and copper will amount to about $745,500; the amounts required to meet existing contracts to about $91,500, leaving, of the amount already appropriated, about $435,995 for the steam vessels, and for the purchase of other materials, and their preservation.

--614--

___________

M.

Statement of the amount and description of stocks owned by the navy pension fund on the 1st of November, 1833, the changes made in them by redemption sales and purchases to the 1st of November, 1834, and the periods at which the interest on said stocks is payable.

United States Bank stock:  
Amount on November 1, 1833   $274,900 00
Purchased December 9, 1833 $24,000 00  
Purchased December 9, 1833 2,500 00  
Purchased February 11, 1834 7,500 00  
Purchased February 26, 1834 7,600 00  
Purchased May 20, 1834 9,500 00  
Purchased August 2, 1834 116,000 00  
Purchased October 11, 1834 141,300 00  
    368,400 00
    $643,300 00
Sold June 15, 1833 $18,000 00  
Sold December 9, 1833 8,000 00  
Sold June 13, 1834 16,000 00  
  $42,000 00
Amount on hand November 1, 1834 $601,300 00
United States exchanged 4 1/4 per cent., per act May 26, 1824: Amount on November 1, 1833 10,000 00
Redeemed November 13, 1833.  
United States 5 per cent. stock, per act March 3, 1821: Amount on November 1, 1833 139,482 78
Redeemed September 30, 1834.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of April 2, 1821: Amount on November 1, 1833 5,000 00
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of December 1, 1826: Amount on November 1, 1833 32,469 16
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of March 24, 1828: Amount on November 1, 1833 43,119 41
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of December 18, 1828: Amount on November 1, 1833 826 34
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of April 22, 1829: Amount on November 4, 1833 1,054 25
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of March 13, 1830: Amount on November 1, 1833 10,000 00
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year.  
Pennsylvania 5 per cents. of March 21, 1831: Amount on November 1, 1833 120,000 00
No changes. Interest payable on February 1 and August 1, in each year  
Stock of the city of Cincinnati 5 per cents: Amount on November 1, 1833 100,000 00
No charges. Interest payable on April 1 and October 1, in each year.  
Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable in 1837. Amount, November 1, 1833 4,000 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from May 9, 1832.  
Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after 1842. Amount, November 1, 1833 5,123 44
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after 1843. Amount, November, 1833 14,000 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after March 31, 1844. Amount, November 1, 1833 6,000 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after June 30, 1844. Amount, November 1, 1833 12,500 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after June 30, 1845. Amount, November 1, 1833 4,277 28
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after September 30, 1845. Amount, November 1, 1833 15,000 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832.  

--615--

Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after 1845. Amount; November 1, 1833 $25,000 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832. Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after September 30, 1846. Amount, November 1, 1833 12,500 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from October 1, 1832.  
Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after 1846. Amount, November 1, 1833 12,500 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from January 1, 1833.  
Maryland 5 per cents:  
Redeemable after June 30, 1847. Amount, November 1, 1833 24,720 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1833.  
Maryland University 5 per cents: Amount, November 1, 1833 4,600 00
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832.  
Washington lottery stock 5 per cents:  
Amount, November 1, 1833 59,472 40
No changes. Interest payable quarterly, from July 1, 1832.  
Bank of Washington stock, amount, November 1, 1833 14,000 00
No changes.  
Stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown 15,000 00
No changes.  
Stock of the Bank of Columbia, amount, November 1, 1833 92,600 00
July, 1834, reimbursed to the fund by the United States, pursuant to the act of Congress of June 30, 1834.  
Stocks owned by the fund, November 1, 1834.  
United States Bank stock $601,300 00
Pennsylvania 5 per cents 212,469 16
Maryland 5 per cents 140,220 72
Stock of the city of Cincinnati, 5 per cents 100,000 00
Washington lottery stock, 5 per cents 59,472 40
Bank of Washington stock 14,000 00
Stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown 15,000 00
  $1,142,462 28

____________

M, 1.

Navy pension fund.

Balance in the Treasury, November 1, 1833 $8,036 49
Repayments from November 1, 1833, to November 1, 1834 400,293 28
  $409,329 77
Payments from November 1, 1833, to November 1, 1834 400,107 37
Balance, November 1, 1838 $9,222 40

___________

M, 2.

Statements showing the balance standing to the credit of the navy pension fund on the first day of October, 1833; the amount of receipts and disbursements on account of said fund, from that date to the first of November, 1834; and the amount of advances to agents during the same period.

1. Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund on the 1st day of October, 1833, per Register's report $17,672 36
2. Amount received into the Treasury since that time, from whom, and on what account, viz: 1833.  
Oct. 10. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for interest on Maryland five per cent. stock, due 1st instant $1,752 39
Oct. 12. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Pennsylvania five per cents 5,311 74
Oct. 24. From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividends on the stock of the Union Bank of  Georgetown 300 00
Nov. 18. From the Secretary of the Navy, for $10,000 United States 4 1/2 per cent. stock, redeemed, including interest 10,058 75
Nov. 18. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on United States stock 3,712 06
Nov. 27. From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on Washington Bank stock, due 1st instant 420 00
Nov. 27. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Washington corporation stock, to 1st October 1,486 82

--616--

Dec. 4. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Cincinnati city stock $2,500 00
1834.    
Jan. 18. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on United States Bank stock 9,639 00
Jan. 25. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on United States Bank stock 280 00
Jan. 30. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of eighty shares United States Bank stock 8,560 95
Jan. 30. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cent. stock 1,152 75
Feb. 11. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Pennsylvania five per cents 5,311 74
March 24. From the Secretary of the Navy, for this sum refunded by the president of the Branch Bank United States, Baltimore 1,000 00
April 11. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cents, due 1st instant 1,752 71
April 21. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on United States five per cents 3,487 06
April 25. From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividend on Union Bank stock, Georgetown 300 00
April 25. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Washington corporation stock 1,486 82
May 10. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Cincinnati corporation stock 2,500 00
June 20. From the Secretary of the Navy, for the proceeds of sale of one hundred and sixty shares United States Bank stock 17,080 03
July 15. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cents 1,752 75
July 23. From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividends on United States Bank stock 9,940 00
July 24. From the Treasurer of the United States, for Columbia Bank stock, purchased of the navy pension fund by the United States, per act of Congress, approved 30th June, 1834 167,164 40
Feb. 8. From Benjamin Homans, refunded by him 32 87
Feb. 13. From J. P. McCorkle, refunded by him 19 81
Feb. 13. From Richard Smith, refunded by him 235 18
Aug. 8. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for interest on Pennsylvania five per cent. stock 5,311 14
Oct. 6. From the Secretary of the Navy, for this sum refunded by the president of the Branch Bank United States, Lexington 104 60
Oct. 9.  From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Cincinnati corporation stock 2,500 00
Oct. 11.  From J. Campbell, Treasurer of the United States, for redemption of United States five per cent. stock 141,303 80
  Total amount of receipts $407,657 97
3. Disbursements made from the fund, from the 1st day of October, 1833, to the 1st day of November, 1834, viz:  
1833.    
Oct. 5. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 160 shares United States Bank stock $16,000 00
Dec. 11. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 265 shares United States Bank stock 26,500 00
1834.    
Jan. 31. Paid Sarah Davis, widow, for pension, in full 1,200 00
Feb. 22. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 75 shares United States Bank • stock 7,500 00
Feb. 28. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 76 shares United States Bank stock 7,600 00
Feb. 28. Paid Richard Smith, for dividends on 80 shares United States Bank stock, sold in December last, erroneously deposited to the credit of the Treasurer in lieu of the purchaser 280 00
March 15. Paid president of the Trenton Bank, for balance due him 83 64
March 15. Paid Richard Smith, cashier, for a transfer to privateer pension fund 470 36 March 15. Paid Joseph P. McCorkle, secretary of the navy pension fund, for transfer to privateer pension fund 39 62
April 10. Paid F. P. Blair, for printing blank certificates 40 00
May 12. Paid president of the Farmers' Bank of Delaware, balance due 48 00
May 12. Paid P. R. Freeman, clerk N. H., D. C, for examining records 12 00
May 13. Paid Captain Thomas Ap C. Jones, for arrears of pension 3,468 67
July 24.  Paid Secretary of the Treasury for 95 shares United States Bank stock 9,500 00
Aug. 7. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 1,760 shares United States Bank stock 176,000 00
Aug. 14. Paid William Williams for arrears of pension 6 80
Sept. 1. Paid Hannah Stone, widow, for arrears of pension 1, 188 00

--617--

Sept. 25.  Paid president of the Branch Bank United States, Pittsburg, for balance due $44 05  
Oct. 15. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 1,413 shares United States Bank stock 141,300 00  
Total amount of disbursements $391,281 14
4. Advances to agents to pay pensions, &c: viz: 1834.    
Jan. 24. To president of Branch Bank of the United States, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire $120 00  
Jan. 28.  To Richard Smith, cashier, to remit to pension agents 9,052 00  
Feb. 6. To H. Toland, navy agent, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 18 37  
April 15. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Maryland 500 00  
May 10. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Pittsburg, Penn 120 00  
May 19. To Elias Kane, navy agent, Washington, D. C 13 67  
June 20. To president of the Bank of the United States, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1,345 80  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 225 80  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Charleston, South Carolina 106 84  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Boston, Massachusetts 2,000 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Hartford, Connecticut 184 19  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Providence, Rhode Island 393 14  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Savannah, Georgia 211 71  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Maryland 677 41  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York 3,469 65  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, District Columbia 483 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New Orleans, Louisiana 357 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at St. Louis, Missouri 36 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Portland, Maine 250 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Virginia 1,000 00  
June 20. To Trenton Banking Company, at New Jersey 36 00  
July 9. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, District Columbia 54 00  
July 22. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Lexington, Kentucky 600 00  
July 22. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York 1,055 00  
July 22. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, District Columbia 310 00  
July 24. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Baltimore, Maryland 360 00  
July 29. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Providence, Rhode Island 300 00  
Aug. 2. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Boston, Massachusetts 250 00  
Aug. 14. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Virginia 243 33  
Aug. 20. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Louisville, Ky. 350 00  
Aug. 21. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Washington, D. C 240 00  
Sept. 3. To president of the Farmers' Bank of Delaware, at New Castle 48 00  
Sept. 18. To Elias Kane, navy agent, Washington, D. C 12 00  
Sept 23. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at New York 88 66  
Oct. 28. To president of the Branch Bank of the United States, at Norfolk, Va 314 66  
Oct, 31. To H. Toland, navy agent, Philadelphia, Penn 200 00  
Total amount of advances   $25,026 23

AMOS KENDALL.

Treasury Department,
     Fourth Auditor's Office, November 22, 1834.

--618--

_________

N.

Amount and description of stocks owned by the privateer pension fund on the 1st November, 1833; the changes made in them by purchases and sales to 1st November, 1834; and the period at which interest on said stocks is payable.

United States Bank stock:    
Amount, 1st November, 1833   $2,100 00
Purchased 9th December, 1833 $800 00  
Purchased 11th February, 1834: 800 00  
Purchased 20th May, 1834 1,100 00  
    2,700 00
    $4,800 00
Sold 9th December, 1833 $1,500 00  
Sold 13th June, 1834 1,600 00  
Sold 10th July, 1834 1,700 00  
    4,800 00
Maryland five per cents., redeemable after 31st March, 1845:    
Amount, 1st November, 1833   $37,500 00
Sold 2d August, 1834 $5,000 00  
Sold 20th August, 1834 15,000 00  
Sold 18th September, 1834 5,000 00  
Sold 13th October, 1834 2,000 00  
    27,000 00
Amount, 1st November, 1834   $10, 500 00
Interest payable quarterly from 1st October, 1832.    
Maryland five per cents., redeemable after 30th June, 1845:    
Amount, 1st November, 1833   $5,067 05
No changes. Interest payable quarterly from October, 1832. Amount of stocks owned by the fund on 1st November, 1834:    
Maryland five per cents   $15,557 05

____________

N, 1.

Privateer pension fund.

Balance in the Treasury, 1st November, 1833 $836 83
Repayment from 1st November, 1833, to 1st November, 1834 35,154 05
  $35,990 88
Payments from 1st November, 1833, to 1st November, 1834 34,729 42
Balance 1st November, 1834 $1,261 46

____________

N, 2.

Statements showing the balance standing to the credit of the privateer pension fund on the 1st day of October, 1833; the amount of receipts and disbursements on account of said fund from that date to the 1st of November, 1834; and the amount of advances to agents during the same period.

1. Balance in the Treasury to the credit of the fund on the 1st day of October, 1833, per Register's report $1,304 09
2. Amount received into the Treasury since that time, from whom, and on what account, viz: 1833.  
Oct. 10. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for interest on Maryland five per cent. stock $532 09
1834.    
Jan. 18. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for dividends on United States Bank stock 49 00
Jan. 25. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for dividends sold in New York 52 50
Jan. 30. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for interest on Maryland five per cent 532 09
Jan. 30. From the Secretary of the Navy, trustee, for proceeds of sale of 15 shares United States Bank stock 1,605 18
Mar. 7. From navy pension fund, to replace this amount, which was erroneously applied to its use, in December last, out of stock sold for privateer pension fund 509 98

--619--

April 9. From president Branch Bank United States, at Portland, Me., refunded $400 00  
April 11. From Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cents. 532 09    
June 20. From Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of 16 shares United States stock 1,708 00  
July 15. From the Secretary of the Navy, for interest on Maryland five per cents 532 09  
July 17. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of seventeen shares United States Bank stock 1,769 93  
July 13. From the Secretary of the Navy, for dividends on United States Bank stock 59 50  
Aug. 15. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $5,000 Maryland five per cents 5,079 62  
Aug. 29. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $2,500 Maryland five per cents 2,543 63  
Aug. 29. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $7,000 Maryland five per cents 7,052 33  
Sept. 3. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $1,500 Maryland five per cents 1,526 18  
Sept. 12. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $4,000 Maryland five per cents 4,069 80  
Sept. 22. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $5,000 Maryland five per cents 5,087 25  
Oct. 21. From the Secretary of the Navy, for proceeds of sale of $2,000 Maryland six per cents 2,044 88  
Total amount of receipts $35,686 14
3. Disbursements made from the fund, from the 1st of October, 1833, to the 1st day of November, 1834, viz: 1833.    
Oct. 5. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for ten shares United States Bank stock $1,000 00  
Dec. 12. Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 8 shares United States Bank stock 800 00  
1834.      
Feb. 22.  Paid Secretary of the Treasury, for 8 shares United States Bank stock 800 00    
Feb. 22. Paid J. P. McCorkle, by a transfer in his account $19 81    
Feb. 22. Paid Richard Smith 235 18    
    254 99  
Feb. 24. Paid Richard Smith, for dividends on 15 shares bank stock, sold in December last, erroneously deposited to the credit of the Treasurer, in lieu of the purchaser 52 50  
July 15. Paid Maria Robinson, widow, for pension in full 750 00  
July 24. Paid Secretary of the Treasury for 11 shares United States Bank stock 1,100 00  
July 31. Paid Nancy Brown, widow, for pension in full 720 00  
Aug. 2. Paid Margaret Southcomb, widow, for pension in full 1,200 00  
Aug. 7. Paid Grace Roath, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 7. Paid Mary Burditt, widow, for pension in full 600 00  
Aug. 7. Paid Mary Montgomery, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Aug. 27. Paid Elizabeth Bartlett, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 27. Paid Lydia Florence, widow, for pension in full 720 00  
Aug. 27. Paid Mary Elliott, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Aug. 27. Paid Sarah Roach, widow, for pension in full 720 00  
Aug. 29. Paid Lavinia Risley, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Sept. 1. Paid Nancy Tewksbury, widow, for pension in full 600 00  
Sept. 1. Paid Elias Kane, for stationery furnished J. P. McCorkle 2 83  
Sept. 10. Paid Rebecca Widger, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Sept. 17. Paid Mary Fish, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Sept. 17. Paid Agnes Lowzado, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Oct. 1. Paid Hannah Patch, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Oct. 1. Paid Susan Veal, widow, for pension in full 600 00  
Oct. 1. Paid Hannah Richardson, for pension in full 600 00  
Oct. 1. Paid Christina Fisher, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Oct. 10. Paid Frances Jones, widow, for pension in full 600 00  
Oct. 14. Paid Sarah Dennis, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Sarah Cale, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Maria Egbert, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Mary Foster, widow, for pension in full 480 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Hannah Green, widow, for pension in full 600 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Mary Rankin, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Euphemia Dobson, widow, for pension in full 1,200 00  
Aug. 9. Paid Sarah Green, widow, for pension in full 720 00  
Aug. 13.  Paid Abigail Goldsmith, widow, for pension in full 360 00  
Total amount of disbursements   $20,090 33

--620--

4. Advances to agents, to pay pensions, viz: 1834.    
Jan. 28. To Richard Smith, cashier, to remit to agent $1,370 00  
June 20. To president of the Bank United States, Philadelphia 120 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Boston 1,500 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Providence, R. I. 54 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Baltimore 212 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, New York 240 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Washington, D. C. 37 00  
June 20. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine 50 00  
July 29. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Boston 324 00  
Aug. 15. To president of the Branch Bank United States, New York 1,080 00  
  To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portsmouth, N. E. 1,296 00  
Aug. 28. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Boston 2,039 10  
Sept. 12. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portsmouth, N. H. 3,780 00  
Sept. 16. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine 1,060 00  
Sept. 23. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine 636 00  
Sept. 23. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portsmouth, N. H. 432 00  
Sept. 23. To president of the Branch Bank United States, New York 1,060 00  
Sept. 23. To Elias Kane, N. A., Washington, D. C. 12 00  
Sept. 27. To president of the Branch Bank United States, Portland, Maine. 318 00  
Oct. 10. To president of the Branch Bank United States, New York 20 00  
  Total amount of advances   $15,639 10

AMOS KENDALL.

Treasury Department,
     Fourth Auditor's Office, November 22, 1834.

___________

O.

Navy hospital fund.

Balance in the Treasury 1st November, 1833 $31,790 33
Repayments from 1st November, 1833, to 1st November, 1834 15,514 41
  $47,304 74
Payments from 1st November, 1833, to 1st November, 1834 11,745 70
Balance 1st November, 1834 $35,559 04

____________

P.

Suppression of the slave trade under act of 3d March, 1819.

Dr.
November 19, 1833. To balance in the Treasury this day $10,263 91
January 24, 1834. To amount appropriated by act of this date 5,000 00
  $15,263 91
November 19, 1834. To balance in the Treasury this day $14,213 91
Cr.
December 31, 1833. By bill of exchange of Jos. Mechlin, jr., agent $60 25
March 26, 1834. By balance paid Jos. Mechlin, jr., on settlement of his account as agent 989 75
November 19, 1833. By balance in the Treasury this day 14,213 91
  $15,263 91

Q.

Report upon the works executed for the survey of the coast of the United States, under the law of 1832, and their junction with the works made in 1817, by and under the direction of Ferdinand Rudolph Hassler.

1. That part of the work for the survey of the coast, which has been executed since the renewed law of 1832, is grounded upon the work done in 1817, under the first original law of 1807.

Therefore, in this first public report of a more full and general character, which I have the occasion to render, it is necessary to go back to that earlier period, in order to give a proper view of the state of

--621--

the work, its systematic connections, and its bearings in every respect; so much the more, as the circumstances of the interruption in 1818 precluded from the presentation of the full report, which was just then in preparation.

2. I may be allowed to suppose the principles upon which the work is to be executed, as sufficiently known, as well from the mathematical elements that must guide such a work in general, as by the plans that have been so repeatedly discussed and approved, upon all the occasions that circumstances have presented for their full consideration, and the test of the public approbation that they have passed.

3. It is, therefore, rather my task here to show how these plans have hitherto been followed; to state the results that have been obtained up to the present time; and to show their consequences.

4. The first distribution of a country into regular geometrical figures, that will approach its form the nearest, and under the most advantageous circumstances to procure accuracy in the survey of it, requires the union of a detailed knowledge of localities and theoretical principles, which is in general foreign to the habitual knowledge of the country in respect to its civil connections: the operator can therefore be guided in it by no other but his personal inspection of the localities.

5. The general outline of the coast of the United States presents, in the neighborhood of New York, a considerable angle between the main directions easterly and southerly, and in some measure a basin, over which lines may be laid and determined between the surrounding elevations fronting these two main directions, thereby furnishing proper base lines for the continuance of the work; though, therefore, I extended my first reconnoitring as far south as the Chesapeake Bay, I was ultimately, for the begining of my work, arrested particularly by the decided advantages of that locality.

6. Guided by the idea that behind the straight ridge of the Pallisadoes, in New Jersey, bordering the Hudson river above New York, a straight valley was likely to be found, that would present the necessary first element of any survey, namely, a nearly level base line, of sufficient length to serve as ground to the triangulation, I directed my attention to, and found the confirmation in, the valley called English Neighborhood; of which I made a detailed survey in the spring of 1817, in order to give it the best location that the ground would admit of, and actually measured the distance between Vreeland's and Cherry hill, as more favorable than any locality that I had visited before with the same views.

7. As habitual for such kind of works, under the expectation of taking the best advantage of the future nearer investigation of the country, and not to make, at the very outset, expenses that might be more advantageously put upon a better line, this base was measured in a preliminary manner with a chain of twenty links, of one metre each, constructed under my direction, by which it was found to be 9,446.15 metres, corresponding to about 30,999.8 feet English measure.

8. From Weasel mountain, one of the prominent rocks of the Newark mountains, first ridge, which formed the first elevated triangle point through a number of other elevated points, a system of triangles was laid over the whole basin of New York Bay, and its surrounding valleys, that presented determined distances, eastward, for the further continuation of the work over Connecticut and Long Island, and southerly over New Jersey, towards the Delaware, over the valley, of which the nature of the country indicates the course for the main triangulation towards the south, to which the survey of the outer coast must attach itself at the two ends, the Delaware Bay and Long Branch, because the sea-shore itself is too flat, too wooded, and deprived of such prominent points as are necessary for a large triangulation.

9. These works exhausted the time of the summer and fall of 1817, until past middle December, even with the omission of the extreme stations which it was intended to occupy the next year, at the same time as the survey would be further extended.

10. Though, in extensive surveys, it is habitual to measure a verification base only at a considerable distance from the first base, I considered it, on the contrary, of importance, in my case, to have a verification, as early as possible, of the proportional accuracy of the base line measured in English Neighborhood, which formed then, and forms as yet, the unit of the whole triangulation.

Therefore, a second, or verification base was measured in December, 1817, upon the sea-shore of Long Island, between a point near the Narrows, and another near Gravesend beach, though not in a very favorable locality.

11. The length of this line was found 7,753 metres, or 25,433 1/4 feet English. The results of three different combinations of the triangles carried out upon it, falling all within two-tenths of a metre (or less than eight inches) of the distance measured, and within themselves, I had reason to consider myself sufficiently authorized to use my base line of English Neighborhood as a preliminary standard for my work.

As this coincidence is greater than usual in common geographical operations, I consider myself also allowed to propose to ground, upon the work thus far obtained, the detailed survey of New York harbor, for the next summer, as I proposed in my letter to the Treasury Department of the 18th December, 1817. The great coincidence of the sums of the angles of the triangles with that required by theory, came equally in support of this satisfactory result.

12. The whole of the observations collected during the summer of 1817, I had, of course, to submit to the necessary reductions, calculations, and clearing up of the results, during the ensuing winter. Besides that, I made also the theoretical calculations that must be derived from the theory of the figure of the earth, and the best known results of the elementary magnitudes, to deduce, from the data obtained by the triangulation, the proper location of each point to its place upon the earth, and in time upon a map; from the same principles, I deduced and calculated, also, those principles upon which the future maps were to be constructed, or, as usually called, the projection; which required so much more attention, and reflected calculation, as in the case of the coast survey it shall serve to carry the work out, in the minutest details, upon a large scale, and a great extent of country.

13. While I was engaged in these calculations, the law of 1818 put an end to my further agency in the work, only a few weeks before I would have been able to present a report from my work, that would certainly have been satisfactory, as I stated in my letter to the Treasury Department of the 9th of April, 1818, written in answer to that announcing to me the dispositions that led to the breaking up of the work. In consequence of which, I delivered to the War Department all the journals, books, instruments, and other appurtenances of the survey, together with an unexpended appropriation of upwards of $5,000.

14. It is necessary that the stations of a work of the nature of the coast survey shall be preserved for future times, and uses in any other surveys to which the determination made by it will serve as fundamental units. Therefore, I had caused hollow cones of stone ware to be made, which were sunk under ground at the station points, deep enough to be sheltered from any plough or light accidental digging: they are well centred to the stations, so that, on their discovery, a signal pole can be placed

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in them, to serve at any time equally as at first, as, by their nature, they will remain undecayed for centuries. Where the station point fell upon a solid rock, I caused a hole, about two inches in diameter, and seven or eight inches deep, to be drilled at the station point, and filled with melted brimstone, which will equally serve to indicate the exact point of the station. An exact description of the locality of the station, must of course, form a part of the journal of each station, to guide in the discovery of the point at any future time.

15. It does not belong here to speak of the chasm that is found, from that time until the renewal of the law of 1807 by that of 1832, which confirmed the former in all its parts, though with the condition that it shall not be considered as authorizing the establishment of a permanent astronomical observatory, which the most enlightened members of the government had, in 1807 and 1816, considered as a natural consequence of the law, because it should, in fact, form the fixed point in the hemisphere of America, to which the work of the coast survey should be attached; wherefore, also, I had been directed to procure, and actually had procured, suitable instruments for such establishments at the same time with those for the survey.

16. This peculiarity of the law of 1832 I have always considered, as stated already in one of my letters to the Treasury Department, as intended to provoke a more direct and separate proposition for the establishment of a proper national observatory upon a greater scale than a mere accessory to the coast survey, and properly adapted to the standing of our country among the civilized nations that have a navy, for which such establishment is an absolute requisite.

17. In taking up the work again in 1832, it was of course proper to take advantage of what had been done in 1817, as base of the operations to be made under the new law, its foundation being good, and all its principal points ascertainable, by the precaution taken, as stated above: the proper acceleration and economy of the work, and good principles, equally indicated that course in preference to any other.

18. The first operation was, therefore, to uncover again the station points of the work of 1817, and to replace signals upon all the essential points; these were easily discovered, and signals placed upon them of the same kind as formerly used, namely, truncated cones of sheet tin elevated upon poles: only two of them, needed only at some future period for the southern extension of the survey, were not yet found by my assistants, who visited the places, but will certainly be found when more especially needed.

19. The direction in which the first extension of the work was by preference to be made, was to be determined by the consideration of where the most advantageous progress could be expected, in order that I might be enabled to present, at as early a period as possible, an actually executed full scheme and example of the work. For these views, the continuation of the work eastwardly, over Connecticut and Long Island, presented evident advantages over that southerly, through Jersey, &c.

20. The line between Weasel mountain, near Patterson, New Jersey, and Harrowhill, near Hempstead harbor, upon Long Island, had been determined, in 1817, to serve for this direction; therefore I reconnoitred in the fall of 1832, and even in the winter, through a part of the Long Island hills, and over the elevations of Connecticut that have those of Long Island constantly in view; and though, in the various intermixtures which they present, all the information that I received from the inhabitants appeared contrary to success, I was so fortunate as to find a series of five to seven hills connecting very properly, and to good advantage for a favorable chain of triangles; and even the corresponding points of Long Island proved more visible from one another than their position, almost in a straight line, had allowed me at first to expect, by the generally wooded state of the interior of the country. Signals were, of course, placed upon all these points, of the same truncated cones as were always used.

21. All the points thus reconnoitred were placed upon a map of Long Island, according to approximate observations made at them, constructed according to the problem of three points, and dependent on the lighthouses on both shores of Long Island Sound.

But, besides that the intransparency of the atmosphere near the sea shore in winter, always renders the distant vision indistinct, the actual inclemency of the month of January prevented the full decision upon the visibility of Weasel mountain, from Buttermilk hill, in Dutchess county, behind Tarrytown, which its locality promised to bring in the line from Weasel, through the interruption of the hills of the Pallisadoes, and the northern hills of New York, commonly called the Notch, which was, however, of the greatest importance.

22. Circumstances out of my control delayed my stay in Washington beyond my expectation, during the winter of 1832 to 1833. As soon as I had again arrived in New York, I placed upon the stations of Weasel mountain and Harrowhill signals of larger dimensions, though of the same form as I always used. Then I began the summer campaign with the station at Buttermilk hill, where it was necessary to ascertain first whether that point would actually answer, in full, the condition of joining the triangulation of 1817 with the continuation of it that I had projected. This was actually verified; so that the whole of my projected triangulation promised to be proper and available.

23. Upon this first station I had, of course, also to put the instruments in proper adjustment, and to introduce my assistants into the peculiarities of the work, and the observations; all which protracted so much more the stay upon this first station, in addition to the often unfavorable weather. The extremely unfavorable weather of the most part of the last season, in general, protracted our stay upon all the stations much beyond expectation, and what is hoped will be the case in future, particularly when the arrival of the new instrument expected from London next summer, will dispense, in some measure, with the numerous and anxious repetitions and cares which the present state of the two-feet theodolite, that had to be used for the great triangulation, obliged me to go through: for this campaign has particularly proved that the accuracy and good state of the instruments is one of the greatest means of economy, by the greater celerity with which results can be obtained by them.

24. It would have been desirable, after the success of that station of Buttermilk, to go upon Weasel mountain and Harrowhill, to observe the angles of this main junction triangle, but it was also desirable to ascertain the whole series of triangles projected; and I hoped to make these stations at the close of the campaign, in the fall, with more economy of the moving of the whole establishment. To get, however, the preliminary determination of the distances required for the calculations which it is necessary to make in the field to guide the progress of the work, I determined this triangle by the given distance between Weasel and Harrowhill, of which the angle subtended at Buttermilk was carefully measured by the azimuth carefully observed there, and compared with the one that I had observed in 1817 upon Weasel, though I had far less reason to rely upon its accuracy.

25. I prosecuted, therefore, my northern triangle stations easterly until past New Haven, and, by

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return, the southern stations upon Long Island, and laid some triangle points upon the southern sea shore of the island. From these main stations I measured as many angles upon secondary triangle points as the localities, time, and circumstances allowed, in the same manner as I had done in 1817. In the course of the work, also, another station point was found, the substitution of which for that of Buttermilk will furnish a very desirable and very favorable verification of the large distances, by doubling the series of the largest triangles. I made, therefore, the proper observations for that from the stations by which it will join the other triangles, the distribution of which is on another side best adapted for the survey of the details in their neighborhood.

26. Upon one of the southern beaches of Long Island appears to present itself a locality for measuring a base line of more extent, and probably under more favorable circumstances than that of English Neighborhood; this is now under nearer investigation, by Captain Swift, and the necessary preparations for this operation, as important as laborious, tedious", and expensive, are in proper progress, as it must, necessarily, be the first work of this summer's campaign.

27. The operations before described having lasted until December, at which time we were upon the Westhills stations, and the winter setting fully in, with the consequent intransparency of the atmosphere of the sea shore, I was forced to abandon my plan to visit the stations of Weasel and Harrow myself. To obtain, however, a better determination, or verification, I directed these two stations to be occupied, preliminarily, by some" of my assistants, though with inferior instruments, that will, therefore, not dispense my observing there, in proper time, myself. So, Mr. Blunt observed the angles upon Harrow, and Mr. Ferguson those upon Weasel; and upon their results, joined with those of Buttermilk hill, the present preliminary determinations are grounded, as far as they are dependent on this part.

28. When I had executed the station at Mount Carmel, the extreme eastern one, to which I had. intended to extend my observations that year. I considered myself authorized to form two parties to carry on the secondary triangulations, within the limits of country that my main triangulation embraced, as the triangles could all be sufficiently determined to allow the verifications required in future. Keeping, therefore, only two of my assistants, Captain Swift and Lieutenant Bell, with me, Mr. Ferguson was directed, with the assistance of a secondant, to fill up with secondary triangulations all the parts included between the main northern triangle points and Long Island Sound; and Mr. Blunt, with another secondant, was directed, in a similar manner, for all that related to both shores of Long Island; both equally proceeding from the eastern extremity of our work towards New York.

29. The secondary points thus determined must be sufficiently numerous, and placed in such a manner as to enable from them to fill up the details, by plane table operations on land, and by observations for the soundings upon the water. Considerable advance was made in these secondary parts already in the latter part of last fall, and the works have been taken up again this spring early, though the weather in that neighborhood has again proved very unfavorable.

30. Upon Buttermilk and Toshua regular series of azimuth observations with the sun were made with the two-feet theodolite, by myself; and the latitudes of all the most essential stations were observed by my assistants, partly with the eighteen-inch repeating circle, partly with the ten-inch repeating reflecting circle. By the calculations of this winter, these latitudes were all reduced to one collective result, by means of the azimuths; and their coincidence has been more satisfactory even than I expected.

31. These reductions carried through the works of 1817, to the city hall of New York, the latitude and longitude of which had been determined by entirely different means, gave the points from which the longitudes have been counted, as reduced to Greenwich; there being no other point within the limits of the survey astronomically determined, nor any fixed point in the United States from which the longitude could be counted.

32. As well in my operations of 1817, as in those of last year, the angles of elevation, or depression, of the main station, points from one another, have always been observed, except upon my two stations upon Long Island, because these will be revisited at a future time. These observations will furnish, in time, an interesting collection of data, upon the elevation of all these points over the level of the sea; but neither the winter of 1817 to 1818, nor this last, has it been possible, for want of time, to calculate any results; in fact, it is rather more proper to postpone these calculations until the exact distances are fully determined, upon which these results depend; they will, therefore, with more propriety, form a part of the calculations of next winter.

33. Since I made, in 1818, my calculation of the elements of the projection that will be the most advantageous for the construction of the maps, as most concordant with the results of both the triangulations and the detail surveys, the knowledge of the dimensions and figure of the earth has much improved, and been much more accurately defined; I had, therefore, to make anew all the theoretical calculations thereto referring, upon the most approved elements, of which the leading data are the ellipticity of the earth, and the mean degree of the whole meridian, that is the 1/360th part. It would, however, be out of place, in the present state of the work, to enter into these nearer details of theory, which will become of interest hereafter, as the ultimate results of the coast survey must furnish one or more of the data for the perfecting of these results themselves, if it shall take its appropriate standing among the works of this nature; it is to be hoped that it will be properly discussed at the end of the work of the main triangulation.

34. It may be here the place to state the reasons for adopting the metre for the unit measure of the whole survey. 1. I had a fully authentic metre made by the committee of weights and measures in Paris; while of any other measure whatsoever, I could only have a copy more or less accurate. 2. Notwithstanding older ideas to the contrary, I found positively, in my comparisons made for the weights and measures, that, in a general way, the metres are obtained of greater accuracy and coincidence than the English scales. (See my report upon weight and measure comparisons.) 3. By my repeated comparisons of this identical and authentic metre with the scale of Troughton, of eighty-two inches, adopted as English standard in this country, together with a number of other measures, its ratio to either one of hem is sufficiently determined to enable at any time to present any distance, in either one of the measures thus compared, as, for instance, to obtain the value in English inches, will need only the addition of the constant logarithm=l.5952859 to the logarithm of any distance recorded in metres. 4. In the ultimate general account, it will be proper to give the distances, both in metres and in yards, or feet, to cause the utility for the various future detail applications for the work.

35. The connection of the station points of the triangulation, by their differences of latitude and longitude, was calculated upon the same theoretical principles stated above; they have coincided with

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the results of the latitude observations, that are by their nature entirely independent of the geodetical operations, to such a degree as, notwithstanding all my cares, I did not consider myself authorized to expect; and the reduction to the city hall of New York showed an equal coincidence with observations made some years ago, by Captain Sabine, on the occasion of his pendulum observations.

36. This afforded also an additional proof that the result of the measurement of the base in English Neighborhood, measured in 1817, would be sufficiently relied upon for the preliminary calculations, as it stood the test of being extended to distances about 160 miles from the same. It confirmed equally the near approximation of the azimuths observed last year, &c.

37. It is, however, evident that my dependence for the ultimate azimuths and latitudes of deciding accuracy must as yet be referred to future observations, with the superior means of instruments,& c, that I have in part ordered, and in part still to continue; in respect to the longitude, it is too evident how desirable an observatory will be, as no doubt will be provided in proper time by special means, independent of the coast survey.

33. My attention at the present stage of the work must be directed principally to the measurement of a base line, with all the means of accuracy that I may be able to dispose of, by means of the apparatus of which I have given the description in my printed papers upon the coast survey. The brass parts of the apparatus were put in full good order already, during last summer; the woodwork is in construction in New York, under the direction of Captain Swift; and I have just now put the double metre bars, which shall determine the absolute length, to their proper standard, by means of the apparatus provided for it, and with the help of my assistant in the weight and measure business.

39. In the actual measurement of the base line, I shall unite all my present assistants, principally because they will all take a great interest in the operation, which is, in its kind, of a peculiar nature, and not often occurring, wherein every operator will always follow his peculiar ways, according to his situation and the means at his disposal.

40. As soon as the result of the base line is ascertained, which will require some time and considerable calculations, the result will be applied to the recalculation of all the triangles; and the reductions to the geographical position will be repeated with this new element. Then a projection of the points, upon the scale of the fifty thousandth part, will be made upon papers, distributed over the extent of the work, in such parts as will be best appropriated to the filling up of the detail surveys, by the plane table, and the insertion of the soundings, in which works the most of my assistants will then be distributed, while I shall proceed again in the main triangulation.

41. During the execution of these works, I hope that the instruments ordered of Mr. Troughton, in London, will arrive in this country, at least if he can execute the promises given to that effect. I hope, therefore, to be able to avail myself of the new large instrument, for the continuation of my work in the main triangles, the determination of azimuths, latitude, and all the more delicate observations, upon properly selected favorable stations. The two-feet theodolite, that I have used last summer, I shall then propose to send to Mr. Troughton to have it again put in a proper serviceable state, for that accuracy, of which it is susceptible when in good order.

42. At the same time, with the distribution of the detail surveys upon land, I should like to put in activity two parties of naval gentlemen, for ascertaining the soundings in the neighborhood of the same parts that the detail surveys would embrace; as they would probably sometimes work in conjunction with one another, they would embrace a great part of Long Island Sound, and part of the south shore of Long Island. This, however, will require to take some arrangement previously, in relation to the vessel, or vessels, which it will be necessary to employ in it. Lieut. Bell, of the navy, who has been one of my assistants last summer, will take the direction of at least one of these expeditions, as his acquaintance with the locality will of course assist him much in the proper execution of this task.

43. I join to this report skeleton maps of the triangulations that have been executed hitherto, containing all the main triangles that I executed, and so much of the secondary triangles, of the two separate parties, as have been communicated to me until now. The distances in numbers would be of no interest in this report, and belong only to a final report; upon the scientific part of the work, it is at no rate proper to mention any before the calculations have been grounded upon a final base measured as above stated. These maps present four sheets upon the scale of the one hundred thousandth part, (1/100000) which is that upon which it will about be proper to execute the detail maps for publication; the whole system of the operations, as far as hitherto executed, will become evident by them. It appeared to me to ease the general insight into the bearing of the work, to add a fourth sheet, upon the half scale of the others, that will present the general view of the whole work; the easier reference to the locality of the triangulation will be assisted by the tracing, only in pencil, of the approximate outlines of the coast, for the survey of which the triangles contain the elements. The projections are made upon the principles above stated, and will present no deviation for the filling up to the minutest details, when executed upon the scale of 1/50000, which it is proper to execute the main original copy of the government.

44. It is proper that all the maps should be drawn upon a proportional decimal fraction of the real dimensions. There is a great advantage in being able to ascertain, by the simple measurement, in any length measure whatsoever, the real distances desired; this can only be obtained by such a system of scales, which, therefore, also is the only one adopted in the present times. The scales of so much in inches, or any other small measure per mile, giving altogether an irregular proportion, are very bad, and therefore have been entirely abandoned in the new maps.

45 It is proper to add here some general remarks upon the character which it is necessary to give to the work of the coast survey, its general bearing for the benefit of the country at large, and the influence which its proper execution shall have upon the improvement of the practical mathematical sciences that are so necessary in our country, and the standing of the officers of the army and navy, to whose departments works of this nature, or requiring similar knowledge, are so often referred; though I have already touched this subject upon other occasions.

46. The survey of the coast must evidently, merely as such already, extend land inwards, at any place, until to the ridges of hills or mountains that border the valleys emptying their waters into the sea, or the large bays and rivers; it must present the localities of all the passages and gorges that lead to these valleys, &c., because it must contain all that is needed for the proper defence of the coast in case of any attack whatsoever, just as much as the outlines of the coast and the soundings; because, as these furnish the guide to the navigation, so the others are the elements upon which the directions for a proper defence of the country, in case of need, must be grounded; and all these elements must be so

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detailed, and present such a full and self-explaining picture of the country, that, with the map before the eye, the military operations may be properly judged and guided in the cabinet. It is, therefore, also habitual to join for each district a statistical statement of its natural means and resources; it is as desirable to have these accounts of the laud part, as those upon the currents in the naval part of the work.

47. This work must besides furnish the elements of any other survey that may be desired for any public aim whatsoever, either within or in the neighborhood of its extent; its accuracy, if properly executed, and its wide range, render it peculiarly fit to become a standard to which all other surveys may, and even shall, be attached; thereby will be gradually obtained the necessary accurate data for any public undertaking of general utility to the country. This feature of the work was felt already in 1817, when the Governor of New Jersey proposed to unite with it the survey of a map of that State, but which was lost by the delay of the decision of the Treasury Department, where I had proposed to accede to the request. It appears equally felt now by the proposition of the State of Maryland for a similar junction of the map of that State, which has been very properly acceded to; and no doubt similar occasions will increase in the same proportion as the general improvement of the country advances, and the proper character of the work of the survey of the coast becomes established; this is another proof of the propriety of the measure that I took at all times properly to secure the station points for future use.

48. The character of a work of the nature of the coast survey is essentially scientific; without that this character be impressed upon it, to the evidence of the public, capable to judge of it, neither credit nor confidence will be given to it; it is, in fact, worse than useless, because it increases the doubts of the cautious and intelligent seamen, and its defects mislead the ignorant who trust to it. Plans, going merely upon what is so wrongfully called sufficient accuracy, are inadmissible, and would prove highly expensive. The economy in the work consists in the certainty of producing the most accurate results.

49. In the execution of the laws in any country, and in a new country in particular, it appears to me to be a duty to take all possible advantage of it, to promote the most general benefit possible of the nation, and especially its scientific improvements, wherever there may be an occasion presented for it, and that upon a liberal scale, because its benefits are always far more extensive than what shows itself at the first outset, I am authorized to this assertion, in the present case, by the approbation which my treating the coast survey with these views has caused me to find in the most enlightened men of the country, and even abroad, as testified, among others, by the late President Jefferson himself, who was the author of the original law, and by many other distinguished citizens; we have, besides, before us, the well-known examples of almost all European countries, who have derived valuable benefits, of various kinds, from the proper execution of similar works, in a scientific form.

50. With these views, also, I found it proper to collect a valuable library of the best works in these parts of mathematics and natural philosophy, that are either directly bearing upon the work itself, or more or less connected with its accessory or influencing branches, by which my assistants may properly improve their scientific standing, and become the more useful to the country in future. It will also be proper to add to the work, as soon as it is in a proper train, such scientific experiments or observations as relate to the pendulum, the magnetic attraction, the tides, refraction, and other similar subjects, which are always connected with such works when properly scientifically treated. I could as yet not do more in this than to cause the magnetic bearing to be observed upon the main stations, merely to determine the declination of the needle at the places and time; but for any other observations nothing is as yet properly provided, nor, in fact, was there time at our disposition for it.

51. By the nature of the services that the navy and the army are engaged to render to the country, these two classes of citizens, that are always of considerable influence in any country, deserve peculiarly, though not to the exclusion of other citizens, to be quoted here in connection with this work. Such officers, in either of these services, as have applied to the study of the higher branches of their profession, of which mathematics form the foundation, will find in the work of the coast survey an occasion of improvement, as well as of gratification for their good dispositions: therefore preference is naturally to be given to those who, with a good foundation in theory, have been successful in the career of practical application of mathematics, in topographical surveying, drawing, and particularly observing and generally in making geodetical and astronomical observations for actual use. Only such officers can reap some benefit for their individual improvement, or be of any service in the work, because this utility must be reciprocal, if success shall attend on either side. The officer or individual whosoever, joining the work, without sufficient knowledge, and even practical ability, cannot reap any benefit from following it, and of course he is also entirely useless for the work, and the coast survey would be improperly laden with him.

52. The success of those officers that have, in the work, both given and received satisfaction, will invite others to acquire the qualifications indispensably required to become serviceable, and thereby to enter the work; but the work itself cannot be the school for him who is too far behind to be of some actual service in it; the distance to be gone through is too great for him; and the functions of all those actually engaged in some part of the work are too constant, and too fully occupying them, that he might be taught and schooled separately who brings not knowledge enough to the work to see himself what he can do, as well in application of his actual acquirements, as in advance of them. All this applies, of course, equally to the assistants from any rank whatever.

53. To all this it is still necessary to add, that habits of assiduity, and devotion to a scientific object, with friendly and open dispositions, without any pretensions, are equally indispensable, moral qualifications to which it is necessary to attend in the selection of the assistants in this work, as much as to their intellectual qualifications and acquirements; for there can, by nature, not be any control upon any observation entrusted to an assistant, or over the assistance rendered in an observation, except the moral strength of confidence; orders from superiors, fear of consequences, and all considerations of that kind, cannot have the slightest power; the morality and ability of the observer, at the very moment, decide what no power whatever can decide; and this is equally applicable to any chief, or any assistant, whosoever, and of whatever grade he may have in the work.

54. In thus exposing the principles that must guide in the selection of the assistants for this work, and which shall therefore ever guide me in the proposition of any assistant, of any rank or class whatever, I give the pledge that I shall always be guided by perfect impartiality as to the personal, though I may propose persons of different qualifications, with the view of their different employments; the moral principle which must guide in all such cases, is simply, that every one must see before him an aim for

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his inclination or ambition, to which he will apply his exertions honestly: the result of which will be useful to the work. With these principles I hope to be as successful in my choice as the general chances of human affairs will admit it, and to be approved in my selections; therefore to obtain, from the civil, naval, or military rank, always such assistants as will act with pleasure and satisfaction, and therefore do honor to the work and to themselves, thence reflect credit upon our country and nation, convinced, as they must be, that they act before the whole of the civilized world, because the history of such works is always minutely known to every well informed man.

55. I can, therefore, also fully rely upon the concurrence of the Department under which the work is placed, as well in the aim as in the means to reach it successfully. This success must be one of its greatest aims, upon the consideration of usefulness as well as upon that of its high credit.

F. R. HASSLER.

Washington City, May 17, 1834.

____________

Notices upon the maps of the triangles herewith joined.

Four sheets upon the scale of []/1000000 present as well the main triangles as the secondary ones, distributed in such sheets as will be proper, to allow the necessary room for the insertion of the soundings upon the seaside, and the insertion of the details of the land near the coast, thence adapted to the actual execution of the charts and maps for publication upon a large scale; they are of course properly oriented, perpendicular to the meridians and parallels.

No. 1 contains the neighborhood of New York.

No. 2 exhibits the continuation of the country in the same latitude as the former, over Long Island, eastwardly.

No. 3 has that part of the triangulation that falls north of the first sheet, and therefore, principally the triangle points land inwards, connecting with those of the shore.

No. 4 contains the triangle points north of sheet No. 3, thereby presenting the part of Connecticut east of No. 2, and north of Long Island Sound, in the neighborhood of New Haven, &c.

A fifth sheet is added, presenting the union of the whole work, equally oriented, but only upon the half scale of the preceding ones, that is, 1/200000 part; to show the full connection of the works, to assist in the reference to the localities of the country, the rough outlines of the coast are traced upon this sheet, by which it becomes evident how the triangulation will apply to the detail survey of the minuter configuration of the country, shores, bays, &c., &c.

F. R. HASSLER.

___________

Q, 1.

Report of F. R. Hassler, as superintendent of the survey of the coast, additional to that dated May 17, 1834, containing an account of the progress of that work during the summer, and until November of 1834.

1. I stated in my report, of which this is to be a continuation, as well as in my previous communications, that the accurate measurement of a base line, by the means especially provided for that purpose, the description of which was published long ago, was, after the measurement of the angles of the main part of the triangulation, presented in that report, the first, and, as is well known, most important part of the work; to that I had, therefore, principally to devote my attention and personal exertions the past summer.

2. I also stated in that report, that from the observations upon the stations of Rulands and Westhills, upon Long Island, there appears to present itself the prospect of a base line, far more advantageous, in every point of view, than that measured preliminary in English Neighborhood, New Jersey; namely, upon the beach called Fire Island beach, upon the south shore of Long Island, which separates what is called the Great South Bay from the ocean.

3. Viewed from the two named stations, this beach presented a narrow strip of land that appeared straight between the lighthouse, at the inlet of the bay, and the station point called Head and Horns, and perhaps even farther. Its position lies eminently favorable for the determination of the distance from Westhills to Rulands, which presents itself extremely favorable as a base for the large triangles crossing Long Island Sound over to Connecticut, &c, as evident by the maps of the triangulation joined to my report of last May.

4. These advantages were too great not to decide in favor of this location of the base line, for the execution of which Captain Swift was preparing all the mechanical means in New York, during the time that I wrote my last report, and before. But it would have been very desirable that the actual work could have been begun with the earlier part of the season; this, however, was impossible, on account of a considerable part of my time being taken up in Washington in the latter part of the winter, to give to the Navy Department all the information that was requested, on account of the correspondence of the coast survey being transferred to that Department from the Treasury Department, where all the detail arrangements of the work, and the tenor of the agreements made with me, were known from their very beginning.

5. When I could join my assistants in New York, in the earlier part of June, the means being all on hand, 1 directed the final adjustment of the whole base measuring apparatus, and what is connected with it: there were also engaged an adequate number of men for the manual assistance required, in the selection of whom we were really fortunate to obtain all efficient, regular men, of such different qualifications as are absolutely required for the very varied exigencies of an accurate measurement of a base line, and the extra works that it requires, in a place entirely isolated, and thence distant from all other means to provide for them.

6. I directed then all the assistants not especially otherwise engaged, the men, and the apparatus, and equipment, to Fire Island lighthouse, in the neighborhood of which the west end of the base line was to fall; and directed the assistants, joining there, to make a detail survey of the beach, from its western end, till to Head and Horns, or even to Watch hill; such a previous survey being always neces-

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sary to enable to select the most favorable ground for the actual measurement. The map of this locality, hereto joined, proves this evidently. Two lines between Head and Horns, and some points near the lighthouse, proposed and scrutinized first by my assistants; presented such difficulties by intervening sand hills and bushes, as not only would have required a great length of time in overcoming, but also would have occasioned chances of inaccuracy, besides a great deal of calculation, for the consequent and necessary reductions to the too much interrupted horizontal line.

7. When I could join my assistants upon the beach, in the beginning of July, though by no means in a good state of health, and after having visited the projected lines, the difficulties they presented decided me to try to lay off a straight line upon the outward sandy shore of the ocean, between the sea and the sand hills, which appeared to present a nearly straight line, little different from parallel to the shore. This succeeded so well, that a line was laid out, starting from a sand hill of moderate elevation, somewhat southeast of the lighthouse, and extending over eight miles upon the sandy beach, only in a few instances edging the sand knolls, and in some others going between the high and low water mark on the seaside; the lowering of the first as much as needed, it was easy to accomplish; and the second apparent difficulty was equally easily overcome, by so regulating the work as meet these places during low tide.

8. This line was then laid out accurately straight by means of a transit instrument, and measured, preliminarily, by the same chain of twenty metres which had been used in 1811 for the preliminary measurement of the base line in English Neighborhood, and which serves now for the detail plane table survey

of the south side of Long Island. At every 400 metres a peg was driven into the ground, bearing the mark of the distance; these precautions are always required as a great means of security against mistakes, by the omission that might happen of inscribing a measuring bar-box in the registers, as thereby constant verifications are presented.

9. During the months of August, September, and October, this line was then measured in forty-five days, of which, twenty-seven in August, fifteen in September, and three in October; the other part of that time being taken up either by interruption from unfavorable weather, or such days as were necessarily employed for the moving of our encampment along the line, for which it was always necessary to employ all the helps otherwise engaged at the manual part of the base measurement, there being never any doublets of men engaged in our work; and I must add, near the end of it, also, my own increased state of sickness was unfavorable.

10. At every 400 metres, as determined by the accurate measurement, and at every 1,000 metres, strong pegs were driven in the ground, marked by their distance from the west end; and every 2,000 metres was, besides, furnished with one of the stoneware cones that are always used at the station points; these are intended as fixed points, from which the detail points of the soundings in the sea that they border are to be determined.

11. Both ends of the base line thus resting upon two sand knolls, that will, by their position, in all appearance, always be secure from the sea, have been marked by two monuments, each consisting of a Newark red sand stone, about four feet high, hewn square for about eighteen inches from the top, with an even top of one foot square, and a round hole in the centre; under the square cut part a frame was fixed in, consisting of four pieces of hard wood scantling, embracing it closely by grooves made expressly in the stone, the lower part being left rough. These stones were sunk entirely even with the sand, together with their frames, which, by their extending about twenty inches on each side further in the ground, will make them stand more solid, and maintain their perpendicular position.

12. The distance between the monuments will exceed 14,050 metres, or 8 734/1000 miles; the accurate number will result from the calculations that I shall make next winter upon the reductions needed for.

1st, The varied state of the temperature.

2d. The elevations and depressions that the localities of the ground obliged to make in many places. 3d. The reduction of the line actually measured upon the shore sand, to that between the monuments, for which all the data have been determined upon the place.

13. The apparatus used for this measurement is that which I have described in my printed papers upon the coast survey, which, though grounded upon entirely new ideas of my own, has obtained the approbation of all the men of science acquainted with such kind of works. It has proved itself practically, yielding the greatest accuracy, as its ultimate product is a line of near nine miles, measured microscopically. It has also proved a very expeditious, therefore even an economical arrangement, as the line was measured in the same time, (45 days,) as the base line of Mr. De Lambre, of 11,840 metres, which mine exceeds, evidently, considerably. In fact, this base is one of the longest ever measured, with an accuracy in any way comparable.

14. The details of the operations in principle, and even the manipulations, are already described in my "papers upon the coast survey;" and as the statement of the final numerical results must naturally be postponed until the adequate calculations will have been made, I have here only yet to state the great satisfaction which it gave me, that my assistants engaged with me in this arduous task, naturally entirely new to them, acquired the manipulations of the apparatus so well, that when otherwise favored by the weather, and the locality, we proceeded with a rapidity far above all expectations; and their cheerful exertions during the whole time, and even that of the laboring men, deserve due praise, and were a great support to my personal exertions, particularly towards the end, when my ill health had rendered my personal exertions very difficult and fatiguing.

15. The detailed account of this operation, which is of rather a scientific nature, I flatter myself will be of interest, and therefore enhance the value or the methods that I have devised for the works of the coast survey, as well as increase the interest for the work with the government, and the well informed public in general; in fact, this account of the work belongs rather to the ultimate scientific account of the main triangulation for the whole work.

16. I had expected, at the close of last campaign, that after the measurement of the base line, I should be able yet, during this campaign, to measure the angles of the triangles, that will determine directly from it the distance from Westhills to Rulands, and also those angles on Harrowhill and Weasel, which connect my work of 1811 to the present; this I intended to do with the large instrument ordered of Troughton, and promised in due time for that purpose. But, unfortunately, not only this instrument has not yet arrived, but even many unexpected impediments have arisen that have made the execution of my projects impossible, and deprive me even now of the use of the means by which I had intended to supply this deficiency. Besides that, the lateness of the season at which the campaign could be opened, postponed naturally everything equally as much as my stay in Washington had been protracted, as above.

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stated; an accessory result of which was, that the season for living and working at the seashore, falling partly in the equinoctial storms, not only our progress was impeded but it reduced me ultimately to the sick bed, and the lingering state consequent to it, which lasts even now, increased and maintained by the difficulties laid in the way of my progress. I had, therefore, also to avail myself of the assistance of Mr. Blunt, whose operations were near the base line, for the measurement of the accessory and preliminary angles, that had to be measured at different places of the base line; for which, besides, neither I, nor any of the other assistants engaged at the actual measurement, could leave our functions.

17. Though the two assistants engaged in the secondary triangulations, Messrs. Ferguson and Blunt, were some part of the time with me at the base line, particularly Mr. Blunt, they have continued equally their tasks, as I stated in my last report, that they were engaged in, namely, Mr. Ferguson in Connecticut, Mr. Blunt upon Long Island, continuing the secondary triangulations, of which a part is already included in my report of last May. The comparison of the sketch of Mr. Ferguson's triangles here joined, with the maps of my last report, will show his part of progress; the necessity of calling off Mr. Blunt for the triangulation around South Bay and to the base, has made it impossible to present with this report a corresponding sketch of his works, besides that herewith from the said South Bay.

18. It is my intention to have the topography of the south part of Long Island, near the base line, fully executed this fall, as well upon land as for the soundings of the great South Bay that lies between Fire Island beach and the main shore of the island. With that view I marked off a part from the west end of the base, easterly, of such length as would serve as base to triangles, adapted in size to the dimensions of that bay. Such a triangulation was then grounded upon it, by Mr. Blunt, as envelopes the whole bay, from its entrance to its eastern extremity, as shown by the sketch here joined.

19. The results so obtained were projected upon the scale of 1/10000, to serve for the filling up of the topography with the plane table, at which Mr. Renard is just now engaged.

20. In the same manner Lieutenant Gedney, of the navy, who has been appointed, upon my proposition, for the first expedition of soundings, namely, that of the bay so enclosed in these triangles, and the seashore, adjacent to the beach, has been furnished with a projection of these triangles, upon a scale sufficiently large to make his preliminary constructions for placing the soundings, in which service he is now engaged upon the bay.

21. It was my intention to procure from Paris the materials and implements (which hitherto I have furnished out of my private stock) necessary to have a fully finished map executed of a part of the coast in the vicinity of the base line, where the topographical details are now executing, and the soundings are now taking, by which I would have been able to present this winter, a real sample of the execution of the maps, early enough to lay it before Congress during the course of the coming session; also, exemplars of drawings in all the different scales that it will become necessary to use were to be procured, as I have only (in my private possession) a single exemplar upon one scale, that was presented to me long ago by Mr. Beautemps Beaupre', of the Depot de Marine, in Paris; for it must be here observed, that these objects are not attainable from any other place than Paris, or where they were brought to from there, and that there has been established for all such works, a universally understood conventional language of signs and manner of distinguishing the objects, which appears not yet much known in this country, and which it is necessary to adopt, in order to be properly intelligible to everybody, and to present the results also from that side, as it is proper, in the present state of the science. But the impediments mentioned in my correspondence, as laid in my way for the best forwarding of the work, by procuring the necessary means in due time, have frustrated me of the pleasure of giving that satisfaction this year; this can only be remedied the following winter (if in the meantime the difficulties are obviated).

22. The secondary triangulation, made by Mr. Ferguson, is now brought to the Pallisadoes on the west, from New Haven, where its eastern part begins, and that of Mr. Blunt, upon Long Island, parallel to it, both upon the plans as already stated, though I had to interrupt Mr. Blunt several times for work at the base line.

23. Thence, also, of all these parts of the country the work is brought to its ultimate application to the minute details of the topography, which I therefore intend to put in full activity, as soon as the necessary arrangements can be made, which, in the present state of things, is impossible.

24. I am sorry to be obliged to state here, what is evident to every man who occasionally is a witness to the work of the coast survey, that, from the most important to the minutest part of the work, everything is arranged in the most strictly economical manner, and at the same time so as to produce the greatest possible effect, in perfectly accurate results, in the shortest space of time, for in this principle lies the true economy of the work; any arrangement whatsoever not fitting to this aim, is a direct loss, as well in work as actually also in money. My experience, by having made similar works formerly, at my private expense, I find a sure guide in this respect; and. I dare to assert, with full confidence, that never so much actually valuable work was obtained in the same space of time, and for the same proportional amount of money, in any other survey whatsoever.

25. By the change of the Department to which this work is committed, it became necessary for me to spend much time in giving the information necessary, to introduce many gentlemen completely new in the business, into the proper genius of the work and its advantageous organization, which lies in documents reaching from 1807 to the present date; during which time, on one hand, the arrangements were constantly perfectioned, while on another, even the older documents in the hands of the government have been destroyed by the conflagration of the Treasury office; so that now I am alone in the possession of them in their original. I had already some time ago begun the copies to restore these documents, and they needed principally only my revision and signature; but it has become necessary to make use of so many of them, that the collection is now very incomplete, and actually my time is otherwise too much engaged to attend to this part at present.

26. As this report is rather to be made in haste, to reach in due time for the aim of the President, to present it with the message to Congress, in addition to that of last May, minuter details have been excluded. I expect, however, to have presented the principal features, and the state of the work, to sufficient satisfaction for the present purpose, and to have made it evident that I have continued the work according to the principles laid out for me, from its first beginning, in 1816; that is, in a manner honorable, and permanently useful to the country, which was already the judgment that late President Jefferson, with whom the first law of 1807 had originated, gave upon my work of 1817; and if nothing is altered in my plans, and my organization of the whole arrangement, I can promise equally good success for the further continuance and even assure, that by no other means or arrangements, it is possible to obtain such a

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result; for this the judgment of all the practical and experienced men of science in this line, all over Europe, is already recorded in the scientific prints.

F. R. HASSLER.

Westhills, Huntington Township, Long Island,

November 11, 1834.

Maps joined to this report.

1. Detailed map of the locality of the base line.

2. Sketch of the triangles around great South Bay, upon Long Island.

3. Sketch of the triangles in Connecticut and New York States.

____________

R.

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, as ascertained at the Department, since December 1, 1833.

Name and rank. Date. Cause. Place.
MASTERS COMMANDANT.
W. L. Gordon April 25, 1834 Congestion of brain Baltimore.
Silas Duncan September 14, 1834 Pulmonary affection White Sulph. Springs, Virginia.
LIEUTENANTS.      
Philander F. Canedy January 2, 1834 Consumption Navy Hos., Pensacola.
Joseph Cross February 10, 1834 Consumption Near Bladensb'g, Md.
John A. Cook February 7, 1834 Consumption Charleston, S. C.
Jerome Callan June 29, 1834 Tic doloreux Red Sulphur Springs, Virginia.
Joseph Cutts, jr September 26, 1834 Suicide Portsmouth, N. H.
Augustus R. Strong October 18, 1834 Yellow fever Nav. Hosp. Pensacola.
ASSISTANT SURGEON.
E. H. Freeland June, 1834   Port Mahon.
PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.
Wm. P. Jones July 15, 1834 Cholera Michigan Territory.
Horatio G. Myers September 16, 1834 Cholera Port Mahon, frigate Constellation.
MIDSHIPMEN.
L. H. Roumfort October 21, 1833   Sloop Peacock, at sea.
Clarence Watkins July 18, 1834 Consumption Washington.
V. L. Williamson September 6, 1834   Wilmington, Del.
SAILINGMASTER.
William Knight July 22, 1834   Philadelphia.
SAILMAKER.
B. B. Burchstead December 11, 1833   Navy Yard, N. Y.
MARINE OFFICER.
Capt. C. Grymes July 25, 1834  

Nav. Hosp., Norfolk.

____________

S.

List of resignations in the navy of the United States, since the 1st of December, 1832.

Name. When accepted.
LIEUTENANTS.
Pedro C. Valdes Feb. 6, 1834, as of Oct. 20, 1833.
John G. Rodgers February 10, 1834.
Philip A. Stockton February 14, 1834.
William Seton July 5, 1834.
Sterne Humphreys October 1, 1834.
SURGEON.
Samuel B. Malone April 16, 1834.
PURSERS.
William S. Rogers February 17, 1834.
Philo White October 31, 1834.
PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.
Robert J. Ross December 13, 1833.
Robert Fitzhugh December 18, 1833.

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Name. When accepted.
MIDSHIPMEN.
William W. Smith February 1, 1834.
Charles. W. Elliott February 1, 1834.
David Deacon March 10, 1834.
Williams Carter March 15, 1834.
Francis A. N. Macomb April 10, 1834.
Spotswood A. Washington April 17, 1834.
Charles Peirce May 30, 1834.
Thomas W. Melville June 3, 1834.
Robert A. Cassin June 9, 1834.
John H. Roberts June 21, 1834.
Albert Wadsworth September 6, 1834.
George Henderson September 13, 1834.
Abner Baker September 17, 1834.
George J. W. Thayer October 27, 1834.

___________

T.

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States, since the 1st of December, 1833.

Name. Date of dismission.
SURGEON.
John S. Wily October 20, 1834.
ASSISTANT SURGEONS.
Euclid Boreland October 22, 1834.
Cornelius Moore November 21, 1834.
PURSER.
John Smith Punch July 2, 1834.
PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.
William Chandler October 20, 1834.
MIDSHIPMEN.
Rhydon G. Moore February 28, 1834.
Carter B. Beverly June 16, 1834.
Samuel Garrison October 20, 1834.

 

[END]
Published:Wed May 18 12:31:02 EDT 2016