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Going back to civilian life : Facts you should know about your rights and your obligations

U.S. Office of Armed Forces Information and Education

1956 edition


<p>Going back to civilian life: facts you should know about your rights and your obligations</p>

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DEPARTMENTS OF THE ARMY,

THE NAVY, THE AIR FORCE, AND THE TREASURY

WASHINGTON 25, D.C., 4 December 1956

DA Pamphlet 21-4/ NAVPERS 1585C/AF Pamphlet 34-4-2/ NAVMC 1072/ CG 142 is published for the use of all concerned.

[AG 461  (23 Mar. 56)]

BY ORDER OF THE SECRETARIES OF THE ARMY, THE NAVY, THE AIR FORCE, AND THE TREASURY: 

 

Official:

        JOHN A. KLEIN                                                  MAXWELL D. TAYLOR

Major General, United States, Army                         General, United States Army,

        The Adjutant General                                                   Chief of Staff

 

OFFICIAL:

        G.L. RUSSELL,                                                    J.L. HOLLOWAY, JR.,

Vice Admiral, United States Navy                         Vice Admiral, United States Navy,

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations,                             Chief of Naval Personnel,

            (Administration).

 

OFFICIAL:

        E.E. TORO                                                            N.F TWINING,

Colonel, United States Air Force,                  Chief of Staff, United States Air Force.

        Air Adjutant General

 

OFFICIAL:

        ROBT. E. HOGABOOM,                                       R. McC. Pate,

Major General, U.S. Marine Corps                            General, U.S Marine Corps

        Deputy Chief, Office of Personnel                 Commandant of the Marine Corps

 

OFFICIAL:

        WILLIAM W. KENNER,                                       ALFORD C. RICHMOND,

Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard                                Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard.

        Chief, Office of Personnel.

 

Distribution:

Army, Navy and Marine Corps:

For issue on requisition on the basis of one copy for each person being separated from the service.

Air Force:

    Zone of Interior:

Headquarters USAF                                                                                                  

800        

Major Air Command

  15

Numbered Air Forces

  10

Air Divisions

    5

Bases

  75

             (Bases and other separation activities will requisition additional copies of this pamphlet for issue    to each separate at time of separation.  Obtain through publication channels.)

 

 

Preface

    This publication is designed for the information of men and women of the Armed Forces at the time of separation from active services as they face the problems of readjustment to civilian life. It does not have the force law, but it explains the principal right, benefits, and privileges to which veterans, their dependents, and their survivors may be entitled because of the veteran’s service. It lists the governmental agencies that administer the benefits and directs attention to the principal private organizations that are authorized to assist veterans to avail themselves of the benefits. In addition it points some of the important obligations, such as the Reserve obligation, that still devolve upon veterans after separation.

    I recommended that every person leaving the Services read pamphlet carefully, at the time of separation, and retain it as a valuable source of information to which reference may be made as the occasion arises.

 

[C.E. Wilson]

Secretary of Defense

 

 

iii

 

 

Why This Pamphlet?

This pamphlet will tell you about

        1. The right, benefits and privileges to which the law may entitle you as a veteran:

        2. The right, benefits and privileges to which your dependents or survivors may be entitled;

        3. Steps you should take to obtain them and to protect yourself against losing them.

The pamphlet will also point out

        4. Some obligations and responsibilities that will rest upon you after separation;

        5. Steps you should take to fulfill them.

    Most of the pamphlet will be devoted to right and benefits. Since all of these will require considerable interpretation, the pamphlet cannot cover all aspects of each benefit but will outline the principal provisions. Keep in mind that any application you make, either at separation of thereafter, will require determination by the Government agency concerned. The agency’s action will be based on the facts in each case and under the then current interpretation of the law or laws governing the subject. For more detailed information or assistance, go to one of the agencies listed on page 2 or write to one of the addresses listed on pages 25, 26, and 27.

CONTENTS

  Page   Page
Preface                                                    iii     CHAPTER THREE. SURVIVORS' RIGHTS AND BENEFITS --continued  
Why This Pamphlet? iv      Educaation for War Orphans  19
CHAPTER ONE. INTRODUCTION        Civil Service Preference  20
     Things To Do I      Social Security Benefits  20
     Important Documents To Be Saved 1      Homestead Preference  20

     Agencies That Will Help You With

     Your Problems

2      Burial in a National Cemetery  20
CHAPTER TWO. VETERANS' RIGHTS AND BENEFITS  

     Loan Guaranty Benefits for 

     Unremarried Widows

 20
    Mustering-Out Payments 3 CHAPTER FOUR. ADVISE AND COUNSEL  

     Employment, Reemployment, and

     Unemployment

4      The Veterans Administration  21
   Government Life Insurance 6

     State and Local Agencies Concerned

     With Veterans' Affairs

 21
     Education and Training 7      Private Organizations  21
     Loans 8      Legal Assistance  21
     Disability Benefits Other Than Insurance 10      Special Assistance for Navy Separatees  22
     Retirement 12 CHAPTER FIVE. OBLIGATIONS AFTER SEPARATION  
     Social Security Credits 13      Your Reserve Obligations  23
     Other Benefits 14      Selective Service Obligations  23
CHAPTER THREE. SURVIVORS RIGHTS AND BENEFITS        Citizenship Obligations  24
     Reimbursement of Burial Expenses 18 DEADLINES FOR VETERANS' BENEFITS  24

     Mustering-Out Payments, Period of Korean

     Conflict

18 WHERE TO WRITE OR GO  25
       
     Government Life Insurance Payments 18    

     Indemnity Compensation for Service-

     Connected Death

18    
     Pension for Non-Service Connected Death 19    
 

The pamphlet supersedes DA Pamphlet 21-4, NAVPERS 15855B, AF Pamphlet 34-4-2, NAVMC 1072, CG 142, 4 February 1955-

 

CHAPTER ONE

INTRODUCTION

 

THINGS TO DO

 

    I.  Things to do immediately or as soon as possible:

    a.  At time of relief from active duty and before leaving the military installation, consult the local Service Transportation Officer if you have household goods to be shipped. (See par. I, page 14.)

    b.  Have your DD Form 214 (Armed Forces of the United States Report of Transfer or Discharge) recorded by your country recorder. There is no need to have Photostat copies made at time of separation since County Veterans’ Service Officers and the Register of Deeds in the most states provide certified copies for veterans on request without cost. Put original (and other important papers) in a safe place.

    c.  Apply for reemployment if you intend to seek your old job. (See page 4.)

    d. If you are eligible, arrange to apply for new insurance or to continue, resume, or convert your old Government life insurance and to make payments of premium. File claim for disability insurance benefits if you are totally or totally permanently disabled.

    e.  Apply for disability compensation if you intend to and have not already done so. Your medical record are readily available now, but to locate them later may require considerable time and letter writing. (See page 10.)

    f.  If you have availed yourself of the protection of the Soldiers and Soldiers' Civil Relief Act during your service, find out what financial or legal adjustments you must make now. (See page 21, under Legal Assistance.)

    g.  Decide what use, if any want to make of the provisions of the Veterans’ Readjustment Assistant Act of 1952 (the Korean GI Bill of Rights) or the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944 (GI Bill of Rights).  (See pages 7 and 8.)

    h. Look into the Reserve programs of your Service. (See page 23.)

     i.  Register, if required, for Selective Service.  (See page 23.)

     2. Things to do on a continuing basis:

    a.  Familiarize yourself with all deadlines that affect you, and meet those deadlines. (See page 24.)

    b.  Keep up payments on your Government insurance and school fees or loans under the GI Bill.  (See pages 6 to 9.)

    c.  Whenever you change your address, notify your Selective Service Board and any other Government agencies which hold your records or administer any benefits for which you have applied. If you were in the Navy, notify the Commandant of the District to which you have moved.

    d. Carry out, to the letter, any instruction or directions from Government agencies from which you are receiving benefits; otherwise you may prejudice your benefits.

    e. Whenever there is a change in the size of your dependent family notify any agency from which you are receiving a monetary benefit. You may be entitled to increased allowances for additional dependents, and you may be overpaid if you fail to report a decrease in the number of your dependents and required to refund the overpayment.

    f. Whenever there is need for employment assistance, register at your local employment office.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS TO BE SAVED

    1.  The following documents pertaining to your service should be kept in a safe place, such as a steel strong-box, the location of which is known to your next-of-kin:

    a. Original copy of DD Form 214.

    This form is a concise account of your service, including the character of discharge. Usually a Photostat or certified copy of this form is required as evidence of eligibility for veteran’s benefits. It may also help in your contacts with the employers and job counselors.

    b.  Original copy of Certificate of Discharge.

    This form attests to the character of your service and is acceptable as evidence of eligibility for certain benefits. A Dishonorable Discharge disqualifies you for most veterans’ benefits based on that period of service.

    c. Certificate Of Service (DD Form 217A or 217 CG).

    This form is issued, instead of a Certificate of Discharge, to a person who is transferred to a Reserve component (instead of being discharged) because of Reserve obligations under the Universal Military Training and Service Act, as amended.

    d. This pamphlet, together with descriptive material on the Reserve program and other material covering your fights, benefits, and obligations.

    e. All Government insurance policies.

1

 

    f. Certificate of eligibility for GI loan benefits.

    g.  A record of premium payments on Government insurance policies. (On 1 August 1952 the Veterans Administration stopped sending premium receipts.)

    h.  A record of your “C” (Claim) number if you have at any time claimed a benefits from the Veterans Administration, and all correspondence from the Veterans Administration.

    i.  Orders to and release from active duty.

    j.  Warrants, commissions, diplomas, citations, commendations, letters of appreciation, etc.

    2. Papers such as the following should be kept available for ready reference and as reminders:

        a. Notices of insurance premiums due.

        b. Notices of due dates of payments of GI loans

AGENCIES THAT WILL HELP YOU WITH YOUR PROBLEMS

    Among agencies generally available and authorized to assist veterans in their readjustments problems are---

    1.  Offices of the Veterans Administration

    2.  Offices of the American Red Cross

     3.  Offices of Veteran’s Service Organization

    4.  Reserve Organizations

    5.  State Employment Offices

    6.  Field offices of the Bureau of Veteran’s Reemployment Right (BVRR), United States Department of Labor. (Locate BVRR Field Representatives through your local State Employment Office.)

    7. For Navy veterans, District Civil Readjustments Officers in appropriate Naval Districts.

    The Veterans Administration, which administers the majority of veteran’s benefits and determines the eligibility of the veteran claimant, extends at all times the facilities of its offices for advice and counsel on such matters.

    A veteran will seldom need a lawyer to collect a Government benefit to which is entitled.

2

 

CHAPTER TWO

VETERANS' RIGHTS AND BENEFITS

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

A.  MUSTERING-OUT PAYMENTS

1. MUSTERING-OUT PAY-KOREAN CONFLICT

    (Public Law 550, 82d Congress, Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952.) Administered by the Services.

    Benefits.  a. $100 to eligible veterans who have served less than 60 days;

      b. $200 to eligible veterans who have served for 60 days or more, with no part of that service outside the continental limits of the United States or in Alaska. 

    c.  $300 to eligible veterans who have served for 60 days or more, with no part of that service outside the continental limits of the United States or in Alaska;

Eligibility.     a. Restricted to personnel below the grade of major or lieutenant commander.

       b. Discharge or release must be under honorable conditions after active service during any part of the Korean conflict period (on or after 17 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955.)

      c.  Persons NOT eligible:

        (1)  Veterans discharged under conditions other than honorable.

         (2)  Veterans separated on their own request on accept employment, IF they have not served outside the continental limits of the United States or in Alaska.

        (3)  Those transferred to the retired list with retired pay or to a similar status (unless retired for physical disability or having received severance pay by reason of physical disability as provided under Title IV of the Center Compensation Act of 1949).

        (4)  Member of the Armed Forces whose total period of service has been as a cadet in one of the Service academies, or in a preparatory school after nomination for admission to one of the Service academies, or in a civilian institution.

        (5) Any member of the Armed Forces discharged for the purpose of entering one of the Service academies.

        (6) Any person ordered to active service for a period of less than 60 days or for the sole purpose of training duty or a physical examination.

Action Required-- Payment is made automatically by the Service involved in the case of those separated on or after 16 July 1952. The separate receives $100 on the date of his separation or release from active duty. If eligible for the maximum amount of $300, the additional amounts will be paid in two subsequent monthly installments of $100 each.  If eligible for $200, the additional amount will be paid in one monthly installment of $100. 

    Deadline.   a. No deadline has been established for members separated on or after 16 July 1952.

    b.  Those who were separated between 27 June 1950 and 15 July 1952 (inclusive) and, who have not received mustering-out pay based on service during the Korean conflict, had until 16 July 1956 to file application for its payment. That deadline has passed and no such applications will now be accepted by the Services. 

Other Facts of Importance.    a.  Receipt of mustering-out pay as a result of previous separation from a period of World War II (Public Law 225,78th Congress) service does not bar the individual for Korean service mustering-out pay. However, persons who have not been previously separated from World War II service (service entered into prior to 1 July1947), while eligible for both World War and Korean mustering-out pay, may not receive both concurrently but must elect which one they desire.  (Example: If the individual had overseas service during World War II period and only domestic service during the Korean period, he would naturally elect to receive the earlier mustering-out pay benefit since it would entitle him to the maximum $300 allowance.)

    b. In case the separate dies before the entire amount of mustering-out pay has been paid, the remainder will be paid immediately to next-of-kin survivors upon application.

    c. Receipt of mustering-out pay bars has the individual from unemployment compensation for the first 30, 60, or 90 days (depending upon amount received, $100, $200, or $300) following separation. 

2. MUSTERING-OUT PAY--WORLD WAR II

    (Public Law 225, 78th Congress, as amended.) Administered by the Services.

    Benefits.  a.  $100 to eligible veterans who have served less than 60 days;

    b. $200 to eligible veterans who have served 60 days or more but not outside continental limits of the United States;

    c. $300 to eligible  veterans who have served 60 days or more with some part of such service outside continental limits of the United States. 

Eligibility.   a. Restricted to personnel below the grade of major or lieutenant commander; certain other exceptions.

    b. Discharge or release must be under honorable conditions.

    c. Persons entering upon active service on or after 1 July 1947 are NOT eligible under this Act.

3

 

Action Required-- In general, payments is automatic, beginning with date of separation.

Deadline- None

Other Facts of Importance- Those eligible for the both World War II and Korean GI Bill mustering-out pay, and who have not received either, cannot receive them concurrently, but must elect under which bill they will receive the payment.  (For details, see "Other Facts of Importance" under MUSTERING-OUT PAY-KOREAN CONFLICT, above.)

B. EMPLOYMENT, REEMPLOYMENT, AND UNEMPLOYMENT

1.  REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS

    (Administered by the Bureau of Veterans’ Reemployment Rights, US Department of Labor, cooperating with State Employment Offices, with respect to private employment, and by the US Civil Service Commission, with respect to Federal employment.)

    Benefit- Restoration to former job with the US Government or in private employment, or to a job of like seniority status and pay (unless, in case of private employment, circumstances have so changed as to make such restoration impossible it unreasonable.)

    Eligibility.   a. Veteran must have left an other than temporary job to enter active service in the Armed Forces and is limited to 4 years in any service entered upon after 24 June 1948, unless involuntarily retained.

    b. Must have completed such service satisfactorily.

    c. Must be qualified to perform duties of former job, unless disability resulting from service renders veteran incapable of performing duties of old job.  (See d under Other Facts of Importance below.)

    Action Required-- Veteran must apply to former employer for reinstatement.

    Deadline.   a. In general, veteran must apply to former employer within 90 days after date of separation from active service (or within 90 days after release from hospitalization which has continued, after discharge, for not more than a year.)

    b. Reservist who has performed short terms of training duty must apply within 30 days after date of release from such training duty.

    c. Rejected enlistee or inductee must apply within 30 days after date of rejection.

    d. Reservists performing duty for 6 months under the Reserve Forces Act of 1955 must apply within 60 days after release from duty or release from hospitalization which has continued after discharge for not more than 6 months.

    Other Facts of Importance.   a.   The Federal law does not give you the right to reemployment by a State government or political subdivision thereof (city, county, school district, etc.). However, the Federal law does declare it to be the sense of Congress that qualified veterans should be so reemployed, and many States have passed laws giving veterans reemployment rights to State jobs.

    b. You cannot be discharged from your old job within 1 year after resuming work, except for a legitimate cause.

    c. Reservists performing duty under the Reserve Forces Act of 1955 may not be discharge within 6 months after reinstatement except for justifiable cause.

    d.  If a service-incurred disability makes you unable to perform the duties required by your old job, Federal law requires that you be given a job that you can handle, with seniority status and pay like that of your former job--or as nearly do as possible.

    e. If a misunderstanding arises between you and your former employer when you apply for your old job in private industry, consult the nearest local office of your State Employment for Information about assistance available to you through the Bureau of Veterans’ Reemployment Right, Department of Labor; or make direct contact with a field representative of the Bureau. He will look into your problem and if you appear to have a just claim under law, he will negotiate with your employer for an amicable settlement of your claim. If his efforts fail, he will, on your written request, help you submit your case to the appropriate United States Attorney. If the United States Attorney believes that you have a valid claim, he will file suit in court on your behalf, without cost to you.

    f. if you fail to secure proper restoration to your old job in the Federal Government, apply immediately to the nearest office of the Civil Service Commission for advice and assistance in securing your rights.

    g.  If you do not intend to apply for your old job, it would be well for you to inform your former employer of that fact promptly. You should also consider returning to your old job while you have the right to it, a new job is located.

2.  JOB-FINDING ASSISTANCE

    (Administered by local offices of State Employment Services in cooperation with the Veteran’ Employment Service.)

    Benefit-- Job counseling and placement service are furnished to help veterans choose-- and-- new jobs. This assistance includes preference in referral to employment for veterans; special preference in referral for disabled veterans; specialized assistance, such as employment counseling, and testing when needed.

    Eligibility.   A.  Active service in time of war.

    b. Discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. Ability to work.

    Action Required- Application to local office. Present DD Form 214, together with Social Security card.

    Deadline- None

    Other Facts of Importance.  a.  Veterans’ Employment Representative is on duty in each local employment office.

    b. A veteran with a service-connected disability for which he is receiving compensation is given preference over other applicants, including nondisabled veterans.

    c. In making job plans, veterans should consider opportunities for civilian employment offered by the Armed Services, since the same skills and knowledge acquired in military service may qualify the processor for a civilian job at a military installation.

4

    d. Veterans who are graduates of colleges or technical schools and who wish employment in fields of their training may also contact the placement bureaus of their schools.

3. CIVIL SERVICE PREFERENCE

    (Administered by Federal, State, or municipal Civil Service Commission.)

Benefits.  a.   Additional points in Federal job examinations (to points to eligible veteran with service-connected disability; 5 points to eligible nondisabled veteran). 

    b. Waiver of age, height, and weight requirements in most instances.

    c. Restriction of examination for positions as guard, elevator operator, messenger, and custodian to veterans as long as veteran applicants are available.

    d. Crediting of time spent in military service toward experience required for advancement in position of kind held before service.

    e. Precedence on registers. (See a under Other Facts of Importance, below.)

    f. Review of Civil Service Commission of agency’s reason for passing over veteran and selecting nonveteran.

    g. Exemption from law prohibiting Government employment to more than 2 members of a family.

    h. Preference for retention when a reduction in force takes place.

    i. Written notification of reasons for discharge, suspension, etc., and right of appeal to Civil Service Commission.

    Eligiblility--- 5 points preference:

    a.   Active service in time of war, in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign badge has been authorized, or during the period from 28 April 1952 through 1 July 1955.

    b.  Discharge or release under honorable conditions.

    10-point preference:

    a.  Active wartime or peacetime service.

    b.  Purple Heart or the present existence of a service connected disability: OR receipt of compensation, disability retirement benefits or pension.

    c.  Discharge or release under honorable conditions.

    Action Required-5 point preference:

    a.  Apply for Civil Service examination.

    b.  Make required score on examination.

    10-point preference:

    Same as above, and file preference claim. Enclose DD Form 214 and proof disability.

    Deadline-None

    Other Facts of Importance.   a.   Veterans with 10-point preference and with compensation service-connected disability go to the top of the list on Civil Service resisters, ahead of all others (except for positions in the professional and scientific services in grade 9 above). All other 10-point veterans and those with 5-point preference are placed on the register ahead of nonpreference edibles who made the same total score.

    b. In some cases, wives, mothers, and widows of disabled veterans and widows and mothers of deceased veterans are entitled to 10-point Civil Service preference.  (See chapter three, page 20.)

    c. Federal Civil Service secretaries, from whom information about Federal jobs may be obtained, are located in all first- and second-class post offices.

    d. Many cities and States have followed the Federal pattern in providing preference benefits for returning service personnel. In such cases the State Employment Service will have the details.

4. UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION--KOREAN CONFLICT

    (Title IV of the Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, Public Law 550-82nd Congress.) Administered by the United States Department of Labor through the Unemployment Compensation agencies of the various States.

    Benefit-$26 for each week of unemployment occurring after 14 October 1952, with a maximum benefit of $676.

    Eligibility.   a.   at least 90 days of active service (less if discharged for actual service-incurred injury or disability), some part of which must have taken place after 26 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955.

    b.  Separation under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c.  Unemployment occurring after discharge.

    d.  Any other conditions of edibility prescribed by State of veteran’s residence.

    e.  A veteran is NOT edible for unemployment compensation under this law-

        (1)   While receiving payments from the Veterans Administration in connection with education or training under the Korean or World War II GI Bill or under the Vocational Rehabilitation Act.

        (2)   While eligible for any other form of Federal or State unemployment compensation payments of $26 or more a week.

    Action Required- Apply at nearest office of your State Employment. Carry DD Form 214 or other separation paper establishing (1) character of separation and (2) length and dates of active service. Also have your Social Security card and a record of your of your employment both before and after discharge.

    Deadline—3 years from the date of discharge; in no event after 31 January 1960.

    Other Facts of Importance.   a.   Benefits will not be paid for weeks of unemployment completed within (1) 90 days after discharge if the veteran is eligible for $300 mustering-out pay, (2) 60 days after discharge if the veteran is eligible for $200, and (3) 30 days after discharge if the veteran is eligible for $100.

    b. Benefits will not be paid for any period during which the veteran is pursuing a program of education or training and receiving an education or training allowance or subsistence allowance from the Veterans Administration.

    c. A veteran who is eligible to receive benefits under any State or other Federal unemployment compensation law will receive only the difference between that amount and $26 weekly.

    d. Veterans to be eligible for payments must comply with

5

the requirements of the State unemployment compensation law. State laws generally require you to be registered for work with the State Employment Service, to file a claim, to be able to work, and to be available for work. State laws also carry disqualifications for such reasons as voluntarily quitting a job without good cause, discharge for misconduct, refusal of suitable work, and participation in a labor dispute.

    e. For weeks of less than full time work, the amounts of benefits will be determined by the provisions of the applicable State law.

C. GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE

Certain veterans are eligible to keep the protection of low-cost Government life insurance. If you are one of them, the importance of retaining this protection cannot be overemphasized.

1.  What to do

    For Government life insurance purposes, those being separated from active service on or after 1 January 1957 will fall into one of the 10 groups listed below. Before being separated you should determine the group into which you fall and, if you have or are entitled to have Government life insurance, you should consider the action indicated. For complete details, see your Insurance Officer or visit the nearest Veterans Administration Office.

    Group A. Those who have never had National Service Life Insurance (NSLI) or U.S. Government Life Insurance (USGLI), and who do not have service-connected disability.

    Action Required—None. Persons who fall into this group are not eligible to purchase Government life insurance.

    Group B. Those who have never had NSLI or USGLI insurance, and who do not have a service-connected disability.

    Action Required—Separated personnel who have a service-connected disability, but who are otherwise in good health, may apply to the Veterans Administration for NSLI within 1 year after the date the service-connected disability is determined by the Veterans Administration. A physical examination report and payment of the necessary premium are required.

    Group C. Those who had permanent-type NSLI or USGLI policies and who, while in in active service, surrendered them for cash on or after 25 April 1951 and before 1 January 1957 in order to take advantage of the free coverage under the Servicemen’s Indemnity Acts of 1951.

    Action Required. Persons in this group may apply to the Veterans Administration, without a physical examination, to reinstate or replace their insurance. This action may be taken at any time while in active service or within 120 days thereafter.

    Group D. Those who had term insurance ( the term of which expired while they were in active service after 25 April 1951, or within 120 days after separation from such service, but in either case before 1 January 1957), and who did not apply to replace this insurance before 1 January 1957.

    Action Required- Persons in this group may apply to the VA, with a physical examination, to replace their insurance at any time while continuing in active service or within 120 days thereafter.

    Group E. Those who have permanent-type NSLI or USGLI upon which they applied for an in service waiver of the pure insurance risk portion of premium payments, and who have not requested termination of the wavier.

    Action Required--Persons in this group may exercise any one of 3 options:

    (1)   They may request termination of the waiver at any time while in active service or within 120 days thereafter, and begin payment of full premiums.

    (2)   They may request, at any time while in active service or within 120 days thereafter, termination of the wavier and stop payment of premiums. NOTE: This action will cause the insurance to lapse.

    (3)    They may continue the waiver as long as they are in active service and for 120 days thereafter. NOTE: If the insured dies on or after 1 May 1957, and while an in-service waiver is in effect, his eligible survivors will not be entitled to indemnity compensation, but will be entitled to the old form of death compensation which, in some cases, may be lower than the new benefits.

    Group F. Those who had term insurance under in service waiver of premium payments, and who have not requested termination of the waiver.

    Action Required--Persons in this group may exercise any one of the 3 options listed above under “Group E Action.”

    Group G. Those who continued regular premium payment on NSLI or USGLI insurance without applying for in-service wavier or for a cash surrender.

    Action Required--Persons in this group should continue regular premium payments after separation in order to keep their insurance.

    Group H. Those who had NSLI or USGLI insurance under in-service wavier and who have requested termination of the waiver and resumed payment of full premiums.

    Action Required--Same as that listed under “Group G Action.”

    Group I. Those who picked up cash-surrendered or expired NSLI or USGLI insurance before 1 January 1957, and who have since continued of full premiums.

    Action Required--Same as that listed under “Group G Action”.

    Group J. Those whose NSLI or USGLI insurance has lapsed for nonpayment of premiums.

    Action Required--Contact the nearest Veterans Administration Office immediately to obtain reinstatement requirements and information.

2. TOTAL DISABILITY INSURANCE BENEFITS

Special benefits, including wavier of premiums, are possible because of total disability under the NSLI Act, as 

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amended, or because of total permanent disability under the World War Veterans Act, 1924.

    If you fall in GROUP B or C and are totally disabled and apply for insurance, you may file claim for wavier of premiums if your total disability continues for 6 more consecutive months after the date of the application of the effective date of such insurance, whichever is later. Wavier of premiums will not be denied to the ground that the service connected disability became total prior to the effective date of such insurance.

    If you fall in GROUP B,C,E,F,G,H,or I and (1) have NSGLI, and have been totally disabled for 6  or more consecutive months, you may file claim for waiver of premiums or for payment of monthly income benefits, if your contract includes a total disability income payments, or (2) have USGLI and are totally and permanently disabled, you may file claim for monthly income payments. If your USGLI contract includes a total disability provision and you have been totally disabled for 4 months or more consecutive months, you may file claim for the special monthly benefits payable under that provision.

    If you fall into GROUP C or the portion of GROUP 1 which picked up surrendered insurance, and apply or have applied for reinstatement or replacement of your permanent plan insurance and (1) if you have NSLI and are totally disabled, you may file claim when your total disability has continued for 6 or more consecutive months on order that fits may be determined (wavier of premiums and total disability income benefits will not be denied on the ground that total disability commenced prior to issue or reinstatement of such insurance), or (2) if you have USGLI and are totally and permanently disabled, you may file claim for payment of monthly benefits. Claims for total disability benefits under NSGLI should be made on VA Form 9-357, if claim is filed at time of separation and forwarded to district office for the area covering your home address. Claims for total permanent disability income benfits under USGLI should be made on VA Form 9-579, and claims for total disability income benefits under the total disability income provision for which an extra premium is being paid under USGLI should be made on VA Form 9-579c and forwarded to the Veterans Administration Insurance Center, Munitions Buildings, Washington 25, D.C.

3.  OTHER FACTS OF IMPORTANCE

    a.   Amount of Insurance Authorized- Government life insurance, NSLI and/ or USGLI is issued in amounts from $1,000 to $10,000 in multiples of $50. No person may carry more than $10,000 of Government insurance at any one time.

    b.  Payment of Premiums After Separation Form Active Service- After separation from active service it becomes the responsibility of the insured to make timely payments of insurance premiums by direct remittance, whether a notice is received or not.

    Separated personnel in any of the categories shown in Group B through J who must commence or continue payments after separation should make such remittances payable to the Veterans Administration. A statement should be included showing the date of separation, service number, mailing address for insurance purposes, and policy number.

    Applications and remittance in connection with NSLI should be mailed to the Veterans Administration district office of jurisdiction. For address of district offices, see address list below.

    Applications and remittances for those persons who maintain mailing address for insurance purposes in foreign countries should be mailed to Veterans Administration Insurance Center, Munitions Building, Washington 25, D.C.

    Applications and remittances in connection with USGLI should be mailed to be mailed to the Veterans Administration Insurance Center, Munitions Building, Washington 25, D.C.

    c.  Information Regarding Government Insurance- Detailed information regarding Government life insurance is contained in VA Pamphlet 9-3, “National Service Life Insurance,” and VA Pamphlet 9-1, “U.S Government Life Insurance.” SEPARATED PERSONNEL SHOULD CONTRACT THE NEAREST VETERANS ADMINISTRATION OFFICE IMMEDIATELY AFTER SEPARATION FOR ASSISTANCE IN DETERMINING THE PROPER COURSE OF ACTION.

    d. The address of the three District Offices and the States they serve and of the Veterans Administration Insurance center are as follows:

List of VA District Offices

    Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado- Area served; Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Mississippi, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Wyoming, Territory of Hawaii.

    P.O. Box 8079, Philadelphia I, Pa. –Area served: Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands.

    Ft. Snelling, St. Paul II, Minnesota- Area served; Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Alaska, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, Wisconsin. 

Veterans Administration Insurance Center

Munitions Building, Washington 25, D.C.

D. EDUCATION AND TRAINING

1. EDUCATION AND TRAINING--KOREAN CONFLICT

    (Veterans Readjust Assistance Act of 1952.) Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit-Education or training at Government expense equal to one and one-half times your period of active service during the period from 27 June 1950 to the date of first separation after 31 January 1955, up to maximum of 36 months of such education or training.

    Monthly allowances are paid directly to veteran, during attendance, to help meet expenses of subsistence, tuition, fees,

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books, supplies, and equipment. Amounts vary according to number of veteran’s dependents.

    Eligibility.   a.   at least 90 days of active service (less if discharged for service-incurred disability), some part of which must have taken place during the period of Korean conflict.

    b. Discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

    Action Required- Obtain required form from the nearest Veterans Administration Office, which will assist you in the preparation and submission of your application. Application should be supported by a certified or photostatic copy of your DD Form 214.

    Deadline.   a.   For beginning education or training at Government expense: 3 years after discharge or release from active service.

    b.  For completing education or training at Government expense: 8 years after discharge or release from active service OR 31 January 1965, whichever is earlier.

    Other facts of Importance- The period of education or training which a person may be granted under the provisions of the Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, and or the Vocational Rehabilitation Act may not exceed 48 months altogether.

2. EDUCATION AND TRAINING---WORLD WAR II

    The servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, as amended- the law that provided for education and training benefits based upon World War II service- expired 25 July 1956, except for persons who enlisted or reenlisted in the regular establishment during the period 6 October 1945 to 5 October 1946, inclusive.

    For persons in this excepted group, education and training benefits may be provided during a period of 9 years following the termination of any period of enlistment or reenlistment entered into during the specified period- PROVIDED training was or is connected not more than 4 years after the date of such person’s most recent unconditional discharge or release from World War II service.

    If you believe you may be eligible for education or training as a result of World War II service, visit your nearest Veterans Administration Office for details.

Monthly Education and Training Allowances

Under the Veterans' Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952

  For education or training in an educational institution For full-time program of institutional courses with strictly supplemental on-the-job training. For apprentice or other on-the-job training1 For institutional on-farming training2 For flight training
  Full time 3/4 time 1/2 time        

Veterans with No Dependent

 

Veterans with One Dependent

 

 

Veteran with More Than One Dependent.            

 $110

 

 

 135

 

 

 

 

 160

 $80

 

 

 100

 

 

 

 

 120

 

 

$50 

 

 

 

 60

 

 

 

 

 80

 

 

      

 $90

 

 

110

 

 

 

 

130

 $70

 

 

 85

 

 

 

105

 $95

 

 

 110

 

 

 

130

75 percent of the established charge for similarly circumstanced nonveterans.

1Subject to reduction at end of each 4 months as training progresses and to ceiling of $310 per month on combined allowance and training wage.

2Subject to reduction at end of the first 12 months and at the end of each subsequent 4-month period.

E. LOANS

1. GOVERNMENT GUARANTY OF LOANS

    (Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, as amended; Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, as amended.) Administration by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- The Veterans Administration guarantees payment of specified portions of loans to purchase or construct a home, to purchase a farm or a business, to buy equipment and machinery to be used in farming or business operations, to make repairs on a building, or to obtain working capital for a business or a profession. The Maximum guaranty is 60 percent of a loan on residential property (guaranty not to exceed $7,500); 50 percent of a loan on nonresidential real-estate (guaranty not to exceed $4,000); 50 percent of a non-real –estate loan (guaranty not to exceed $2,000).

    Under certain conditions, in areas where private capital at a 4 ½ percent interest rate is unavailable, the Veterans Administration is authorized to make direct home or farm house loans, not exceeding $10,000 each, until 30 June 1958.

Eligibility.

    Korean conflict:

    a.  90 days active service (less if discharged for service-incurred disability), some part of which must have taken 

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place on or after 27 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955.

    b.  Discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

    Note.  Entitlement based on service since 27 June 1950 cancels any unused entitlement based on World War II service.  Entitlement is also reduced by the amount of World War II benefit used (1) on real property owned by the veteran at the time of application or (2) on World War II loan on which the Veterans Administration Administrator incurred actual liability or loss, unless the Veterans Administration has been paid in full.

World War II:

    Same basic requirement except that some of service must have taken place between 16 September 1940 and 25 July 1947.

    Action Required.   a.  First.   Apply to appropriate Veterans Administration Office for certificate of eligibility. Present original discharge separation papers and complete VA Form 4-1880, which may be obtained from any Veterans Administration Office.

    b. Second.  Negotiate loan with a bank or other lending institution at interest rate of not more than 4 ½ percent. This involves convincing the prospective lender that the risk he takes is sound. Present certificate of eligibility, and lending institution will request an appraisal of property and forward your application for guaranty to the Veterans Administration.

    Deadline.

    Korean conflict:

    Guaranties on the basis of Korean conflict service are available on loans made by 31 January 1965.

    World War II:

    The application for guaranty on the basis of World war II service must be made on or before 25 July 1958. (Exception: Persons enlisting or reenlisting between 6 October 1945 and 5 October 1946 have 10 years after discharge from such enlistment or reenlistment to use their loan guaranty rights).

    Other Facts of Importance.   a.   A person who availed himself of his World War II loan guaranty but has since disposed of the property purchase therewith may be eligible for full loan benefits under the Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952.

    b. Guaranty of a loan to buy an automobile, truck, or tractor may be granted only in cases where such vehicles are necessary in the conduct of the borrower’s business or farm operations.

    c. Generally, real estate loans have maximum permissible repayment periods of 30 years (except hat farm realty loans must be paid in full in more than 40 years). In the case of non real-estate loans, maturity may not exceed 10 years.

    d. In accordance with the Veterans Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, entitlement to loan benefits derived from World War II service is subject to certain modifications in cases where the veteran has served in the active military service of the United States on or after 27 June 1950. Entitlement derived from service on or after 27 June 1950 (1) cancels all unused World War II entitlement, and (2) is reduced under certain conditions by the World War II entitlement previously used to obtain direct, guaranteed or insured loans.

2. FARM LOAN BENEFITS

    Administered by the Farmers Home Administration, United States Department of Agriculture.

    Benefit- Preferential consideration of applications for loans for the following purposes: to acquire livestock and equipment and to pay other farm operating and family subsistence cost; to purchase, improve, develop, or enlarge family-type farms; or to improve or establish approved soil and water practices. (Under certain conditions, a veteran with a pensionable disability may obtain a loan to acquire or improve a farm unit or less than family-type size.)

    Eligibility.   a.  Status as veteran of any war between the United States and any other nation.

    b. Discharge or release from active service under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. Meet other general eligibility requirements.

    Action Required- Veterans should file applications at Farmers Home Administration country offices, generally located in county seat towns throughout the United States. For further information regarding location of county offices, see local banks, County Agent, or other agricultural agencies.

    Deadline- None.

3.  GUARANTY OF PREMIUMS ON COMMERCIAL LIFE INSURANCE POLICIES

    (Soldiers and Sailor’s Civil Relief Act of 1940, as amended and extended.) Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Guaranty, upon application, of premiums and interest on commercial life insurance policies carried by a serviceman or servicewoman (not exceeding $10,000 insurance for any one individual). Guaranty effective for the period of service and for 2 years after the expiration thereof. Any amount paid by the United States becomes a debt due to the United States by the insured and is subject to repayment.

    Eligibility- Any person on active duty with the military or naval forces of the United States is eligible, provided the commercial life insurance was in effect not less than 180 days before the person entered service.

    Action Required- If you made acceptable application for this benefit while in active service, upon discharge you should determine whether or not you desire to continue the commercial insurance. If you desire to continue such insurance, you should resume payment of premiums with the commercial company and make arrangements satisfactory to the company for repayment of the premiums and interest which have been guaranteed by the Veterans Administration, but which are an indebtedness against the policy.

    Deadline.    a. For resumption of payment of premiums: 2 years after discharge.

    b. for repayment of debt to the Government: Any amount paid by the United States becomes a debt due to the United States by the insured, and such amount may be collected by deduction from any amount due to insured by the United States or as otherwise authorized by law.

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F. DISABILITY BENEFITS OTHER THAN INSURANCE

1. COMPENSATION FOR SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITY

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit.   a.  In case of disability incurred during war or during the period 27 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955:

    Monthly rates, according to a degree of disability, from $17 for 10 percent disability to $18 for total disability, with additional amounts for specific conditions (such as $47 for loss of foot, hand, eye, or creative organ). Helplessness, blindness, multiple amputation, ect., carry rates from $279 to $420 per month.

    Additional amounts for wife, children, or dependent parents are payable to veterans 50 percent or more disabled.

    b. In case of disability incurred during peacetime: All rates are 80 percent of the wartime rates for the same disabilities except under certain specified circumstances.

    Eligibility.   a. Disability must result from disease or injury incurred in or aggravated by active military or naval service in line of duty or be presumptively connected therewith by statutory provision.

    b. Discharge must be under other than dishonorable conditions.

    Action Required- Filing of claim and copy of DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None.

    Other Facts of Importance.   a. Compensation is payment made because of disability incurred in or traceable to military or naval service. A pension is a payment made because of disability not traceable to military or naval service.

    b. When you are being processed for separation from active military service for any reason, you should apply for compensation from the Veteran Administration if you have undergone prolonged hospitalization or suffered from wounds, injury, or disease while in service; or if you feel that military service have aggravated a physical defect that you had when you entered the service.  Under present regulations, application should be made on VA Form 8-526e. If you do not apply at the time of separation, you may do so at any time thereafter, using the longer VA Form 8-526. However, if you do intend to file, it is advisable to do so before you leave the service, because your medical records needed to establish service connection will be more easily obtainable and action on your claim by the Veterans Administration will be expedited. Moreover, filing a VA Form 8-526e will in no way delay your separation.

    c. If you claim is filed within 1 year after discharge, the effective date of award will be the day following discharge, if otherwise in order. If claim is made for additional compensation because of dependents in connection with an original application, the veterans is allowed a period 1 year from the date of request within to submit the necessary evidence If the evidence is received within such period, the additional compensation for the dependents will be effective as of the effective date of the claim, provided relationship and dependency existed on such date. Otherwise, increased disability compensation will be effective only from the date of receipt of the evidence showing entitlement.

2. PENSION FOR NON-SERVICE-CONNECTED DISABILITY

    World War, World War II, or Korean conflict, Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- $66.15 per month, increased to $78.75 at age 65 or after continuous receipt of pension for 10 years; for eligible veterans who requires regular aid and attendance, $135.45 per month.

    Eligibility.     a. Permanent and total disability, 90 days or more of active service (unless discharged sooner for disability in line of duty), and discharge under other than dishonorable conditions.

    b. Veterans is NOT eligible if his annual income is over $1,400 and he has no wife or minor children or if his annual income under any circumstance is more than $2,700.

    Action Required- Filling of claim and copy of DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None.

3. VOCATIONAL REHABILTATION

    (Public Law 16, 78th Congress, as amended, and Public Law 894, 81st Congress as amended.) Administered by the Veterans Administration.

Benefits.   a. Advisement and guidance for vocational rehabilitation.

    b. Necessary training expenses and special equipment.

    c. Minimum without subsistence allowance is $65 for a veteran without dependents or $90 for a veteran with dependents. If in full-time institutional training, allowance is $75 for a veteran with no dependents, $105 for a veteran with 1 dependent, and $200 for a veteran with more than 1 dependent. Additional allowances are available depending on veteran’s degree of disability and number of additional dependents.

    Eligibility.   a. Active service, some part of which must have taken place between 16 September 1940 and 25 July 1947 OR between  27 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955.

    b. Discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. At least 10 percent service-connected disability due to service within the specified periods, or retirement from such service because of disability due to service within the specified periods.

    d. A need for vocational training, caused by the disability, to overcome the handicap of such disability.

    e. Receipt of this benefit as the result of World War II service will not bar eligibility for a second period of training if such is needed to overcome the handicap of a compensable service-connected injury, or aggravation of injury, during the Korean conflict period.

    Action Required- Filing claim. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline.   a. For initiating claim and beginning training, none.

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    b. For completing training as follows:

    (1) For the veteran whose service was during the period of the Korean conflict and who was separated prior to 20 August 1954, training must be completed by 20 August 1963.

    (2) For the veterans whose service was during the period of the Koran conflict and who was separated on or after 20 August 1954, training must be completed within 9 years after separation or 9 years after 31 January 1955, whichever is earlier.

    (3) For the veteran whose service was during World War II, training must been completed by 25 July 1956.

    c. If, for certain reason as defined by law, a veteran is prevented from entering or completed training by the deadline dates specified in paragraph b above, these deadline dates may be extended by the Veterans Administration to:

        (1) 20 August 1967 for those in category b (1) above.

        (2) 13 years after date of separation of 13 years after 31 January 1955, whichever is earlier, for those in category b (2) above.

        (3) 25 July 1960 for those in category b (3) above.

4. HOSPITALIZATION

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Care in Veterans Administration and certain other Federal hospitals. Care elsewhere may be authorized by the Veterans Administration for service-connected disabilities only when the aforementioned hospitals are unavailable.

    Eligibility.    a.   Discharge or release under other than dishonorable conditions from active Federal service for disability in line of duty or if in receipt of compensation for service-connected disability.

    b. Discharge or release under other than dishonorable conditions from a period of war service, including the Korean conflict, in cases of non-service-connected disability if there is inability to defray the cost of hospital care and subject to availability of beds.

    c. Retirement from active military service during a period of war or the Korean conflict, on same basis as a discharge veteran.

    d. Permanent or temporary retirement for physical disability when hospitalization is required for a chronic disease.

    Action Required- Apply for admission. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline-None.

    Other Facts of Importance- Excluding emergency admissions, which first preference, veterans are admitted to Veterans Administration hospitals in the following order;

    a. Veterans who require treatment for a service-incurred disability.

    b. Veterans with a service- connected disability who require treatment for a non-service-connected disability.

    c. Veterans without a service-connected disability who require treatment for a non-service-connected disability.

5. DOMICILIARY CARE

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Domiciliary care is designed to provide a “home” for those veterans who have a chronic condition which incapacities them from earning a living and who require minimal medical treatment. Full care, including the medical treatment, in Veterans Administration domiciliary home. Transportation at Government expenses, as a rule, is provided only for the initial admission.

    Eligibility- Same in general as for hospitalization; except that-

    a. Applicant must be incapacitated from earning a living and in peacetime cases have no adequate means of support.

    b. Need for domiciliary care must be medically determined.

    Action Required- Apply for admission. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline-None

6. OUTPATIENT MEDICAL TREATMENT

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

Benefits.   a.  Medical treatment (not requiring hospitalization) at Veterans Administration clinic or by approved private physician in veteran’s home community.

    b. Includes the supplying of medicine, bandages, syringes ect.

    Eligibility- Same in general as for hospitalization except that-

    a. Veteran must need treatment for service-connected disability and have prior Veterans Administration authorization for such treatment.

    b. Retired persons must elect under Public Law 314, 78th Congress, to received disability compensation from the Veterans Administration.

    Action Required- Apply for treatment. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None.  

7. OUTPATIENT DENTAL TREATMENT

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Dental treatment at Veterans Administration clinic or by approved private dentist in veterans’ home community when Veterans Administration clinical facilities are not available.

    Eligibility- Same in general as for hospitalization and outpatient medical treatment except that-

    a. Veteran must need treatment for a service-connected dental condition.

    (1) If the service-connected dental condition is compensable, due to combat wounds or other service trauma, of a former prisoner of war, or of Spanish-American War veteran, such treatment as is deemed necessary will be provided.

    (2) For all other veterans needing treatment for service-connected dental conditions, it must be shown that the condition was in existence at time of discharge or release from active service, an application for treatment must be made before “Deadline” shown below, and treatment will be limited to professionally acceptable one-time completion.

    b. Adjunct dental treatment may be furnished for service-connected physical disability.

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    c. Trainees under Public Law 16, 78th Congress, and Public Law 894, 81st Congress, as amended, may be furnished required dental treatment to prevent interruption of training.

    d. retired persons must elect under Public Law 314, 78th Congress, to receive disability compensation from the Veterans Administration.

    Action Required- Apply for treatment. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None for a(1) above. For a(2) above, application must be filed within 1 year after discharge or release from active service.

8. PROSTHETIC APPLIANCES

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Includes artificial limbs and eyes, braces, trusses, orthopedic shoes, special clothing, crutches, canes, wheelchairs, eyeglasses, hearing aids, ect., and fitting and training in the use of the appliances; also repairs and replacements under certain conditions.

    Eligibility- Same in general as for hospitalization except that-

    a. Veteran must need appliance for a service-connected condition, for a disease or injury for which hospitalization has been authorized, or as an incident of domiciliary care.

    b. Retired persons who suffered loss of a limb or use thereof in line of duty may be furnished artificial limb, stump socks, braces, or similar appliances required by such disability.

    c. Retired persons requiring prosthetic appliances for service-incurred disabilities other than the loss of a limb or the loss of the use thereof must elect to waive a portion of their retired pay to receive disability compensation from the Veterans Administration (Public Law 314, 78th Congress).

    Action Required- make application. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None.

9. SEEING-EYE DOGS, ELECTRONIC AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT FOR THE BLIND

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Seeing-eye or guide dog; expense of training veteran in use of dog and for dog’s medical attention; approved electronic and mechanical equipment.

    Eligibility- a Veteran must be blind and entitled to compensation for service-connected disability;

BUT

    b. Blindness itself need not be service-connected.

    Action Required- Make application. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline-None

10. AUTOMOBILES OR OTHER CONVEYANCES

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Payment by the Veterans Administered of an amount not to exceed $1,600 on purchase price of vehicle or conveyance, including special appliances.

    Eligibility- Loss, or permanent loss of use of, one of both hands or feet, or permanent impairment of vision of both eyes to a prescribed degree, resulting from World War II service or service on or after 27 June 1950 and prior to 1 February 1955.

    Action Required- Make application. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline- Application must be made within 5 years after 20 October 1951, or 5 years after release from active duty if not released until or after 20 October 1951, except where the qualifying disability occurred after separation from active service, in which case application must be within 3 years after occurrence of such disability or within 1 year from the date on which entitlement to compensation for a disability outlined in “Eligibility,” above, is determined.

11. SPECIAL HOUSING

    Administered by the Veterans Administration

    Benefit- Grant up to 50 percent( not to exceed $10,000) of the purchase price or the cost of acquiring a specially adapted housing unit and necessary land therefor.

    Eligibility- Service-connected disability, due to either war or peacetime service, entitling veteran to compensation for permanent disability due to loss, or loss f use of, both lower limbs so as to prevent locomotion without the aid of braces, crutches, canes, or a wheel chair.

    Action Required- make application. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline-None.                                                                                                                    

G. RETIREMENT

1. RETIREMENT FOR LENGTH OF SERVICE OR FOR AGE

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefits. a. Voluntary retirement after 20, 30,or 40 year of service.

    b. Statutory retirement of commissioned officers at age 60, 62, or 64, whichever is applicable for grade in which retired.

    c. Retirement pay for life, varying according to specific law under which retirement is granted, but not exceeding 75 percent of active duty pay.

    Action Required.   a.   For voluntary retirement based on length of service, individual application.

    b. For statutory required based upon age, administered action.

Other Facts of Importance.    a. The voluntary retirement systems of the Army, navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard are not the same. Complete information is available from the services.

    b. Retirement privileges are provided for both Regular and Reserve Armed Forces personnel. Complete information is available from the Services.

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    Retirement Credits for Reserve Service- You may qualify for retirement pay at age 60, through sufficient continued active service and raining as a member of the Reserve to make the equivalent of 20 satisfactory years of service.

    Basically, to qualify for retirement a member of the Reserve must: (1) have attained age 60; (2) be credited with the minimum of 20 years of satisfactory Federal service; (3) have served the last 8 years of qualifying service as a member of a Reserve component; (4) if a member of a Reserve component before 15 August 1945, must have performed active Federal service during some portion of either World War I or World War II. (For this purpose the official periods of these wars are from 6 April 1917 to 11 November 1918 and from 9 September 1940 to 31 December 1946 respectively, all dates inclusive. ) You will be credited with satisfactory Federal service for each year in which you earn a specified number of credits through attendance at Reserve meetings, attendance at drills, completion of extension courses, or extended active duty, including short-period tours of training. 

2. RETIREMENT O SEPARATION FOR DISABILITY

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefits.    a.  Permanent retirement, with payment of a fixed amount monthly for life.

    b. Temporary retirement, with payment of a fixed amount monthly until permanent disposition if case is made.

    c. Discharge or separation.

        (1) With final lump-sum severance pay.

        (2) Without severance pay.

        (3) Without consideration by a Physical Evaluation Board. (Applicable in certain exceptional cases.)

    Eligibility- Retirement or separation for disability requires an administrative order of the Secretary of the appropriate Service, based usually upon the recommendation of a Physical Evaluation Board which has been reviewed by a higher council.

    To be eligible for disability separation or retirement, you must be found unfit to perform duties commensurate with your rank or rating, as a result of physical or mental disability. The nature and the amount of disability separation or retirement benefits are dependent on the extent of your disability (that is, the degree to which it incapacities you) and the circumstances under which it was incurred. Each case must be decided on its own merits. In general, to be eligible for disability retirement or severance pay your disability must have been incurred while on active duty or be aggravated by such duty or be the primate result of the performance of full-time training duty, other full-time duty, or inactive duty training; must not be the result of your willful misconduct or negligence, or incurred during an unauthorized absence; and must be of a nature which either is permanent or may be permanent.

    Action Required- Consideration by a board of medical officers and/ or other boards as required, together with the required review appropriate to the case. Complete information is available from the Services.

    Other Facts of Importance.    a.  Disability retirement pay is (1) monthly basic pay of highest grade satisfactory held, multiplied by 2 ½  percent, multiplied by the number of years of active service, as defined by law; OR (2) basic pay multiplied by percent by disability; BUT in NO case more than 75 percent of basic pay.

    b. Severance pay (paid in a lump sum after less than 20 years of service if disability is adjudged less than 30 percent) is 2 months basic pay the highest grade satisfactory held, for each year of active service, as defined by law, up to 12 years.

    c. In cases considered by a Physical Evaluation Board, the applicant is entitled to appear before the Board in person with or without counsel, or he is entitled to be represented by the Veterans Administration.

    d. In order to assure equal payment for all retired personnel for comparable disabilities, all the service not follow the Standard Schedule of rating Disabilities in current use by the Veterans Administration.

    e. Disability retirement pay must be waived if Veterans Administration compensation is desired instead.

    f. Retired personnel should consult their Services concerning right to hospitalization, outpatient treatment, commissary and exchange privileges to which they may be entitled.

H. SOCIAL SECURITY CREDITS

    Administered by the Social Security Administration, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

    Persons separated from the Armed Forces on or after 1 January 1957 may be eligible for Social Security credits based on their military service, under either or both (1) Gratuitous Social Security Credits, or (2) Contributory Social Security Credits. Persons separated before 1 January 1957 may be eligible for Gratuitous Credits only.

1. GRATUITOUS SOCIAL SECURITY CREDITS

    Benefits- Gratuitous wage credits of $160 per month for certain months of active servicer, applied in determining Old –Age and Survivors Insurance (OSAI) benefits.

    Eligibility.    a.    Active service in the Armed Forces for 90 days or more (unless discharge or released in less than 90 days because of disability or injury incurred or aggravated in line of duty) during the period 16 September 1940 to 31 December 1956, inclusive.

    b. Discharge or release under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. To receive gratuitous wage credits for active service months during the World War II period (16 September 1940 to 24 July 1947, inclusive), it must not have been determined that a periodic benefit is payable by another Federal agency, based in whole or in part on active service during that period.

    d. To received gratuitous wage credits for active service months during the post-World War II period (25 July 1947 to 31 December 1956, inclusive), it must not have been determined that a periodic benefit is payable another Federal agency, based in whole or in part on active service during that period. HOWEVER, if an individual performs active

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duty or active duty for training on or after 1 January 1957, he may receive the gratuitous wage credits for active service months during the period 1 January 1951 to 31 December 1956, inclusive, even though his retired pay from the military is partially based on service between 25 July 1947 and 31December 1956,I inclusive.

    Action Required- Apply to local office of the Social Security Administration. Show Social Security card and DD Form 214.

    Deadline.   a.   None for monthly benefits, but payments are retroactive for 12 months only.

    b. Lump-sum death benefits (except as noted under “social Security Benefits” on page 20, must be claimed within 2 years after the veterans death.

    Other Facts of Importance.    a.   In qualifying for gratuitous wage credits under Eligibility, c and d above, it should be noted that a pension or compensation payable by the Veterans Administration is not considered to be a periodic benefit within the meaning of the law.

    b. For Social Security purposes, retired pay or any other Federal periodic benefit is considered based on the World War II period or post-World War II period if active service in the particular period is directly used in establishing eligibility to receive, or in computing the amount of, retired pay or other Federal benefit.

2. CONTRIBUTORY SOCIAL SECURITY CREDITS

    Effective 1 January 1957, members of the Armed Forces on active duty were brought under Social Security on a contributory basis. Member’s contributions to OSAI are made through payroll deductions.

    Basic pay were credits for active duty or active duty for training on or after 1 January 1957 may be added to gratuitous and /or civilian wage credits (if any) in determining OSAI benefits.

I OTHER BENEFITS

1.  TRANSPORTATION OF HOUSEHOLD GOODS

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefit- Transpiration of household goods from last duty station to home.

    Eligibility- Personnel must be relieved from active duty under honorable conditions.

    Persons Eligible.    a.   members in pay grade E-4 (with over 4 years of service) and above, who (1) are retired for physical disability or placed on the temporary disability retired list, or (2) are retired with pay of discharged with severance pay after at least 8 years of continuous active duty, are entitled to shipment of household goods within the prescribed weight limitations from last permanent duty station or a previous duty station to the home selected.

    b. Members in pay grade E-5 (with over 4 years of service) and above, who are separated from the Service or relieved from active duty, are entitled to shipment of household goods within the prescribed weight limitation from last permanent duty station or previous duty station to the home of record or place from which ordered to active duty; or if the cost is not more than between these paints, shipment may be made from and to any place.

    Action Required- At time of relief from active duty contact local transportation Office relative to forms required and necessary procedures.

    Deadline- Shipment must commence within 1 year after relief from active duty.

2. HOUSING PREFERENCE

    Administered by the local public housing authority.

    Benefits.    a.   Preference in the purchase or rental of Government housing.

    b. Liberal mortgage insurance on cooperative housing.

    Eligibility. a. Active service in the Armed Forces during a period of war or during the period of the Korean conflict.

    b. Discharge or release under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. Eligible must meet local housing authority requirements.

    Action Required.    a. Show DD Form 214 to sales or rental agent.

    b. Contact Public Housing Administration, Washington 25, D.C., if law appears to be violated.

    Deadline-Indefinite

3. HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS)

    Administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior.

    Benefits.     a.   Preference for a period of 90 days over members of the general public in applications for homesteads on withdrawn surveyed public lands being restored to vacant public domain status.

    b. Deduction of term of service (not exceeding 2 years from the 3-years period of residence and cultivation required of a homesteader before he can obtain a land patent.

    Eligibility.   a.  Active service in the Armed Forces for 90 days or more (unless discharged sooner for service-connected disability) between 16 September 1940 and a future date to be set by Presidential proclamation or concurrent resolution of the Congress.

    b. An honorable discharge or discharge under honorable conditions.

    Action Required.    a.  Visit or write local land office (see “Where to Write or Go,” page 25) nearest to lands in which you are interested to determine if any lands are being restored. Obtain full information and instruction on procedure, including lists or maps of public lands if any are available.

    b. Determined by personnel inquiry and inspection whether any of the lands are attractive to you and are capable of profitable farm production. (You must certify to this personal inspection in your application).

    Deadline- To obtain statutory preference, a veteran must file application within the 90 days preference filing period

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specified in the order of restoration. The local land office can advise you on what date this period expires.

    Other Facts of Importance.     a.  The vacant public lands are located mainly in the II Western States (Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and westward) and in Alaska. Most of these lands have long since been passed over as undesirable for homesteads. However, it may be exceptionally possible to locate a tract that would be suitable for farm development. Irrigation development is usually necessary. The responsibility of locating a suitable tract is that of the potential homesteader, but the local land office will assist with office information that is available.

    b. Veteran is assessed a small sum (maximum of $16 for 160 acres) at time of filing application.

4. DESERT LAND ENTRY PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS)

    Administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior.

    Benefits-Preference for a period of 90days over members of the general public in application for desert land entries on withdrawn surveyed public lands being restored to vacant public domain status.

    Eligibility- See under HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS), above.

    Action Required- See under HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS), above

    Deadline-See under HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS), above.

Other facts Importance.     a.  The vacant public lands are located mainly in the II Western States (Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and westward) and in Alaska, and has been held not apply to entries based on irrigation from percolating ground water in the State of Arizona. Most of the vacant public lands have long since passed over as being unsuitable for desert land entry. However, it may be exceptionally possible to locate a tract not exceeding 320 acres that would be capable of reclamation by the use of irrigation water from surface flows or ground water sources. The responsibility of locating a suitable tract is that of the potential entryman but, the local land officer will assist with office information that is available.

    b. Veteran is assessed 25 cents per acre of land at time of filing application and $1.25 per acre, which is the price of the land. The 25 cents is returned if the applications is not allowed.

5. SMALL TRACT PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS) 

    Administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior

    Benefits- Preference for a period of 90 days over member general public in applications for lease or sale of small tracts not exceeding 5acres classified on motion of the Government and in public auction sales of small tracts under certain conditions.

    Eligibility- See under HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS), above.

    Action Required.    a.  Visit or write local land office (see “Where to Write or GO,” Page 25) nearest to lands in which you are interested to determine if any lands are being restored from withdrawal or are being classified for small tract disposal at the motion of the Government. Obtain full information and instructions on procedure, including lists or maps of public lands if any are available.

    b. Determined by personal inquiry and inspection whether any of the lands are attractive to you for a residential, business, or recreation site and are worthy of your personal time and investment in making necessary improvements. (You must certify in a lease application that you have personally inspected that tract or lands within 1 mile of the tract.)

    Deadline- To obtain statutory preference, a veteran must file application with 90 days preference filling period specified in the order of restoration or the small tract classification order. In the case of a public auction sale of small tracts, veteran’s bid must be received before the date and time for closing receipt of bids specified in sale notice. The local land office can advise you on what date the preference period expires.

Other Facts of Importance.    a.  The vacant public lands are located mainly in the II Western States (Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, New Mexico, and westward) and in Alaska. A few lands possibly suitable for small tracts may exist in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Minnesota, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The Bureau of Land Management from the time to time classifies and opens vacant public lands to small tract application or direct public auction sale. Information as to location and character of lands may be obtained from the local land office.

    Caution: The Government does not provide roads, streets, electricity, water, sewers, or other utilities. Private land surveys may be necessary to determine the corners of the tract.

    b. Veteran is assessed a filing fee of $10 for small tract lease application. Advance rental must be paid for 2 or 3 years. Under a lease and sale contract, lands may be purchased after construction of satisfactory improvements upon payment of appraised fair market value of the unimproved land. At public auction sales, land is sold at highest bid, but for not less than appraised fair market value. Where the Bureau of Land Management is satisfied that local planning boards or zoning ordinances are available to insure proper standards of construction and sanitation, direct sales are authorized before improvements are made.

    c. Application may be made by veteran direct to the local land office. Services of an intermediary or broker are not required.

6. HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (RECLAMATION PROJECT LANDS)

     Administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior.

    Benefits.    a.  Preference, for a period of 90 days, over members of general public in application for homesteads on reclamation projects as availability of farm units is announced by public notice.

    b. Reduction in the 3 year period of residence required of

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a homestead before he can obtain a land patent- reduction not to exceed 2 years and to be proportionate to term of service.

    Eligibility- See under HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE (VACANT PUBLIC LANDS), above.

    Action Required- To obtain information on the availability of lands, visit or write the Regional Office, Bureau of Reclamation (See RECLAMATION PROJECT LANDS, “Where to Write or Go.” Page 25) nearest the project area in which you are interested.

    Deadline- Application must be filed within 90 days preference filing period set forth in public notice obtain statutory preference.

    Other Facts of Importance- Irrigable lands located on reclamation projects in 17 Western States are opened from time to time for entry under homestead and reclamation laws. Additional irrigable farm units (principally in the Columbia Basin project in central Washington) are intermittently offered for sale by public announcement. Requirements for purchase of such units differ somewhat from those applicable to homestead entry. Information on such sales is available on request.

7. NATURALIZATION PREFERENCE

    Administered by the Immigration and Naturalization Service, U.S. Department of Justice.

    Benefit- Waiving of certain prerequisites to naturalization, such as waiting period, residence requirements, ect.

    Eligibility.    a. Honorable active service in the Armed Forces during World War I or period from September 1939 to 31 December 1946.

OR

    b. Honorable service in the Armed Forces for a least 3 years during any other period.

    Action Required- File application at the nearest office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, U.S. Department of Justice. If filed at the headquarters of the Service, Washington, 25, D.C., it will be routed to the correct office. Show DD Form 214.

    Deadline.   a.  For filing application based on World War I or the period 1 September 1939 to 31 December 1946 service: none

    b. For filing application based on 3 years’ service; in sufficient time so that petition may be filed within 6 months after discharge in order to qualify for maximum benefits.

    Other Facts of Importance- For further information consult nearest office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service.

8. REVIEW OF DISCHARGE

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefits.    a.  Review of discharge not the result of a general court-martial.

    b. Correction or modification of such discharge and insurance of anew discharge in accord with the facts presented.

    Eligibility- Review is available to any veteran, except if discharge as the result of a general court-martial, who feels that his or her military service warrants a more favorable discharge than that received.

    Action Required- Written application accompanied by the original discharge and supporting statements and affidavits. DD Form 293, Application for Review of Discharge or Separation from the Armed Forces of the United States, is available at Veterans Administration Offices.  (See “Where to Write or Go.” Page 25)

    Deadline- 15 years after 22 June 1944 OR 15 years after discharge whichever is later.

    Other Facts of Importance.    a.  Veteran has right to appear before the Review Board, to present witness, and to be represented by counsel.

    b. Review may also be initiated by the Service.

    c. A deceased veteran’s surviving next-of-kin may file the application.

    d. Review Board considers only whether original discharge was just and fair. Veteran’s conduct or character since the issuance of the original certificate is not considered.

9. CORRECTION OF MILITARY AND NAVAL RECORDS

     Administered by the Services.

    Benefits- Correction of record, sometimes resulting in eligibility for certain benefits from Service, Veterans Administration, or other agencies.

    Eligibility- Judgment of the Service concerned that action is necessary to correct an error or to remove an injustice.

    Action Required- Submit DD Form 149 (Application for Correction of Military or Naval Record), accompanied by statements and affidavits. (See “Where to Write or Go.” Page 25.)

    Deadline- 3 years after discovery of alleged error or injustice.

10. BURIAL IN NATIONAL CEMETERY

    Administered by the Superintendent of National Cemetery in which burial is desired.

    Benefit- No charges for grave site or for services incidental to actual interment, such as opening and closing grave.

Eligibility.    a.  Burial is available to any deceased veteran of wartime or peacetime service whose last discharge was honorable.

    b. Burial is available also to eligible veteran’s wife, husband, widow, widower, minor child, and under certain conditions, unmarried adult children.

    Action Required- Application to Superintendent of the National Cemetery in which burial is desired. Person making application should present veterans; last discharge certificate or DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None

    Other Facts of Importance.     a.  If a veteran’s wife dies before he does, upon his application she may be buried in a National Cemetery. He must state in writing that he intends to be buried by her side.

    b. The funeral director, the Veterans Administration, the Red Cross, or veterans’ organizations will assist survivors of deceased veterans to obtain all authorized benefits.

11. BURIAL FLAGS

    Furnished by the Veterans Administration or at first and second class post offices.

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    Benefits- An American flag, without charge, to drape veteran’s casket and to be presented to next-of-kin after burial. If no next-of kin makes claim for the flag, it may be presented to a friend of the deceased.

    Eligibility.    a.  Service during a period of war or during the period of Korean conflict, OS service of a least one enlistment, OR discharge for disability incurred in the line of duty.

    b. Discharge under conditions other than dishonorable.

    Action Required- Application at any Veterans Administration Office or local post office.

    Deadline-None.

12. HEADSTONE OR GRAVE MARKER

    Furnished by the Quartermaster General, Department of the Army.

    Benefit- Headstone or grave marker without charge.

    Eligibility- Service in the Armed Forces and honorable discharge from last period of service.

    Action Required.     a. If veteran is buried in a national Cemetery, no action required. Headstone will be furnished without application.

    b. If veteran is buried elsewhere, application should be made to Quartermaster General, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C.

Deadline- None.

13. STATE AND LOCAL BENEFITS

    Many States, Territories, and possessions have made some provision for assistance to veterans and their dependents. Among these forms of assistance are: unemployment compensation benefits, employment preference, Civil Service appointment preference, Civil Service retirements, educational opportunities for children of deceased veterans, domiciliary homes for veterans, domiciliary homes for wives and widows, relief of indigent veterans, educational benefits for World War II veterans, hospital benefits in State or county hospital, and land settlement benefits.

    Not all of the benefits are granted by each State, but information about specific benefits authorized by a State may be obtained from the appropriate State Secretary of state, or from the State veteran’s service organization, the American Red Cross, or a recognized veteran’s organization. Several States also provide bonuses.

14. AWARDS, MEDALS, CAMPAIGN RIBBONS

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefit- Awards, medals, campaign ribbon to which you are entitled but which you did not received when separated.

    Eligibility- Meritorious or satisfactory service under certain conditions

    Action Required- Watch newspapers for announcements. Reservists may apply through their unit commanders. Other veterans may apply direct to their respective services. If your request us premature, it will be held until the award, medal, or ribbon requested is ready. In making application, a veteran should give full name, service number, rank of grade, dates of service, unit served in, medals applied for, and return address. Applications should be forwarded to addresses listed in “Where to Write or Go.” Page 25.

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CHAPTER THREE

SURVIVORS' RIGHTS AND BENEFITS

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    You should call the attention f your dependents to this pamphlet so that they may refer to this chapter in the event of your death.

    This chapter may so be helped to you at the present time in planning for the future of those who may survive you.

1. REIMBURSEMENT OF BURIAL EXPENSES

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- A sum not to exceed $150, payable as reimbursement for burial expenses of veteran.

    Eligibility.    a.  Veteran must be a veteran of wartime service or service during period of Korean conflict, OR a peacetime veteran receiving compensation at time of death, OR a veteran discharge or retired for disability incurred in line if duty, Discharge must be under conditions other than dishonorable.

    b. This benefit is payable to the undertaker, if he is unpaid, or if paid, to the person whose personal funds were used to pay that expense.

    Action Required- Make written application giving full information to nearest Veterans Administration District Office or visit the nearest Veterans Administration Officer for any needed assistance.

    Deadline- 2 years after permanent burial (or cremation) of veteran. ‘

    Other Facts of Importance.    a.  Additional cost covering transportation will be allowed if veteran died in a Veterans Administration hospital or domiciliary home, while hospitalized or domiciled at Veterans Administration expense, or while in transit to or from such a hospital or home or to or from a regional office at the expense of the Veterans Administration.

    b. Some country and city governments also provide for the burial of honorably discharged veterans.

2. MUSTERING-OUT PAYMENTS, PERIOD OF KOREAN CONFLICT

    Administered by the Services.

    Benefit- If a veteran discharged under honorable conditions dies before receiving any portion of, or the full amount of the mustering-out payment to which he has entitled under either the Mustering-Out Payment Act of 1944 of Title V of the Veterans’ Readjustment Act of 1952, the balance of the amount due him may be paid, on appropriate application therefor, to his surviving spouse; if no surviving spouse, in equal shares to the child or children; or if no spouse or child, in equal shares to surviving parents.

    Eligibility- As stated above.

    Action Required- Application should be made by the appropriate survivor or survivors, as the case may be, by letter to the appropriate disbursing officers (see page 26), that includes all available information required for entitlement. Application must be accompanied by the veteran’s DD Form 214.

    Deadline- None.

3. GOVERNMENT LIFE INSURANCE PAYMENTS

    Administration by the Veterans Administration. (See chapter two, page 6, GROUP B through J.)

    Benefit- Death benefits payable as designated by insured.

    Eligibility.    a.  Veterans must have had USGLI or NSLI inforce at time of death.

    b. Applicant for death benefits must have been designated beneficiary by the insured.

    Action Required- Beneficiary should apply to the nearest Veterans Administration Officer for necessary forms and instructions.

    Deadline- None.

4. INDEMNITY COMPENSATION FOR SERVICE-CONNECTED DEATH

    (Public Law 881, 84th Congress, effective 1 January 1957.) Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefits- Monthly compensation payable to eligible dependent survivors of service members and veterans who die of service-connected cause.

    (1) Compensation for Widow: Monthly rate of $112 plus percent of the current monthly basic pay of an active duty serviceman of the same pay grade and length of service as the deceased had at time of death or time of separation, if death takes place after separation. If you widow is eligible or has eligible children, an additional payment may be made by Social Security.

    (2) Compensation for Children: May be paid for the support of deceased serviceman’s children if the mother is divorced from the serviceman, dies, or remarries. The following monthly rates of payment may be made:

For 1 child                                                              $   70                    
For 2 children     100
For 3 children     130
For each additional child       25

These payments are in addition to any benefits for which children under 18 may be eligible under Social Security.

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    (3) Compensation for Dependent Parents: Within certain income limitation, may be paid on a sliding scale according to other income and marital status. Monthly payments range from $15 to $75 for I surviving parent, and from $10 to $50 each for 2 surviving parents. Complete details are available at any Veterans Administration Office.

    Eligibility.    a. As indicated under “Benefits”.

    b. If a member dies on or after 1 May 1957 with an in-service wavier of payment of premiums on Government life insurance in effect, compensation payments in most cases will be lower than those listed above.

    c. A widow or child becomes ineligible upon marriage.

    d. An unmarried child becomes ineligible at age 18 (21 if attending an approved school), unless mentally or physical incapable of self-support, in which case certain benefits are payable for the duration of such condition.

    Action Required- File claim with nearest Veterans Administration Office. Enclose proof of death.

    Deadline- None; but in order for the effective date of award to be day following date of death, the claim must be filed within 1 year after the service-connected death.

    Other Facts of Importance.    a. Rates of payment under Public Law 881 are the same for wartime and peacetime service-connected deaths.

    b. Survivors receiving or eligible to receive benefits under old laws (based on a death before 1 January 1957) will continue to receive such benefits unless they elect indemnity compensation under the new law. If such survivors would to receive greater benefits under Public Law 881, they may elect to receive payment under its provisions.

5. PENSION FOR NON-SERVICE-CONNECTED DEATH

    Administration by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- Monthly pension payments payable to unmarried widow and/ or unmarried child under 18 years (21 years if attending school approved by the Veterans Administration) based on non-service-connected death and provided veteran met other eligibility factors described below.

Payments are as follows:

For widow with no child                                                                          $50.40      
For widow, 1 child      63.00
For each additional child         7.56
For no widow, 1 child       27.30
For no widow, 2 children       40.95
For no widow, 3 children       54.60
For each additional child         7.56

Not payable to a widow without a minor child whose annual income exceeds $1,400 or to a child whose annual income exceeds $1,400 or to a widow with 1 or more children if her annual income exceeds $2,700.

Eligibility.    a. Veteran must have been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.

    b. Must have served at least 90 days during World War II or the Korean conflict period (or less than 90 days if discharged for service-connected disability).

    c. Excepting survivors of World War I veterans, must have had at the time of his non-service-connected death a service-connected disability for which compensation would have been payable if 10 percent or more in degree. Pension is also payable regardless of length of service if at time of death veteran was receiving or was entitled to be receiving compensation or retirement pay because of a physical disability suffered as a result of wartime service.

    Action Required- File claim with nearest Veterans Administration Office. Enclose proof of death.

    Deadline- None; but in order for effective date of award to be on the day following date of death, claim must be filed within 1 year after veteran’s death.

6. EDUCATION FOR WAR ORPHANS

    (War Orphans Education Act, Public Law 634, 84th Congress) Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- An educational benefit of $110 a month (if in school full-time), $80 a month (three quarters times), or $50 a month (half time), up to a maximum of 36 months education ( or the equivalent of 36 months if enrolled in part time schooling), for the sons or daughters of servicemen or serviceman who die of a war time service-connected cause.

    Eligibility.    a. As indicated under “Benefits.”

    b. If death occurred after military service, the veteran parent must have been discharged under conditions other than dishonorable.

    c. Generally, children must be between the ages of 18 and 23. (For exceptions, see “Other Facts of Importance”.)

    d. Students must pursue educational (such as a college degree), professional (such as law or medicine), or vocational (such as bookkeeper or machinist).

    e. Children may NOT be enrolled in their regular high school education.

    Action Required- Apply at nearest Veterans Administration Office. The surviving parent or guardian should make application for a minor child. Eligible children of legal age may file application on their own behalf.

    Deadline- None, except as noted under “Eligibility (above), and “Other Facts of Importance” (below).

Other Facts of Importance.    a. A child under 18 may be eligible if he has quit or graduated from high school, is above the age of compulsory school attendance, and if the Veteran Administration finds it would be in his best interest to commence training before reaching 18.

    b. Eligibility may continue beyond the age of 23 under the following circumstances:

        (1) If the child had passed his 18th but not his 23rd birthday when the law went into effect (29 June 1956), he may receive education up to 29 June 1961.

        (2)  If he was eligible for such schooling, but served in the Armed Forces before age 23, he may receive the educational benefits up to 5 years after discharge.

        (3) If the veteran parent dies after the child is 18 but not yet 23, benefit may be received up to 5 years from that date of the parent’s death.

    c. Notwithstanding the above exception, the benefit will not extend beyond the recipient’s 31st birthday.

    d. if the child is entitled to GI educational benefits in his own right, entitlement to benefits under the War Orphans’ Education Act will be reduced by the amount of any training so received. 

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    e. The Act does not permit on-the-job, on-the-farm, or correspondence school training, nor does it permit training countries. Also, prohibited are courses such as bartending, dancing, and personality development. Flight training is prohibited unless it is part of a standard college course for which credit is given toward a degree.

7. CIVIL SERVICE PREFERENCE

    Administered by the Federal Civil Service Commission.

    Benefit- Federal Civil Service 10-point veterans’ preference is authorized for-

    a. The wife of a veteran with a service-connected disability when the veteran is disqualified by the disability from Civil Service appointment along the general lines of his usual occupation.

    b. The unremarried widow of a veteran of a war, campaign, or expedition, or of service during the period 28 April 1952 through 1 July 1955.

    c. Certain mothers (i.e., widowed, separated, or divorced from husband, or with husband totally disabled) veterans who died while on active duty in a war, campaign, or expedition, or during the period 28 April 1951 through 1 July 1955.

    d. Certain mother (i.e., widowed, separated, or divorced from husband, or with husband totally disabled) of veterans with permanent and total service-connected disabilities.

    See also “CIVIL SERVICE PREFERENCE,” page 5.

8. SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFITS

    Administered by the Bureau of Old Age and Survivors’ Insurance, Social Security Administration, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

    Benefits.    a. Survivors’ insurance payments are paid to widows and children on the basis of military wage credits if the veteran was insured under Social Security at the time of death. The general test of being insured is that the veteran must have credit for half of the “quarters” elapsing after 1950 and age 65, or death if it occurs earlier. (A quarter of coverage is one in which an individual is paid $50 in a calendar quarter. A calendar quarter is a 3 months’ period beginning 1 January, 1 April, 1 July, or 1 October.) A minimum of 6 quarters is required. After earning credits for 40 quarters, the individual is insured for life. Quarters earned before 1951 may be applied to the 1 January 1951 starting date. Quarters earned in nonmilitary employment may be combined with military wage credits. Survivors’ benefits are also payable to certain eligible dependents of individuals who had credit for 6 quarters out of the most recent 13 quarters, including the quarter in which he died, even though he did not meet the sticker requirement stated above.

    b. Lump-sum burial expense payment payable to the eligible spouse, or if no spouse to the person who pays the burial expenses of an “insured” veteran. The person entitled to lump sum has until 2 years after date of burial or reburial to file for payment.

    Eligibility- As stated above.

Action Required- Apply to local office of the U.S Social Security Administration. Show DD Form 214 and proof of death.

    Deadline.    a. None for monthly benefits, but payments are retroactive for 12 months only.

    b. Lump-sum death benefits must be claimed within 2 years after the veteran’s death, except as noted above under “Benefits,” in event the veteran dies on active duty while overseas.

    Other Facts of Importance.   a. Social Security wage credits may be even though the Veterans Administration is also paying pension or compensation.

    b. If the serviceman had active duty or active duty for training on or after 1 January 1957, gratuitous military wage credits for active service during the period 1951 to 1956 (inclusive) may be used in computing OSAI benefits, even though a monthly benefit based in whole or in part on the same period of service is payable by some Federal agency other than the Veterans Administration.

    e. See also “SOCIAL SECURITY CREDITS,” page 13.

9. HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE

    Administered by the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior.

    Benefit- Generally, the surviving widow and minor children of a veteran eligible on account of service, and of a veteran who has died in service, are eligible for the same homestead preference to which the veteran was entitled.

    See also HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE,” page 14.

10. BURIAL IN A NATIONAL CEMETERY

    Administered by the Superintendent of the National Cemetery in which burial is desired.

    Benefit.    a. The wife or husband, widow, or widower, and minor children of a veteran eligible to the buried in a National Cemetery may be buried in the same grave or in an adjoining grave, provided space is available. Under certain conditioning, unmarried adult children of an eligible veteran are also eligible.

    b. The Quartermaster General, Department of the Army, will furnish a headstone or grave marker, without cost, to an eligible survivor of a veteran who is buried alongside the deceased veteran, but no more than 2 headstones or markers will be supplied to any single family.

    c. If the widow or widowed of a veteran wishes to reserve for herself or himself a grave site adjoining the veteran, he or she should notify the Superintendent of the cemetery of that desire at the time at the veteran’s burial.

    See also, BURIAL IN A NATIONAL CEMETERY,” page 16.

11. LOAN GUARANTY BENEFITS FOR UNREMARRIED WIDOWS

    Administered by the Veterans Administration.

    Benefit- The unmarried widow of an eligible veteran may be eligible for loan benefits under the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, as amended, or the Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, as amended, provided the veteran’s death was due to his service and the widow herself is not an eligible veteran. She may apply for such benefits in the same manner as prescribed for a veteran. (See page 8.)

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CHAPTER FOUR

ADVICE AND COUNSEL

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THE VETERANS ADMINISTRATION

    The Veterans Administration is the agency responsible for administering the major veterans’ programs authorized by the Congress. Its nearest office will give you or your dependents or survivors information, advice, and aid on any phase of these programs.

    Although VA operates a central office in Washington, D.C., 70 regional offices, and approximately 300 contact offices, you may not live close enough to a Veterans Administration Office to visit it in person when you need information or assistance. In that event, write to the nearest Veterans Administration Office giving your full name, your permanent mailing address, your Service serial number, and your “C” (for claim) number, if the Veterans Administration has assigned you such a number.

    All inquiries made to the Veterans Administration regarding Government insurance should contain the insurance contract number for identification purposes, including a claim number if you have one. Address inquiry to appropriate Veterans Administration Office as set forth on page 7 under Section C, Government Life Insurance.

    Just as your serial is the key for quick and accurate identification in service, your “C” number is the Veterans Administration’s code system of quickly identifying your records. Your “C” number- assigned to you when you first apply for benefits-never changes. Always give your “C” number when writing to the Veterans Administration.

STATE AND LOCAL AGENCIES CONCERNED WITH VETERANS' AFFAIRS

    Most States have set up veterans’ service agencies, generally called State Departments of Veterans Commissions, with headquarters in the State capital, to supervise the States’ veterans’ program and, through local service offices, to assist veterans in applying for State and Federal benefits.

    Many of these organizations have been recognized by the Veterans Administration to present claims on behalf of veterans on their dependents.

PRIVATE ORGANIZATIONS

    Seventy organization, including State agencies, have been authorized to present and prosecute claims to the Veterans Administration on behalf of veterans and their dependents. The organizations are either chartered by Congress or designated by Congress, or otherwise recognized by the Veterans Administration.

    Only duly accredited representative of these organizations may represent you and your dependents before the Veterans Administration. Only 1 organization may represent you at any one time.

    Veterans’ organization-such as the American Legion, Amvets, Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars, and a host of smaller ones- render such services to veterans. Usually a veterans’ organization will help you file a claim for disability or any other type of claim; it will assist at a veteran’s funeral; and it will be a source of general information about veterans’ benefits.

    The American Red Cross is another national organization engaged in providing valuable information and assistance in preparing claims and representing veterans before the Veterans Administration.

    Under the law, no fess may be charged for services rendered you by the organizations’’ representatives, whether or not you are a member of the organization.

    Before the Red Cross or any of the other organizations may represent you in any claim, you must execute Veterans Administration Form 2-22 giving that organization a limited “Power of Attorney.” This Power of Attorney may be canceled at any time by simply writing a letter to the Veterans Administration asking that it be canceled.

    You will achieve best results in any claim if you give the representative of your choice the fullest cooperation.

LEGAL ASSISTANCE

    Legal Assistance Officers serving at separation centers, hospitals, or other installations involved in the separation of personnel are competent to advise and assist you in connection with legal questions arising from your imminent return to civilian life. Typical of such assistance are the review and revision of a will, advice about revocation of a power of attorney, advice about the adjustment and payment of deferred income and other taxes, and advice about the need for action on your part to receive the protection and benefits afforded under the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act.

    The provisions of that Act were designed to afford protection to military personnel in matters of personal debt, leases, evictions, interest rates, income taxes, personal property taxes, real estate taxes, installment purchases, condition

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sales repossessions, foreclosures, mortgages, storage charges, life insurance, suits, judgments, attachments, executions, garnishments, penalties, statutes of limitation, homesteads, and mining claims. It will be to your advantage to out your financial house in order as soon as possible. For example, if any mortgage or installment payments were postponed while you were in service, your obligations may be extended over a period of time equal to your period of service. The same protective rights are available in connection with property taxes or assessments and other types of personal liabilities. However, such refinancing is not automatic- you must apply to a court for relief Court action is necessary, and each case is decided on its merits. You should consult an attorney or, if unable to afford legal counsel, contact the nearest legal aid organization for free assistance.

    In some cases, the individual, bank, building and loan association, or finance company to which you are obligated, is familiar with the law and may, without the necessity of court action, grant the relief voluntarily by drawing up a new contract.

    If the Government is acting as the guarantor for commercial life insurance premiums, the guarantee is effective for the period of service and 2 years after the expiration thereof.

    Guardianship service is available to protect the benefits paid into the estates of incompetent veterans, their minor dependents, or incompetent beneficiaries. Such protection is provided by the Chief Attorneys at Veterans Administration Regional Offices acting under the direction and supervision of the Deputy Administration. These Chief Attorneys maintain supervision over guardians appointed in veterans’ cases by Probate and Country courts as well as over legal custodians recognized by the Veterans Administration in their respective jurisdictions.

SPECIAL ASSISTANCE FOR NAVY SEPARATEES

    In addition to assistance available through the agencies listed above, the Navy maintains a special program of Civil Readjustments for its separatees. This program is maintained in the office of the District Civil Readjust Officer. Duplicate copies of separation documents are maintained there on each individual whose home address was indicated as being in that particular Naval District at the time of separation. The purpose of this program is to facilitate the acquisition of documents needed by the veteran in applying for his veterans’ rights and benefits, to assist him with any post-service problem which stems from his naval career, and to refer him directly to the agency involved in any particular veterans’ benefit in which he is interested.

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CHAPTER FIVE

OBLIGATIONS AFTER SEPARATION

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    Specific obligations for Reserve service will follow most veterans after separation from active service, and the general responsibilities of citizenship will continue for all.

1. YOUR RESERVE OBLIGATIONS

    In order to build adequate military forces without assuming an unnecessary economic burden, our Nation’s defense policy is to maintain the civilian Reserves, ready or partially ready for quick call to active duty in an emergency. Thus your future Reserve service and your readiness to return to active service if necessary may be as important to the Nation as the period of service from which you are being separated.

    The Reserve components of the Armed Forces of the United States are-

        The Army National Guard.

        The Army Reserve

        The Naval Reserve

        The Marine Corps Reserve

        The Air National Guard

        The Air Force Reserve

        The Coast Guard Reserve

In each of the Services there is a Ready Reserve, a Standby Reserve, and a Retired Reserve. Members of the Ready Reserve are subject to order to active duty without their consent in any emergency declared by the President or the Congress. Members of the Standby Reserve are subject to order to active duty without their consent only in event of war or national emergency declared by the Congress. Further, no member of the Standby Reserve may be ordered to active duty until the Director of Selective Service had determined that such member is available for active duty.

    The Reserve Forces Act of 1955 became effective on 9 August 1955.

    If you entered the Armed Forces after 19 June 1951 but before 10 August 1955 under age 26, you assumed an 8 year service obligation. If you entered on or after 10 August 1955 under age 26 and are now in the Active Forces, you assumed a 6-year service obligation. If you entered service before 19 June 1951, you probably will have completed your service obligation before you are released from active duty. However, to be sure about this, you should consult your commanding officer.

    If you went to active duty as soon as you joined the Armed Forces, and if you say for the entire period of your service obligation, that’s it. When released from active duty, you will not be required to stay in the Reserve. But if you’re released from active duty before you’ve completed your service obligation, you will remain in the Reserve until you have rounded out your time.

    Assume you went on active duty when you joined the service. If you served less than 5 years when released from active duty, you will be assigned to the Ready Reserve. If you have served as much as 5 years, you will be assigned to the Standby Reserve unless you ask to be kept in the Ready Reserve and your Service has a spot for you.

    Normally, Ready Reserve training will consist of 48 drills a year, plus 2 weeks of active-duty-for-training. However, if you are prevented from taking part in such a program-because of your occupation or place of residence- you may be allowed to preform 30 days active-duty-for-training annually in lieu of the weekly drills plus 15 days active-duty-for-training. Reserve drills will conducted throughout the Nation at (1) Reserve training centers (2) National Guard and Reserve armories, and (3) installations of the Active Forces. Active-duty-or training will be conducted at (1) training camps, (2) installations of the Active Forces, and (3) in ships of the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard.

    If you entered service on after 10 August 1955 and are assigned to the Ready Service upon release from active duty, you may be required to remain in the Ready Reserve until you have rounded out 5 years. While in the Ready Reserve you may be required to patriciate in a training program. If so, and your participation is unsatisfactory, you may be ordered to report for 45 days of active-duty- for training. If you ignore these ordered, you will be subject to court martial under the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

    If you entered served before 10 August 1955, you cannot be required to take part in training even though you may be assigned to the Ready Reserve.

    For further information on your service obligation, see directives and publications of your Service or the commanding officer of a local Reserve unit.

2.  SELECTIVE SERVICE OBLIGATIONS

    If you were born after 30 August 1922, you are required to report to the local Selective Service board having jurisdiction over your permanent residence, or to the nearest local board, within 30 days after your release from active duty.

    If you were not registered with Selective Service before entering the Armed Forces, you must register upon being discharged or released from active duty. Be sure to take a copy of your DD Form 214 with you when you register. Upon registering, you will receive a Registered Certificate and a Classification Card. These are to be carried on your person at all times. Also, you are required by law to keep your local board advised indefinably if any change of address or any other change in your status so that your record may be kept current.

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    The local board of the area in which you are a permanent resident will have permanent custody of your Selective Service records. Your records cannot be transferred from one local board to another. All correspondence, therefore must be addressed to the local board having jurisdiction over you.

    You are required to notify your local board of your release is discharge from active duty even if you have registered with Selective Service before you enlisted or were called to active duty because of Reserve or National Guard obligations.

    If you entered service after 16 September 1940 and either have completed at least 6 months of honorable service and have been discharged for the convenience of the Government, or have served 1 year if honorable service, you will be exempt from induction by Selective Service for further service unless Congress declares war or a national emergency. If you have a Reserve obligation and are transferred from active duty to membership in a Reserve component, you will be exempt from induction by Selective Service if you have served 1 year of honorable service after 16 September 1940 unless Congress declares war or a national emergency.

    If you have reached your 26th birthday when you are discharged or separated from active duty, or when you subsequently reach that birthday, you will be placed in Class V-A (over age) unless you  were deferred prior to going on active duty. If you are in Class V-A, you will be exempt from induction for further service.

    If you believe your local board has given you an improper classification, you may request a personal appearance before the local board to discuss your case or you may appeal to the State Appeal Board. The law provides that if you appeal your local board in writing within 10 days after the Notice of Classification is mailed, the board must forward your case to the State Appeal Board. If the State Appeal Board classifies you as being available for induction for further service by a split vote (e.g., 4-1) you may appeal your case to the National Selective Appeal Board in Washington, D.C.

3. CITIZENSHIP OBLIGATIONS

    While serving on active duty in the Armed Forces you have been a “citizen-in-arms,” away from home for a time, doing a necessary job. Unless you extend your period of active service, you will now be returning home to take up your civilian life again. Just as you have fulfilled your responsibility as a citizen during your active service, you will be expected not to fulfill your responsibilities as a citizen- in your community, in your State, and in the affairs of the Nation. You should now be a better citizen with a keener appreciation of what citizenship means. You can take pride in yourself as an individual who has undertaken to defend the Nation “against all enemies, foreign and domestic.” As long as citizen are ready to do that, our Nations will remain free.

DEADLINES FOR VETERANS' BENEFITS

    This listing is divided into 2 categories- (1) Federal benefits to which Korean- and World War II period veterans are entitled and (2) benefits to which surviving next-of-kin of deceased veterans are entitled.

FOR VETERANS

AUTOMOBILE GRANTS:

    Apply generally within 5 years after date of discharge or release from active duty. (See page 12)

CiIVILIAN INSURANCE:

    Resume payment of premiums on non-Government insurance which were deferred and guaranteed by the Government under the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Civil Relief Act of 1940, as amended, within 2 years after discharge.

COMPENSATION (see also PENSIONS):

    Claims for service-connected disabilities may be filed during lifetime.

DISCHARGE REVIEW:

    Apply within 15 years after 22 June 1944 or 15 years after date of discharge, whichever is later.

DOMICILIARY CARE. (See MEDICAL BENEFITS)

EDUCATION AND TRAINING (Korean GI Bill):

    Initiative within 3 years after discharge or release.

    Complete within 8 years after date of discharge or release or 8 years after 31 January 1955, which is earlier.

EMPLOYMENT. (See JOB-FINDING ASSISTANCE; REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS)

HOMESTEADING, DESERT LANDS, AND SMALL TRACTS:

    Ninety-day preference over members of the general public on restoration of withdrawn public lands, reclamation project lands opened to entry, and classification of small tracts of vacant public lands; preference over members of the general public at certain public auction sales of small tracts of vacant public lands- both until 26 September 1959, inclusive.

HOSPITALIZATION. (See MEDICAL BENEFITS)

HOUSING:

    Veterans with certain specified disabilities (war or peacetime), apply for specially adapted housing during lifetime

    Preference in low-rent housing until 1 March 1959.

    Preference in purchase of war housing the Lanham Act- Indefinitely.

    FHA mortgage, insurance for cooperative projects- Indefinitely.

INSURANCE. (See CIVILIAN INSURANCE; NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE)

JOB-FINDING ASSISTANCE:

    Through local State Employment Service offices-Indefinitely.

JOB PREFERENCE:

    Apply for reinstatement in permanent job held at time of induction within 90 days after discharge.

        Exception: In case of hospitalization continuing after discharge, the 90 days may begin up to 1 year after discharge.

LOAN GUARANTY (Korean GI Bill):

    Apply within 10 years after 31 January 1955.

LOAN GUARANTY (World War II GI Bill):

    Apply for guaranty in purchase of home, farm, or business before 25 July 1958.

        Exception: Those enlisted or reenlisted (under Public Law 190, 79th Congress) between 6 October 1945 and 5 October 1946, have 10 years from termination of first enlistment or reenlistment in which to apply.

MEDICAL BENEFITS:

    Domiciliary care during lifetime.

    Hospitalization during lifetime.

    Outpatient treatment during lifetime (if qualified).

    Prosthetic appliances during lifetime (if qualified).

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MUSTERING-OUT PAY (Korean GI Bill):

    Payment is automatic in the case of those eligible only for this pay.

MUSTERING-OUT PAY (World War II):

    See under Section A. page 3.

NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE:

    Term NSLI under nondisability (Section 622) premium wavier:

Payments must be resumed within 120 days after separation. P

    Permanent NSLI under nondisability (Section 622) premium wavier: payment of full premium must be continued following separation.

    Permanent plan NSLI surrendered for cash while in the service: replace or reinstate within 120 days after separation.

    Term NSLI which expired after 25 April 1951 and was not renewed during the active service; apply for new insurance within 120 days after separation.

    Application for reinstatement of a permanent plan may be submitted at any time.

    Application for reinstatement of term insurance must be submitted within the term period, or within the succeeding term period if lapse occurred not more than 2 months prior to the expiration of the term period.

    Conversion from term to permanent policy must be applied for during term period.

    Change of converted policy from lower to higher premium rate- any time.

    Change of converted policy from higher premium rate-any time

    Total Disability Income Provision may be added to new or existing contract prior to insured’s 60th birthday.

        Exception: Before maturity of 20-year endowment prior to age 60.

        Note. The total disability income provision may not be added to the types of contracts described under Group B on page 6. Generally, in order to avoid possible loss ot curtailment of the benefit, claim for disability insurance benefits under NSLI must be filed within 1 year from the date the total disability commenced.

OUTPATIENT TREATMENT. (See MEDICAL BENEFITS.)

PENSIONS (see also COMPENSATIONS):

    File claims for non-service-connected disabilities during lifetime.

POST-SERVICE INSURANCE:

    Five-year term, apply within 120 days after separation, if eligible. Insurance for persons with service-connected disabilities, apply within 1 year of Veterans Administration determination of service-connected.

PROSTHETIC APPLIANCES. (See  MEDICAL BENEFITS)

REEMPLOYMENT RIGHTS:

    Veterans who desire reinstatement in jobs held at the time of induction should apply to their former employer within 90 days after discharge.

        Exception: In case of hospitalization continuing after discharge, 90 days may begin up to 1 years after discharge.

    Apply for information or assistance at field offices of the Bureau of Veterans Reemployment Rights of the U.S. Department of Labor. Contact local State Employment Service offices for information and direction to BVRR field offices.

RETIREMENT REVIEW OFFICES:

    Any officer retired or released to inactive service without pay for physical disability may request review of retiring board’s decision, within 15 years after discharge.

UNEMPLOYMENT (READJUSTMENT ALLOWANCES AND UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION):

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION (Korean GI Bill):

    Apply through local office of State Employment Service or Unemployment Insurance Agency within 5 years after 31 January 1955.

READJUSTMENT ALLOWANCES (World War II GI Bill):

    No Payment made after 25 July 1952.

        Exception: Those who enlisted or reenlisted (under Public Law 190, 79th Congress) between 6 October 1945 and 5 October 1946, have 2 years from discharge to claim benefit, provided it id within 5 years from termination of such enlistment or reenlistment.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (Korean Conflict, Public Law 16);

    See Section F, paragraph 3, page 10.

VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION (World War II, Public Law 16);

    See Section F, paragraph 3, page 10.

FOR SURVIVORS

BURIAL ALLOWANCES:

    File claim within 2 years after permanent burial or cremation.

CIVIL SERVICE PREFERENCE:

    No deadline

COMPENSATION:

    File claim in case of service-connected death any time after veteran’s death.

DISCHARGE REVIEW:

    Surviving spouse, next of kin, or legal representative of deceased veteran ay apply with 15 years after 22 June 1944 or 15 years after date of discharge, whichever is later.

HOMESTEADING:

    Widow and minor children of deceased veteran are entitled to preferred right of application for 90 days before general public may apply for entry on public lands reopened for settlement, until 26 September 1959.

LOANS:

    Unremarried widows eligible for loan benefits under the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act of 1944, as amended, or under the Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1952, as amended, if veterans’ death was due to service and if widow is not herself an eligible veteran: World War II -25 July 1958.

        (Exception: Where serviceman enlisted or reenlisted between 6 October 1945 and 5 October 1946, deadline for loan is 10 years from date of discharge from such enlistment or reenlistment)

Korean conflict-loans must be made by 31 January 1965.

MUSTERING-OUT PAYMENTS:

    No deadline for the survivors of those separated on or after July 1952.

PENSION:

    File claim in case of non-service-connected death any time after veterans’ death.

WHERE TO WRITE OR GO

AWARDS, MEDALS, CAMPAIGN RIBBON:

    ARMY: The Adjutant General, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C. ATTN: AGPO-AD-M.

    NAVY: Chief of Naval Personnel, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

    AIR FORCE: Director, Air Force Records Center, 9700 Page Blvd., St Louis 14, Mo ATTN; Awards Branch

    MARINE CORPS: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps, (CODE DL), Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: The Commandant (PS), U.S. Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

CIVIL SERVICE (FEDERAL), INCLUDING VETERANS' PREFERENCE; CIVIL SERVICE (STATE), CIVIL SERVICE (CITY): Representative at nearest first or second class post office.

COMPENSATION: The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

CORRECTION OF RECORDS:

    See DISCHARGE, REVIEW of (GCM)

DENTAL CARE:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

DISCHARGE CERTIFICATE (CERTIFICATE IN LIEU OF):

    ARMY: ARMY RECORDS CENTER, 9700 page Blvd, St. Louis 14, MO.

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    NAVY: Chief of Naval Personnel, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

    AIR FORCE: AIR ADJUTANT GENERAL, HEADQUARTERS USAF, Washington 25, D.C.

    MARINE CORPS: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps, (CODE DL), Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: The Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

DISCHARGE, REVIEW OF (GCM) and Correction of Records:

    ARMY: The Adjutant General, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C.

    NAVY: Board for the Correction of Naval Records, Department of the Navy, Washington 25. D.C

    AIR FORCE: Air Adjutant General, headquarters USAF, Washington 25, D.C.

    MARINE CORPS: Board for the Correction of Naval Records, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: Board of the Correction of Military Records, US Coast Guard, Washington, 25, D.C.

DISCHARGE, REVIEW OF (OTHER THAN GCM)

    ARMY: The Adjutant General, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C.

    NAVY: Navy Discharge Review Board, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C.

    AIR FORCE: Officers-Director of Military Personnel, Headquarters USAF, Washington 25, D.C.

    Airmen- Air Adjutant General, Headquarters USAF, Washington 25, D.C.

    MARINE CORPS: Board of Review of Discharge and Dismissal, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: Board of Review, Discharges and Dismissals, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

DOMICILIARY CARE:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

EDUCATION:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

EMPLOYMENT:

    State Employment Service Office in local or nearby community.

ENLISTMENT OR REENLISTMENT:

    ARMY: Local Army- Air Force Recruiting Office

    NAVY: Local Navy Recurring Office.

    AIR FORCE: Local Army- Air Force Recruiting Office

    MARINE CORPS: Local Marine Corps Recruiting Office or nearest Marine Corps Post or Station.

    COAST GUARD: Local Coast Guard Recruiting Office.

GUARDIANSHIP SERVICE (FOR INCOMPETENT VETERAN, ETC.):

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

HOMESTEAD PREFERENCE:

    State Supervisor, Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior, in State in which lands are located:

    ARIZONA: 233-A, Main Post Office Building, Phoenix.

    CALIFORNIA:

        215 West 7th Street, Los Angeles.

        352 New Federal Building, Sacramento.

    COLORADO: P.O. Box 1018, Denver 2.

    IDAHO: P.O Box 2237, Bosie.

    MONTANA: 1245 N. 29th Street, Billings.

    NEVADA: P.O. Box 155, Reno.

    NEW MEXICO: P.O Box 1251, Santa Fe.

    OREGON: 1001 N.E. Lloyd Blvd, Portland 8.

    UTAH: P.O Box 777, Salt Lake City.

    WASHINGTON: 209 Federal Building, Spokane.

    WYOMING: 305 Federal Building, Cheyenne.

    ALASKA:

        P.O. Box 1470, Anchorage

        P.O. Box 110, Fairbanks

HOSPITALIZATION:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

HOUSING PREFERENCEe:

    Local public housing authority office. Consult post office or telephone directory.

INSURANCE:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

LOAN GURANTIES:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

MEDICAL CARE:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

    NATIONAL GUARD STATUS:

        ARMY: Adjutant General of your State of residence; address him at the State Capitol.

        AIR FORCE: Adjutant General of your State of residence; address him at the State Capitol.

    NOTICE OF SEPARATION (NAVPERS-553; (NAVMC 78-PD;NAVCG-553), Duplicate of:

        ARMY: Not applicable.

        NAVY:  Chief of Naval Personnel, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

        AIR FORCE: Not applicable.

        MARINE CORPS: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters U.S. Marine Corps, Washington 25, D.C.

NOTICE OF SEPARATION (NAVPERS-553; NAVMC 78-PD; NAVCC 553), DUPLICATE OF:

    ARMY: Not applicable

    NAVY: District Civil Readjustment Officer (Naval District in which you reside).

    AIR FORCE:  Not applicable.

    MARINE CORPS:  Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: Commandant U.S Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C

ON-TIME JOB TRAINING (TRADE OR FARM):

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

    PAY AND ALLOWANCES (INCLUDING MUSTERING-OUT PAY). (If you have been discharged with accrued pay and allowances unpaid, or if you believe an error has been made in paying you off):

    ARMY: Settlements Division, Finance Center, U.S Army, Indianapolis 49. Ind.

    NAVY: Commanding Officer, U.S Navy Finance Center, Cleveland 14, Ohio.

    AIR FORCE: Settlements Division, Air Force Finance Center, 3800 York Street, Denver, Colo.

    MARINE CORPS: Disbursing Branch, Supply Division, U.S. Marine Corps, Washington, 25 D.C.

    COAST GUARD: Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

PENSIONS:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

PROSTHETIC APPLIANCES:

    The nearest Veterans Administration Office.

READJUSTMENT ALLOWANCES:

    State Employment Service Office in local or nearby community.

RECLAMATION PROJECT LANDS:

    Regional Office, Bureau of Reclamation, nearest project area in which you are interest:

    Region 1, P.O Box 937, Bosie, Idaho.

    Region 2, P.O Box 2511, Sacramento 11, Calif.

    Region 3, Administration Bldg, Boulder City, Nevada.

    Region 4, P.O Box 360, Salt Lake City, Utah

    Region 5, P.O. Box 1609 Amarillo, Texas.

    Region 6, P.O. Box 2553, Billings, Montana.

    Region 7, Bldg. 46 Denver Federal Center, Denver 2, Colorado.

REEMPLOYMENT:

    Bureau of Veterans’ Reemployment Right Field Office or contact local State Employment Office for location of Field Office

    U.S. Civil Service Commission Regional Office.

REENLISTMENT:

    See ENLISTMENT.

26

REPORT OF TRANSFER OR DISCHARGE, DD FORM 214 (formerly known as Report of Separation, DD Form 214), Correction to:

    ARMY: Army Records Center, 9700 Page Blvd., St Louis 14. Mo.

    NAVY: Chief of Naval Personnel, Department of the Navy, Washington 25, D.C.

    AIR FORCE: Director, Air Force Records Center, 9700 Page Blvd., St, Louis 14. Mo.

    MARINE CORPS: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Headquarters, U.S Marine Corps, Washington 25, D.C.

    COAST GUARD: Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

REPORT OF TRANSFER OR DISCHARGE, DD FORM 214 (formerly known as REPORT OF SEPARATION DD FORM 214), DUPLICATE OF:

    ARMY: Army Records Center, 9700 Page Blvd., St Louis 14. Mo.

    NAVY: District Civil Readjustment Officer (Naval District in which you reside).

    AIR FORCE: If Separate Has Reserve Affiliation- Commander, Air Reserve Records Center, Denver, Colo.

    For Separate without Reserve Status- Director, Air Force Records Center , 9700 Page Blvd., St, Louis 14. Mo.

    MARINE CORPS: Commandant of the Marine Corps, Washington 25, D.C

COAST GUARD: Commandant. U.S Coast Guard, Washington 25, D.C.

RESERVE STATUS:

    ARMY: Headquarters of the Military District of your State of residence; obtain address from nearest Army installation or recruiting station.

    NAVY: Director of Naval Reserve (Naval District in which you reside).

    IR FORCE: Commander, Air Reserve Records Center, Denver, Colo.

    MARINE CORPS: (1) Marine Corps Reserve and Recruitment District Headquarters: (2) Local Marine Corps Recruiting Office.

    COAST GUARD: Coast Guard Reserve Director (Coast Guard District in which you reside).

RIGHTS AND BENEFITS (GENERAL INFORMATION AND ASSISTANCE):

    ARMY: The Adjutant General, Department of the Army, Washington 25, D.C.

    NAVY: District Civil Readjustment Officer (naval District in which you reside).

    AIR FORCE: Not applicable.

    MARINE CORPS: marine Corps Reserve and Recruiting District Headquarters.

    ALL SERVICES:

        (1) Local office, American Red Cross

        (2) Local veterans’ organizations

        (3) Veterans Administration Offices

SOCIAL SECURITY:

    Social Security District Office. (Your Post Office can tell you where it is.)

STATE RIGHTS AND BENEFITS:

    State Veterans’ Commissions.

TAX INFORMATION (FEDERAL):

    Internal Revenue Service, nearest local office.

TERRITORIAL RIGHTS AND BENEFITS:

    Territorial Veterans’ Commission.

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION:

    State Employment Service Office in local or nearby community.

VOCATIONAL REHABILATION:

    The nearest Veterans’ Administration Office.

 

 

 

This publication was prepared by the Office of Armed Forces Information and Education, Department of Defense, in cooperation with the Interdepartment Separation Committee and the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard.  Inquiries concerning is contents should be addressed to the appropriate departments and agencies as indicated on pages 25, 26, and 27.

 

Published: Tue Nov 03 17:32:53 EST 2020