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Cover image of 1935 General Orders.

NAVY DEPARTMENT

GENERAL ORDERS

Nos. 1 to 68, inclusive Series of 1935

Reprinted February 1944, incorporating all changes effected by General Orders up to and including No. 207, dated 15 November 1943

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE WASHINGTON: 1944

SERIES OF GENERAL ORDERS, 1935, AND DISPOSITION OF SERIES OF 1921

*****

GENERAL ORDER No. 1

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

1. A new series of general orders is hereby established and the series of 1921 is hereby discontinued.

2. All permanent orders of the series of 1921, which are to be continued in force, have either been incorporated in the Navy Regulations, the Bureau manuals, have served their purposes, or have been reprinted (revised in some cases) in the series of 1935. Attention is invited to the list below which gives the disposition of the orders in the series of 1921.

Number of order Date of order Disposition
1 Jan. 5, 1921 Canceled by General Order No. 217.
2 do Reprinted as General Order No. 2.
3 do Reprinted as General Order No. 3.
4 do Reprinted as General Order No. 4.
5 do Canceled by General Order No. 45.
6 do Canceled by General Order No. 169.
7 do Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
8 do Canceled by General Order No. 207.
9 do Reprinted as General Order No. 5.
10 do Canceled by General Order No. 146.
11 do Canceled by General Order No. 144.
12 do Canceled by General Order No. 133.
13 do Canceled by General Order No. 41.
14 do Canceled by General Order No. 217.
15 do Canceled by General Order No. 145.
16 do Canceled by General Order No. 184.
17 do Canceled by General Order No. 217.
18 do   Do.
19 do Canceled by General Order No. 65.
20 do Canceled by General Order No. 130.
21 do Reprinted as General Order No. 6.
22 do Canceled by General Order No. 217.
23 do Canceled by General Order No. 42.
24 do Reprinted as General Order No. 7.
25 do Canceled by General Order No. 121.
26 do Canceled by General Order No. 164.
27 do Pars. 2 and 3 canceled by General Order No. 228.
Par. 1 included in new General Order No. 44.
28 do Canceled by General Order No. 85.
29 do Canceled by General Order No. 69.
30 do Canceled by General Order No. 94.
31 do Canceled by General Order No. 134.
32 do Bureau of Construction and Repair manual.
33 do Canceled by General Order No. 198.
34 do Canceled by General Order No. 149.
35 do Canceled by General Order No. 195.
36 do Canceled by General Order No. 166.
37 do Canceled by General Order No. 242.
38 do Reprinted as General Order No. 8.
39 Feb. 3, 1921 Canceled by General Order No. 225.
40 do Canceled by General Order No. 140.

--1--

Number of order
Date of order
Disposition
41
Apr. 8, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
42
Apr. 4, 1921
   Do.
43
Apr. 14, 1921
   Do.
44
Apr. 26, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 153.
45
May 6, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
46
May 20, 1921
Reprinted as General Order No. 9.
47
May 13, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
48
June 4, 1921
Reprinted as General Order No. 10.
49
May 28, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 231.
50
June 9, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 198.
51
June 13, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 86.
52
do
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
53
June 16, 1921
Reprinted as General Order No. 11.
54
June 23, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 183.
55
June 30, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
56
June 23, 1921
Bureau of Navigation manual.
57
July 2, 1921
Bureau of Aeronautics manual.
58
July 1, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
59
do
Canceled by General Order No. 228.
60
do
   Do.
61
do
   Do.
62
July 18, 1921
Reprinted as General Order No. 12.
63
July 27, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
64
Aug. 3, 1921
Bureau of Navigation manual.
65
Aug. 10, 1921
Bureau of Aeronautics manual.
66
Aug. 13, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 153.
67
Aug. 25, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
68
Sept. 6, 1921
Reprinted as General Order No. 13.
69
Sept. 16, 1921
Revised with amendment and reprinted as General Order No. 14.
69 amended.
Apr. 13, 1926
70
Sept. 26, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 140.
71
do
Reprinted with General Order No. 11.
72
Sept. 29, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
73
Oct. 26, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
74
Nov. 3, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 153.
75
Dec. 3, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 191.
76
Dec. 29, 1921
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
77
do
   Do.
78
Feb. 23, 1922
Reprinted as General Order No. 15.
79
do
Reprinted with General Order No. 7.
80
Feb. 25, 1922
Reprinted with General Order No. 9
81
do
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
82
Mar. 1, 1922
   Do.
83
Mar. 6, 1922
   Do.
84
Mar. 25, 1922 Canceled by General Order No. 182.
85
May 12, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 165.
86
June 22, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 240.
87
July 10, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
88
July 19, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
89
July 1, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
90
Oct. 26, 1922 Canceled by General Order No. 147.
91
Oct. 27, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
92
Nov. 2, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 165.
93
Nov. 22, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
94
Dec. 6, 1922
Canceled by General Order No. 211.
95
Feb. 15, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 109.
96
Mar. 1, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
97
Mar. 6, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 182.
98
Mar. 6, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 168.
99
Mar. 7, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 228.
100
do
   Do.
101
Mar. 8, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 153.
102
Mar. 21, 1923
Reprinted as General Order No. 16.
103
Apr. 18, 1923
Reprinted as General Order No. 17.
104
Apr. 20, 1933
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
105
May 3, 1923
Navy Regulations and Bureau manuals.
106
May 9, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 137.
107
May 24, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 134.
108
June 6, 1923
Served its purpose.
--2--
Number of order
Date of order
Disposition
109
June 13, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
110
July 5, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 228.
111
Aug. 3, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
112
Aug. 13, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 232.
113
Aug. 15, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
114
do
Canceled by General Order No. 174.
115
Aug. 22, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
116
do
   Do.
117
Sept. 13, 1923
   Do.
118
Nov. 1, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 225.
119
Nov. 19, 1923
Canceled by General Order No. 231.
120
Jan. 10, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
121
Jan. 24, 1924
   Do.
122
Jan. 25, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
123
Feb. 4, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
124
do
   Do.
125
Feb. 20, 1924
   Do.
126
Mar. 12, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 231.
127
May 23, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
128
Mar. 22, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
129
June 21, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 153.
130
do
Canceled by General Order No. 162.
131
July 17, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
132
July 7, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 173.
133
July 17, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 252.
134
Aug. 14, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 247.
135
Aug. 21, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
136
Aug. 20, 1924
Bureau of Construction and Repair manual.
137
Oct. 4, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 150.
138
Oct. 28, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 169.
139
Nov. 13, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
140
do
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
141
Dec. 4, 1924
Canceled by General Order No. 191.
142
do
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
143
Feb. 11, 1926
Reprinted as General Order No. 18.
144
May 25, 1925
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
145
June 8, 1925
   Do.
146
Aug. 7, 1926
   Do.
147
Aug. 20, 1926
Reprinted as General Order No. 19.
148
do
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
149
Oct. 16, 1925
Canceled by General Order No. 176.
150
Oct. 24, 1925 Canceled by General Order No. 158.
151
Nov. 5, 1925
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
152
Apr. 21, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 175.
153
Apr. 13, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
154
Jun 22, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 166.
155
Aug. 6, 1926
Reprinted as General Order No. 20.
156
Aug. 7, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 167.
157
Oct. 20, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 222.
158
Oct. 27, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 170.
159
Nov. 5, 1926
Canceled by General Order No. 186.
160
Feb. 4, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 227.
161
Mar. 5, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 202.
162
do
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
163
Apr. 18, 1927
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
164
July 1, 1927
Reprinted as General Order No. 21.
165
July 11, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 219.
166
May 16, 1927
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
167
June 6, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 189.
168
Sept. 21, 1927
Reprinted as General Order No. 22.
169
Sept. 1, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
170
Oct. 31, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 180.
171
Nov. 5, 1927
Reprinted as General Order No. 23.
172
Nov. 30, 1927
Canceled by General Order No. 230.
173
Jan. 16, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
174
Jan. 17, 1928
Reprinted as General Order No. 24.
175
Mar. 28, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 243.
176
Apr. 28, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 209.
177
July 7, 1928
Reprinted as General Order No. 25.
--3--
Number of order
Date of order
Disposition
178
July 17, 1928
Revised and reprinted as General Order No. 26.
179
Sept. 28, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 202.
180
Oct. 20, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 196.
181
Oct. 30, 1928
Reprinted as General Order No. 27.
182
Nov. 13, 1928
Canceled by General Order No. 223.
183
Nov. 27, 1928
Reprinted as General Order No. 28.
184
Jan. 22, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
185
Jan. 23, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 219.
186
Feb. 28, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 247.
187
Mar. 8, 1929
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
188
Mar. 7, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
189
Apr. 29, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 216.
190
May 11, 1929
Reprinted as General Order No. 29.
191
do
Canceled by General Order No. 217.
192
June 11, 1929
Reprinted as General Order No. 30.
193
July 15, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 219.
194
Oct. 1, 1929
Canceled by Alnav 31, 1930.
195
Oct. 4, 1929
Reprinted as General Order No. 31.
196
Nov. 1, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 210.
197
Nov. 8, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 206.
198
Dec. 4, 1929
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
199
Dec. 21, 1929
Reprinted as General Order No. 32.
200
Dec. 23, 1929
Canceled by General Order No. 210.
201
Jan. 25, 1930
Canceled by General Order No. 219.
202
Mar. 15, 1930
Revised and reprinted as General Order No. 33.
203
do
Canceled by General Order No. 209.
204
do
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
205
Apr. 28, 1930
Bureau of Navigation manual.
206
May 6, 1930
   Do.
207
July 22, 1930
Reprinted as General Order No. 34.
208
Oct. 6, 1930
Canceled by General Order No. 227.
209
Oct. 16, 1930
Revised and reprinted as General Orders Nos. 35 and 36.
210
Oct. 27, 1930
Canceled by General Order No. 218.
211
Dec. 10, 1930
Canceled by General Order No. 255.
212
Jan. 15, 1931
Served its purpose.
213
Feb. 5, 1931
Canceled by General Orders Nos. 246 and 247.
214
Feb. 7, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 37.
215
Mar. 5, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 38.
216
Mar. 18, 1931
Canceled by General Order No. 235.
217
Mar. 26, 1931
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
218
Apr. 21, 1931
Served its purpose.
219
Apr. 3, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 39.
220
Apr. 22, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 40.
221
May 8, 1931
Served its purpose.
222
Sept. 5, 1931
Bureau of Aeronautics manual.
223
Nov. 5, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 41.
224
Nov. 13, 1931
Reprinted as General Order No. 42.
225
Feb. 18, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 43.
226
Feb. 19, 1932
Canceled by General Order No. 246.
227
June 13, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 44.
228
June 30, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 45.
229
Oct. 14, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 46.
230
Nov. 14, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 47.
231
Dec. 23, 1932
Reprinted as General Order No. 48.
232
do
Reprinted as General Order No. 49.
233
May 17, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 50.
234
June 10, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 51.
235
June 23, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 52.
236
July 18, 1933
Bureau of Supplies and Accounts manual.
237
Oct. 13, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 53.
238
Oct. 10, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 54.
239
Nov. 11, 1933
Included in new General Order No. 34.
240
Nov. 25, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 55.
241
Dec. 7, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 56.
242
Dec. 22, 1933
Reprinted as General Order No. 57.
243
Mar. 8, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 58.
244
Mar. 21, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 69.
245
June 13, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 60.
--4--
Number of order
Date of order
Disposition
246
Aug. 11, 1934
Served its purpose.
247
do
Reprinted as General Order No. 61.
248
Sept. 10, 1934
Included in new General Order No. 25.
249
Oct. 9, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 62.
250
Dec. 4, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 63.
251
Dec. 10, 1934
Reprinted as General Order No. 64.
252
Jan. 5, 1935
Reprinted as General Order No. 65.
253
Feb. 9, 1935
Reprinted as General Order No. 66.
254
Mar. 5, 1935
Par. 1 included in new General Order No. 39.
Par. 2 reprinted as General Order No. 67.
255
Apr. 24, 1935
Reprinted as General Order No. 68.

Note. - General Order No. 255, of April 24, 1935, was the last order of the 1921 series.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 2

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

STANDARD SPECIFICATIONS FOR NAVAL STORES AND MATERIALS

1. The Navy Department's standard specifications for naval stores and material cover in a comprehensive way a great number of items required by the naval service, and it is the desire of the Department to maintain in these specifications a high standard, but at the same time permit of the widest possible competition and economy in purchase.

2. With this end in view the Department directs that commanders in chief, commanding officers, commandants, heads of yard divisions, inspectors of material, and other officers bring to the attention of the bureaus concerned cases coming under their observation where a lower standard of quality or a less elaborate make or design of equipage would answer as well as the articles called for under the standard specifications.

3. All officers are requested to submit constructive criticisms and detailed suggestions on the Navy Department's specifications which would tend to improve these specifications in such a way as to result in broader competition, more satisfactory deliveries, and reduction in cost, by changing these specifications to meet more nearly the best commercial standard of quality in manufacture, thus reducing the number of articles which require special treatment in manufacture in order to pass the Government's tests or by eliminating noncommercial requirements in methods of pack-

--5--

ing or delivery. Recommendations looking to the adoption of new specifications for material not already covered are also desired.

4. In order to enable the bureaus more readily to consider 2 suggestions, it is desired that each specification be treated in a separate communication.

5. In criticizing present specifications revised drafts should be submitted or revised paragraphs where the changes are small.

6. Copies of standard specifications may be secured upon application to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 3

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

DISPOSITION OF STOCK WHICH APPEARS TO BE "IN EXCESS," "OBSOLETE," OR "NONSTANDARD"

1. The Department directs that great care be taken in recommending for scrap, dump, or sale, stock which appears to be "in excess," "obsolete," or "nonstandard." The Department does not consider it economical to sell material of this character simply because the material appears to be "in excess," "obsolete," or "nonstandard."

2. Commandants, heads of departments, and surveying officers are therefore directed to cooperate in utilizing such material wherever practicable. Yard requisitions for material for special purposes or material for installation in particular places shall carry in the future a certificate by the head of the department concerned that the stock on hand of a similar character or of the approximate size has been examined, and that none of it will answer. If it be considered that stock on hand of the same character or size cannot be economically used the particulars shall be communicated to the bureau concerned for its decision as to the best course to pursue.

3. Consideration should be given to substituting stock on hand for standard material whenever practicable.

4. Commanding officers of vessels should also give this subject close attention in connection with stock carried on board ship.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

--6--
*****

General Order No. 4.

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

SAFETY DEVICES ON MACHINE TOOLS

1. Hereafter all requisitions for machine tools shall include in the specifications a requirement that such appliances shall be provided with safety devices of approved type.

2. In submitting bids for such machine tools, all prospective bidders shall fully describe the general character of the safety devices that they propose to furnish. The officer or official recommending the purchase of such tool shall specifically state that the safety appliances proposed by the manufacturer are of a character that will meet the necessary safety requirements.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 5

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

ADOPTION OF USE OF INVENTIONS, PROPRIETARY ARTICLES, AND COMPOSITIONS

1. Hereafter no bureau or office, or employee in or under the Navy Department, and no officer of the Navy or Marine Corps shall, for or in the interest of the Government, knowingly adopt or use or authorize the adoption or use of any proprietary article or any invention or composition patented or copyrighted, or on which patent or copyright has been applied for, without consent or agreement with the owner, except by specific authorization of the department; provided always that the interests of the naval service will not be injured or jeopardized by delay necessary for obtaining the department's authorization.

2. In all cases where such invention or proprietary article or composition is to be adopted or used without the owner's consent or agreement, full report of the facts and circumstances of the case will be made to the Department without unnecessary delay.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

--7--
*****

General Order No. 6

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

STATUS OF NAVAL VESSELS CARRYING CARGO

While carrying cargo for private commercial account, under Government supervision, vessels manned by naval crews, and operating under the direction of the Navy Department, while not vessels of war in the strict application of the term, are, nevertheless, vessels of war to the extent that they are public vessels of the United States and are, or may be, armed. It is national features, not fighting qualities, that establish the Governmental character of a vessel.

Such vessels, while retaining their public character, are, in all that regards their commercial cargo, subject to the customs regulations of the port where they may be, domestic or foreign, and in all matters relating to such cargo, shall follow the same procedure as private merchant vessels.*

Ships' stores, such as canteen stores, clothing and small stores, commissary stores, being the property of the Government, not landed and not intended to be landed, nor in any manner trafficked in, are exempt from customs duties by the established precedent of international courtesy. However, the declaration of such stores, such as for instance on a store clearance sheet, if required by local customs regulations, should properly be complied with.

When carrying cargo for commercial account, such vessels in foreign ports shall comply with such consular regulations as apply to merchant vessels. This does not apply to cargoes carried for Government account.

In view of the novel and somewhat anomalous situation of such vessels, commanding officers are enjoined to observe scrupulous care in relation to compliance with local customs regulations in ports, foreign and domestic, and to prevent as far as possible, by an exercise of tact and good judgment, disputes with the local authorities. This, however, is not to be interpreted as in any manner impairing the right and duty of the commanding officer to protect the ship and her Government-owned equipment and stores from any search or seizure.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

___________

*NOTE: Secnav ltr. Ser. 5713 of 30 Jan. 1943, modifies the provisions of General Order No. 6 as follows : "Secretary of the Treasury letter dated January 11, 1943, forwarding Bureau of Customs order of the same date (waiving compliance with certain provisions of R. S. 4197 as amended and the Act of April 29, 1902, as amended) permits as being necessary in the conduct of the war vessels of the United States Navy when transporting commercial cargo to depart from ports of the United States for foreign ports or ports in non-contiguous territory of the United States without delivering to the Collector of Customs of the district from which such vessels are about to depart a manifest of all the cargo on board the vessel and without obtaining from the collector a clearance for the vessel and her cargo."

--8--
*****

General Order No. 7, May 13, 1935, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 158, Nov. 13, 1941.

******

General Order No. 8

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

INSIGNIA TO BE WORN ON UNIFORM BY PERSONS NOT IN SERVICE, DEFINITION OF "OCCASION OF CEREMONY"

1. Section 125 of the national defense act, approved June 3, 1916, as amended by section 8 of the naval appropriation act, approved June 4, 1920, provides that members of military societies composed entirely of honorably discharged officers or enlisted men, or both, of the United States Army, Navy, or Marine Corps, regular or volunteer, may, upon occasions of ceremony, wear the uniform duly prescribed by such societies to be worn by the members thereof.

2. It further provides that instructors and members of duly organized cadet corps at certain institutions of learning and under certain conditions may wear the uniform duly prescribed by the authorities of such institutions.

3. This act further provides that the uniform worn by members of the above military societies or by members and instructors of the cadet corps mentioned therein shall include some distinctive mark or insignia to be prescribed by the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy to distinguish such uniforms from the uniforms of the Army, Navy, or Marine Corps.

4. Accordingly, the following mark is hereby designated to be worn by all persons wearing the Naval or Marine Corps uniform as provided above:
A diamond, 3 1/2 inches long in the vertical axis and 2 inches wide in the horizontal axis, of any cloth material, white on blue, forestry green, or khaki clothing and blue on white clothing. This figure shall be worn on all outside clothing on the right sleeve, at the point of the shoulder, the upper tip of the diamond to be one-fourth inch below the shoulder seam.

5. Within the meaning of the above-cited acts, an "occasion of ceremony" shall be construed to be an official function which a person attends in his capacity as a war veteran or as a member of a military society as described in the act of June 3, 1916.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

******

General Order No. 9

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

ARTICLES ON PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTS

1. The Navy Department will maintain no censorship on discussions or articles on professional subjects by persons belonging

--9--

to the Navy. Nevertheless, unrestricted utterance or publication of fact and opinion may divulge information which it is not advisable to make public, and may constitute an offense against military discipline, as "conduct prejudicial to good order and discipline."

2. For information and guidance of the Naval Service this order enumerates some of the limitations which come under the naval regulations:
(a) Articles bearing on the foreign policies of the Government.
(b) Articles offensive to foreign governments.
(c) Open discussion of war plans, proposed or approved strategic and tactical plans, or of new developments in naval material not yet made public.

3. Navy Regulations, 1920, articles 75 1/2 and 76, prescribes the method of caring for "secret and confidential" material. Article 100 (1) forbids praise or censure of other persons in the Naval Service. Article 198 states that the motives of others must not be impugned. Articles 98 and 99 prescribe the methods of redress for wrongs. Article 2027 covers appeals. Regulations also exist for guidance in correspondence.

4. Any communication intended for the public should be composed only after mature reflection, in a spirit of good taste and good temper, and in a seemly and proper manner. The author will be responsible for any statements made.

5. The Navy Department invites and urges officers to submit well-considered ideas and suggestions for improvements relative to naval efficiency. Suggestions based on practical experience are especially desirable. Such communications will be addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, and will be officially acknowledged by the office to which they may be referred. If found to have value, or to indicate more than usual interest in his profession on the part of any officer or man, the fact will be entered on his official record.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 10

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

EXPENDITURES UNDER APPROPRIATION "CONTINGENT, NAVY"

1. To provide for a uniform system whereby a proper record of obligations and expenditures under the appropriation "Contingent, Navy," may be maintained, the following procedure is hereby established:

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2. All authorizations for expenditures under this appropriation will be by allotments granted by the Secretary of the Navy upon requests submitted in letter form; requests will be addressed to the Secretary of the Navy and will be for a specific amount, and will state the purpose for which desired. Allotments will be assigned numbers when granted, which number will be used on every voucher covering expenditures under such allotments. A copy of every allotment granted by the Secretary of the Navy will be furnished by the Department to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts for accounting purposes.

3. Expenditures under allotments will be made only for the purpose specified. The officer to whom an allotment is granted will furnish the disbursing officer designated to make a payment from the appropriation "Contingent, Navy," an order directing such payment, together with a certified copy of the letter granting the allotment under which the obligation was incurred. Both the original order and the certified copy of the letter will be attached to the original copy of the public bill.

4. No requisitions are necessary to cover expenditures under these allotments, the order to make payment and the certified copy of the letter granting the allotment being sufficient authority for the disbursement.

5. In cases where an officer granted an allotment apportions it among officers under him he shall furnish such officers with a certified copy of the Secretary's letter granting the original allotment, in order that the foregoing procedure may be carried out Officers thus receiving suballotments will report to the officer distributing them whenever they are exhausted, or if no more expenditures will be made under them a report will be made of the unexpended balance. Officers to whom the original allotment was granted will make a similar report to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts in connection with the original allotment.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 11

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C. May 13, 1935.

The following organization and methods of administration apply to all Navy Yards:

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF NAVY YARDS AND NAVAL STATIONS

(1) Navy yards and stations exist for the service of the fleet, and chiefly for those services to vessels, of repair, docking, re-

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victualing, and improvement, that are beyond the capacity of the ship's force to accomplish.

(2) The officer ordered to command a navy yard or station is the commandant. He is the representative of the Navy Department in all matters within the limits of the his command, and is responsible to the Department for all business transacted therein. As commanding officer he shall exercise entire control over every part of the yard or station, and Shall have full authority over all persons, civil and naval, employed therein or attached thereto.

(3) The commandant shall execute the Department's policies issued to him from time to time so far as they apply to his command, together with such orders and instructions as he may receive from proper authorities.

(4) It is the duty of the commandant -
(a) To base his plans, methods, decisions, and recommendations upon such approved plans for national defense as may be furnished him from time to time by the Department.
(b) To accomplish the maximum service to the fleet.
(c) To lead the men of his command, whether civil or naval, through sympathetic consideration of their aims and of their needs.
(d) To establish, to maintain, and to enhance, by every practicable means, the spirit of his subordinates, civil as well as naval.
(e) To restrict expenditures to the limitations of funds made available for expenditure within his command.
(f) To secure the performance of work in accordance with priority established by the Department.
(g) To prevent and to avoid waste, whether of funds, of time, or of facilities.
(h) To simplify the organization and methods of administration by concentration of shops, drafting rooms, storehouses, and other facilities to the end that as large a proportion as possible of the total navy yard expenditures shall be devoted to productive labor on approved projects.
(i) To cooperate in every way possible with the Navy Department and with the commanding officers of the vessels at the yard.
(j) To coordinate the work of the various yard activities, to require the faithful and efficient performance of duty by all persons employed within his command, and to enforce within his command the strict observance of law and of regulations.
(k) To exercise a proper supervision over all matters affecting general health, safety, and welfare.
(l) To make recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy in regard to development of the yard or station.

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(m) To keep the Department informed as to the progress of work and the general condition of the command.
(n) To give the Department the benefit of his experience and judgment to assist it in formulating its policies.

(5) It is the intention of these regulations that the commandant, as the representative of the Department, shall, in the exercise of his duties and in accordance with the Department's policies and instructions, make decisions to relieve the Department of detail and to reduce correspondence.

The administration of navy yards and stations is directly under the commandants. The Bureaus of the Department have no cognizance over this administration, but the commandants are responsible for the faithful execution of the Bureaus' orders.

(6) The commandant has power to administer punishment in accordance with the regulations of the Navy and of the civil service, upon any person under his command, who commits any crime or misdemeanor or whose conduct otherwise warrants it.

(7) In the absence of the commandant the senior officer present, eligible by law to exercise command ashore, shall assume command of the station.

(8) The internal organization of any navy yard shall be based upon the service that the yard is expected to render to the fleet in time of war. The relation between the usual peace-time conditions and those that may be met successfully in time of emergency as well as peculiar local conditions, such as facilities available and character of work and of personnel, should determine all decisions made by the commandant in framing the organization of the yard and in modifying the duties charged to any one of his subordinates beyond those hereinafter set forth, which are prescribed as the standard practice for navy yards. The commandant should arrange the internal organization of his command so that ordinary, usual, and smoothly running affairs of the command be not referred to him; to the end that the overcoming of difficulties, adjustment of differences of opinion between subordinates, and troubles, together with the needs and methods of their yards in a large way, shall furnish practically the entire demand upon the time of the commandant.

(9) The principal aids to the commandant are the captain of the yard, whose duties are set forth in Navy Regulations, and the manager, who shall be an officer of experience and demonstrated capacity in the direction of industrial activities.

(10) The commandant shall place the industrial activities of the yard, including the labor force, all facilities for productive shops and offices, the supervision of personnel and facilities of

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the Industrial and Public Works Departments, in the hands of an experienced officer, who shall be called the manager. Unless some officer is specifically detailed for duty as manager, by orders of the Navy Department, the commandant shall select one from his subordinates and assign him to this duty.

(11) The duties of the manager are as follows:
(a) To support the policy and to execute the orders of the commandant.
(b) To assist the commandant in all ways practicable in the execution of his duties as herein set forth.
(c) To coordinate and be responsible to the commandant for the activities placed directly under his charge.
(d) To pass upon requests for work from ships and to decide such requests in accordance with general instructions from the commandant.

(12) The Accounting Officer and the personnel and facilities of the Accounting Department shall be placed directly under the Commandant. The Accounting Department shall render such services to the Industrial and other departments of the yard as the Commandant may direct.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 12

Navy Department,
Washington, D. G., May 13, 1935.

SUGGESTIONS FOR ECONOMY

1. For the purpose of cooperating to the fullest extent with the administration in its expressed policy of reducing expenditures of the Government to the lowest basis consistent with efficiency, the Department desires that suggestions and constructive criticism be submitted by anyone connected with the naval establishment which tend to point out more economical methods of administration than those now in force in the Navy Department and in connection with the operation of United States naval vessels and stations.

2. The criticisms and suggestions herein referred to need not be confined to matters within the scope of the particular duty of the person making them, but it is directed they be addressed to "The Secretary of the Navy (Budget Officer)," submitted via the usual channels to insure the Department having the benefit of the indorsement and comment of the senior officials.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 13

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION OF NAVY YARDS AND NAVAL STATIONS

1. The departmental administration of navy yards and naval stations will be conducted under the immediate supervision of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

2. Specifically, the following activities are included within the purview of this order, and all conflicting regulations shall be changed accordingly:
(a) Administration, organization, and management.
(b) Civilian personnel and labor, and all matters pertaining thereto, including the maintenance of high morale.
(c) Recommendations for complements of officers.
(d) Buildings, grounds, shops, power plants, service lines, and rolling stock.
(e) Plants, machine tools, equipment, and appliances.
(f) Manufacturers and manufacturing processes.
(g) Cost analysis in connection with the determination of economy and efficiency.
(h) Coordinating the assignment of available funds, coordinating the assignment of work on vessels made available for work at yards and stations by the Chief of Naval Operations, and coordinating other work assigned to yards and stations in accordance with their abilities, with a view of maintaining stable labor conditions, consistent with the military needs of the fleet.
(i) Inspections of navy yards and naval stations.
(j) Coordinating the above activities and functions with the war plans and fleet operating schedules.

3. The actual assignment to yards of vessels; the availability of vessels for repairs; the priority of work on vessels; the designs and details of work, repairs, and alterations; and the allotment of funds, will be determined as heretofore by the bureaus and offices responsible therefor under law and regulations.

4. The functions mentioned in paragraph 2 above will be consolidated in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy (Navy Yard Division), except that in the cases of the Bureaus of Supplies and Accounts and Yards and Docks the functions in detail will not be physically consolidated in that office, but an officer of the Supply Corps and an officer of the Corps of Civil Engineers will be ordered to duty in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy (Navy Yard Division).

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5. The consolidated office will also function as a division common to the various bureaus and offices in the discharge of their duties herein consolidated. The several offices and bureaus concerned will furnish the necessary officer and civilian personnel for the consolidated functions of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy (Navy Yard Division).

6. Naval districts, navy yards, and stations will address all correspondence on items (a), (b), (c), (e), (f), (g), and (i) of paragraph 2, and correspondence relating to the work load, to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Correspondence on item (d), paragraph 2, will be addressed to the Bureau of Yards and Docks as heretofore, but in the cases of correspondence relative to important changes, additions, extensive repairs, changes in assignments of buildings and offices, and other matters of which the Assistant Secretary of the Navy should have full knowledge in order that he may at all times have complete information on navy yards, plants, facilities, and activities, a copy will be sent by the writer of the correspondence to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Correspondence relating to assignments of vessels, designs, and details of work, allotments of funds, accounting and supply will, as heretofore, be addressed to the bureaus and offices designated by regulations.

7. The offices of the Navy Yard Division, Secretary's Office, shall be close together in a central location convenient to the office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy. Necessary changes in offices to accomplish this purpose are authorized and directed.

8. This order will go into effect September 12, 1921, except that the preliminary work of organization will be begun at once.

9. This order does not lessen the responsibility and authority given to commandants by General Order No. 11 for the administration of their commands.

10. For the present this order will apply only to the navy yards and naval stations listed below in this paragraph, except that all matters pertaining to civilian personnel and labor in the executive department of the Navy and in the Naval Establishment will without exception, as heretofore, remain under the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and he will assign such of these matters to the Navy Yard Division as he deems advisable.
Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N. H.
Navy Yard, Boston, Mass.
Navy Yard, New York, N. Y.
Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa.
Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va.
Navy Yard, Charleston, S. C.
Naval station, Key West, Fla.

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Naval station, New Orleans, La.
Navy Yard, Mare Island, Calif.
Navy Yard Puget Sound, Wash.
Naval station, Guantanamo, Cuba.
Naval station, Guana, M. I.
Naval station, Pearl Harbor, T. H.
Naval station, Olongapo, P. I.
Naval station, Cavite, P. I.

11. Inspection of the accounts of officers of the Supply Corps, inspections and details of management and work at naval hospitals, marine barracks, naval prisons, and similar activities not affecting the industrial purpose of the yard or station are not included within the purview of this order.

*****

General Order No. 14

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

MEASURES FOR THE PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF VENEREAL DISEASE

1. Most men who come into the Navy are young and inexperienced and are therefore to be warned particularly of the dangers to which they will be exposed if they indulge in illicit sexual relations. Emphasis shall be laid upon the moral and physical evils of incontinence. It shall be made clear that continence is not incompatible with health and the fullest degree of physical and mental vigor.

2. All men of the Navy shall receive thorough instructions as to the nature and dangers of the venereal diseases and they shall be warned that continence is the only sure means of avoiding them. As much use as possible shall be made of literature, posters, lantern slides, or other material provided by the Bureau of Navigation in cooperation with the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery to supplement instructions given by medical officers.

3. All men shall be informed that in case of exposure to venereal infection contrary to instruction, advice and warning, they shall take medical prophylactic treatment as a final recourse to prevent infection.

4. Wherever medical department facilities exist provision will be made for the examination and treatment of men who have acquired a venereal disease or have been exposed to infection. All men upon returning to their ships or stations shall be given

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opportunity to report voluntarily at the dispensary exposure to possible infection without delay, and those reporting that they have been exposed shall receive early medical treatment for purposes of disinfection and continued, treatment until cured if prophylaxis fails. When large liberty parties are sent ashore or other conditions make it advisable, proper facilities for giving prophylactic treatment shall be provided in a suitable place ashore if practicable.

5. Every case of venereal infection, regardless of disability involved, shall be made a matter of statistical record. A daily loose-leaf record shall be kept in the sick bay or medical officer's office of the names of men reporting exposure, together with the date of exposure, name of the port or other place, and the time in hours and minutes elapsing between exposure and prophylactic treatment. Such records shall not be kept permanently but shall be destroyed as soon as the necessary data as to prophylaxis has been obtained from them. Each day the record for the preceding 24 hours shall be signed by the hospital corpsman supervising the treatment, removed from the treatment room, and marked so that names cannot be subsequently entered.

6. Whenever, in the opinion of the senior medical officer, there is reason to believe venereal diseases are being concealed by any member of the crew, he shall, with the approval of the commanding officer, conduct such examination as may be necessary for the detection of concealed cases and place any men that seem to require it under appropriate treatment. Such examinations shall also be made when directed by the commanding officer.

7. Men under treatment for venereal diseases shall not be granted liberty while in an infective stage except in case of urgent business or imperative personal necessity.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 15 of May 13, 1935, canceled by General Order No. 202 of 15 November 1943.

*****

General Order No. 16

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

CUSTOMS INSPECTIONS

1. With reference to the provisions of article 867, Navy Regulations, relative to the lists of dutiable articles to be submitted by personnel on board naval vessels returning to the United

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States ports from foreign waters, it is directed that this information be submitted by commanding officers of such vessels to collectors of customs in a form similar to that given below, on 8 by 10 1/2-inch paper.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

United States Navy Customs Declaration, text below image.
United States Navy Customs Declaration, text below image.

United States Navy Customs Declaration. U.S.S.____, Port of Arrival___, To the Collector of Customs:, Herewith is submitted a list of articles acquired in foreign countries by myself and the respective officers and members of the crew under my command, which list is correct to the best of my knowledge and belief., Owner, Rank, Description of articles, Cost or value, Date___, 19__, Name, ____, Rank___, Commanding Officer, Note. - This form must be filled out and filed with the collector of customs immediately upon arrival from a foreign port. The listed articles should be segregated until formally passed by the customs. If there are no articles to be listed, the statement "Nothing to declare" will suffice.

*****

General Order No. 17

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

COOPERATION BETWEEN ARMY AND NAVY ACTIVITIES WITHIN ARMY CORPS AREAS, DEPARTMENTS, AND NAVAL DISTRICTS

1. In order to insure better cooperation between the Army and the Navy, to the end that the personnel of the two services may be brought into closer contact and have a fuller appreciation and a more sympathetic understanding of the problems that confront them - many of which cover a common field of endeavor - the

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Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy in joint order have agreed:
(a) That the commanding generals of Army corps areas and departments and the commandants of naval districts, whose headquarters are in the same vicinity, shall appoint from among their immediately available officer personnel a permanent local joint planning committee to be composed of not more than three officers from each service. This local joint planning committee will take cognizance of questions referred to it by proper authority, and will originate questions on such local subjects as in its judgment are necessary. It shall be responsible for making reports of its studies and recommendations jointly to the commanding general of the Army corps area or department and the commandant of the naval district concerned. This local joint planning committee shall meet at least once each month.
In cases where the superior headquarters for a given corps area, department, or district are widely separated, advantage may be taken of drawing upon the personnel of two adjacent subordinate activities of the Army and the Navy to compose a local joint planning committee. In cases of this kind it is possible to have more than one planning committee, particularly where there are two or more subordinate activities of major importance distantly removed from the superior headquarters in an extensive corps area, department, or naval district.
(b) That, in addition to the local joint planning committee above provided for, the commanding general and the naval commandant shall designate one or more officers on their staffs through whom close contact with the other service shall be maintained.
(c) That for subordinate activities of the two services whose offices are remote from their superior headquarters but are themselves in the same locality the procedure described in (b) shall apply.
(d) That the Army and the Navy, having due regard for the necessities of the case, shall afford the other service every opportunity for utilizing the facilities under their respective controls.

2. For problems and situations in which agencies of other Government departments have a local interest in common with that of the Army or the Navy, the responsible official of the Army or of the Navy on the spot will cooperate fully and loyally with the local representatives of the other Government departments concerned.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 18 of May 13, 1935, superseded by General Order No. 189 of April 30, 1943.

*****

General Order No. 19 of May 13, 1935, superseded by General Order No. 162 of December 8, 1941.

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*****

General Order No. 20

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

FORFEITURE OF PAY FOR ABSENCE FROM DUTY

1. The act of May 17, 1926, repealed those portions of the acts of April 27, 1914, August 29, 1916, and July 1, 1918, relating to forfeiture of pay on account of absence from duty due to injury, sickness, or disease resulting from the intemperate use of drugs or alcoholic liquors, or other misconduct Accordingly, all portions of the Navy Regulations and Bureau Manuals based on the above-mentioned laws and relating to loss of pay on account of a person's own misconduct are therefore canceled.

2. The act further provides that for all purposes within its scope the period of absence and the cause thereof shall be determined under such procedure and regulations as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Navy. Accordingly, the following shall hereafter govern in such cases:

3. No person in active service in the naval service who shall be absent from his regular duties for more than 1 day at any one time on account of the effects of a disease, as distinguished from injury, which is directly attributable to and immediately follows his own intemperate use of alcoholic liquors or habit-forming drugs, shall, except as hereinafter provided, be entitled to any pay, as distinguished from allowances, for the period of such absence (act of May 17, 1926).

4. No person in active service in the naval service who shall be absent from his regular duties for more than 1 day at any one time on account of the direct effects of a venereal disease, due to his own misconduct, shall, except as hereinafter provided, be entitled to any pay, as distinguished from allowances, for the period of such absence: Provided, That such absence is within a period of 1 year following the appearance of the initial symptoms of such venereal disease and regardless of whether the appearance of the initial symptoms occurs prior or subsequent to the date of entry into the service (act of May 17, 1926).

5. Each person whose pay, as distinguished from allowances, is forfeited for a period in excess of 1 month at any one time pursuant to the above-quoted provisions shall be paid for necessary personal expenses the sum of $5 for each full month during which his pay is so forfeited (act of May 17, 1926).

6. The term "more than 1 day at any one time" shall be construed as meaning more than 1 sick day at any one time as recorded on the person's health record.

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7. The term "injury," as distinguished from "disease," shall be construed as a disability resulting from violence or other external cause.

8. The term "pay," in the case of commissioned officers, warrant officers, midshipmen, and nurses, shall be construed as including all compensation except rental allowance and subsistence allowance. In the case of enlisted men it shall be construed as including all compensation except allowance in lieu of quarters and subsistence, and money allowances granted on account of awards of medals or decorations expressly authorized by Congress, and in the case of enlisted men of the Marine Corps clothing allowance.

9. The term "initial symptoms" shall be construed as the earliest manifestations of the disease commonly appearing after exposure to infection, whether or not recognized at the time of development.

10. The term "full month" shall be construed as the time elapsing from and including a given date in a month to and including the day preceding the corresponding date in the next succeeding month.

11. In every case coming within the provisions of this order the medical officer shall enter in the health record of the person concerned all ascertainable evidence bearing on the origin of the disability, whether resulting from disease or injury being diligent to record all available evidence bearing on the date of the appearance of the initial symptoms in venereal-disease cases as well as evidence in other cases bearing on the question of whether the absence from regular duties for more than 1 day at any one time was on account of the effects of a disease, as distinguished from injury, directly attributable to and immediately following said person's own intemperate use of alcoholic liquor or habit-forming drugs. If, in the medical officer's opinion, the disease in question was acquired as the result of the person's own misconduct he shall also follow the procedure set forth in article 1196, Navy Regulations, 1920.

12. In no case involving absence from regular duties, on account of venereal disease due to own misconduct shall a person be deprived of pay unless such person is absent from regular duties for more than 1 day at any one time, nor shall a person be so deprived of pay if a period of 1 year has elapsed from the date of appearance of the initial symptoms of the venereal disease.

13. In no other case involving absence from regular duties on account of disease due to own misconduct shall a person be deprived of pay unless absent from regular duties for more than

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1 day at any one time on account of the effects of a disease, as distinguished from an injury, which is directly attributable to and immediately follows such person's own intemperate use of alcoholic liquor or habit-forming drugs.

14. Every person who has been absent from his regular duties for a period in excess of 1 full month at any one time shall be paid the sum of $5 for each full month during which his pay is forfeited on account of the effects of a disease which is directly attributable to and immediately follows his own intemperate use of alcoholic liquor or habit-forming drugs, or on account of the direct effects of a venereal disease due to his own misconduct.

16. The act of May 17, 1926, applies only to loss of pay under circumstances above described, and does not repeal the following provisions of the act of August 29, 1916, as amended by the act of July 1, 1918, "That an enlistment shall not be regarded as complete until the enlisted man shall have made good any time in excess of 1 day lost on account of injury, sickness, or disease resulting from his own intemperate use of drugs or alcoholic liquors or other misconduct." The action heretofore required to carry out the provisions of the act of August 29, 1916, as amended and quoted above, will be taken in all cases where applicable.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 21

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

ADMINISTRATION OF SUBMARINE BASES

1. Due to the lack of mobile tenders it is necessary to base several submarine divisions at submarine bases. This assignment of submarine divisions is made from time to time by the Department and is shown in the current "Operating Force Plan."

2. Submarine bases are located at New London, Conn.; Hampton Roads, Va.; Key West, Fla.; Pearl Harbor, T. H.; Cavite, P. I.; and Astoria, Oreg.

3. Bases in a decommissioned status will in all matters of organization, administration, personnel, and material be under the command of the commandant of the district in which located.

4. Bases in an operative status will be administered as hereinafter provided. In their operation, administration, and in all

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matters of personnel and material they will parallel as closely as possible mobile tenders.

5. The bases and submarines and other craft assigned thereto are a part of the United States Fleet or Asiatic Fleet, according to the stations in which they are located, and are under the command of the commander in chief through appropriate force commanders. Bases will be manned and operated by officers and enlisted personnel to the extent required to tend the number of submarines assigned to each base.

6. (a) The commander of a submarine base will be given orders by the department for additional duty in command of submarines and attending craft based thereon. He will, therefore, be the immediate military superior in command of those units, and as such will, in matters of upkeep, discipline, doctrine, and training, be governed by the directions of the commander of the fleet force to which they are assigned. Should the submarines be assigned for training for, or actual operations in district defense, the commander of the submarine base, as commander of the submarines so assigned, will be governed by the orders of the district commandant in such training or operations, but the fleet duty of submarines shall be regarded as paramount.

(b) The personnel of the bases, not included in the crews of the vessels based thereon, will be attached to the submarine base.

(c) The officer personnel of the submarines and attending craft based thereon will be assigned and ordered by the department.

7. In general, all matters on submarine bases affecting the internal organization and administration of the naval district are under the control of the district commandant. Public works and public utilities will be provided and maintained in the same manner as in nonindustrial shore stations. This class of work will, in general, be performed by civilian labor of a public works department or under Yards and Docks' contracts and charged to allotments authorized by the Bureau of Yards and Docks from its appropriations. The upkeep and operation of power plants and water supply will be duties of the public works department. Where the public works department is solely or chiefly concerned with the submarine base, its requisitions and purchases and the payment of its civilian rolls will be handled by a Supply Corps officer attached to the submarine organization.

8. Accounts and returns, records, reports, etc., required by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts will be kept and made by officers of the Supply Corps attached to the bases as prescribed in the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts Manual. Allotments of funds under appropriations for the maintenance and operation of the shore establishment part of the bases shall be requested of

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the several bureaus in the same manner as for any other shore station. The pay accounts of the officer and enlisted personnel of the bases will be carried on separate rolls from those of the personnel manning vessels assigned by the department to the bases. All relations with the material bureaus in connection with submarines assigned to the bases will be exactly the same as that for mobile submarine divisions.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 22 revised in its entirety by General Order No. 133.

*****

General Order No. 23 canceled and replaced by General Order No. 131.

*****

General Order No. 24

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

INSCRIPTIONS ON OFFICIAL MATTER FREE OF POSTAGE UNDER THE PENALTY PRIVILEGE

1. The Postmaster General has called the attention of the Secretary of the Navy to numerous instances of improper inscriptions appearing on official matter free of postage under the penalty privilege contrary to Postal Laws and Regulations. The following is given as an example of correctly printed matter which should appear on official matter free of postage under the penalty privilege:

Penalty privilege form, text below image.
Penalty privilege form, text below image.

(Upper left corner), "Navy Department, Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., Supply Department, Official Business.", (Upper right corner), "Penalty for private use to avoid payment of postage, $300."

Another example is as follows:

Penalty privilege form, text below image.
Penalty privilege form, text below image.

"Navy Department, U.S.S. Hulbert, Asiatic Station, Via Seattle, Wash., Official Business" "Penalty for private use to avoid payment of postage, $300."

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2. Hereafter inscriptions appearing on official matter free of postage under the penalty privilege will be printed in accordance with the Postal Laws and Regulations.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 25 of May 13, 1935, canceled and replaced by General Order No. 157 of October 23, 1941.

*****

General Order No. 26

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

JOINT WAR-NAVY POLICY REGARDING RELEASE OF INFORMATION ON AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES

1. The following policy approved by the Secretary of War and by the Secretary of the Navy on 6 July 1934 is published for information and guidance:
Release for publication of information on the characteristics or performance of aircraft or engines produced solely for the War or Navy Departments shall be made only by the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy, or by such offices as the respective Secretaries may designate. In general, such information shall not be released on service models until 1 year after going into production. Information on experimental models which are accepted as a basis for production shall be withheld until 1 year after going into production. Information on experimental models which are rejected as a basis for production may, upon approval of application, be released as soon as the airplane or engine is definitely rejected for service use. Exceptions to the foregoing may be made at the discretion of the offices authorized to release information when such exceptions appear to be in the interest of the government.

2. The Chief of Naval Operations is designated as the agency through which releases of information regarding naval aircraft and engines will be made.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 27

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

OUTLINE OF EXAMINATIONS FOE LINE CHIEF WARRANT OFFICERS

1. The following outline of examinations for line chief warrant officers is published for the information of the naval service.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

FOR PERMANENT GRADE OF CHIEF BOATSWAIN

(1) The examination will be based on the following subjects:
(a) General information and instructions -

(1) United States Navy Regulations.
(2) Bureau manuals.
(3) General orders.
(4) Duties of a boatswain.
(5) Duties of a division officer.
(6) Duties of the officer of the deck.
(7) Duties of a boat officer.
(8) Official correspondence.
(9) Current history.
(10) Geography.
(11) Arithmetic - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, ratio, percentage, interest, fractions (common and decimal), cancelation, proportion, and mensuration.

(b) Seamanship -

(1) Boats - types, equipment, and construction.
(2) Handling of boats under (1) oars, (2) sail, (3) power.
(3) Boat salutes.
(4) Lowering and hoisting of boats.
(5) Cordage, canvas, and purchases.
(6) Anchor gear, cables, anchoring, mooring, clearing hawse, and docking.
(7) Rules for preventing collisions - international and inland.
(8) Signals - (1) semaphore, (2) lights, (3) flags.
(9) General knowledge of ship's construction - nomenclature; division by decks and compartments; numbering of compartments; drainage system; preservation of hull.
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(b) Seamanship - Continued.

(10) Handling of ships alongside docks and at sea.
(11) Towing; use of oil at sea.
(12) Handling of boats in a surf.
(13) Carrying out anchors and kedging.
(14) Laws of storms.
(15) Buoyage system in the United States.

(c) Ordnance and gunnery -

(1)Duties of beach master.
(2)Landing Force Manual, United States Navy: Drill regulations - definitions, introduction, and general rules for drills and formations.
Infantry - weapons, orders, commands, and signals.
Infantry drill - school of the recruit, the squad, the platoon, and the company.
Artillery - general principles, organization, etc.; school of the platoon.

(d) Navigation and piloting -

(1) Detailed description of magnetic compass, binnacle, and compensator; compass error, variation, deviation; how to apply compass error.
(2) Piloting vessels in channels and harbors and along coasts; fixing positions on soundings by various methods; knowledge of methods of plotting position by radio compass bearings.
(3) Navigating by dead reckoning, use of patent log speed - R. P. M.
(4) Use of charts, use of Notices to Mariners, correction of charts.
(5) Tides, tide tables.
(6) Winding chronometer, chronometer error by radio-time signal.
(7) Description of the sextant - adjustments to a sextant.

(e) Aviation seamanship -

(1) General knowledge of the handling and arresting gear for aircraft.
(2) General knowledge of the handling of aircraft aboard ship, in hangars, on the ground, and on the water.
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(e) Aviation seamanship - Continued.

(3) General knowledge of approaching aircraft in small boats, taking aircraft in tow, hoisting aboard, use of slings, towing bridles, mooring and unmooring aircraft, and general aviation seamanship.
(4) Knowledge of the rules of the road for aircraft.
(5) General knowledge of equipment necessary in aircraft operating from a base independently or extended flights.

(f) Optional questions for boatswains performing aviation duty will be based on the following subjects -

(1) A detailed knowledge (e) (1-5) above.
(2) A detailed knowledge of the alignment and rigging of standard types of naval aircraft.
(3) Knowledge of personnel and material required to operate a given number of aircraft and to carry on routine overhaul and repair. Same for rigid airships.
(4) Detailed knowledge of fabrics, wing and fuselage, covering and doping.
(5) Detailed knowledge of laying out a balloon for inflation, deflating, and packing.
(6) Knowledge of mooring and unmooring a rigid air ship and stowing in hangar.

FOR PERMANENT GRADE OF CHIEF GUNNER
(1) The examination will be based on the following subjects:
(a) General information and instructions -

(1) United States Navy Regulations.
(2) Bureau manuals.
(3) General orders.
(4) Duties of a gunner.
(5) Duties of a division officer.
(6) Duties of the officer of the deck.
(7) Duties of a boat officer.
(8) Official correspondence.
(9) Current history.
(10) Geography.
(11) Arithmetic - addition subtraction, multiplication, division, ratio, percentage, interest, common and decimal fractions, cancelation, proportion, and mensuration.
--29--

(b) Seamanship -

(1) Rules for preventing collisions--international and inland; buoyage system in the United States.
(2) Loading guns in boats and landing guns from boats.
(3) Handling boats in a surf.

(c) Ordnance and gunnery -

(1) Thorough knowledge of Landing Force Manual, United States Navy.
(2) Naval ordnance: Service explosives; recoil and counterrecoil systems; naval rifled guns; details of gun construction; naval gun mounts; breech mechanisms; naval gun sights; firing attachments and gas-expelling devices: armor; projectiles; ammunition and ammunition stowage; naval proving ground work; aircraft; antiaircraft and field guns.
(3) Ammunition and explosives: Making up of service ammunition and explosives; tests and inspection of all service ammunition; safety precautions; pyrotechnics; erosion; and dispersion. (Reference, Ordnance Pamphlet No. 4.)
(4) Torpedoes and accessories: Torpedoes; torpedo tubes; air compressors; accumulators; and separators. (Reference, Ordnance Pamphlet No. 3.)
(5) Fire control: General knowledge of fire control; all batteries. (Reference, Ordnance Pamphlet No. 0.)
(6) Turret installations. (Reference, Ordnance Pamphlet No. 0.)
(7) Mines. (Reference, Ordnance Manual on Mines.)
(8) Small arms and machine guns. (Reference, Ordnance Manual.)
(9) Diving. (Reference, Bureau Construction and Repair Diving Manual.)
(10) Aircraft ordnance: A general knowledge of all aircraft ordnance equipment, such as bombs, bomb fuzes, and bomb sights; aircraft machine guns, machine-gun mounts, and machine-gun synchronizers; aircraft gun sights; aircraft torpedo accessories; and aircraft catapults.

(d) Optional questions for gunners performing aviation duty.

(1) A detailed knowledge of (c) (10) above.
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FOR PERMANENT GRADE OF CHIEF ELECTRICIAN

(1) The examination will be based on the following subjects:
(a) General information and instruction:

(1) United States Navy Regulations.
(2) Bureau manuals.
(3) General orders.
(4) Duties of an electrician.
(5) Duties of a division officer.
(6) Duties of a boat officer.
(7) Official correspondence.
(8) Current history.
(9) Geography.
(10) Arithmetic - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, ratio, percentage, interest, common and decimal fractions, cancelation, proportion, and mensuration.

(b) Electricity:

(1) Units.
(2) Construction, care, repair, and operation of A. C. and D. C. generators and motors.
(3) Switchboards.
(4) Wiring systems.
(5) Instruments.
(6) Safety devices.
(7) Starting devices.
(8) Interior communications.
(9) Fire control.
(10) Gyrocompass.
(11) Searchlights - care and operation.
(12) Storage batteries - care and operation.
(13) Operation and care of dynamo-room machinery.
(14) Telephones.

(c) Radio apparatus and radio compass - care and operation, elementary knowledge of.

FOR PERMANENT GRADE OF CHIEF RADIO ELECTRICIAN

(1) The examination will be based on the following subjects:
(a) General information and instructions:

(1) United States Navy Regulations.
(2) Bureau manuals.
(3) General orders.
(4) Duties of a radio electrician.
(5) Duties of a division officer.
(6) Boat salutes.
--31--

(a) General Information and Instruction - Continued.

(7) Official correspondence.
(8) Current history.
(9) Geography.
(10) Arithmetic - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, ratio, percentage, interest, common and decimal fractions, cancelation, proportion, and mensuration.

(b) Electricity:

(1) Units.
(2) Construction, care, repair, and operation of A. C. and D. C. generators and motors.
(3) Switchboards.
(4) Wiring systems.
(5) Instruments.
(6) Safety devices.
(7) Starting devices.
(8) Interior communication.
(9) Batteries--care, repair, and operation.

(c) Radio and communications:

(1) Radio apparatus - detailed, theoretical, and practical knowledge of the construction, care, repair, and operation of modern radio transmitters from source of power to antenna, and of modern receivers.
(2) Radio compasses ashore and afloat - detailed knowledge, theory, operation, repair, etc.
(3) Sonic apparatus, transmitters, and receivers - detailed knowledge, theory, operation, repair, etc.
(4) Electrical measurements; the more usual measurements used in radio, such as measuring the decrement, the resistance of ground and antenna, the input and output of transmitters, tuning transmitters, measuring the capacity of an antenna, etc.
(5) Standard radio equipment of different types of ships and aircraft.
(6) Expert knowledge of operating; Continental and Morse codes, and of naval procedure, international procedure, and land-line procedure.
(7) Detailed knowledge of the Communication Instructions, U. S. Navy, Commercial Traffic Regulations, and Fleet Regulations, Instructions and Letters on Radio and Communications.
--32--

(c) Radio and communication--Continued.

(8) Radio organization of the fleet and organization of the communication service in the fleet and on individual ships.
(9) Organization of the communication service on shore, including the routing and handling of traffic for the fleet.
(10) Genera] knowledge of publications required in the radio room and communication office on board ship, including the use of codes which are accessible to enlisted personnel.
(11) Handling and abstracting of commercial traffic.
(12) Fleet organization and administration.

(d) Optional questions for radio electricians performing aviation duty will be based on the following subjects:

(1) Detailed knowledge of aircraft radio sets.
(2) Detailed knowledge of aircraft radio generators.
(3) Detailed knowledge of spares, shop equipment, and personnel necessary to operate any given number of aircraft radio.
(4) Knowledge of adjustment, ordinary troubles, and repair of aircraft radio.

FOR PERMANENT GRADE OF CHIEF MACHINIST

(1) The examination will be based on the following subjects:
(a) General information and instructions:

(1) United States Navy Regulations.
(2) Bureau manuals.
(3) General orders.
(4) Duties of a machinist.
(5) Duties of a division officer.
(6) Official correspondence.
(7) Current history.
(8) Geography.
(9) Arithmetic - addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, ratio, percentage, interest, common and decimal fractions, cancellation, proportion, and mensuration.

(b) Engineering:

(1) Main engines -
Inspection, alignment, adjustment, care, repair, safety precautions, and operation of reciprocating engines, turbines, diesel engines, and electric drive.
Sketches and description of engines and parts.
Oils and materials.
--33--

(b) Engineering -Continued.

(2) Boilers -
Sketches and description of various types used in the Navy, including all fittings and piping. Cleaning, testing, and inspection.
Operation, safety precautions, and casualties. Gas analysis and fuels.
(3) Internal-combustion engines, 2-cycle, 4-cycle, gasoline, and Diesel - care, repair, and operation. Safety precautions.
(4) Auxiliaries - sketches, description, repair, adjustment, operation, casualties, and safety precautions of all auxiliary machinery on board ship (including machine shop, blacksmith shop, coppersmith shop, and foundry practice).
(5) Storage batteries - care and operation.

(c) Optional questions for machinists performing aviation duty will be based on the following subjects:

(1) Detailed knowledge of aviation engines, water cooled and air cooled.
(2) Detailed knowledge of personnel and material required to operate given numbers of aircraft and carry on routine overhaul and repairs. Same for rigid airships.
(3) Detailed knowledge of repair and overhaul of all types of aviation engines.
(4) Detailed knowledge of aviation metals, their characteristics and uses.
(5) Detailed knowledge of aviation metal working and repairs.
(6) Detailed knowledge of machine tools and machine-shop practice.
(7) Detailed knowledge of rigging and alignment of standard types of naval aircraft.
(8) Knowledge of launching and arresting gear for aircraft.
(9) Detailed knowledge of aircraft-engine accessories, such as starters, generators, magnetos, and gun synchronizers. Ability to balance and adjust propellers.
(10) Detailed knowledge of aircraft engine installations - fuel systems, cooling systems, lubrication systems, including oil, and water radiators.
--34--

General Order No. 28 of May 15, 1935, canceled by SecNav letter SO (Pub) Jam ;mds of June 15, 1942. (Published in Navy Department Semimonthly Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 3, dated July 1, 1942).

*****

General Order No. 29

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

IMPORTATION OF RUMINANTS, SWINE, AND OTHER ANIMALS INTO UNITED STATES

1. In order to prevent the introduction into the United States of serious diseases of livestock including foot-and-mouth disease, rinderpest, contagious pleuropneumonia, and surra, no ruminants or swine will be landed in the United States from foreign countries except Canada without first obtaining a permit from the Secretary of Agriculture. This permit which is in two sections must be obtained in time to present the first part to the American consul at the port of shipment and the second part to the collector of customs at the port of entry specified therein at which place the animal or animals will be inspected. Animals other than ruminants and swine will not be landed upon arrival at a United States port without a permit of the Secretary of Agriculture for presentation to the collector of customs.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 30

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

ADMINISTRATION OF RECEIVING SHIPS AND RECEIVING STATIONS

1. All activities concerned with the housing of personnel of the Navy on general detail, except where a ship is used, shall be known as receiving stations.

2. In order to simplify the administration of receiving stations and to furnish a basis for determining appropriation charges, it is directed that orders and regulations affecting receiving ships, as far as they may be applicable, govern the administration of re-

--35--

ceiving stations and that the cost of all materials necessary for the operation of receiving stations be charged to appropriations and be under the cognizance of the same bureaus as if the materials were purchased for or issued to a ship in commission, except that public works and public utilities will be under the cognizance of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, which bureau shall be responsible for furnishing heat, light, power, fuel for galleys, furniture, permanent fixtures, materials for repairs, and such skilled labor as may not be included in the personnel available to the receiving stations.

3. The several bureaus will authorize quarterly limitations for receiving stations and receiving ships to provide for expenditures chargeable to appropriations under their cognizance. Such limitations will not be cumulative, and when a vessel having quarterly allotments is assigned to duty as a receiving ship the quarterly allotments will be discontinued and the vessel will operate under the quarterly limitations provided for the receiving ship.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 31

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C. May 13, 1935.

INVENTION BY OFFICERS AND MEN IN THE NAVAL SERVICE AND EMPLOYEES CONNECTED WITH THE NAVAL ESTABLISHMENT

1. So far as affects rights pertaining to inventions and patents, the status of persons in the naval service is similar to that of persons in other occupations, and in connection with such rights the relation between the Navy Department and each person in its service, whether officer, enlisted person, or civilian employee (all referred to hereinafter as employee) is the relation between employer and employee; and the Navy Department recognizes the rights of the employee in and to inventions and patents as established by the law pertaining to employer and employee, with certain exceptions incident to Government service.

2. Those rights in each case must be determined by the facts in the particular case. For the purpose of illustration, however, there are described below certain assumed situations based on facts and circumstances that frequently occur, in which the respective rights of the parties may be clearly defined.

(a) The title to the invention and to any patent secured on it by the employee vests in the employer when:

An employee is directed to make or improve a specific device, means, method, or process, and in the performance
--36--
of such duty he makes an invention directly bearing upon that particular device, means, method, or process, or

 

The complete control of the invention is necessary in order for the employer to realize all the benefits which he anticipated would flow to him by the employment of the employee.

(b) The title to the invention and to any patent secured on it by the employee, including all commercial and foreign rights, resides in the employee, but subject to a license to the employer when

An employee not assigned to duty as in (a) makes an invention and uses the employer's time or facilities or other employees in the development of the invention. In such case the Navy Department requires a nonexclusive, irrevocable, and unlimited right to make and use, and have made for the Government's use, devices embodying the invention, and to sell such devices as provided for by law regarding the sale of public property.

(c) The title to the invention and to any patents secured on it by the employee is the property of the employee, subject to no right of the employer when

An employee makes an invention not within the circumstances defined in (a) or (b) or concerning which he is not otherwise obligated to the employer.

3. Where the Navy Department does not have the title to or right to use the invention, compensation to the employee for any use of the invention by the Navy Department will be proper matter for an agreement conformable to law between the Navy Department and the employee.

4. In the interest of the Government every person in the naval service and every employee of the Naval Establishment who makes an invention is hereby urged to furnish information thereof to the Navy Department promptly through official channels. To assist the Navy Department in determining the rights of the Government and the inventor, a summary of the circumstances should be included in the indorsement of the commanding officer. Such information should be furnished irrespective of the rights of the individual. In cases where the Government has the title to or right to use the invention, the Navy Department will proceed with the application for letters patent in the name of the inventor in order to protect the interests of the Government. In cases where the Government has no title or right to use the invention, but the invention is deemed useful to the Government, the Navy Department will, on request of the inventor, undertake the prosecution of the application for

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letters patent upon execution of a license, of the scope previously defined, to the Government. Under other circumstances the inventor will be left free to secure a patent in such manner as he may choose.

5. In the event an employee makes an invention that appears to be of such military character that in the interest of the national defense the invention should be kept secret, the inventor is hereby required to make a full and complete disclosure thereof to the Secretary of the Navy direct. If the Navy Department should decide after consideration that such invention should be kept secret, the matter of compensation will be the subject of agreement between the inventor and the Navy Department conformable to law. If an invention of military value is made and is adopted as part of the national defense, the disclosure of the invention to persons not authorized to receive the information may involve a violation of the national defense act.

6. The foregoing is not to be understood as conflicting in any way with the provisions in the act of July 1, 1918, for compensating civilians for valuable suggestions, which reads as follows:

"That the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized, in his discretion and under such rules and regulations as he may prescribe, to pay cash rewards to civilian employees of the Navy Department or the Naval Establishment or other persons in civil life when due to a suggestion or series of suggestions by them there results an improvement or economy in manufacturing process or plant or naval material; Provided, That such sums as may be awarded to employees or other persons in civil life in accordance with this act shall be paid them out of current naval appropriations in addition to their usual compensation: Provided further, That no employee or other person in civil life shall be paid a reward under this act until he has properly executed an agreement to the effect that the use by the United States of the suggestions or series of suggestions made by him shall not form the basis of a further claim of any nature from the United States by him, his heirs, or assigns" (40 Stat. 718).

7. It must be remembered that it should be the first thought of every officer and man and every civilian employee to perform the duty to which he is assigned to the best of his ability; and if in this performance improvements in a device, means, method, and process are made, it is a sign of ability and devotion to service, and this the Navy Department will recognize, giving due credit therefor on the official record.

8. The Navy Department is bound to respect the property rights of persons in the naval service and employees connected with the Naval Establishment under their patents, but no restrictions can be placed on the right of the Government, irrespec-

--38-

tive of the question of compensation, to use any invention for public purposes whether it is protected or not by patent. If agreement cannot be effected with the owner before the use, the matter of compensation will be left to subsequent determination.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 32 revised in its entirety by General Order No. 125.

*****

General order No. 33 canceled by General Order No. 94.

*****

General Order No. 34

Navy Department,
Washington D. C., May 13, 1935.

FEDERAL STANDARD STOCK CATALOGUE

1. Bulletin No. 116 of the office of the Chief Coordinator, dated January 20, 1930, is quoted for the information and guidance of all persons in the Navy.

Office of the Chief Coordinator,
Washington, January 20, 1930.

Bulletin No. 116.

To the Heads of all departments and establishments.

Subject: Federal Standard Stock Catalogue.

1. In accordance with the provisions of Bureau of the Budget Circular No. 260 of March 29, 1929, the sections of the Federal Standard Stock Catalogue, as far as applicable, shall be binding upon and govern all departments, bureaus, agencies, and offices of the Government in accordance with the following regulations:
(a) The nomenclature, description, classification, and stock number assigned to each stock item appearing in the Federal Standard Stock Catalogue shall be used in all official papers pertaining to items of supply, and all official correspondence relative thereto, which enter into interdepartmental communications.

H. H. Rousseau,
Chief Coordinator.

2. It is further directed that in intradepartmental communications the nomenclature, description, classification, and stock number assigned to each stock item appearing in the Federal Standard Stock Catalogue shall be used in requisitions, inspection calls, issuing and shipping memoranda, invoices, surveys, and all

--39--

other official papers of every description pertaining thereto, both afloat and ashore.

3. Until further orders, the provisions of this general order are not applicable to the Bureau of Ordnance, the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, or the Marine Corps.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 35 canceled by General Order No. 96.

*****

General Order No. 36 of May 13, 1935, canceled by General Order No. 178 of July 29, 1942.

*****

General Order No. 37 canceled by General Order No. 121.

*****

General Order No. 38

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

USE OF HOLYSTONES TO CLEAN WOODEN DECKS

1. The use of holystones for cleaning the wooden decks of naval vessels wears down the decks so rapidly that their repair or replacement has become an item of expense to the Navy Department which cannot be met under limited appropriations.

2. The wooden decks of the new 10,000-ton light cruisers are so light that they may be made unserviceable very rapidly by the use of holystones.

3. It is therefore directed that the use of holystones or similar material for cleaning wooden decks be restricted to the removal of stains.

4. Wooden decks will usually be cleaned with brushes and sand or by such other means as will not cause excessive wear.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 39 canceled by General Order No. 110.

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*****

General Order No. 40

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

REPORTS OF LANDINGS MADE BY THE NAVY AND MARINE CORPS FORCES

1. Article 712, United States Navy Regulations, requires that a report from the commanders of divisions or from the commanding officers of ships be submitted to the Commander in Chief after a battle or action of any kind or any important service or duty.

2. It is directed that a report made in accordance with Article 712, United States Navy Regulations, be submitted in the case of all landings of bluejackets and marines made as a precautionary measure, for the actual protection of American lives or for any purpose other than drill, recreation, parades, or usual police duties.

3. The report required by paragraph 2 will include the names of ships and places concerned, numbers of officers and men of the Navy and Marine Corps landed, date, purpose of landing, and account of services or duty performed ashore. Upon withdrawal in whole or in part of forces landed the report will show the reason for withdrawal, the date, and the number of officers and men of the Navy and Marine Corps withdrawn.

4. One copy of this report and all endorsements thereon will be forwarded direct to the Chief of Naval Operations (Office of Naval Intelligence).

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 41 canceled by General Order No. 124.

*****

General Order No. 42 of May 13, 1935, canceled and replaced by General Order No. 199 of 2 August 1943.

*****

General Order No. 43 canceled by General Order No. 121.

*****

General Order No. 44 superseded by General Order No. 81.

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*****

General Order No. 45

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

DESIGNATION OF CERTAIN NAVAL OPERATING BASES AND NAVAL STATIONS

1. The provisions of this general order will become effective July 1, 1932.

Paragraph 2 canceled by G. O. 145.

3. The naval operating bases at New Orleans, Pearl Harbor, and in the Canal Zone are hereby abolished.

4. The naval property at Algiers, La., is hereby designated as the United States naval station, New Orleans.

5. Paragraph 5 canceled and replaced by SecNav Letter, Serial 69113 of May 11, 1943.

6. The naval operating bases at Norfolk, San Diego, and San Francisco will continue in existence and will comprise the following administrative establishments:
Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, Va.
Naval training station.
Receiving station.
Naval supply depot.
Marine depot of supplies.
Marine barracks.
Submarine base (inoperative).

Naval Operating Base, San Diego, Calif.
Naval training station.
Naval supply depot.
Naval fuel depot
Receiving ship.
Marine base.

Air squadrons, West Coast
Expeditionary Force.

Naval Operating Base, San Francisco, Calif.
Naval training station (inoperative).
Receiving ship.
Naval fuel depot (inoperative).
Naval air station, Sunnyvale.
Naval radio station.
Navy freight wharf.

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7. Naval operating bases will be administered in accordance with article 1487, United States Navy Regulations, 1920.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 46 superseded by General Order No. 83.

*****

General Order No. 47

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

PRECEDENCE OF FORCES IN PARADES

1. In parades of forces which include United States troops the order of precedence will be as follows:

(a) Cadets, United States Military Academy.
(b) Midshipmen, United States Naval Academy.
(c) Cadets, United States Coast Guard.
(d) Regular Army.
(e) United States Marines.
(f) United States Navy.
(g) United States Coast Guard.
(h) National Guard organizations which have been federally recognized.
(i) Marine Corps Reserve.
(j) Naval Reserve.
(k) Other organizations of the Organized Reserve, National Guard, Naval Militia, Reserve Officers' Training Corps, and other training units in the order prescribed by the grand marshal of the parade.
(i) Veterans and patriotic organizations in the order prescribed by the grand marshal of the parade.

2. The grand marshal and his staff will in all cases lead the parade. A detachment of police or special forces may be assigned to precede the grand marshal for the purpose of clearing the line of march.

3. (a) When foreign troops are invited to participate in parades within the Territorial jurisdiction of the United States they will be assigned a position of honor ahead of United States troops, and next after the grand marshal and his staff, except that a small detachment of United States troops will immediately precede the foreign troops as a guard of honor.
(b) On occasions when troops of two or more foreign nations participate the order of precedence among them will be determined

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by the grand marshal in accordance with the one of the following methods which he deems appropriate.
(c) When the parade or exercise is in honor of a particular nation, as, for example, in the celebration of a national holiday of that nation, the troops of such nation should be assigned a position in the line ahead of all others.
(d) Except as provided in (c), the order of precedence among foreign troops will normally be fixed by

(1) The relative ranks of the commanders of the forces from which the parade detachments are drawn, but in cases where this method is not applicable, it may be fixed by
(2) The relative ranks of the commanders of the parade detachments; or
(3) The alphabetical order in the English language of the names of the nations concerned.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 48

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

OUTLINE OF EXAMINATIONS FOR LINE OFFICERS

1. The following outline of examinations for line officers is published for the information of the naval service.

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF CAPTAIN
(a) Strategy and Tactics.
(b) Aviation, Communications and Security, questions on the strategical aspects of.
(c) International Law, practical situations, action taken and reasons. Questions belonging to the following subjects may be expected: Neutrality; Blockade; War, Treaties, Policies; Contraband, Prizes; Sovereignty; Insurgency.

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF COMMANDER
(a) General. - Duties of commanding officers, handling ships, navigation, Navy Regulations and customs of the service, a general knowledge of the machinery and gunnery installations in different types of naval vessels. Duties of executive officers of first-class ships.
(b) Military law. - This may be included in (a). Duties of commanding officer as regards discipline, punishments, courts and boards, honors, salutes, etc.

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(c) International law. - Practical situations, action taken and reasons. Questions dealing with the following subjects may be expected: Neutrality; Blockade; War; Treaties; Policies; Contraband, Prize; Sovereignty; Insurgency.
(d) Strategy and tactics, communications. - Scouting and screening, information and security. The examination may include a practical problem covering the estimate of the situation and formulation of orders. Disposition and movements of forces may be required to be shown on a chart. Joint action Army and Navy; strategic raw materials. Communications (organization, administration, and operation). (See G. O. 22.)
(e) Aviation. - Aviation organization, aircraft designations, marking; mission and requirements of different types; scouting, tactics, communications.

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF LIEUTENANT COMMANDER

(a) Seamanship. - Duties of commanding officer of destroyers, gunboats, or other small vessels; of executive officer; of navigator; of first lieutenant; handling of ship; organization and care of personnel and ship; Navy Regulations; customs of service; intercourse with foreign and United States officials, both civil and military. Boats; ground tackle; laws of storms; rules of road, including collision cases; stability control; towing; the mooring board; oiling at sea; paravanes, mine sweeping; and dry docking.
(b) Military law. - Duties of (1) commanding officer as regards discipline and administration of justice; (2) president of general court-martial; (3) senior officer of other courts or boards; (4) questions of precedence; (5) procedure in dealing with foreigners and United States officials, both military and civil; (6) punishments; (7) duties of a judge advocate of courts; (8) senior member of summary court-martial and boards; (9) limitations and duties of courts and boards.
(c) International law. - Practical situations, action taken and reasons. Questions dealing with the following subjects may be expected: Neutrality; blockade; war, treaties, policies; contraband, prize; sovereignty; insurgency.
(d) Strategy and tactics, communications. - Scouting and screening, information and security. The examination may include a practical problem covering the estimate of the situation and formulation of orders. Disposition and movements of forces may be required to be shown on a chart. Joint action Army and Navy; strategic raw materials. Communications (organization administration, and operation). (See G. O. 21.)

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(e) Aviation. - Aviation organization, aircraft designations, marking; mission and requirements of different types; catapult operation; scouting, tactics, communications.
(f) Navigation (practical). - Day's work. Work may he required to be plotted.
(g) Navigation and piloting. - Grounding cases, charts, lights, buoyage, tides, navigational instruments, piloting, radio bearings (plot of fix) ; compass, magnetic and gyro; problems requiring a knowledge of time and astronomical projections; functions of Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office.
(h) Ordnance and gunnery. - Fire control, including instruments; defense against air attacks; spotting; battery duties; projectiles, fuses, primers, powder, including safety orders and precautions; guns; mounts; turrets; ammunition stowage and handling; torpedoes; depth charges; mines; training and organization of landing force; gas warfare and gas-warfare defense,
(i) Hull, propelling plant, machinery, and equipment. - (1) General: Manufacture of various metals and alloys, their properties and uses and application in marine engines; properties of steam and its application to the development of power; fuels.
(2) Boilers : Description and discussion of various types; methods of firing and value of fuels; equipment of firerooms.
(3) Main engines: Description and discussion of various types of propelling machinery for naval vessels.
(4) Main engine details: Sketches, description, and construction of all parts of propelling machinery.
(5) Auxiliaries: Sketches, description, and uses of all auxiliary machinery, including those under cognizance of C. & R.
(6) Internal-combustion engines: Description and theory of various types of Diesel, semi-Diesel, and gasoline engines.
(7) Operation and management: Methods of operation to secure efficiency; casualties, precautions, and care of all classes of naval machinery.
(8) Repairs: Description of manner of fitting and repairing parts of all machinery and boilers; tools and shopwork.
(9) Regulations Navy Regulations; Manual of Engineering Instructions; care of stores and all regulations and matter necessary for duty in the engineer division.
(10) Materials, tests, and inspections.
(11) Piping systems (air, oil, fresh and salt water, drainage), draft marks and gauges, fire-fighting apparatus, stowage and handling of inflammable materials.
(12) Corrosion; paints and painting.
(13) Compartmentation, water-tight integrity, protection against underwater explosions, precautions in entering closed compartments.

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(14) Hull boards, hull reports, docking reports, hull book, C. & R. machinery records.
(j) Electricity. - (1) General; fundamental principles and definitions of terms and units; principles of generators, motors, primary and storage batteries.
(2) Batteries, generators, and motors: Description, construction, care, and operation.
(3) Switchboards and instruments: Sketches, description, operation, and uses of, as furnished on naval vessels.
(4) Lighting, wiring, and interior communication: Description, installation, care of, and uses; detection and corrections of faults in.
(5) Radio, sound, and gyrocompass: Principle and operation of radiotelegraph and radiotelephone installations, including radio direction finder; principle and operation of all underwater sound and listening devices; principle and operation of gyrocompasses.
(k) Engineering, aeronautics. - (1) Heavier-than-air machines: Theory of explosive engines; description of various types of engines used in naval service, combustion, ignition, lubricating, and cooling systems in use; requirements and care of.
(2) Lighter-than-air machines: Properties, characteristics, and laws of gases used; manufacture and care in handling same; types and description of propulsive engines used with dirigibles; care and operation of same.

TO PERMANENT GRADES OF LIEUTENANT AND LIEUTENANT (JR. GR.), AND FOR ORIGINAL APPOINTMENT AS ENSIGN

(a) Seamanship. - Duties of commanding officer of destroyers or smaller vessels; of executive officer; of navigator; of first lieutenant; watch and divisional duties, handling of ship; organization and care of personnel and ship; Navy Regulations; customs of service; intercourse with civil and military - United States officials; boats; ground tackle; laws of storms; rules of road, including collision cases; stability control; towing, and the mooring board.
(b) Military law. - Duties of (1) commanding officer as regards discipline and administration of justice; (2) senior officer, member and recorder of courts and boards; (3) punishments; (4) limitations and duties of courts and boards.
(c) International laws. - Same as lieutenant commander (c). (See notes, last page.)
(d) Strategy and tactics. - Same as lieutenant commander (d). (See notes, last page.)
(e) Aviation. - Same as lieutenant commander (e), except that instruments and material are included. (See notes, last page.)

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(f) Navigation (practical). - Same as lieutenant commander (f). (See notes, last page.)
(g) Navigation and piloting. - Same as lieutenant commander (g). (See notes, last page.)
(h) Ordnance and gunnery. - Same as lieutenant commander (h). (See notes, last page.)
(i) Hull, propelling plant, machinery and equipment. - Same as lieutenant commander (i). (See notes, last page.)
(j) Electricity. - Same as lieutenant commander (j). (See notes, last page.)
(k) Engineering, aeronautics. - Same as lieutenant commander (k). (See notes, last page.)

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF CAPTAIN, ENGINEERING DUTY ONLY

(a) General questions on administration of technical group of which candidate is a member.
(b) International Law. (Note. - All other subjects eliminated.)

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF COMMANDER, AND LIEUTENANT COMMANDER, ENGINEERING DUTIES ONLY

General subjects
(a) General. - Naval Regulations; customs of the service.
(b) Military law. - For commanders this subject will be included in (a) general; for other officers same as corresponding subject (b) for line officers.
(c) International law. - Same as for (c) line officers, such as pertains to shore stations in relation to foreign ships both afloat (in port) and on shore.

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF COMMANDER, ENGINEERING DUTIES ONLY

Specialized subjects
(a) Marine engines and boilers. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character. Duties of fleet engineer, industrial manager, or commandant of a navy yard; duties of inspector of naval material or of naval inspector of machinery; design and selection of types of installations to suit special requirements; methods of inspection and of conducting tests of plants to ascertain efficiency and insure safety; organization of engineering personnel on board ship and at industrial plants; tools and methods of doing work in building, erecting and repairing all naval machinery installations; care necessary for operation and preservation of machinery on board ship when in use and when not in use; selection of stores and outfits and their care and use; selection, stowage, and care of fuels.

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(b) Electricity. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character. General questions concerning application of electricity on board naval vessels and at shore stations, covering latest practice in installation, care, repairs, and management. Radio installations.
(c) Engineering, aeronautics. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character.

TO PERMANENT GRADE OF LIEUTENANT COMMANDER, ENGINEERING DUTIES ONLY

Specialized subjects
(1) Marine engines and boilers. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character. (1) Boilers: Description of various types and their advantages and disadvantages, operation, and care, including all appurtenances and fittings. Combustion of fuels and methods of handling, stowing, and using same. Methods of conducting tests for efficiency and safety. Operation casualties and repairs.
(2) Marine engines: Description and discussion of various types of propulsive machinery, their design and arrangement to suit various conditions; sketches and descriptions of all details, auxiliaries and fittings, operation, casualties, repairs, and management.
(3) Oil and gas engines: Theory of and description of various types; care, operation and management, and tests for efficiency.
(4) Tests of material: Physical and chemical tests required and details of inspection.
(b) Electricity. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character. Theory of the generator and motor with description of those used on board ship and at shore stations. Primary and secondary batteries, including their care, operation, testing, and casualties; interior communication, fire-control and wiring systems, including care, operation, management, and repairs. Instruments, tools, and fittings. Radiotelegraph, radiotelephone, and radio direction-finder installations.
(c) Engineering, aeronautics. - Same as for corresponding grade in line, but of more advanced character.
(d) General. - Duties of engineer officer of a vessel or navy yard; as naval inspector of machinery or inspector of naval materials; manufacture of materials and their properties and treatment; properties of steam and gases and generation of power by their use; composition of fuels and theory of combustion; efficiency of plants.
(c) Organization. - The organization of enlisted force of engineer division on board naval vessels and organization of working forces at a navy yard.

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(f) Stores. - Engineering equipment and stores required on board naval vessels; their custody, supply, and disposition, including fuels.

NOTES

"Officers selected as 'fitted' but not retained shall be examined on their records only."

Examinations will be graded for the different promotions, those for the higher ones being of a more advanced nature.

New subjects will be included in the examinations when their development and service knowledge warrant, as directed by the Department.

A very intimate knowledge of the United States Navy Regulations relating to subject under examination is required.

The precepts for all examining boards require that examinations shall be practical in nature, therefore in marking examinations the board will consider how officers have profited by their observation and experience in their duties in relation to the professional subjects in which they are being examined.

The scope of the examination in aviation will be enlarged and extended as officers have further opportunities to develop their knowledge of this subject, so that they may show the examining board that they are keeping abreast of the times and the development of tills subject. Flight knowledge will not be required except from flying officers.

The examinations for officers selected for engineering duty only (aeronautics) and engineering duty only (ordnance) will be in subjects pertaining to their specialty.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 49

Navy Department
Washington, D. C. May 13, 1935.

DANGERS OF HELMET DIVING

1. Attention is called to the dangers involved in the practice of diving with the helmet and without the diving suit, particularly when diving to depths for which decompression is required. Helmet diving has no advantage over diving with the full suit other than the comfort of the diver in tropical waters. In case of difficulty, the diver can handle himself to better advantage when wearing the full suit, and is much safer.

2. Before authorizing helmet diving the officer in charge of the work will satisfy himself that the special circumstances make this procedure particularly desirable and that no undue hazard will be

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incurred by the diver. Helmet diving to depths in excess of 36 feet will be considered only for experienced divers who have been recently engaged in diving. The officer in charge, prior to the lowering of the diver, shall see that the diving air hose is looped under the diver's arm and that there is no danger from this source of accidentally pulling the helmet from his head. Descents and ascents shall be made on the descending line or stage. Ascents shall be made with the helmet on and the air supply from the surface to the helmet shall be continued until the diver is on deck and the helmet removed. In all dives in excess of 36 feet, ascents shall be made in accordance with the decompression stages prescribed in the Diving Manual. Ascents from depths of 36 feet and less may be made up the ascending line or by stage hoisted from the surface at a rate not greater than 50 feet per minute. Divers should be cautioned not to hold their breath but to freely vent air from the lungs during such ascents.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 50

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

MOFFETT FIELD

1. Effective June 1, 1933, the landing field at the United States Naval Air Station, Sunnyvale, Calif., is hereby officially designated as Moffett Field.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 51 of May 13, 1935, superseded by General Order No, 195 of 16 June 1943.

*****

General Order No. 52 canceled by General Order No. 104.

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*****

General Order No. 53

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

JOINT ECONOMY BOARD

1. Upon recommendation of the joint board, approved by the Secretaries of War and Navy, a joint economy board is appointed as a permanent agency. It is charged with the continuing responsibility of investigating and reporting to the joint board on economies which can be effected from time to time, without loss of efficiency, by the elimination of overlap or the simplification of functions in those activities of the War and Navy Departments concerned with joint operations of the two services or which have approximately parallel functions.

2. The membership of the joint economy board will comprise five or more officers from each service and will include the following:

For the Army
For the Navy
The Chief of the Budget and Legislative Planning Branch, and four other officers of the Budget Advisory Committee of the War Department. The assistant Budget officer, Navy Department;
Director, Central Division, Office of Chief of Naval Operations;
Director, Material Division, Office of Chief of Naval Operations;
An officer from the Shore Establishments Division, Office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy; and
An officer from the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts (not below the rank of commander).

The secretary of the board will be detailed from the permanent personnel of either the War Department or of the Navy Department.

3. Reports and recommendations of the joint economy board will be presented to the joint board for action.

4. Each chief of arm, service, or bureau will designate a liaison officer whose name shall be furnished to the joint economy board and who will maintain contact between his office and the corresponding activity of the other service and with the board. Liaison officers will bring to the attention of the joint economy board any matter which their respective chiefs shall deem to come within the purview of the board. Each

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liaison officer will furnish such aid to the board in securing information and data from his particular arm, service, or bureau as the board shall request. The joint economy board will have authority over the liaison officers insofar as their duties pertain to the work of the board.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 54

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

SUBMARINE DISASTERS - RESCUE OF PERSONNEL AND SALVAGE OF SHIPS

1. In recent years the Navy Department has expended considerable effort to determine how personnel may be rescued from sunken submarines. The first method considered was the raising of the disabled submarine with pontoons and the removal of the personnel from the submarine on the surface. Later the oxygen bag or "lung" and the rescue chamber were devised, tested, and found practicable. The experimental hulk S-4 was sent to all submarine stations to permit training submarine personnel in the use of the "lung" and pontoons. These tests and previous experience have shown that raising a submarine with pontoons is not a practical means of rescue and should be considered only as a salvage operation.

2. Hereafter, the pontoons, together with the storage barges and pontoon lifting gear, are designated as salvage gear only.

3. While the forces afloat and the forces ashore are equally concerned in the rescue of personnel, the forces afloat are trained in search and rescue operations and are better fitted to undertake rescue work than the forces ashore. If rescue operations fail and subsequent salvage of material is decided upon, the shore establishment will be responsible for the salvage operations. The decisions to undertake salvage operations will be made by the Navy Department and appropriate orders and instructions issued.

4. Pontoons, barges, and pontoon gear are under the cognizance of the Bureau of Ships, and as salvage equipment they will not be issued to the custody of the forces afloat but will be issued to certain shore establishments. If it is considered desirable, pontoons and pontoon gear may be removed from barges and stored on shore. In such cases the barges may be converted to such uses as the Bureau of Ships may authorize.

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5. The rescue chambers will be issued as title "B" equipment as part of the allowance of submarine-rescue vessels.

6. The following activities are hereby designated as custodians of the salvage equipment:

First naval district, district commandant.
Eleventh naval district, district commandant.
Fourteenth naval district, district commandant
Fifteenth naval district, district commandant
Sixteenth naval district, district commandant.

7. The custodians of salvage gear will be responsible for its upkeep, preservation, and test in accordance with existing instructions, and will submit the required reports to the Bureau of Ships with a copy of such report to the commanding officer of the rescue vessel attached to the submarine unit that operates in that area. In order to familiarize himself with the salvage gear on hand the commanding officer of the above-mentioned rescue vessel will, upon assuming command and at least once a year thereafter, make inspection of the salvage gear and submit a report to the Bureau of Ships via the custodian as to the result of his inspection.

8. When an actual rescue is being undertaken the senior officer of the line of the Navy first at the scene will assume the duties of rescue officer. This officer will continue to act as rescue officer unless or until another officer is designated to relieve him. An officer detailed to complete rescue operations should have had experience with submarine training in submarine rescue work. The officer in charge of diving on board a rescue vessel should, normally, be selected as soon as the rescue vessel has reported at the scene. The commander, Submarine Force, should recommend the officer to be detailed as permanent rescue officer and diving officer. The requests of the rescue officer for personnel and material needed for rescue operations should be acted upon promptly.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 55

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

SUBMISSION OF REQUESTS FOR NAVY YARD WORK OR VESSELS

1. Beginning January 1, 1934, all requests from ships for repairs to be performed by navy yards shall be submitted upon the standard repair request form NSO 105 (revised). If printed forms are not available, ships will print or typewrite the forms necessary on 8- by 10 1/2-inch paper following the illustration below.

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2. Each item of repair shall be submitted as a separate request; the original and two copies of the repair requests with forwarding endorsements will be forwarded to the navy yard where the work is to be done. Such additional copies as may be necessary shall be made for the files of commanders afloat through whom these requests may pass. When repair requests are accompanied by a forwarding letter, formal forwarding endorsements will not be required on each individual repair request but an indication of the action of the forwarding officer will be stamped or written in lieu of the formal endorsement.

3. Repair requests from each ship shall be numbered serially during the calendar year, thus: Repair request 1-34, etc. (the first figure being the serial number, the figure following the dash being the year). These serial numbers shall be consecutive regardless of bureau cognizance or whether the job order will be title A, D, or P.

4. In addition to the serial number, each request will bear, for identification, the group name and group number of the material for which the repair is requested in accordance with the United States Navy filing manual.

5. Repair requests must not only describe, in as much detail as may be necessary, the conditions needing correction but must state, so far as may be practicable, a detail of the work the yard is expected to undertake. These requests must also indicate the extent to which the ship's force will be able to assist and that such navy yard work as is requested has been investigated and is beyond the capabilities of the available facilities afloat.

6. Ordinarily, all repair requests should be submitted via official channels to reach the navy yard 30 days prior to the scheduled overhaul period and should be accompanied by a forwarding or summary letter in which is stated the desired priority of the various repairs. When it is definitely known that a repair will be required which is beyond the capabilities of forces afloat and where extensive preliminary preparations or assembly of material will be necessary, the request should be submitted at as early a date as practicable. In the event that a commanding officer considers that a delay will ensue in the work requests reaching the overhaul yard through official channels, copies of work requests should be mailed direct to the yard for advance information.

7. Requests for alterations will be submitted in letter form but the reasons for the alteration, the description of conditions, and the detail of work to be performed by ship, forces afloat, and navy yard must follow, in general, the same form as the repair request. Alteration requests shall be numbered serially

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during the calendar year, thus: Alteration request 1-34, etc. Serial numbers shall be consecutive regardless of bureau cognizance.

8. All alteration letters must be forwarded to the bureau having cognizance via type and other appropriate commanders. Type and other commanders through whom these alteration letters pass will comment fully on the desirability or necessity for the alteration and its application to other vessels of similar type.

9. Copies of letters involving alterations to the characteristics of vessels affecting aeronautical facilities, with copies of all Fleet endorsements thereon, shall be forwarded to the Bureau of Aeronautics.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

United States Navy Customs Declaration, text below image.
United States Navy Customs Declaration, text below image.

NSO 105 (Revised)., U.S.S.___, date___, Serial No.___, Repair Request, Urgent, Desirable___, Bureau having cognizance___, (Cross out one), Group name or designation of machinery unit, appliance, or part of ship: (group name), (Group number), To:, 1. The following condition requires navy yard work:____, 2. Due to the above conditions, the following repairs are recommended:___, 3. Ship's force will assist as follows:___ 4. Repair facilities of forces afloat have been investigated and they are unable to undertake this item for the following reasons:___, (Signed)___, U.S.N. Commanding.

__________

Note. - In preparation of work requests, read U. S. N. Regulations, chapter 51, articles 1970, 1971, and 1973, General Order No. 55, and Fleet and Force Regulations.

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*****

General Order No. 56

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

THE FLEET MARINE FORCE

1. The force of marines maintained by the major general commandant in a state of readiness for operations with the fleet is hereby designated as fleet marine force (F. M. F.), and as such shall constitute a part of the organization of the United States Fleet and be included in the operating force plan for each fiscal year.

2. The fleet marine force shall consist of such units as may be designated by the major general commandant and shall be maintained at such strength as is warranted by the general personnel situation of the Marine Corps.

3. The fleet marine force shall be available to the commander in chief for operations with the fleet or for exercises either afloat or ashore in connection with fleet problems. The commander in chief shall make timely recommendations to the Chief of Naval Operations regarding such service in order that the necessary arrangements may be made.

4. The commander in chief shall exercise command of the fleet marine force when embarked on board vessels of the fleet or when engaged in fleet exercises, either afloat or ashore. When otherwise engaged, command shall be as directed by the major general commandant.

5. The major general commandant shall detail the commanding general of the fleet marine force and maintain an appropriate staff for him.

6. The commanding general, fleet marine force, shall report by letter to the commander in chief, United States Fleet, for duty in connection with the employment of the fleet marine force. At least once each year, and at such other times as may be considered desirable by the commander in chief, the commanding general, fleet marine force, with appropriate members of his staff, shall be ordered to report to the commander In chief for conference.

7. Correspondence relating to the employment of the fleet marine force shall be conducted directly between the commander in chief and the commanding general, fleet marine force.

8. The commanding general, fleet marine force, shall at all times keep the commander in chief informed of the strength and distribution of the units comprising the fleet marine force, as well as the efficiency, readiness, and adequacy of the force, to accomplish successfully the tasks assigned to it by the commander in chief.

9. The commanding general, fleet marine force, shall keep the major general commandant informed of all matters pertaining to

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the employment of his command, in order that the major general commandant may provide an adequate strength and armament for the force and otherwise assist in maintaining a high standard of efficiency in the organization.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 57

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

REPORTING OF AIDS TO NAVIGATION.

1. It has been agreed upon between the Navy Department and the Department of Commerce that whenever temporary aids to navigation are established, changed, or discontinued by naval authorities the same be reported on Department of Commerce form 117c and a copy forwarded to the local lighthouse superintendent concerned. It is hereby directed that all commandants of districts, navy yards, and stations, and commanding officers or others having occasion to make reports of this nature, comply with this arrangement, accompanying the report by a statement whether information concerning the aid should be considered as being confidential and therefore be not published in the Notices to Mariners issued by the Department of Commerce. A copy of the report shall be forwarded direct to the Hydrographic Office and another to the nearest branch Hydrographic Office.

2. The form in question may be obtained from the local lighthouse superintendent by officers having occasion to make reports of this matter.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 58

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

AVIATION TRAINING, HEAVIER-THAN-AIR

1. In general, aviation training will be divided into four categories:
A. Basic instruction at the Naval Academy.
B. Elimination flight training at such naval air stations as may be designated by the Department, to determine the qualification of candidates for the primary course at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola.

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C. Primary and advanced flight course for qualification as naval aviator, naval aviation observer, and naval aviation pilot, at Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.
D. Familiarization training for nonaviation officers.

A. BASIC AVIATION INSTRUCTION
2. The basic instruction and training at the Naval Academy will be given as a part of the curriculum at that school to all midshipmen.

V. ELIMINATION FLIGHT TRAINING
3. The purpose of elimination flight training is to ascertain which of the available personnel show sufficient proficiency in aviation to justify assignment for the primary course at Pensacola. In general, this training will consist of about 10 hours dual instruction in training planes. Elimination flight training will be given to officers of not less than 2 years' commissioned service and within the age limit prescribed by the Bureau of Navigation who request aviation training; it will be given to enlisted personnel as prescribed by the Bureau of Navigation.
4. Commander battle force and commander scouting force will arrange for details for flight elimination courses with the commanding officers of the naval air stations concerned. Officers and enlisted men not serving in the above-mentioned commands may be assigned to elimination flight training upon application to the Bureau of Navigation.
5. The major general commandant of the Marine Corps will, from time to time, inform the Bureau of Navigation of the number of officers and enlisted men required to be given elimination flight training to fulfill the needs of the Marine Corps and Marine Corps Reserve. They will be ordered to elimination training upon notification by the Bureau of Navigation of the dates of commencement of classes and the number of marine officers and enlisted men which the student capacity of the training school will allow.
6. Elimination flight training of officers and enlisted men of the Naval and Marine Corps Reserves will be prescribed by the Bureau of Navigation.

C. PRIMARY AND ADVANCED FLIGHT SCHOOLS
7. From those officers and enlisted men who successfully complete the elimination course, the Bureau of Navigation and the major general commandant will order such personnel as may be required by the needs of the service to the primary and advanced flying schools (at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.).
8. Personnel of the Naval (and Marine Corps) Reserve selected for flight training will be ordered to Pensacola as directed by the

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Bureau of Navigation. Personnel of the Marine Corps Reserve selected for flight training will be ordered to Pensacola as directed by the major general commandant.

D. FAMILIARIZATION TRAINING
9. It is the desire of the Department that all line officers of the Navy have personal flight experience as a basis on which to judge and to appreciate the potential value and limitations of aircraft in naval warfare. With this end in view, force commanders and commandants of naval districts are authorized to give familiarization courses to such officers as may request it, provided such familiarization flying does not interfere with routine scheduled operations and funds for the cost in connection therewith are available.

GENERAL
18. (a) Curricula covering aviation training and modifications thereto shall be forwarded to the Bureau of Navigation for approval:
(b) The Bureaus of Navigation and Aeronautics will be charged with the procurement of personnel and material, respectively, to carry out the prescribed training. Funds for maintenance and operation will be provided from the appropriation, aviation, Navy.
(c) The Department will look with favor upon the initiative taken by nonaviation officers of all ranks who may elect to take the familiarization training.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 59

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

ALCOHOLIC LIQUORS

1. In reference to article 118, Navy regulations, the possession and use of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes at shore establishments under the jurisdiction of the Navy Department will be confined to officers' quarters, officers' messes, and officers' clubs.

2. Commandants and commanding officers will issue the necessary detailed orders.

3. The Secretary of the Navy will give consideration to requests for exceptions to this general order when in the opinion of the commandant or commanding officer special circumstances justify such exceptions.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 60

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

COMMISSIONING OF ALL MIDSHIPMEN WHO HEREAFTER GRADUATE FROM NAVAL ACADEMY AND APPOINTMENT OF LOWER HALF OF NAVAL ACADEMY CLASS 1933

Section 1 of the act approved May 6, 1932 (47 Stat. 149; U. S. C., Sup. VII, title 34, sec. 12), as amended by section 5 of the act approved May 29, 1934 (Pub., No. 264, 73d Cong.) provides: "That the President of the United States is authorized, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint as ensigns in the line of the Navy all midshipmen who in 1934 and hereafter graduate from the Naval Academy: Provided, That all former midshipmen graduated in 1933 who received a certificate of graduation and honorable discharge and whether they have since been married or not may, upon their own application, if physically qualified, and under such regulations as the Secretary of the Navy may prescribe, be appointed as ensigns prior to August 1, 1934, by the President and shall take rank next after the junior ensign appointed in 1933 and among themselves in accordance with their proficiency as shown by the order of merit at date of graduation: And provided further, That the number of such officers so appointed shall, while in excess of the total number of line officers otherwise authorized by law, be considered in excess of the number of officers in the grade of ensign as determined by any computation, and shall be excluded from any computation made for the purpose of determining the authorized number of line officers in any grade on the active list above the grade of lieutenant (junior grade) until the total number of line officers shall have been reduced below the number otherwise authorized by law."

Pursuant to the above, the following regulations are hereby established:
(1) General Order No. 46 shall have full force and effect in its application to ensigns commissioned under the provisions of the above-cited act.
(2) (a) Applicants under the provisions of section 5 of the act of May 29, 1934, must be found fully qualified physically and in all other respects in accordance with standards which obtain for the United States Naval Academy class graduating in 1934.
(b) The applicant's conduct and mode of life during the period of his separation from the naval service must have been creditable in accordance with naval standards, and any fact which may, in the opinion of the Secretary of the Navy, be deemed not creditable and which may now or during the period that he is serving under

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a revocable commission be duly established, will be considered cause for the revocation of his commission.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 61 revised in its entirety by General Order No. 122.

*****

General Order No. 62

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

NAVY REGULATIONS GOVERNING OFFICERS' RECORDS

1. Article 137, Navy Regulations, 1920, contains the rules which govern officers' records. Article 202, Navy Regulations, 1920, bears upon the same subject. Further instructions are contained in the Bureau of Navigation Manual, articles C-1007, C-2001, and C-2002.

2. Throughout all of the above references the principle is clearly established that unfavorable matter shall not be filed in connection with an officer's record without his knowledge and an opportunity to reply thereto.

3. The attention of all officers is directed to the articles of the Navy Regulations and of the Bureau of Navigation Manual to which reference is made in paragraph 1. Strict compliance therewith is mandatory.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 63 canceled by General Order No. 107.

*****

General Order No. 64 canceled by General Order No. 84.

*****

General Order No. 65 canceled and superseded by General Order No. 138.

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*****

General Order No. 66

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

WAKE ISLAND, KINGMAN REEF, AND JOHNSTON AND SAND ISLANDS

1. The following Executive order is quoted:

"Executive Order

"PLACING CERTAIN ISLANDS IN THE PACIFIC OCEAN UNDER THE CONTROL AND JURISDICTION OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY

"Wake Island, Kingman Reef, and Johnston and Sand Islands

"By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by the act of June 25, 1910, ch. 421, 36 Stat. 847, as amended by the act of August 24, 1912, ch. 369, 37 Stat. 497, and as President of the United States it is ordered that Wake Island located in the Pacific Ocean approximately in latitude 19°17'28'' N. and longitude 166°34'42" E. from Greenwich, Kingman Reef located in the Pacific Ocean approximately in latitude 6°24'37" N. and longitude 162°22' W. from Greenwich, and Johnston and Sand Islands located in the Pacific Ocean approximately in latitude 16°44'32" N. and longitude 169°30'59" W. from Greenwich, together with the reefs surrounding all the aforesaid islands, as indicated upon the diagram hereto attached and made a part of this order, be, and they are hereby, reserved, set aside, and placed under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy for administrative purposes, subject, however, to the use of the said Johnston and Sand Islands by the Department of Agriculture as a refuge and breeding ground for native birds as provided by Executive Order No. 4467 of June 29, 1926.

"This order shall continue in full force and effect unless and until revoked by the President or by act of Congress.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
December 29, 1934"

2. The above islands are hereby placed in the fourteenth naval district.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 67

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 13, 1935.

1. Effective April 12, 1935, the official designation of the United States Naval Hospital at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is "U. S. Naval Hospital, Philadelphia, Pa."

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 68 canceled by General Order No. 143.

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*****

General Order No. 69 is canceled by General Order No. 101

*****

General Order No. 70 of June 20, 1935, canceled by General Order No. 205 of 27 January 1944.

*****

General Order No. 71 is canceled by General Order No. 129.

*****

General Order No. 72 is canceled by General Order No. 110.

*****

General Order No. 73 is canceled by General Order No. 158.

*****

General Order No. 74 is canceled by General Order No. 104.

*****

General Order No. 75 is canceled by General Order No. 110.

*****

General Order No. 76 of April 25, 1936, is incorporated in reprint General Order No. 55 of May 13, 1935.

*****

General Order No. 77

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., April 28, 1936.

Turner Field

1. Effective July 1, 1936, the flying field at the Marine Barracks, Quantico, Va., is hereby officially designated as Turner Field.

W. H. Standley,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 78

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., April 16, 1938.

Reservation of Naval Radio Station, Balboa, Canal Zone

1. The following Executive orders are quoted:

Executive Order

RESERVATION OF NAVAL STATION, BALBOA, CANAL ZONE

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 5 of title II of the Canal Zone Code, approved June 19, 1934, and as President of the United States, the following described land situated in the Canal Zone is hereby reserved and set apart as, and assigned to the uses and purposes of, a naval reservation, which shall be known as Naval Station, Balboa, Canal Zone, and shall be under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy, except that it shall be subject to the civil jurisdiction of the Canal Zone authorities in conformity with the provisions of said Canal Zone Code:
Beginning at a concrete monument, marked "G" on Panama Canal drawing L 6103-62, located at the extreme high-water mark on the shore of Panama Bay, the geographic position of which (referred to Panama-Colon datum of the Canal Zone triangulation system) is in latitude 8°56' plus 3,653.4 feet N. and longitude 79°33' plus 1,518.0 feet; thence
S. 37°40' W , a distance of 828.8 feet through an iron rail in concrete monument, 63.8 feet from beginning of course, marked "V" on the map, to an iron rail in concrete monument, marked "Z" on the map (this line corresponds with a part of the northwestern boundary of Fort Amador); thence
N. 52°20' W. a distance of 1,286.0 feet through concrete monument, 635.3 feet from beginning of course, marked "C" on the map, and an iron rail in concrete, 1,049.9 feet from beginning at course, marked "W" on the map to a concrete monument, marked "H" on the map; thence
N. 11°10' E., a distance of 442.5 feet to a concrete monument, marked "I" on the map; thence
N. 68°37' E., a distance of 91.3 feet to a concrete monument, marked "J" on the map; thence
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N. 21°23' W, a distance of 1,120.3 feet through concrete monuments, marked "K" and "L" on the map, 370.0 feet and 740.0 feet, respectively, from beginning of course, to a concrete monument, marked "M" on the map; thence
N. 68°37' E., a distance of 400.0 feet to a concrete monument, marked "N" on the map, located 28.0 feet westerly and at right angles from the center line of the pavement of Amador Road; thence
S. 21°23' E., a distance of 1,120.3 feet, parallel to and at a distance of 28.0 feet from the center line of the pavement of Amador Road, to a concrete monument, marked "O" on the map; thence N. 68°37' E., a distance of 388.2 feet through an iron rail in concrete monument, 35.0 feet from end of course, marked "Y" on the map, to a point marked "P" on the map, located at the extreme high-water mark on the shore of Panama Bay; thence
S. 35°01' E., a distance of 1,080.0 feet to monument "G" on the map which is the point of beginning,
The direction of the lines refers to the true meridian. The above-described tract contains an area of 40.84 acres.
All of the above-described area is shown on Panama Canal drawing L 6103-62 of November 27, 1935, entitled "Boundary of Balboa Naval Station," showing approval by the Governor of the Panama Canal, and by the Commandant, Fifteenth Naval District, in whose offices the drawing is filed.

This order supersedes Executive Order No. 4047 of July 8, 1924, and Executive Order No. 4105 of November 22, 1924, setting apart and assigning certain sites in the Canal Zone to the uses and purposes of naval reservations.

Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The White House,
June 15, 1936.

Executive Order

MODIFICATION OF EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 7387 OF JUNE 15, 1934, RESERVING NAVAL STATION, BALBOA, CANAL ZONE

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 5 of title II of the Canal Zone Code, approved June 19, 1934, and as President of the United States, it is ordered that

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Executive Order No. 7387 of June 15, 1938, be, and it is hereby, modified to the extent that the naval reservation established thereby shall hereafter be known as "Naval Radio Station, Balboa, Canal Zone," and shall be assigned to the uses and purposes of a naval radio station and to such other naval uses and purposes as the Secretary of the Navy may determine.

Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The White House,
April 7, 1938.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 79

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., July 2, 1936.

Reservation of Naval Radio Station, Summit, Canal Zone

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

Executive Order

"RESERVATION OF NAVAL RADIO STATION, SUMMIT, CANAL ZONE

"By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 5 of title 2 of the Canal Zone Code, approved June 19, 1934, and as President of the United States, the following-described area of land in the Canal Zone is hereby reserved and set apart as, and assigned to the uses and purposes of, a naval reservation, which shall be known as U. S. Naval Radio Station, Summit, Canal Zone, and shall be under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy, except that it shall be subject to the civil jurisdiction of the Canal Zone Government in conformity with the provisions of the said Canal Zone Code;

"Beginning at a 1-inch round steel bar, marked No. 1 on Panama Canal Dwg. No. 6103-73, located on the centerline of the entrance road leading southwesterly from Gaillard Highway into the Station and approximately 41 feet from the centerline of Gaillard Highway. The geographic position of Monument No. 1 (referred to the Panama-Colon datum of the Canal Zone triangulatlon system) is in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,600.8 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 956.2 feet; thence

"S. 53°52'30" E., 75.0 feet, to a brass plug cemented into the top of a 3-inch G. I. pipe monument, marked No. 2 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,556.6 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 895.6 feet. (All boundary monuments are similar to Monument No. 2, except Monument No. 1) ; thence

"S. 42°51'30'' W., 307.6 feet, through a monument, marked No. 3 on the map, to a monument, marked No. 4 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,331.2 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 1,104.7 feet; thence

"S. 04°23'30" E., 921.1 feet, to a monument, marked No. 5 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,412.9 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 1,034.1 feet; thence

"S. 54°41'00" E., 777.3 feet, through monuments, marked No. 6 and No. 7 on the map to a monument marked No. 8 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,963.6 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 399.9 feet; thence

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"N. 67°16'00" E., 64.4 feet, to a monument, marked No. 9 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,988.5 fleet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 340.4 feet; thence

"N. 35°19'30" E., 372.6 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No, 1 and No. 2 and 300 feet from the most westerly footing of tower No. 2, to a monument, marked No. 10 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,292.5 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 125.0 feet; thence "N. 69°04'30" E., 115.0 feet, to a monument, marked No. 11 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,333.5 feet and longitude 79°39' W., plus 17.6 feet; thence "S. 54°40'30" E., 312.9 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 2 and No. 4 and 300 feet from the most northerly footing of tower No. 2, to a monument, marked No. 12 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,152.7 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,774.0 feet ; thence

"S. 57°39'00" E., 272.6 feet, to a monument, marked No. 13 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,006.8 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,043.7 feet; thence "S. 56°21'30" E., 168.4 feet, to a monument, marked No. 14 on the map, located on the westerly side of Gaillard Highway opposite the Canal Zone incinerator, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,913.5 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,403.5 feet; thence "S. 09°56'00" E., 203.6 feet, to a monument, marked No. 15 on the map, located at the P. C. of a curve, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,713.0 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,368.4 feet; thence "Along a 14° curve to the left, 283.8 feet, through monuments, marked No. 16 and No. 17 on the map, located at stations 1+0 and 2+0 respectively from monument No. 15, to a monument, marked No. 18 on the map, located at the P. T. of the curve and approximately 34 feet westerly from the centerline of Gaillard Highway, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,471.0 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,229.8 feet; thence "S. 49°40'00" E., 541.0 feet, parallel to and approximately 34 feet westerly from the centerline of Gaillard Highway to a monument, marked No. 19 on the map, located at the P. C. of a curve, in latitude 9"03' N., plus 2,120.9 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 4,817.4 feet; thence

"Along a 7° curve to the left, 782.2 feet, parallel to and approximately 34 feet, southerly from the centerline of Gaillard Highway through monuments, marked No. 20, No. 21, No. 22, and No. 23 on the map, located at stations 1+0, 3+0, 5+0, and 6+50 respectively, from monument No. 19, to a monument, marked No. 24 on the map, located at the P. T. of the curve, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 1,952.0 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 4,083.2 feet; thence

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"S. 54°55'00" E., 385.0 feet, to a monument, marked No. 25 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 1,730.7 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 3,768.1 feet; thence

"S. 54°40'00" E. 417.9 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 4 and No. 6 and 300 feet from the most northerly footing of tower No. 6, to a monument, marked No. 26 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 1,489.1 feet, and longitude 79°38' W. plus 3,427.2 feet; thence

"S. 35°20'00" W., 1,776.9 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 6 and No. 5 and 300 feet from the most easterly footings of towers No. 6 and No. 5, through a monument, marked No. 27 on the map, to a monument, marked No. 28 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 39.7 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 4,454.9 feet; thence "N. 54°39'30" W., 715.4 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 5 and No. 3 and 300 feet from the most southerly footing of tower No. 5 to a monument, marked No. 29 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 453.5 feet, and longitude 79°38' W., plus 5,038.5 feet; thence "N. 54°40'30" W., 2,381.4 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 3 and No. 1 and 300 feet from the most southerly footings of towers No. 3 and No. 1, through monuments, marked No. 30 and No. 31 on the map, to a monument, marked No. 32 on the map, located on the westerly side of the old Empire-Paraiso Road, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 1,830.7 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 969.9 feet; thence

"N. 11°09'30" E., 226.4 feet, along the westerly side of the old Empire-Paraiso Road to a monument, marked No. 33 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,054.8 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 925.7 feet; thence

"N. 06°10'30" W., 279.3 feet, along the westerly side of the old Empire-Paraiso Road to a monument, marked No. 34 on the map, located northwesterly from the intersection of the old Empire Paraiso Road with the Station road, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 2,332.4 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 955.7 feet; thence

"N. 43°27'30" W., 1,368.6 feet, crossing the Rio Obispo and through a monument, marked No. 35 on the map, to a monument, marked No. 36 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,325.7 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 1,897.1 feet; thence

"S. 88°19'00" W., 649.5 feet, to a monument, marked No. 37 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,306.7 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 2,546.3 feet; thence

"N. 54°40'00" W., 271.5 feet, approximately parallel to the common axis of towers No. 11 and No. 10 and 300 feet from the most southerly footing of tower No. 11, to a monument, marked No. 38 on the map, located on the easterly bank of the Rio Obispo Diver-

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sion, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,463.7 feet, and longitude 79°39' W. plus 2,767.8 feet; thence "N. 00°05'30" E., 261.1 feet, along the easterly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 39 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,724.8 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 2,767.4 feet; thence

"N. 06°09'00" W., 92.3 feet, along the easterly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 40 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 3,816.6 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 2,777.3 feet; thence

"N. 31°57'00" W., 221.1 feet, along the easterly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 41 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,004.1 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 2,894.3 feet; thence "N. 54°55'00" W., 263.4 feet, along the northerly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 42 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,155.5 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 3,109.8 feet; thence

"N. 61°30'00" W., 453.0 feet, along the northerly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 43 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,371.6 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 3,507.9 feet; thence

"N. 68°13'00" W., 264.9 feet, along the northerly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 44 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,469.9 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 3,753.9 feet; thence

"S. 75°38'00" W., 227.9 feet, along the northerly bank of the Rio Obispo Diversion, to a monument, marked No. 45 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,413.4 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 3,974.7 feet; thence

"N. 43°12'30" W., 376.6 feet, to a monument, marked No. 46 on the map, located 12 feet easterly from the 10-wire telephone line to Gaillard Cut, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 4,687.8 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 4,232.5 feet; thence

"N. 48°56'30' E., 1,249.9 feet, parallel to and 12 feet easterly from the 10-wire telephone line to Gaillard Cut, to a monument, marked No. 47 on the map, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 5,508.7 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 3,289.9 feet; thence

"N. 89°59'30" E., 1,089.7 feet, through a monument, marked No. 48 on the map, to a monument, marked No. 49 on the map, located approximately 73 feet southwesterly from the centerline of Gaillard Highway, in latitude 9°03' N., plus 5,508.9 feet, and longitude 79°39' W., plus 2,200.2 feet; thence

"S. 53°52'30" E., 1,540.1 feet, along the southwesterly side of Gaillard Highway through monuments, marked No. 50 and No. 51

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on the map, to a monument, marked No. 1 on the map, which is the point of beginning.

"The directions of the lines refer to the true meridian.

"The above-described tract contains an area of 249.63 acres. "The above-described area was surveyed by the Section of Surveys, the Panama Canal, in February 1936, and is as shown on Panama Canal Drawing 6103-73, dated March 31, 1936, titled 'U. S. Naval Radio Station, Summit, C. Z.', showing approval by the Governor of the Panama Canal and by the Commandant, Fifteenth Naval District, in whose offices the drawing is filed.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
June 23, 1936."

W. H. Standley,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 80 canceled and replaced by SecNav letter, Serial 69113 of May 11, 1943.

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******

General Order No. 81

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., July 18, 1936.

The Aeronautical Board

The following order supersedes the existing precept of the Aeronautical Board, signed January 21, 1927, as amended and published in General Order No. 44:
1. In order to secure a more complete measure of cooperation and coordination in the development of aviation of the Army and of the Navy, and to provide an agency for consideration of aeronautical matters, the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy have agreed upon the reorganization of the Aeronautical Board with membership, functions, and procedure as follows:
2. Membership. -

ARMY

NAVY

The Commanding General, Army Air Forces. Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Air).
Assistant Chief of Air Staff, Material, Maintenance, and Distribution. Director Aviation Planning Division, Office of Chief of Naval Operations.
One member of the Operations Division, General Staff, War Department, designated by the Chief of Staff. Director of Engineering, Bureau of Aeronautics.

The War Plans Divisions members, while serving as such, will not be eligible for duty as members of the Joint Board or the Joint Planning Committee.

The Secretary of the Board will be selected by the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy from the permanent personnel of either Department and detailed to this duty.

3. Functions. - The Aeronautical Board will investigate, study, and report upon all questions affecting jointly the development of aviation of the Army and the Navy referred to it by the Secretary of War, by the Secretary of the Navy, by the Joint Board, by the Chief of Air Corps, or by the Chief of Bureau of Aeronautics. It will also be charged with the duty of originating consideration of such subjects, when, in its judgment, necessary, and of recommending whatever it considers essential to establish sufficiency and efficiency of cooperation and coordination of effort between the Army and the Navy as to aviation.

4. Procedure. - The Aeronautical Board will hold regular monthly meetings and such extraordinary meetings as may be deemed advisable. The Board will prescribe its procedure, including the composition and functions of its working committees. The senior

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member of the Board present will preside at its meetings. Reports and correspondence of the Board which express opinions or submit recommendations will be authenticated by the senior Army member and the senior Navy member present at the meeting at which action is taken. All recommendations of the Aeronautical Board affecting joint Army and Navy policies or plans relative to the national defense will be referred to the Joint Board for consideration before submission to the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy. Matters affecting the procurement of materiel in time of war to meet joint requirements will be submitted to the Army and Navy Munitions Board. All other matters will be submitted direct to the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy.

W. H. Standley,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 82 of July 23, 1936, canceled and replaced by General Order No. 158 of November 13, 1941.

*****

General Order No. 83 is revised in its entirety by General Order No. 117.

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*****

General Order No. 84

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., August 15, 1936.

Navy Expeditionary Medal

1. General Order No. 64 is hereby canceled.

2. Commemorative of expeditionary service performed by the Navy and Marine Corps, a Navy Expeditionary Medal has been authorized for issue to officers and enlisted men of the naval service.

3. The medal will be awarded to the officers and enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps who shall have actually landed on foreign territory and engaged in operations against armed opposition, or operated under circumstances which, after full consideration, shall be deemed to merit special recognition and for which service no campaign medal has been awarded.

4. No person in the naval service is entitled to more than one Expeditionary Medal. Participation in more than one expedition will be recognized by the issue of bronze stars (one star for each expedition in excess of one), to be worn on the ribbon of the Expeditionary Medal.

5. Only one type medal - the Navy Expeditionary Medal - will be awarded for participation in expeditions not now approved for the award of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal, except that the Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal may be awarded to Marine personnel participating in said expeditions until such time as the present supply of Marine Corps Expeditionary Medals is exhausted.

6. All Marine personnel now entitled to receive the Marine Expeditionary Medal will be allowed to retain that medal. Navy personnel who have been awarded the Marine Corps Expeditionary Medal will be permitted to exchange that medal for the Navy Expeditionary Medal.

7. All officers and men of Navy and Marine Corps who took part in an operation listed in the Bureau of Navigation Manual for the award of the Navy Expeditionary Medal may submit to the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation or the Major General Commandant, United States Marine Corps, respectively, through official channels, applications for the above medal. The application should include the names and dates of the expeditions for which the medal is claimed.

8. The medal may be awarded to officers and enlisted men who have become separated from the service under honorable conditions.

W. H. Standley,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 85 is canceled by General Order No. 104.

*****

General Order No. 86 is revised in its entirety by General Order No. 133.

*****

General Order No. 87 is canceled by General Order No. 110.

*****

General Order No. 88 is canceled by General Order No. 137.

*****

General Order No. 89 is canceled by General Order No. 104.

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*****

General Order No. 90

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., December 30, 1936.

Chevalier Field

1. Effective as of this date, the station field at the United States Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Florida, is hereby officially designated as Chevalier Field.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 91 is revised in its entirety by General Order No. 120.

*****

General Order No. 92

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., January 23, 1937.

Mail Transportation in Navy Planes

No mail other than official Government mail and bona fide correspondence addressed to or originating from the personnel of naval vessels or stations and naval units shall be transported in Navy planes making flights outside the continental limits of the United States except by express authority of the Secretary of the Navy. In no case shall mail so carried be marked or stamped in such a manner as to indicate that it was transported in naval aircraft.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 93 is canceled by General Order No. 110.

*****

General Order No. 94

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 8, 1937.

Cancelation of General Order No. 33

1. General Order No. 33 is canceled as of July 1, 1937.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 95

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Apr. 5, 1937.

Kure (Ocean) Island

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

EXECUTIVE ORDER

"Placing Kure (Ocean) Island, Territory of Hawaii, Under the Control and Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy

"KURE (OCEAN) ISLAND, TERRITORY OF HAWAII

"By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 91 of the act of April 30, 1900, 31 Stat. 141, 159, as amended by section 7 of the act of May 27, 1910, 36 Stat. 443, 447, and as President of the United States, it is ordered that Kure (Ocean) Island, being under the sovereignty of the Territory of Hawaii, and located in the Pacific Ocean approximately in the latitude 28°25' North and longitude 178°25' West from Greenwich, together with the surrounding reef as indicated upon the diagram hereto attached and made a part hereof, be, and it is hereby, reserved, set aside, and placed under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy for naval purposes.

"This order shall continue in full force and effect unless and until revoked by the President or by act of Congress.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
February 20, 1936."

2. Kure (Ocean) Island was placed in the fourteenth naval district, by Secretary of the Navy dispatch 1314 1100, March 1936.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 96 of April 28, 1937, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 179 of August 26, 1942.

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*****

General Order No. 97 of May 5, 1937, is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 14 of May 13, 1935.

*****

General Order No. 98 is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 28.

*****

General Order No. 99 is canceled by General Order No. 121.

*****

General Order No. 100

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., October 5, 1937.

Establishment of Naval Experimental Model Basin

1. The Naval Experimental Model Basin, Carderock (P. O. Cabin John), Md., is hereby established and will be known as "The David W. Taylor Model Basin."

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 101 is canceled by General Order No. 137.

*****

General Order No. 102 is canceled by General Order No. 143.

*****

General Order No. 103 is canceled by General Order No. 121.

*****

General Order No. 104 is canceled by Alnav 88 of 1941.

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*****

General Order No. 105

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 14, 1938.

Chambers Field

1. Effective June 1, 1938, the flying field at the United States Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Virginia, is officially designated as Chambers Field, in memory of the late Captain Washington Irving Chambers, United States Navy.

William D. Leahy,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 106 is canceled by General Order No. 134.

*****

General Order No. 107 is canceled by General Order No. 115.

*****

General Order No. 108 canceled by SecNav letter, Serial 69113 of May 11, 1943.

*****

General Order No. 109 is canceled by General Order No. 142.

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*****

General Order No. 110

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., September 28, 1938.

Saluting Stations

1. General Orders Nos. 39, 72, 75, 87, and 93 are hereby canceled.

2. The Department publishes for the information and guidance of the service the following list of saluting stations. This information shall not be taken as changing the provisions of article 319, United States Navy Regulations, 1920.

3. Commanding officers and others are directed to furnish the Department with any additions or corrections to the accompanying list which may come to their notice.

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Albania Durazzo Naval Bastion.
Argentina Bahia Blanca Ships that go directly to one of the ports of the city of Bahia Blanca should make the salute on passing through Puerto Belgrano.
La Plata Navy Yard, Rio Santiago. Salutes should be fired within the moles, between the extreme north and the semaphore.
Puerto Belgrano Approximately 1,500 meters east of the entrance to anteport. Salutes should be fired in the man-of-war anchorage (between buoys 13 and 14) or while passing through the channel to the port.
Belgium Antwerp Fort Sainte Marie, on Scheldt, left bank.
Belgium (colony) Ostend Fort Napoleon.
Congo Fort Shinkakassa.
Brazil Rio de Janeiro Navy Yard, Ilha das Cobras. In other ports salutes are returned only when Brazilian men-of-war are present, and then only when not moored to breakwater or seawall.
Bulgaria Varna No permanent saluting battery. Salutes are returned by Bulgarian men-of-war, if present, or by field artillery when a foreign man-of-war is expected. Inquiry should be made on or before arrival as to whether a salute would be returned.
Chile Talcahuano Fort "El Morro"
  Valparaiso Silva Palma Barracks. Salutes prohibited inside area of water from Duprat Point breakwater to coaling dock.
China   Foreign men-of-war may fire salutes at any port in China where Chinese men-of-war able to return salutes are present. A salute to the Chinese flag is in no case returned by a shore battery.
Colombia Buenaventura Teneriffe battery.
Cartegena Bastion on wall, south side of city (flag monument).
Costa Rica Port Lima National Pier. Saluting arrangements may not be altogether efficient.
Puntarenas Near main wharf. Saluting arrangements may not be altogether efficient.
--82--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Cuba Habana Fort Cabanas. In all other Cuban ports salutes are returned only when Cuban men-of-war are present (first ascertain whether such vessel will return the salute).
Denmark Copenhagen Battery Sixtus, Royal Dockyard.
Kronborg-Elsinore Saluting port only by previous arrangement, on special occasions.
Ecuador Guayaquil Artillery battery.
Egypt Alexandria Fort Tsali, east side of outer harbor.
Port Said Battery on the front. Salutes should be fired outside the harbor.
Estonia Tallinn Roads Esthonia has no saluting stations. Salutes of foreign men-of-war are returned only by Esthonian warships riding in the Tallinn (Reval) Roads.
Finland Helsingfors Fort at Suomenlinna (Sveaborg) at harbor entrance. Visiting men-of-war should salute on reaching Harmaja (Grahara) Lighthouse.
France Ajaccio (Corsica) Citadel.
Brest Fer-a-Cheval.
Cherbourg Homet.
Dunkirk Eastern sea front.
Le Havre Fort Sainte-Adresse.
Marseille Pharo.
Toulon Piastre.
France (colonies):  
Algeria Algiers Admiralty Island.
Oran Chateau-Neuf.
Cochin-China Saigon Mobile battery (Quai de l'Argonne).
India Pondicherry Detachment of Indian Sepoys.
Indo-China Haiphong In front of Fort Annamite.
Kwang - Chow - Wan. Fort Bayard Field battery on river bank near Government house.
Madagascar Diago-Suarez Colonial artillery on the cliff of Antsirane.
Martinique Fort de France Fort Tartanson.
Morocco Casablanca Battery of the new naval barracks (Caserne Neuve de la Marine).
Rabat Section of artillery of the Garde Cherifienne.
New Caledonia Noumea Battery of artillery.
Senegal Dakar Battery of the pointe.
Somaliland Djibouti Mobile battery in front of Government house.
Tahiti Papeete Saluting battery located on water front near main wharf in immediate vicinity of post office
Tunis Bizerta Fort d'Espagne.
Tunis-La Goulette Borjd de la Karaba.
Germany Borkum Near naval signal station.
Cuxhaven Outer berths at Landungshoft.1
Kiel-Friedrichsort Blucher Bridge and outer berths on Tirpitz breakwater.1
Kaiser-Wilhelm Canal The saluting stations Cuxhaven and Kiel-Friedrichsort also return salutes of warships passing through can as without touching a German port. In such cases, salute is only expected once (by German saluting stations).
Pilau On north side of entrance. Inside inner harbor breakwater.1
Swinemunde On west side of entrance near naval signal station. Eichstaden.1
Wilhelmshaven In front of Fort Heppens. North (outer) breakwater of third entrance.1

1 Warships tied up at naval base may salute only when lying as described.

--83--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Great Britain (United Kingdom). Dover Dover Castle.
Leith Edinburgh Castle. Foreign warships entering Firth of Forth and intending to anchor in Leith Roads should fire their salutes off Inchkeith. These salutes are returned by Edinburgh Castle.
Plymouth The Royal Citadel.
Portsmouth Long Curtain Battery.
Sheerness Garrison Point Fort.
Great Britain (Dominions, colonies, etc.):  
Aden Port of Aden Shore battery on Ras Marbat.
Australia. Darwin Military barracks.
Fremantle. Artillery barracks.
Melbourne Queenscliff Fort.
Sydney George's Heights.
British North Borneo. Sandakan Fort Pryer.
Canada. Esquimalt, B. C. Work Point Barracks (mobile battery).
Halifax, N. S. The Citadel.
Quebec The Citadel (mobile battery).
Victoria, B. C. Work Point Barracks (mobile battery).
Ceylon Colombo Flagstaff Battery.
Gibraltar Port of Gibraltar King's Bastion. The firing of salutes on Sunday is restricted to between the hours of 1300 and 1800.
Kong Kong Kowloon Signal Hill.
India Bombay Middle Ground Saluting Battery.
Calcutta Fort William.
Karachi Manora Battery.
Madras Fort St. George.
Rangoon Saluting battery, Shive Dragon Pagoda.
Jamaica Kingston Port Royal
Malay States (Unfederated). Johore Bahru The Fort. Bukit Timbalan. Situated almost directly behind the New Law Courts and Government Rest House.
Trengganu. Kuala Trengganu.
Maldive Islands. Male  
Malta Valetta Upper Barracca Saluting Battery.
Mauritius. Port Louis Fort George.
Newfoundland St. John's. Fort Townsend. (Salutes are fired on very special occasions only.)
New Zealand Auckland, Devonport Narrow Neck.
Wellington Point Jerningham (western slope).
Samoa Apia Matautu Point.
Sierra Leone Freetown Tower Hill Barracks.
South Africa Capetown The Castle.
Straits Settlement Singapore Fort Teregah, Pulau Brani.
Tonga Nukualofa. Saluting battery of field guns situated by national flagstaff just to westward of pier.
Zanzibar Island Zanzibar  
Greece Piraeus Near Inner harbor red-light buoy on left when entering.
Salamis Island Naval base.
Guatemala Champerico  
Livingston Barracks.
Puerto Barrios Comandancia.
San Jose Government building.
Haiti Port-au-Prince Fort National (also known as Port Alexandre).
--84--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Honduras Amapala Fort El Vijia, on hill overlooking town and harbor. Old-style saluting pieces. Requires an hour or more for firing full national salute.
La Ceiba Desirable to announce visit by radio. Powder is not always accessible.
Puerto Cortes La Laguna. May delay answering unexpected salutes.
Tela  
Trujillo Desirable to announce visit by radio. May delay answering unexpected salutes.
Iraq Basrah (Ashar) Field guns mounted on the Viceroy's pier.
Italy Brindisi Batteria Isola S. Andrea.
Gaeta Batteria Santa Maria.
La Spezia Batteria Varignano.
Maddalena Forte Camiciotto.
Messina Batteria Passino (S. Ranieri). Salutes are not to be fired in anchorages at entrance to the Straits.
Naples Mola S. Vincenzo.
Pola Punta Fisella salutes not to be fired when anchored off Brioni Island.
Taranto Castello (at entrance to Mare Piccolo).
Venice (and anchorages in Laguna). Fort Nicolett. Ships salute only in vicinity of entrance of the Narrows of S. Nicolo de Lido and of Spignon. Salutes are not to be fired in the Bay of San Marco.
Zara  
Italian possessions:  
Dodecanese Isis. Porto Lago (Lero) Batteria Revel.
Clrenaica Tobruk Punta Tobruk.
Eritrea Massaua Batteria Abd-el-Cader.
Tripoli Tripoli Fort near quarantine station.
Japan General Foreign men-of-war may fire salutes at any port in Japan where Japanese men-of-war able to return salutes are present. At the sites of naval stations and minor naval stations, the following land corps may return salutes in case Japanese naval vessels should not be present:
Yokosuka Naval station barracks.
Kura Do.
Sasebo Do.
Maidzura Minor naval station, Defense Corps.
O-Minato Do.
Chinkai Do.
Baku. Do.
Ryojun Harbor office.
Latvia Liepaja (Libau)  
Riga Fort Daugavdrigas. Battery on right river bank fortress flagstaff.
Liberia Monrovia Fort Norris.
Mexico Acapulco Fort San Diego.
Vera Cruz Fort San Juan de Ulera.
Monaco Monaco Shore battery at palace situated on west side of harbor.
Morocco Tangier Battery situated under wall of town, close to Jetty and port lighthouse.
See also entries under France and Spain.  
Netherlands Den Helder Naval barracks, west side of harbor canal. Salutes are also returned at Flushing and other ports, when a Dutch man-of-war is present.
--85--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Netherlands (colonies):  
Curacao Willemstad Fort Amsterdam. Salutes not allowed in Santa Ana Bay.
Guiana (Surinam). Paramaribo Fort Zeelandia.
Java Batavia Shore battery at Tandjong Priok.
  Saurabaya East side of entrance to navy yard.
Nicaragua  
Norway Bergen Fort Bergenhus.
Horten Fort Carljohansvern.
Kristiansand Fort Odderoen.
Oslo Fort Akershus.
Trondheim Fort Kristiansten.
Vardo Fort Vardoyhus.
Paraguay Asuncion Battery at harbor entrance.
Persian Gulf Bushire In Persian territory.
Maskat In the independent State of Oman.
Peru Callao Naval School, La Punta.
Poland Gdynia Schoolship Baltyk moored at the entrance of the naval port.
Portugal Lisbon Battery of Bom Sucesso.
Portugal (colonies):  
Angola Lunada Fortress of Sao Miguel.
Azores:  
St. Michaels. Ponta Delgada Redoubt of Sao Braz.
Terceira Angra de Heroismo Castle of St. John the Baptist.
Cape Verde I. Praia  
St. Vincent  
Goa (India) Mormugao  
Guinea Bolama  
Macao (China)   Fortress of Guie and Monte.
Madeira Funchal Fortress of Santiago.
Mozambique Lourenco Marques Battery.
St. Thomas Ana Chaves  
Timor Dili Prior to saluting, inquiry should be made as to whether salute will be returned.
Rumania Constanza Rumanian Naval Base.
Salvador La Libertad  
San Domingo San Domingo City The Citadel.
Siam Paknam (Bangkok) Fort Chula Chomkiao at mouth of Menam River.
Soviet Union Batumi Shore battery.
Kronstadt Do.
Odessa Do.
Sevastopol Do.
Vladivostok Do.
Spain Algeciras Fort Santiago, in an approximate position 305°, 1,050 yards from the head of the Galera Mole.
Barcelona Fort Montjuich.
Cadiz San Felipe.
Cartagena Fort or arsenal.
El Ferrol 1 battery at entrance naval dockyard; 1 battery at main wharf.
Spanish possessions:  
Baleric Islands Mahon Fort Isabella II. Request information of pilot.
Palma Navidad.
Canary Islands Las Palmas San Fernando.
Santa Cruz de Tenerife. Fort Almeida.
Morocco Alhucemas

 

Ceuta

 

Melilla

 

--86--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Sweden Gothenburg Near Gota River in westernmost area of naval station (Nya Varet). Men-of-war entering the port of Gothenburg should commence the salute when passing Knippelhoim's lighthouse. Men-of-war, staying at Gothenburg Naval Station, anchored west of the meridian through Knippelholm's lighthouse, may not salute.
Karlskrona Fort Kungsholmen.
Stockholm Kastellhomen Battery.
Tralhavet Oscar Fredriksborg Battery.
Turkey Istanbul Haider Pasha (Selimiye Barracks). Note. - Warships passing through the Straits are not required to exchange salutes with the batteries installed along the coast, such as Anadolukavak at the entrance to the Bosphorus and at Cimenlik at the entrance to the Dardanelles. Warships which put in at Istanbul exchange salutes with Haidar Pasha battery.
Smyrna Fort Yéni-Kale (at entrance to port).
United States:  
Atlantic and Gulf coasts. Annapolis, Md Naval Academy.
Baltimore, Md Fort Howard.
Boston, Mass Fort Strong.
Charleston, S. C. Fort Moultrie.
Fisher's Island, N. Y. (eastern entrance to Long Island Sound, ports of New London, and New Haven). Fort H. G. Wright.
Galveston, Tex Fort San Jacinto.
Hampton Roads, Va (Norfolk and Newport News). Fort Monroe.
Key West, Fla Fort Taylor.
Newport, R. I. Fort Adams.
New York, N. Y. Fort Jay. Salutes to be fired as incoming vessels pass a line between Castle Williams on Fort Jay and the Statue of Liberty on Bedloe's Island.
Pensacola, Fla Fort Barrancas.
Philadelphia, Pa Fort Du Pont.
Portland, Maine Fort Williams.
Washington, D. C. Navy Yard water front.
Pacific coast Astoria and Portland, Oreg Fort Stevens.
Los Angeles, Calif. Fort Mac Arthur.
Monterey, Calif Presidio of Monterey.
Port Townsend, Seattle, and Tacoma, Wash. Fort Worden.
San Diego, Calif. Fort Rosecrans.
San Francisco, Calif. Fort Winfield Scott.
Island possessions:  
Guam Apra Harbor Battery at Piti Landing.
Hawaii Honolulu Fort Armstrong.
Philippines Manila Fort Santiago.
Puerto Rico San Juan Post of San Juan.
Samoa Pago Pago Battery in front of Administration Building.
Panama Canal Zone. Atlantic entrance to Canal. Fort De Lesseps. Salutes to be fired just after incoming vessels have passed through the breakwater entrance.
Pacific entrance to Canal. Fort Amador. Salutes should be fired when incoming vessels are opposite the barracks of Fort Amador.
--87--

Country

Port

Saluting battery - Remarks

Uruguay Montevideo El Cerro. Salute returned by naval battery in naval arsenal, at southern extremity of land below El Cerro. No salutes are fired inside breakwater.
Venezuela Carupano  
Ciudad Bolivar Fort Los Castillos at Guayama Vieja (100 miles above mouth of Orinoco River).
La Guaira Fort Lavleja.
Maracaibo Fort San Carlos.
Puerto Cabello Castillo Libertador
Puerto Sucre (Cumana). San Antonio Castle.
Yemen Hodeida Fort outside town walls to southward.
Loheiya The Castle.
Medi 2 forts to the north of town.
Mocha Mobile battery.
Yugoslavia Heroes Novi Fort Spagnuolo, mouth of Kotor Bay.
Split Fort San Stefano, harbor entrance.

Claude A. Swanson,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General order No. 111 of November 22, 1938, is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 48 of May 13, 1935.

*****

General Order No. 112 of Feb. 6, 1939, canceled by General Order No. 158 of Nov. 13, 1941.

*****

General Order No. 113 of Feb. 6, 1939, incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 53 of May 13, 1935.

*****

General Order No. 114 of Feb. 6, 1939, incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 110 of September 28, 1938.

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*****

General Order No. 115

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 29, 1939.

Regulations Regarding Officers of the Supply Corps Serving Under Revocable Commissions

1. General Order No. 107 is hereby canceled.

2. An Act of Congress approved May 6, 1932, provides in part as follows: "Sec. 2. That all commissions hereafter issued * * * in the lowest commissioned grades of the Staff Corps of the Navy with the rank of ensign, may be revoked by the Secretary of the Navy, under such regulations as he may prescribe, at any time during a period of two years, from the dates of such commissions, and each officer whose commission is so revoked shall be discharged from the service with not more than one year's pay. The rank of such officers of the same date of commission among themselves at the end of said period shall be determined by boards of officers under such rules as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Navy, and the recommendations of such boards shall be final when approved by him."

Pursuant to this Act, the following regulations are hereby established:

3. (a) In the case of officers serving under revocable commissions as provided in the Act of Congress approved May 8, 1932, the Secretary of the Navy may revoke the commission of any officer whose conduct or performance of duty is such as not to justify his retention as an officer of the Navy; or whose retention as an officer of the Navy is not justified for other good and sufficient reasons appearing to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Navy.

(b) In case any officer commissioned in the Supply Corps of the Navy marries during the period that he is serving under a revocable commission as provided by the terms of the Act cited above, such marriage will be considered cause for the revocation of his commission.

(c) In case the revocation of an officer's commission is recommended by his commanding officer or higher naval authority, such recommendation shall be accompanied by a complete statement of facts, together with such statement as the officer concerned may desire to make with respect thereto.

(d) In case, under the provisions of the Act, cited above, a commission is revoked because of misconduct, the officer upon discharge will not be allowed a year's pay or any part thereof.

(e) Nothing in the aforesaid statute or in these regulations in execution thereof shall be construed as precluding trial by court

--89--

martial in the case of misconduct of such nature as to warrant such action.

4. Naval Academy graduates who enter the Supply Corps upon graduation and who are commissioned under the provisions of this Act as Assistant Paymasters with the rank of ensign, and whose commissions are of the same date, shall take rank among themselves, after the completion of the 2-year period, in accordance with their relative standing based (1) on the reports of fitness on each officer during the 2-year period, and (2) on the final multiple obtained on graduation from the Naval Academy. Based on a scale of 100, fitness reports will be given a weight of 20 and Naval Academy multiple a weight of 80 in the computation for this standing.

5. Officers commissioned as Assistant Paymasters, with the rank of ensign, from civil life shall take rank among themselves, after the completion of the 2-year period in accordance with their relative standing based (1) on their class standing upon completion of the course at the Finance and Supply School, and (2) on the reports of fitness of each officer during the 2-year period. These factors will be given equal weight in the computation for this standing.

6. Fitness reports of officers serving under revocable commissions shall be submitted every three months.

William D. Leahy,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 116 of May 29, 1939, canceled by General Order No. 161 of Dec. 8, 1941.

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*****

General Order No. 117

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., June 12, 1939.

Regulations Regarding Officers of the Line of the Navy or the Marine Corps Serving Under Revocable Commissions

General Order 83 is hereby revised in its entirety as follows:

An Act of Congress approved June 23, 1938, provides in part as follows: "Sec. 14 (a). The Secretary of the Navy, under such regulations as he may prescribe, may hereafter revoke the commission of any officer on the active List, initially commissioned after the date of this Act, who, at the date of said revocation has had less than seven years of continuous service as a commissioned officer of the line of the Navy or of the Marine Corps, and each officer whose commission is so revoked shall be discharged from the naval service: * * * : Provided further, That no officer discharged by reason of revocation of commission within a period of probation shall receive advanced pay or allowances upon such discharge."

Pursuant to this act, the following regulations are hereby established :

1. (a) In the case of officers serving under revocable commissions as provided in the Act of Congress approved June 23, 1938, the Secretary of the Navy may revoke the commission of any officer whose conduct or performance of duty is such as not to justify his retention as an officer of the line of the Navy or Marine Corps; or whose retention as an officer of the Navy or the Marine Corps is not justified for other good and sufficient reasons appearing to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Navy.
(b) In case any officer commissioned in the Navy or Marine Corps marries within two years subsequent to his original commission, such marriage will be considered cause for the revocation of his commission. This provision is not to be construed as applicable to commissioned warrant officers.
(c) In case the revocation of an officer's commission is recommended by his commanding officer or higher naval authority, such recommendation shall be accompanied by a complete statement of facts, together with such statement as the officer concerned may desire to make with respect thereto.
(d) Nothing in these regulations shall be construed as precluding trial by court martial in the case of misconduct of such nature as to warrant such action.
--91--
2. The provisions of General Order No. 83 will remain in effect until the termination of the two (2) year period, described in the Act of May 6, 1932, applicable to the Naval Academy Classes of 1937 and 1938.

William D. Leahy,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 118

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., June 14, 1939.

Establishing a Defensive Sea Area in and About Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

"Executive Order "Establishing a Defensive Sea Area in and About Pearl Harbor, Hawaii

"By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, Sec. 96), the area of water in Pearl Harbor, Island of Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, lying between extreme high-water mark and the sea in and about the entrance channel to said harbor, within an area bounded by the extreme high-water mark, a line bearing south true from the southwestern corner of the Puuloa Naval Reservation, a line bearing south true from Ahua Point Lighthouse, and a line bearing west true from a point three nautical miles due south true from Ahua Point Lighthouse, is hereby established as a defensive sea area for purposes of national defense.

"At no time shall any person (other than persons on public vessels of the United States) enter the defensive sea area above defined, nor shall any vessels or other craft (other than public vessels of the United States) be navigated within said defensive sea area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"Any person violating the provisions of this order shall be subject to the penalties provided by law.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"May 26, 1939."

William D. Leahy,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 119 is canceled by General Order No. 142.

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*****

General Order No. 120

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., August 11, 1939.

United States Fleet Training Base,

San Clemente Island, Calif.

General Order No. 91 is hereby revised in its entirety as follows: "1. Effective July 1, 1937, there will be established the United States Fleet Training Base, San Clemente Island, Calif.

"2. The base will be organized and administered as a unit of the Naval Operating Base, San Diego, Calif., the aviation facilities thereof being assigned as a part of the Naval Air Station, San Diego.

"3. Water around the island for a distance of one nautical mile from low-water mark shall be restricted to naval use."

Charles Edison,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 121

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Sept. 12, 1939.

Administration of Naval Air Stations

1. Effective October 1, 1939, General Orders Nos. 37, 43, 99, and 103 are canceled, and superseded by this order. Thereafter, all naval aviation shore establishments, with the exception of the Naval Aircraft Factory, Philadelphia, Pa., and the naval reserve aviation bases, shall be designated naval air stations.

2. All naval air stations shall include their auxiliary fields and shall be a part of the command of the Commandant of the Naval District in which they are located, except that the Naval Air Station, Anacostia, shall be administered by the Commandant, Navy Yard, Washington, D. C., and the Naval Air Stations, Pensacola and Corpus Christi shall be administered by the Commandants of the Naval Air Training Centers, Pensacola and Corpus Christi, respectively, as parts of the Air Intermediate Training Command.

3. Shore aviation facilities provided for the use of the fleet, but not designated as naval air stations, shall he maintained and administered as integral parts of the commands to which assigned by the Secretary of the Navy. Effective October 1, 1939, the aviation facilities at San Clemente Island, Calif., and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are assigned to the Naval Air Station, San Diego, and the Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, respectively.

Charles Edison,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

--93--
*****

General Order No. 122 of August 14, 1939, suspended by General Order No. 177 of July 8, 1942.

*****

General Order No. 123

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., September 8, 1939.

Withdrawing Public Land and Water for Naval Purposes

Alaska

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

Executive Order withdrawing public land and water for naval purposes

ALASKA

By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me as President of the United States and by the act of June 25, 1910, c. 421, 36 Stat. 847, as amended by the act of August 24, 1912, c. 369, 37 Stat. 497, and subject to the conditions therein expressed, it is ordered as follows:

Section 1. The Executive order of October 30, 1901, reserving Harbor Island and three islets southeast thereof in Sitka Harbor, Alaska, for the use of the Revenue Gutter Service is hereby revoked.

Section 2. The public land and water in the following-described area in the Territory of Alaska are hereby withdrawn from settlement, location, sale, or entry, and reserved for the use of the Department of the Navy for naval purposes:

That part of Sitka Bay lying south of Japonski Island and west of the main channel described by metes and bounds as follows: Beginning at the southeast point of Japonski Island at angle point No. 7 of the meanders of U. S. Survey No. 1496; thence east approximately 12. 00 chains to the center of the main channel; thence S. 45" E. along the main channel approximately 20. 00 chains; thence S. 45° W. approximately 9. 00 chains to the southeastern point of Aleutskl Island; thence S. 79° W. approximately 40. 00 chains to the southern point of Fruit Island; thence N. 60° W. approximately 50. 00 chairs to the southwestern point of Japonski Island at angle point No. 35 of U. S. Survey No. 1496; thence easterly with the meanders of Japonski Island to the point of beginning, including Charcoal, Aleuski, Harbor, Alice, Love, Fruit Islands, and a number of smaller unnamed islands and containing a total land and water area of approximately 195 acres.

--94--

Section 3. The reservation made by section 2 of this order shall remain in force until revoked by the President or by act of Congress.

Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The White House,
July 25, 1939.
(No. 8216)

(F. R. Doc. 39-2749; Filed July 26, 1939; 10:03 a. m.)

Charles Edison,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 124 is canceled by General Order No. 150.

--95--
*****

General Order No. 125

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Oct. 13, 1939.

Public Exhibit of Naval Material

General Order No. 32 is hereby revised in its entirety as follows:

1. Navy materials may be made available for public exhibit under the following circumstances:

(a) Under the provisions of the act of May 22, 1896, as amended (34 U. S. C. 546) which permits the loan or gift of condemned or obsolete materials not needed in the service of the Navy Department, to soldiers' monument associations, posts of the Grand Army of the Republic, posts of the American Legion, and other recognized war veterans' associations, State museums, municipal corporations, and to incorporated museums operated and maintained for educational purposes only, whose charter denies them the right to operate for profit.

(b) To comprise special exhibits not contemplated by the acts mentioned in (a) above.

2. The policy of the Navy Department in this regard is that:

(a) Except for items coming under the provisions of paragraph (1) (a) above which the Department determines shall be disposed of as a gift, all articles, equipment, or materials authorized for exhibition purposes must remain under the control of the Navy Department.

(b) The Government shall be placed at no expense in connection with such loan or gift. In all cases, costs of preparation, handling, and shipment of the property shall be borne by the agency requesting the material, unless legal authority exists for the Navy Department to make disbursements in any particular case. When the property will remain in the custody of naval personnel during an exhibit, necessary transportation, subsistence, or shelter for personnel will likewise be borne by the requesting agency.

(c) The exhibit must be under such auspices and so displayed as to emphasize its educational value and attract wide attention.

(d) The exhibit must not be directly or indirectly for the benefit of any private individual or corporation.

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(e) In all cases of loans, the agency making the request must furnish in advance a surety bond to cover the return of the property in as good condition as shipped.

3. All requests for naval material for exhibition purposes, or for the loan or gift of condemned or obsolete material covered by the acts cited in paragraph (1) (a) above, will be forwarded with appropriate recommendations via official channels to the Navy Department. Such request will give full particulars as to the approximate period for which the material is desired. Requests approved by cognizant Bureaus will be submitted to the Secretary of the Navy for approval, then forwarded to the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts for final action.

4. Requests which contemplate the gift of property having possible historical interest will be referred to The Curator, Navy Department, for recommendation before action is taken by the cognizant Bureau.

5. Materials concerned will be accounted for in accordance with instructions in the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts Manual.

H. R. Stark,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 126

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Nov. 8, 1939.

Withdrawing Public Land and Water for Naval Purposes, Alaska

1. The following Executive order is quoted:

Executive Order
WITHDRAWING PUBLIC LAND AND WATER FOR NAVAL PURPOSES, ALASKA
By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by the act of June 25, 1910, c. 421, 36 Stat. 847, as amended by the act of August 24, 1912, c. 369, 37 Stat. 497, and subject to the conditions therein expressed, it is ordered as follows:
Section 1. The public land and water in the following-described area in the Territory of Alaska are hereby withdrawn from settlement, location, sale, or entry and reserved for the use of the Department of the Navy for naval purposes:
The eastern portion of Kodiak Island, described by metes and bounds as follows: Beginning at a point at latitude 57°47'0" north, longitude 152°26'30" west, thence:
W. to latitude 57°47'0" north, longitude 152°36'0" west;
S. to latitude 57°44'30" north, longitude 152°36'0" west;
SW. to latitude 57°42'0" north, longitude 152°38'0" west;
S. to latitude 57°39'30" north, longitude 152°38'0" west;
E. to latitude 57°39'30" north, longitude 152°30'0" west;
NE. to latitude 57°42'0" north, longitude 152°26'0" west;
N. to latitude 57°44'0" north, longitude 152°26'0" west;
NW. to latitude 57°47'0" north, longitude 152°26'30" west to the point of beginning.
Section 2 This order supersedes Executive Order No. 7748 of November 20, 1937, reserving a certain area in Alaska for the use of the Navy Department for naval purposes.
Section 3. The reservation made by section 1 of this order shall remain in force until revoked by the President or by act of Congress.
Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The White House,
October 28, 1939. [No. 8278]
(F. R. Doc. 39-4023; filed October 30, 1939; 2:41 p. m. )

H. R. Stark,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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General Order No. 127 of Nov. 14, 1939, is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 54 of May 13, 1935.

*****

General Order No. 128 is canceled by General Order No. 142.

*****

General Order No. 129

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Nov. 15, 1939.

Cancelation of General Order No. 71

1. General Order No. 71 is hereby canceled.

Charles Edison,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 130 is canceled by General Order No. 150.

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*****

General Order No. 131

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 25, 1940.

Rules or Precedence Relating to Foreign Service Officers and Other Officers of the United States Government

1. General Order No. 23, which quotes Executive Order No. 4705 of August 10, 1927, is hereby canceled, and the following Executive Order, quoted for information and guidance, replaces it:

"Executive Order

"Rules of Precedence Relating to Foreign Service Officers and Other Officers of the United States Government

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 1752 of the Revised Statutes of the United States (22 U. S. C., sec. 132), and as President of the United States of America, I hereby prescribe the following rules governing precedence as between officers of the Foreign Service of the United States and officers or accredited representatives of other Executive departments or establishments of the United States Government:

"1. In the country to which he is accredited, the chief of the diplomatic mission shall take precedence over all officers or accredited representatives of other Executive departments or establishments.

"2. In the absence of the titular head of the mission, the charge d'affaires ad interim shall take precedence over all officers or accredited representatives of other Executive departments or establishments.

"3. Counselors shall take place and precedence next in succession after the chief of mission.

"4. Military and naval attachés shall take place and precedence next in succession after the counselor of embassy or legation, or at a post where the Department of State has deemed it unnecessary to assign a counselor, after the senior secretary. Military and naval attachés shall take precedence among themselves according to their respective grades and seniority therein.

"5. Foreign Service officers designated as attachés shall take precedence among Federal Service officers according to their respective grades and seniority therein, or as the Secretary of State may direct; but they shall take place and precedence with but after military and naval attachés, except when the provisions of section 12 hereof are applicable and such Foreign Service officers are also assigned as diplomatic secretaries.

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"6. Treasury attachés shall take place and precedence with but after military, naval, commercial, and agricultural attachés.

"7. Assistant military and naval attachés shall take place and precedence next after second secretaries. Assistant military and naval attachés shall take precedence among themselves according to their respective grades and seniority therein.

"8. Foreign Service officers designated as assistant attachés shall take precedence among Foreign Service officers according to their respective grades and seniority therein, or as the Secretary of State may direct; but they shall take place and precedence with but after assistant military and naval attachés, except when the provisions of section 12 hereof are applicable and such Foreign Service officers are also assigned as diplomatic secretaries.

"9. Assistant treasury attachés shall take place and precedence with but after assistant military, naval, commercial, and agricultural attachés.

"10. No extra rank or precedence shall be conferred upon a military, naval, marine, or Foreign Service officer because of his duties as attaché to a diplomatic mission.

"11. At ceremonies and receptions where the members of the mission take individual position, and in the lists furnished foreign governments for inclusion in their diplomatic lists, place and precedence shall follow the ranking indicated in the preceding sections.

"12. At ceremonies and receptions where the personnel of diplomatic missions are present as a body, the chief of mission, or chargé d'affaires ad interim, accompanied by all Foreign Service officers assigned as diplomatic secretaries, shall be followed in the order named by the military, the naval, the commercial (when not also assigned as diplomatic secretaries), the agricultural (when not also assigned as diplomatic secretaries), and the treasury attachés, formed as distinct groups.

"13. In international conferences at which the American delegates possess plenipotentiary powers, the senior counselor of embassy or legation attached to the delegation shall take place and precedence immediately after the delegates, unless otherwise instructed by the Secretary of State.

"14. In the districts to which they are assigned, consuls general shall take place and precedence with but after Brigadier Generals in the Army or Marine Corps and intermediate between Rear Admirals and Captains in the Navy; consuls shall take place and precedence with but after Colonels in the Army or Marine Corps and Captains in the Navy; Foreign Service officers commissioned as vice consuls shall take place and precedence with but after Captains in the Army or Marine Corps and Lieutenants in the Navy.

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"15. Medical officers of the Public Health Service assigned to duty in American consular offices shall rank relatively with but after career officers of the consular branch of the Foreign Service of the Department of State in their respective grades as follows: Medical director with consul general; senior surgeon and surgeon with consul; passed assistant and assistant surgeon with Foreign Service officers commissioned as vice consul: Provided, That this regulation shall not operate to give seniority to any medical officer above that of the consular officer in charge.

"Revocation or Executive Order

"Executive Order No. 4705 of August 10, 1927, prescribing rules of precedence relating to officers of the Foreign Service and other officers of the United States Government, is hereby revoked.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"March 2, 1940."
(No. 8356)

(F. R. Doc. 40-913; filed March 4, 1940; 2:46 p. m.)

Lewis Compton,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 132

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 30, 1940.

Defining Certain Vital Military and Naval Installations and Equipment

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

"Executive Order

"Defining Certain Vital Military and Naval Installations and Equipment

"Whereas section 1 of the act of January 12, 1938, 52 Stat. 3, provides:

" 'That, whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President shall define certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection against the general dissemination of information relative thereto, it shall be unlawful to make any photograph, sketch, picture, drawing, map, or graphical representation of such vital military and naval installations or equipment without first obtaining permission of the commanding officer of the military or naval post, camp, or station concerned, or higher authority, and promptly submitting the product obtained to such commanding officer or higher authority for censorship or such other action as he may deem necessary. Any person found guilty of a violation of this section shall upon conviction be punished by a fine of not more than $1, 000 or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

"Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the foregoing statutory provisions, and in effectuation of the purposes of the said act of January 12, 1938, I hereby define the following as vital military and naval installations or equipment requiring protection against the general dissemination of information relative thereto:

"1. All military or naval installations and equipment which are now classified, designated, and marked under the authority or at the direction of the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy as 'secret, ' 'confidential, ' or 'restricted, ' and all military or naval installations and equipment which may hereafter be so classified, designated, and marked with the approval or at the direction of the President, and located within:

"(a) Any military or naval reservation, post, arsenal, proving ground, range, mine field, camp, fort, yard, station, district, or area.

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"(b) Any defensive sea area heretofore or hereafter established and existing under authority of section 44 of the United States Criminal Code, as amended by the act of March 4, 1917, 39 Stat. 1194 (U. S. C., title 18, Sec. 96).

"(c) Any airspace reservation heretofore or hereafter established and existing under authority of section 4 of the Air Commerce Act of 1926 (44 Stat. 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174).

"(d) Any naval harbor closed to foreign vessels.

"(e) Any area required for fleet purposes.

"(f) Any commercial establishment engaged in the development or manufacture of military or naval arms, munitions, equipment, designs, ships, or vessels for the United States Army or Navy.

"2. All military or naval aircraft, weapons, ammunition, vehicles, ships, vessels, instruments, engines, manufacturing machinery, tools, devices, or any other equipment whatsoever, in the possession of the Army or Navy, or in the course of experimentation, development, manufacture, or delivery for the Army or Navy, which are now classified, designated, and marked under the authority or at the direction of the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy as 'secret, ' 'confidential, ' or 'restricted, ' and all such articles, materials, or equipment which may hereafter be so classified, designated, and marked with the approval or at the direction of the President.

"3. All official military or naval books, pamphlets, documents, reports, maps, charts, plans, designs, models, drawings, photographs, contracts, or specifications, which are now marked under the authority or at the direction of the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy as 'secret, ' 'confidential, ' or 'restricted, ' and all such articles or equipment which may hereafter be so marked with the approval or at the direction of the President.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"March 22, 1940."
(No. 8381)

(F. R, Doc. 40-1220; filed, March 23, 1940; 12:09 p. m.)

Lewis Compton,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 133

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., August 16, 1940.

Mental Preparation for the Exercise of Command

1. General Order No. 22 is hereby revised in its entirety.

2. An appreciation of the fundamental considerations governing the successful conduct of war is a prime requisite to competent exercise of command. To a degree varying with the demands of responsibility, every naval officer should have an understanding of the fundamentals underlying naval strategy and tactics, and joint operations with the Army, fortified by a background of history, world politics, economics, and international law. To the same degree every officer should possess sufficient knowledge to arrive at sound decisions, to transmit his will and intent to his subordinates, and to interpret correctly the strategic and tactical dispositions of his superiors. The fulfillment of these requirements is essential to mutual understanding which, because it is the basis of Intelligent cooperation and unity of effort, is vital to the success of all military undertakings.

3. To further the achievement of the above objectives the following are provided:

(a) The Naval War College correspondence courses:
(1) Strategy and tactics - Parts 1 and 2.
(2) Special course in strategy and tactics for officers other than Navy.
(3) International law.
(4) Advanced international law.
(b) The Naval War College junior course.
(c) The Naval War College senior course.
(d) The Naval War College advanced course.
(e) The Army War College course.
(f) Schools at shore stations.
(g) Schools afloat.

4. (a) The Naval War College correspondence courses are designed to provide preliminary training for officers who will later attend the resident courses and to extend the facilities of the college as far as practicable to those officers unable to attend in person. They cannot be considered as substitutes for resident courses.

The correspondence course in strategy and tactics consists of reading books on military and naval history, natural policy, and other professional subjects, and submitting written comments thereon; and studies of tactical and minor strategical situations involving making estimates, arriving at sound decisions, planning, and formulating directives.

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The correspondence course in strategy and tactics is divided into two parts:

Part 1 - available for lieutenants (junior grade) and above. Part 2 - available for lieutenants and above.

Part 1 constitutes a necessary preliminary to part 2, and in all cases must be completed before part 2 can be undertaken. The ground covered in each part will be as prescribed by the President of the Naval War College, part 1 being primarily a reading course suitable for officers of the lower ranks, with more advanced subjects and problems in part 2.

A special course is designed for officers of the Naval Reserve, Coast Guard, and other services.

The correspondence courses in international law cover the reading of standard textbooks, answering questions, discussion of topics, and solution of situations. The advanced course in international law is available to officers who have completed the correspondence course in international law and who are interested and wish to pursue their studies further.

It is to the advantage of all officers to complete the correspondence course in strategy and tactics before reaching the grade of lieutenant commander.

Correspondence courses are not available to ensigns, except that the correspondence course in international law may be taken by ensigns of the Naval Reserve and Coast Guard. Ensigns of the line serving under revocable commissions are required to complete a selective reading course. It is not considered that the proper performance of their regular duties, together with this additional duty, would leave them sufficient time to devote to a correspondence course.

Officers desiring more detailed information concerning these courses will make their applications direct to the President of the Naval War College.

(b) The Naval War College junior course includes the study and solution of problems in fundamental tactics and strategy, by the use of chart and board maneuvers, international law, thesis writing, a prescribed reading course, and a series of lectures on subjects of naval and national interest. This course is approximately 11 months.

Admission to the junior class will be limited in general to ranks corresponding to the following: All lieutenant commanders, and lieutenants with at least 6 years' commissioned service.

As many officers of such grades and service as practicable will be assigned to this course.

(c) The Naval War College senior course included the application of the fundamentals of strategy and tactics through the solution of major military and naval problems, theses on com-

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prehensive subjects, and an advanced reading list. The course is approximately 11 months.

Officers ordered to this class shall ordinarily be of ranks corresponding to commander and above.

As many officers of such ranks as may be practicable will be assigned to this course.

In addition to officers of the naval service, provision for the attendance in the senior and junior classes will be made for officers of the Army, Marine Corps, and of the Coast Guard. Eligibility for the admission of such officers will be as determined by the heads of their respective departments.

(d) The Naval War College advanced course covers the study of the elements of the war-making capacities of nations, of national objectives in peace and war, of military objectives in war, and of the means by which national and military objectives are attained.

The classes will be composed of flag officers and senior captains, and officers of the Marine Corps and Army who have completed the senior course. The length of the course will be from 1 to 2 years, depending upon the availability of officers.

(e) Army War College course. - The course at the Army War College begins in September of each year and ends the following June. In order to familiarize naval officers with Army problems and better train officers for joint operations and staffs, there will be assigned to each Army War College class at least four captains or commanders of the line of the Navy, if practicable, and at least two colonels, lieutenant colonels, or majors of the Marine Corps. Naval officers so assigned will be graduates of the Nava) War College.

Following the present policy there will be on the staff of the Army War College a naval officer of suitable rank, and, correspondingly, an Army officer on the staff of the Naval War College. The naval officer shall have taken the course at the Army War College and the senior or junior course at the Naval War College before being ordered to the staff.

(f) Shore stations. - At each shore station where large numbers of officers are assembled, schools based on that of the junior class at the Naval War College will be conducted on an entirely voluntary basis for the training of such officers who desire to attend. It is desired that commandants of shore stations encourage the formation of such classes.

(g) Afloat. - At home bases where forces of the fleet assemble for extended periods of time, fleet schools will be conducted as far as may be practicable for the purpose of instructing officers particularly in the problems relating to the forces to which they are attached and in general to joint fleet problems relating to the

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methods of war afloat. Advantage will be taken of the opportunities thus presented for conducting critiques of fleet maneuvers.

5. In examinations for promotion of officers to the grades of rear admiral and captain, certificates of graduation from the Naval War College senior course will be accepted as evidence of qualification in strategy and tactics. Certificates of graduation from the Naval War College junior course will be accepted as evidence of qualification in strategy and tactics for promotion of officers to the grades of commander and lieutenant commander. Certificates of satisfactory completion of the strategy and tactics correspondence course, part 1 and the international law course will be accepted as evidence of qualification in these two subjects for promotion to lieutenant. Likewise, certificates of satisfactory completion of the strategy and tactics correspondence course, parts 1 and 2 and the international law course will be accepted as evidence of qualification in these two subjects for promotion to the grade of lieutenant commander. However, if at any time a candidate for promotion has been found by a naval examining board markedly deficient in his written examination, his record, or both, the board may examine him in the subjects of strategy and tactics and international law, regardless of the fact that he has completed the respective correspondence courses in those subjects, or holds a certificate of graduation from the Naval War College.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 134

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., August 19, 1940.

Canceling General, Order No. 106

1. General Order No. 106 is hereby canceled. (See ALNAV No. 65 of August 10, 19-10.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 135 of August 23, 1940, canceled by General Order No. 176 of July 1, 1942.

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*****

General Order No. 136

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., September 16, 1940.

San Clemente Island Naval Defensive Sea Area

1. The President, on September 6, 1940, signed Executive Order No. 8536, revising Executive Order No. 7747 dated November 20, 1937; thereby extending the San Clemente Island Naval Defensive Sea Area to a distance of one nautical mile from low-water mark.

2. General Orders No. 91 and No. 120 are hereby revised to accord therewith by changing paragraph 3 to read as follows:

3. Water around the island for a distance of one nautical mile from low-water mark shall be restricted to naval use.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 137

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., November 7, 1940.

Cancelation of General Orders Nos. 88 and 101

1. General Orders No. 88 and No. 101 are hereby canceled.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 138

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., November 26, 1940.

Execution of Leases, Licenses, and Permits on Nongovernment Property for the Naval Service

1. General Order No. 65 is canceled and superseded by this order.

2. When non-Government property is to be occupied by an activity of the naval service, other than the Marine Corps, under a lease, license, or permit, or a renewal thereof, all data and information disclosing the need for the proposed occupancy and a description of the premises will be forwarded to the administrative bureau or office concerned to obtain approval.

3. The administrative bureau or office concerned, other than the Marine Corps, will forward such requests for the execution of leases, licenses, or permits, or renewals thereof, to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General) via the Chief of Naval Operations, together with an adequate description of the premises, all original bids, and evidence as to the fair market value of the premises when rental consideration exceeds $2, 000. 00 per annum. If clearance is required through the Federal Works Agency, five copies of PSC Form No. 6 will accompany these papers. After clearance has been obtained, where necessary, all papers will be forwarded by the Chief of Naval Operations to the Secretary of the Navy (Judge Advocate General) for execution; one copy of clearance will he returned to the originating bureau. The recommendation of the Chief of Naval Operations as to the military features of a site in connection with general naval policy is to be sought before the proposal for the acquirement is laid before the Secretary of the Navy.

4. All leases, licenses, or permits, or renewals thereof (other than Marine Corps leases) will be prepared by or under the direction of the Judge Advocate General for execution on behalf of the lessor and the United States of America. When they are duly executed the Judge Advocate General will distribute the originals and copies thereof to the parties concerned. All leases shall be prepared on Standard Form of Government Lease No. 2 and renewals thereof on Notice of Renewal Form No. 1.

5. All leases, licenses, or permits, or renewals thereof, under which property is to be occupied by the Marine Corps, will be forwarded for approval to the Secretary of the Navy via the Chief of Naval Operations, together with an adequate description of the premises, all original bids, and evidence as to the fair market value of the premises when rental consideration exceeds

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$2,000.00 per annum. If clearance is required through the Federal Works Agency, five copies of PSC Form No. 6 will accompany these papers. After clearance has been obtained, where necessary, all papers will be returned to the Major General Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps. Copies of all such leases, or renewals thereof, will be furnished the Judge Advocate General for filing among the muniments of title as required by article 469 (6), United States Navy Regulations, 1920.

6. In the case of any lease, or any renewal thereof, of any property to be occupied by the Marine Corps which might affect other Naval interests in the Naval District where such property is located, the matter shall be referred first to the local Commandant by the Marine Corps, giving full particulars of the area to be leased, the expected duration of the lease and complete details as to the use to which the leased property will be put in all cases not so referred, the Commandant shall be duly informed of the fact that the leases have been negotiated and of the aforementioned particulars.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 139

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., November 28, 1940.

Establishing Sitka Naval Airspace Reservation and Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation

1. The following Executive order is quoted:

Executive Order

Establishing Sitka Naval Airspace Reservation and Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation

ALASKA

By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 (44 Stat. 568, 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the airspaces over the hereinafter-described areas in the Territory of Alaska and over the territorial waters within the three-mile limits adjacent thereto are hereby set apart and reserved as naval airspace reservations, for purposes of the national defense and other governmental purposes; such reservations to be known as "Sitka Naval Airspace Reservation" and "Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation, " respectively.

SITKA NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATION

All of Japonski Island situated immediately west of the city of Sitka, Alaska, and that part of Sitka Bay lying south of Japonski Island and west of the main channel described by metes and bounds as follows: Beginning at the southeast point of Japonski Island at angle point No. 7 of the meanders of the U. S. Survey No. 1496; thence east approximately 12.00 chains to the center of the main channel; thence south 45° east along the main channel approximately 20.00 chains; thence south 45° west approximately 9.00 chains to the southeastern point of Aleutski Island; thence south 79° west approximately 40.00 chains to the southern point of Fruit Island; thence north 60° west approximately 50.00 chains to the southwestern point of Japonski Island at angle point No. 35 of the U. S. Survey No. 1496; thence easterly with the meanders of Japonski Island to the point of beginning including Charcoal, Aleutski, Harbor, Alice, Love, Fruit Islands, and a number of smaller unnamed islands, and containing a total land and water area of approximately 195 acres, being the same area described in Executive Order No. 8216, dated July 25, 1939.

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KODIAK NAVAL AIRSPACE RESERVATION

The eastern portion of Kodiak Island described by metes and bounds as follows: Beginning at a point at Latitude 57°47'0" north, Longitude 152°26'30" west, thence

W. to Lat. 57°47'0" N., Long. 152°36'0" W.
S. to Lat. 57°44'30" N., Long. 152°36'0" W.
SW. to Lat. 57°42'0" N., Long. 152°38'0" W.
S. to Lat. 57°39'30" N., Long. 152°38'0" W.
E. to Lat. 57°39'30" N, Long. 152°30'0" W.
NE. to Lat. 57°42'0" N., Long. 152°26'0" W.
N. to Lat. 57°44'0" N., Long. 152°26'0" W.
NW. to Lat. 57°47'0" N., Long. 152°26'30" W. to the point of beginning, being the same area described in Executive Order No. 8278, dated October 28, 1939.

At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into, within, or through Sitka Naval Airspace Reservation or Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

The provisions of the preceding paragraph shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Territory of Alaska, and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

Any person who shall violate any of the provisions of this order relating to Sitka Naval Airspace Reservation and Kodiak Naval Airspace Reservation will be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 ( 52 Stat. 973).

This order shall take effect ninety days after the date hereof.

Franklin D. Roosevelt.
The White House,
November 18, 1940.
[No. 8597]

(F. R. Doc. 40-4986; Filed November 19, 1940; 11:53 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 140 of Dec. 3, 1940, superseded by General Order No. 160 of Dec. 12, 1941.

*****

General Order No. 141

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., January 4, 1941.

Palmyra Island, Territory of Hawaii

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

"Executive Order

"Placing Palmyra Island, Territory of Hawaii, Under the Control and Jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy.

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 91 of the act of April 30, 1900, 31 Stat. 141, 159, as amended by section 7 of the act of May 27, 1910, 36 Stat. 443, 447, and as President of the United States, it is ordered that Palmyra Island, consisting of a group of islets surrounded by a coral reef located in the Pacific Ocean approximately at Latitude 5°52'18" North and Longitude 162°05"55" West, as indicated by diagram hereto attached and made a part hereof, be and it is hereby, subject to valid existing rights, if any, placed under the control and jurisdiction of the Secretary of the Navy and reserved for naval purposes: Provided, That nothing herein contained shall affect the civil or criminal jurisdiction of the Territory of Hawaii with respect to persons or property on Palmyra Island, insofar as such jurisdiction is consistent with the purposes for which said island is hereby reserved.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
December 19, 1940."
[No. 8616]

(F. R. Doc. 40-5804; Filed, December 20, 1940; 11:43 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 142 of Jan. 10, 1941, canceled by General Order No. 174 of June 2, 1942.

*****

General Order No. 143 of Feb. 3, 1941, canceled by General Order No. 174 of June 2, 1942.

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*****

General Order No. 144

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 29, 1941.

Establishing Kodiak Island and Subic Bay Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Subic Bay Naval Airspace Reservation

1. The following Executive orders are quoted:

"Executive Order

"Establishing Kodiak Island Naval Defensive Sea Area, Alaska

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), the territorial waters between extreme high-water mark and the three-mile marine boundary adjacent to the eastern portion of Kodiak Island, Alaska, in and about Women's Bay to the westward within a line bearing true north and south tangent to the eastern extremity of High Island, are hereby set apart and reserved as a naval defensive sea area for purposes of the national defense, such area to be known as 'Kodiak Island Naval Defensive Sea Area.'

"At no time shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into Kodiak Island Naval Defensive Sea Area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraph shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Territory of Alaska; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
March 22, 1941."
[No. 8717]

[F. R. Doc. 41-2164; Filed March 24, 1941; 1:14 p. m.

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Executive Order

Establishing Subic Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and Subic Bay Naval Airspace Reservation

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 (44 Stat. 568, 570; U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters within Subic Bay, Philippine Islands, between extreme high-water mark and the sea and in and about the entrance channel within a line bearing true southwest extending three nautical miles from Panibatujan Point, a line bearing true southwest extending three nautical miles from Sanpaloc Point, and a line joining the seaward extremities of the above two bearing lines, are hereby set apart and reserved as a naval defensive sea area for purposes of the national defense, such area to be known as 'Subic Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspace over the said territorial waters and over the Subic Bay Naval Reservation, Olongapo, Philippine Islands, is hereby set apart and reserved as a naval airspace reservation for purposes of the national defense, such reservation to be known as 'Subic Bay Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into Subic Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, he navigated into Subic Bay Naval Airspace Reservation, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law-enforcement officers of the United States; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Subic Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Subic Bay Naval Airspace Reservation shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 (52 Stat. 973).

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"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
March 22, 1941."
[No. 8718]

[F. R. Doc. 41-2165: Field, March 24, 1941; 1:14 p. m.]

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 145

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 31, 1941.

Designation of Naval Operating Bases, Newport, R. I., and Guantanamo, Cuba

1. The provisions of this general order will become effective April 1, 1941, upon which date paragraph 2 of General Order No. 45 is canceled.

2. The naval shore activities in the Narragansett Bay area, including the following administrative establishments, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Operating Base, Newport, R. I.:

Naval War College.
Naval Torpedo Station.
Naval Training Station.
Naval Fuel Depot.
Naval Net Depot.
Naval Hospital.
Naval Air Station, Quonset Point

3. The naval shore activities in the Guantanamo Bay area, including the following administrative establishments, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Operating Base, Guantanamo, Cuba:

Naval Station.
Naval Net Depot.
Naval Air Station.
Marine Corps Base.

4. The senior line naval officer of the establishments involved will be ordered to additional duty as the commandant of the appropriate base. The naval bases will be administered in accordance with article 1487, United States Navy Regulations, 1920.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 146

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., April 7, 1941.

Naval Defensive Sea Areas and Airspace Reservations

1. The President, on February 14, 1941, signed Executive Orders Nos. 8680, 8681, 8682, 8683, and 8684. They are quoted;

"Executive Order

"Establishing Naval Defensive Sea Areas Around and Nava)

Airspace Reservations Over the Islands of Kiska and Unalaska

"ALASKA

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 (44 Stat. 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters between the extreme high-water marks and the three-mile marine boundaries surrounding the islands of Kiska and Unalaska are hereby established and reserved as naval defensive sea areas for purposes of national defense, such areas to be known, respectively, as 'Kiska Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' and 'Unalaska Island Naval Defensive Area'; and the airspaces over the said territorial waters and islands are hereby set apart and reserved as naval airspace reservations for purposes of national defense, such reservations to be known, respectively, as 'Kiska Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' and 'Unalaska Island Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any person, other than persons on public vessels of the United States, enter either of the naval defensive sea areas herein set apart and reserved, nor shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into either of said areas, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into either of the naval airspace reservations herein set apart and reserved, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Territory of Alaska; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

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"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval defensive sea areas shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval airspace reservations shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 (52 Stat. 973).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"February 14, 1941."
[No. 8680]

[F. R. Doc. 41-1136; Filed, February 15, 1941; 11:50 a. m.]

"Executive Order

"Establishing Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and Kaneohe Bay Naval Airspace Reservation

"Hawaii

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 (44 Stat. 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters within Kaneohe Bay between extreme high-water mark and the sea and in and about the entrance channel within a line bearing northeast true extending three nautical miles from Kaoio Point, a line bearing northeast true extending four nautical miles from Kapoho Point, and a line joining the seaward extremities of the two above-described bearing lines, are hereby established and reserved as a naval defensive sea area for purposes of national defense, such area to be known as 'Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspace over the said territorial waters is hereby set apart and reserved as a naval airspace reservation for purposes of national defense, such reservation to be known as 'Kaneohe Bay Naval Airspace Reservation'.

"At no time shall any person, other than persons on public vessels of the United States, enter Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area, nor shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into said area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States be navigated into Kaneohe Bay Naval Air-

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space Reservation, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Territory of Hawaii; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Kaneohe Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, see. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Kaneohe Bay Naval Airspace Reservation shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 (52 Stat. 973).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"February 14, 1941."
[No. 8681]

[F. R. Doc. 41-1137; Filed, February 15, 1941; 11: 50 a. m.]

"Executive Order

"Establishing Naval Defensive Sea Areas Around and Naval Airspace Reservations Over the Islands of Palmyra, Johnston, Midway, Wake, and Kingman Reef

"PACIFIC OCEAN

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 ( 44 Stat. 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters between the extreme high-water marks and the three-mile marine boundaries surrounding the islands of Palmyra, Johnston, Midway, Wake, and Kingman Reef, in the Pacific Ocean, are hereby established and reserved as naval defensive sea areas for purposes of national defense, such areas to be known, respectively, as 'Palmyra Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' 'Johnston Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' 'Midway Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' 'Wake Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' and 'Kingman Reef Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspaces over the said territorial waters and islands are hereby set apart and reserved

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as naval airspace reservations for purposes of national defense, such reservations to be known, respectively, as 'Palmyra Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' 'Johnston Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' 'Midway Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' 'Wake Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' and Kingman Reef Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any person, other than persons on public vessels of the United States, enter any of the naval defensive sea areas herein set apart and reserved, nor shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into any of said areas, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into any of the naval airspace reservations herein set apart and reserved, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Territory of Hawaii; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval defensive sea areas shall he subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval airspace reservations shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 ( 52 Stat. 973).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"February 14, 1941"
[No. 8682]

[F. R. Doc. 41-1139; Filed, February 15, 1941; 11:51 a. m.]

"Executive Order

"Establishing Naval Defensive Sea Areas Around and Naval Airspace Reservations Over the Islands of Rose, Tutuila, and Guam

"PACIFIC OCEAN

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title

--121--

18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 ( 44 Stat. 570, U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters between the extreme high-water marks and the three-mile marine boundaries surrounding the islands of Rose, Tutuila, and Guam, in the Pacific Ocean, are hereby established and reserved as naval defensive sea areas for purposes of national defense, such areas to be known, respectively, as 'Rose Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' Tutuila Island Naval Defensive Sea Area,' and 'Guam Island Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspaces over the said territorial waters and islands are hereby set apart and reserved as naval airspace reservations for purposes of national defense, such reservations to be known, respectively, as 'Rose Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' Tutuila Island Naval Airspace Reservation,' and 'Guam Island Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any person, other than persons on public vessels of the United States, enter any of the naval defensive sea areas herein set apart and reserved, nor shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into any of said areas, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into any of the naval airspace reservations herein set apart and reserved, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval defensive sea areas shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to the above-named naval airspace reservations shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 ( 52 Stat. 973).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"February 14, 1941."
[No. 8683]

[F. R. Doc. 41-1140; Filed, February 15, 1941; 11:51 a. m.]

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"Executive Order

"Establishing Culebra Island Naval Defensive Sea Area and Culebra Island Naval Airspace Reservation

"PUERTO RICO

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 ( 44 Stat. 570, D. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters between the extreme high-water mark and the three-mile marine boundary surrounding the island of Culebra, Puerto Rico, are hereby established and reserved as a naval defensive sea area for purposes of national defense, such area to be known as 'Culebra Island Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspace over the said territorial waters and island is hereby set apart and reserved as a naval airspace reservation for purposes of national defense, such reservation to be known as 'Culebra Island Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any person, other than persons on public vessels of the United States, enter Culebra Island Naval Defensive Sea Area, nor shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States, be navigated into said area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into Culebra Island Naval Airspace Reservation, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States and of the Government of Puerto Rico, and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Culebra Island Naval Defensive Sea Area shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Culebra Island Naval Airspace Reservation shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 (52 Stat. 973).

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"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"February 14, 1941."
[No. 8684]

[F. R. Doc. 41-1138; Filed, February 15, 1941; 11:50 a. m.]

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 147

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 7, 1941.

Establishing Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation, Cuba

1. The following Executive Order is quoted:

"Executive Order

"Establishing Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area and Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation

"Cuba

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by the provisions of section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and section 4 of the Air Commerce Act approved May 20, 1926 (44 Stat. 568, 570; U. S. C., title 49, sec. 174), the territorial waters within Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, between high-water mark and the sea and in and about the entrance channel within a line bearing true south extending three nautical miles from the shore line of the eastern boundary of Guantanamo Naval reservation, as laid down in the agreement between the United States of America and the Republic of Cuba signed by the President of Cuba on February 16, 1903, and by the President of the United States on February 23, 1903, a line bearing true south extending three nautical miles from the shore line of the western boundary of said Naval Reservation, and a line joining the seaward extremities of the above two bearing lines, are hereby set apart and reserved as a naval defensive sea area for purposes of the national defense, subject to the right of vessels engaged in Cuban trade to have free passage through the waters as provided for in said agreement, such area to be known as 'Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area'; and the airspace over the said territorial waters, and over the Guantanamo Naval Reservation, is hereby set apart and reserved as a naval airspace reservation for purposes of the national defense, such reservation to be known as 'Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation.'

"At no time shall any vessel or other craft, other than public vessels of the United States and vessels engaged in Cuban trade, be navigated into Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"At no time shall any aircraft, other than public aircraft of the United States, be navigated into Guantanamo Bay Naval

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Airspace Reservation, unless authorized by the Secretary of the Navy.

"The provisions of the preceding paragraphs shall be enforced by the Secretary of the Navy, with the cooperation of the local law enforcement officers of the United States; and the Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized to prescribe such regulations as may be necessary to carry out such provisions.

"Any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Guantanamo Bay Naval Defensive Sea Area shall be subject to the penalties provided by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), and any person violating any of the provisions of this order relating to Guantanamo Bay Naval Airspace Reservation shall be subject to the penalties prescribed by the Civil Aeronautics Act of 1938 (52 Stat. 973).

"This order shall take effect ninety days after date hereof.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"May 1, 1941."
[No. 8749]

[F. R. Doc. 41-3242; Filed, May 2, 1941; 12:07 p. m.]

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 148

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., June 14, 1941.

Certain Coast Guard Personnel to Operate as Part of Navy

1. The President, on June 3, 1941, signed Executive Order Number 8767, quoted below:

"Executive Order

"Directing Certain Personnel of the Coast Guard to Operate as a Part of The Navy, Subject to the Orders of The Secretary of the Navy

"Whereas section 1 of the act of January 28, 1915, 38 Stat. 800 (U. S. C., title 14, sec. 1) provides:

"That there shall be established in lieu of the existing Revenue-Cutter Service and the Life-Saving Service, to be composed of those two existing organizations, with the existing offices and positions and the incumbent officers and men of those two services, the Coast Guard, which shall constitute a part of the military forces of the United States and which shall operate under the Treasury Department in time of peace and operate as a part of the Navy, subject to the orders of the Secretary of the Navy, in time of war or when the President shall so direct When subject to the Secretary of the Navy in time of war the expense of the Coast Guard shall be paid by the Navy Department: Provided, That no provision of this Act shall be construed as giving any officer of either the Coast Guard or the Navy, military or other control at any time over any vessel, officer, or man of the other service except by direction of the President:

"And whereas it is essential, for the strengthening of our national defense within the limits of peace-time authorizations, that certain personnel of the Coast Guard operate as a part of the Navy, subject to the orders of the Secretary of the Navy: "Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority conferred upon me by the statutory provisions above set out, I hereby direct that such number of commissioned, chief warrant, and warrant officers and enlisted men of the Coast Guard required to man and operate certain naval vessels, as may be agreed upon by the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the Coast Guard, shall operate as part of the Navy, subject to the orders of the

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Secretary of the Navy; and such Coast Guard personnel while serving on such naval vessels shall be subject to the laws enacted for the government of the Navy.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt
"The White House,
"June 3, 1941."
[No. 8767]

[F. R. Doc. 41-4001; Filed, June 4, 1941; 12:22 p. m.]

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 149

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., June 25, 1941.

Safeguarding Classified Material

1. During the continuance of the present emergency it is hereby directed that all classified material furnished other Departments of the Government, other than the ordinary letter correspondence, bear the following stamp:

Reproduction of this material in any form is not authorized except by specific approval of the Secretary of the Navy.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 150

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., July 12, 1941.

Coordination or Research and Development

1. General Orders Nos. 124 and 130 are hereby canceled.

2. The Naval Research Laboratory, as now constituted, is hereby placed under the cognizance of the Bureau of Ships.

3. In order to secure a more complete measure of cooperation and coordination in matters of research and development and to provide an agency for consideration of such matters, there is hereby established, in the office of the Secretary of the Navy, the Naval Research and. Development Board, with membership, functions, and procedure as follows:

(a) Membership. - The Naval Research and Development Board shall consist of the Coordinator of Research and Development, as Chairman, with representatives of the Chief of Naval Operations, Bureau of Ships, Bureau of Ordnance, Bureau of Aeronautics, and Bureau of Yards and Docks.

(b) Functions. - The Board shall recommend to the Secretary of the Navy action in respect to research and development matters.

(c) Procedure. - The Coordinator of Research and Development will call the meetings of the Board, prepare its agenda, and transmit its findings and recommendations.

4. The Coordinator of Research and Development shall be a civilian scientist or a naval officer. The Assistant Coordinator shall be a naval officer who will assist the Coordinator and act as his deputy.

5. The duties of the Coordinator are as follows:

(a) Advise the Secretary of the Navy on matters of Naval research and development.

(b) Provide information to Bureaus and Offices of the Navy regarding research of outside agencies.

(c) Cooperate with all agencies of research and development with a view to coordination of effort

(d) Arrange for suitable representation of the Navy on outside Boards, Committees, and Councils dealing with research.

(e) Provide a Progress Section and a Planning Section for formulation of coordinated programs of research.

(f) Supervise the handling of correspondence regarding suggestions and inventions brought by individuals to the Office of the Secretary of the Navy.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 151

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., July 17, 1941.

Probation of Charges for Fuel, Oil, Electricity and Water

1. Effective July 1, 1941, where Marine Detachments are serving at stations maintained and operated solely under the direct supervision of a bureau of the Navy Department, and are furnished barracks and quarters built by such bureau, all utility charges and all maintenance charges for fixed equipment as is under the cognizance of the bureau operating the station, shall be borne by the bureau concerned and no proration of charges between such bureau and the Marine Corps will be made. The Marine Corps will furnish rations for the enlisted men of the Marine Corps, and provide all movable equipment in barracks, kitchens, and mess halls, the Navy will completely furnish all quarters assigned to the commissioned officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps and absorb all utility charges, provided however, that issues in excess of any established allowance for heat, fuel, electric current, gas, and water shall be reimbursed by each officer or enlisted man concerned to the proper Navy appropriation.

2. Where Marine Corps quarters are assigned to commissioned officers and enlisted men of the Navy, the Marine Corps will completely furnish and maintain all such quarters and absorb all utility charges identical to the responsibility prescribed for the Navy in the foregoing paragraph, provided however, that issues in excess of any established allowance for heat, fuel, electric current, gas, and water shall be reimbursed by each officer or enlisted man concerned to the proper Marine Corps appropriation.

3. At navy yards, naval bases, and at posts operated solely by the Marine Corps where buildings have been built from Marine Corps appropriations, or which have been built by the Navy and permanently assigned to the Marine Corps, all maintenance or utility charges will be borne by the Marine Corps.

4. The term "fixed equipment" as used herein includes bunks, mattresses, lockers, mess tables, mess gear, galley equipment, and all furniture necessary to equip the buildings. The term "movable equipment" shall be deemed inclusive of all other equipment not enumerated herein and its maintenance, the latter being inclusive of the foraging of public animals.

5. For the purposes of administering this general order, the Bureau of Yards and Docks is hereby charged with the cognizance of and appropriation responsibility for the fixed equipment and its maintenance in barracks and quarters occupied by Marine

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Corps personnel at submarine bases and at other comparable naval activities not under the cognizance of another bureau, as may be necessary to the accomplishment of the intent of this general order.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 152 of July 18, 1941, canceled by General Order No. 158 of November 13, 1941.

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*****

General Order No. 153

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., September 8, 1941.

Establishing Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area

1. The President, on August 16, 1941, signed Executive Order No. 8853, quoted below:

"Executive Order "Establishing Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area

"PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:

"The following-described area is hereby established and reserved, for purposes of national defense, as a naval defensive sea area, to be known as 'Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area':

"All territorial waters of Manila Bay, Philippine Islands, and its approaches and tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. charts, to: "A line running southwest true from Luzon Point, in approximate position, Latitude 14°27'40" North, Longitude 120°23'13" East to the seaward limit of territorial waters, thence southeasterly along the seaward limit of territorial waters, to the parallel of Latitude 14°10'15" North, thence east along that parallel of Latitude to meet the shore at Hamilo Point in approximate Latitude 14°10'15" North, Longitude 120°34'24" East.

"A vessel not proceeding under United States Naval or other United States authorized supervision, shall not enter or navigate the waters of Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs. and permission to enter the port shall be requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of the master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

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"A vessel entering or navigating the waters of Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area does so at its own risk.

"Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft will he identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"These regulations are subject to amplification by the local United States Naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"When a United States Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon the above-established defensive sea area, it shall he assumed that permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any one continuous passage through or within both areas.

"Any master of a vessel or other person within the Manila Bay Defensive Sea Area who shall disregard these regulations, or shall fail to obey an order of United States Naval authority to stop or heave to, or shall perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses or the safety of navigation, or shall take any action inimical to the interests of the United States, may be detained therein by force of arms and shall he liable to attack by United States armed forces, and liable to prosecution as provided for in section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).

"All United States Government authorities shall place at the disposal of the Naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations.

"The Secretary of the Navy will be charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt
"The White House,
"August 16, 1941."
[No. 8853]

[F. R. Doc. 41-6114; Filed, August 18, 1941; 2:31 p. m.

Forrestal,
The Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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******

General Order No. 154

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., September 25, 1941.

Designation of Naval Operating Bases, San Pedro, California, and Key West, Florida

1. The provisions of this general order will become effective September 25, 1941, upon which date delete "Key West" from General Order No. 45.

2. The naval shore activities in the San Pedro-Long Beach area, including the following administrative establishments, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Operating Base, San Pedro, California:

Roosevelt Base, Terminal Island.
Naval Air Station, Reeves Field, Terminal Island.
Naval Net Depot, San Pedro.
Naval Hospital.
Naval Dispensaries.
Naval Reserve Aviation Base, Long Beach.
Naval Disbursing and Transportation Office, San Pedro.

3. The naval shore activities in the Key West area, including the following administrative establishments, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Operating Base, Key West, Florida:

Naval Station.
Naval Air Station.
Naval Hospital.

4. These naval bases will be administered in accordance with article 1487, United States Navy Regulations, 1920.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

******

General Order No. 155 of October 6, 1941, canceled by General Order No. 200 of September 13, 1943.

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*****

General Order No. 156

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Oct., 13, 1941.

The Control of Prostitution in Areas Adjacent to Naval Activities.

An Act of Congress approved July 11, 1941 (Public Law 163, 77th Congress), reads as follows:

"That until May 15, 1945, it shall be unlawful, within such reasonable distance of any military or naval camp, station, fort, post, yard, base, cantonment, training or mobilization place as the Secretaries of War and/or Navy shall determine to be needful to the efficiency, health, and welfare of the Army and/or Navy, and shall designate and publish in general orders or bulletins, to engage in prostitution or to aid or abet prostitution or to procure or solicit for the purposes of prostitution, or to keep or set up a house of ill fame, brothel, or bawdyhouse, or to receive any person for purposes of lewdness, assignation, or prostitution into any vehicle, conveyance, place, structure, or building, or to permit any person to remain for the purpose of lewdness, assignation, or prostitution in any vehicle, conveyance, place, structure, or building or to lease, or rent, or contract to lease or rent any vehicle, conveyance, place, structure, or building, or part thereof, knowing or with good reason to know that it is intended to be used for any of the purposes herein prohibited; and any person, corporation, partnership, or association violating the provisions of this Act shall, unless otherwise punishable under the Articles of War or the Articles for the Government of the Navy, be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000, or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, and any person subject to military or naval law violating this Act shall be punished as provided by the Articles of War or the Articles for the Government of the Navy, and the Secretaries of War and of the Navy and the Federal Security Administrator are each hereby authorized and directed to take such steps as they deem necessary to suppress and prevent the violation thereof, and to accept the cooperation of the authorities of States and their counties, districts, and other political subdivisions in carrying out the purposes of this Act: Provided, That nothing in this Act shall be

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construed as conferring on the personnel of the War or Navy Department or the Federal Security Agency any authority to make criminal investigations, searches, seizures, or arrests of civilians charged with violations of this Act"

2. When cases of venereal disease come to the attention of medical officers, those officers will endeavor to establish the source of the disease and will at all times keep the respective Commanding Officers fully informed as to the source and prevalence of venereal disease. Officers in charge of Shore Patrols will likewise report to the officer establishing the Patrol, such information as to prostitution which may come to their attention in the discharge of their duties. Through the above means, and through such assistance as may be rendered by Public Health Officers, the State or local health authorities, or by the representatives of the Division of Social Protection of the Federal Security Agency, Commandants, Commanding Officers and Senior Officers Present Afloat will keep themselves fully informed as to location and prevalence of prostitution in areas adjacent to their respective commands.

3. The basic responsibility for determining if and when prostitution in areas adjacent to shore activities of the Navy adversely affects the efficiency, health, and welfare of the naval personnel present rests with the Senior Officer Present Afloat, or with the Commandant or Commanding Officer of the shore activity, concerned. Initially, he will make every reasonable effort to obtain a correction of the conditions by request to the local civil authorities for enforcement of municipal and state laws. This may include a request to the Regional Supervisor of the Division of Social Protection, Federal Security Agency, since this agency has set up an organization for the purpose of handling such problems, and the facilities thus provided should be utilized to the fullest extent. If the Regional Supervisor cannot be contacted directly, a request for his assistance may be sent to the Federal Security Administrator, Washington, D. C.

4. Failure of local authorities to take corrective measures within a reasonable period of time, will be reported by the appropriate local naval authority via official channels to the Secretary of the Navy. Such report will include the following:

A. A statement of prostitution conditions which are inimical to the efficiency, health, and welfare of his command.

B. A narrative of the efforts which have been made to cause the local authorities to correct conditions.

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C. A recommendation as to the invocation of the provisions of the Act above quoted, with designation of the specific area or areas involved.

5. If the report indicated in paragraph 4, together with other available information, indicates the existence of a condition harmful to the efficiency, health, and welfare of naval personnel at the specified station, camp, yard, base, or cantonment, the Secretary of the Navy will designate and publish, as prescribed by the Act quoted in paragraph one hereof, the specific area or areas where it shall be unlawful to engage in prostitution or otherwise aid or abet same, or commit any other offenses specified in the act Such designation will not, however, be made without prior consultation with the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

6. The primary purpose of this law is to assist the military and naval establishments in controlling venereal disease in their commands by removing, as far as possible, contact with the major source of venereal disease. Commanding Officers will not neglect, however, other means of reducing venereal disease in their respective commands but will continue to exert every effort toward this objective.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

GENERAL ORDER No. 157

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., October 23, 1941.

Instructions Regarding Quarantine for United States Naval Vessels

1. General Order No. 25 is hereby canceled.

2. The following Instructions to health officers issued by the U. S. Public Health Service are quoted for the information and guidance of the naval service:

Federal Security Agency

U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE

Washington

"Revised October 14, 1941. "Foreign Quarantine Division Circular No. 82.

"To: Medical Officers in Charge, U. S. Quarantine Stations, and Others Concerned.

"Subject: Quarantine Treatment of U. S. Army, Navy, and Coast Guard Vessels upon Arrival at United States Ports.

"In order to promote uniformity of procedure at United States ports in the quarantine treatment of vessels belonging to the United States Army, Navy, and Coast Guard, the following supplemental instructions are hereby issued for your information and guidance.

"1. Vessels of the United States Army and Navy which carry a medical officer of their respective Services, and vessels of the United States Coast Guard which carry a medical officer of the Public Health Service, upon entering United States ports from foreign ports or from ports in the possessions or dependencies of the United States are exempt from quarantine inspection provided that such vessels have not sailed from a port infected with cholera, yellow fever or plague, or in which typhus or smallpox is epidemic, and further provided that no case of these quarantinable diseases has occurred on board en route. Immediately following the arrival of a vessel coming within the above provisions at the first United States port of entry, a letter will be addressed and mailed by the commanding officer to the quarantine officer reporting the pertinent facts, including a statement by the ship's medical officer to the effect that no case of the

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above-mentioned quarantinable diseases occurred on board during the voyage; giving the name and rank of the ship's medical officer; and enclosing duplicate copies of the American bills of health required to be taken out by the vessel at the port of departure and each subsequent port of call on the homeward-bound voyage.

"2. When two or more vessels of the smaller type, such as destroyers, only one of which carries a medical officer, are cruising together, one certificate as provided for in section 1, above, will be accepted as the basis for the quarantine clearance of the group.

"3. The provisions of this circular do not apply to vessels which do not carry a medical officer or are not certified for by a medical officer as provided for in section 2, above.

"Respectfully,

"W. F. Draper,
"Acting Surgeon General."

Frank Knox,
Secretary of Navy.

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(Pages 141-144 not included in the copy this file was created from. )

through or within the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area must be made, preferably by application to a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call "NQO" shall be made on a frequency of 500 Kcs and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of the master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"A vessel entering or navigating the waters of the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area does so at its own risk.

"Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy or other United States authority.

"A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"The loading or unloading by vessels of oil fuel or other inflammable or explosive materials shall be under the control of the local naval authority, who shall require such loading or unloading to be accomplished in such manner and at such times as will safeguard the other activities within the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area essential to the national defense.

"These regulations are subject to amplification by the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"When a United States Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area, it shall be assumed that permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any one continuous passage through or within both areas.

"Any master of a vessel or other person within the Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area who shall disregard these regulations, or shall fail to obey an order of United States naval authority to stop or heave-to, or shall perform any act threatening the efficiency of mines or other de-

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fenses or the safety of navigation, or shall take any action inimical to the interest of the United States, may be detained therein by force of arms and renders himself liable to attack by the armed forces of the United States, and liable to prosecution as provided for in section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).

"All United States Government authorities shall place at the disposal of the naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations. The Governor of the State of California, the local municipal officials, and the local civilian defense agencies are called upon to render the local naval authorities all possible assistance in the enforcement of these regulations.

"The Secretary of the Navy shall be charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.

"This order supersedes Executive Order No. 8403 of May 7, 1940, entitled "Establishing Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor Naval Defensive Sea Area - California."

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.
"The White House,
"November 27, 1941."

[F. R. Doc. 41-8974; Filed, November 28, 1941; 2:31 p. m.]

3. The Commandant, Eleventh Naval District, shall assist the Secretary of the Navy in the enforcement of the above Executive order and, until otherwise directed, shall act for the Secretary of the Navy and perform the duties and exercise the powers and functions now vested in the Secretary of the Navy by the above Executive Order.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 161 of December 8, 1941, is incorporated in reprint General Order No. 11 of May 13, 1935.

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*****

General Order No. 162

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., Dec. 8, 1941.

Importation of Fruits, Vegetables, Plants, and Meats Into the United States

1. General Order No. 19 is hereby canceled.

2. The entry into the United States of certain foreign-grown fruits, vegetables, plants, and plant products is controlled by quarantine or other restrictive orders issued by the United States Department of Agriculture to reduce or eliminate the danger of introducing insect pests and plant diseases into this country.

3. Importation in this case is construed as bringing into the waters of the United States, whether actually landed or not, and applies to small quantities as well as large, even to one fruit or vegetable.

4. In order that the regulations of the Department of Agriculture may be fully complied with and no prohibited or infested articles brought into the United States on board naval vessels, it is directed that the commanding officer of a naval vessel or vessels arriving at a United States port from a port outside of the continental limits of the United States (Hawaii and Puerto Rico particularly) -

(a) Afford the facilities for and permit of a thorough examination of the ship by inspectors of the Department of Agriculture who may come aboard to determine whether infestation exists on the ship, and carry out directions of such inspections as to disposition of contraband or infested articles.

5. The requirements of this order apply to aircraft as well as naval vessels with provision that no foreign-grown plant or unprocessed plant product, including fresh fruits and vegetables, are to be carried into the territorial limits of the United States by naval aircraft unless a permit has been previously secured from the Department of Agriculture. Similarly, the movement of such products from Hawaii and Puerto Rico to the mainland should not be permitted in naval aircraft except in accordance with existing plant quarantine.

6. Commandants of naval districts will keep themselves informed of the regulations and procedure of the Department of Agriculture relative to the subject matter and cooperate to carry out the provisions of this order.

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7. In view of the prevalence of rinderpest and foot-and-mouth disease among cattle in foreign countries, fresh and frozen meats procured by vessels in foreign ports shall not be landed in United States ports, either as meat or garbage. Commanding officers of ail naval vessels are strictly enjoined to see that these instructions are carried out.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 163 of December 8, 1941, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 192 of 3 January 1944.

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*****

General Order No. 164

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Dec. 23, 1941.

Establishing Various Naval Defensive Sea Areas in The Continental United States

1. The following Executive orders are quoted:

"Executive Order

"Establishing Defensive Sea Areas at Portland, Maine; Portsmouth, New Hampshire; Boston, Massachusetts; Narragansett Bay; San Diego, California; San Francisco, California; Columbia River Entrance; and Strait of Juan de Fuca and Puget Sound

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), the following-described areas are hereby established for purposes of national defense as naval defensive sea areas, with names as indicated:

"1. Portland, Maine, Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Casco Bay, Portland Harbor, Luckse Sound, Broad Sound, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from Dyer Point (Cape Elizabeth) to West Cod Ledge Rock buoy No. '2' in approximate position, Latitude 43°34'17" North, Longitude 70°07'40" West, thence to Bulwark Shoal buoy, in approximate position Latitude 43°36'02" North, Longitude 70°04'04" West, thence to Halfway Rock Light, thence to the southernmost point on Little Birch Island, thence to Chebeag Point on Great Chebeag Island, thence to Blaney Point on Cousin Island, thence to Drinkwater Point on the mainland; and within Portland Harbor to--

"A line crossing Portland Harbor at the Portland Terminal Bridge.

"2. Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of the Atlantic Ocean, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and Kittery, Maine Harbors, the Piscataqua River and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to-

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"A line running northwest and southeast across Pepperrel Cove through nun buoy No. '4' of Fishing Island, in approximate position Latitude 43°04'40" North, Longitude 70°42'18" West;

"A line running southerly from Sisters Point on Gerrish Island to nun buoy No. '2', off West Sister Shoal in approximate position Latitude 43°03'36" North, Longitude 70°40'11" West, thence southwesterly to bell buoy No. '1' off Gunboat Shoal in approximate position Latitude 43°01'25" North, Longitude 70°41'51" West, thence westerly to Seal Rocks, thence northwest to the shore of the mainland:

"A line running from Frosts Point Light to Jaffrey Point Light on Newcastle Island; and within Portsmouth Harbor, to -

"A line crossing the Piscataqua River at and following the Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge.

"3. Boston, Massachusetts, Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Massachusetts Bay, Broad Sound, President Roads, Boston Harbor; the Mystic, Chelsea, and Charles Rivers, Quincy Bay, Weymouth Fore River, Nantasket Roads, Hingham Bay, and their tributaries, bays, and streams from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts to -

"A line connecting Strawberry Point (Cohasset) and East Point, Nahant;

"A line connecting Bass Point, Nahant, and Grovers Cliff, Winthrop Highlands; and within Boston Harbor, to-

"A line across the Mystic River at and following the downstream Boston and Maine Railroad Bridge; and

"A line across the Charles River at and following the Charlestown Bridge.

"4. Narragansett Bay Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Narragansett Bay, the Sakonnet River, Providence Harbor, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to: "A line running from the shore North of Point Judith on true bearing East to Little League Rock, thence northeasterly to a position in approximately Latitude 41°23'55" North, Longitude 70°21'43" West, thence to bell buoy No. '2' off Schuyler Ledge, in approximate position Latitude 41°26'24" North, Longitude 71°11'39'' West, thence to the southernmost land of Sakonnet Point; and within Narragansett Bay and its tributaries to:

"A line across the Taunton River at and following the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad Bridge; and

"A line across the Seekonk River at and following the Red Bridge."

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"5. San Diego, California, Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of the Pacific Ocean, San Diego Bay, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters, as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from Point Loma Lighthouse southerly to lighted whistle buoy '1A', in approximate position Latitude 32°37'19" North, Longitude 117°14'42" West, thence northeasterly to torpedo range buoy '0', in approximate position, Latitude 32°38'06" North, Longitude 117°12'07" West, thence easterly to Target No. 1 on shore, in approximate position Latitude 32°37'20'' North, Longitude 117°08'04" West; and, within San Diego Bay, all the waters to the north of -

"A line following the parallel of Latitude 32°40' North, from shore to shore.

"6. San Francisco, California, Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of the Gulf of Farallones, San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, the Napa River, Carquinez Strait, Oakland Harbor, San Leandro Bay, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters, as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to-- "A line running north to the shore from whistle buoy '1DR' (Duxbury Reef) in approximate position, Latitude 37°51'36'' North, Longitude 122°41'46" West;

"A line running southerly from whistle buoy '1DR' along the seaward limit of United States territorial waters to the parallel of Latitude 37°40' North, thence east along that parallel of Latitude to the shore; and within San Francisco Bay and its tributaries to -

"A line across the south part of San Francisco Bay at and following the San Mateo Bridge;

"A line across Carquinez Straits at and following the Southern Pacific Railroad Bridge;

"A line across the Napa River at and following the Vallejo-Mare Island Causeway.

"7. Columbia River Entrance Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of the Pacific Ocean and the Columbia River and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from North Head, Washington, west to the boundary of United States territorial waters, thence southerly along the boundary of United States territorial waters to the vicinity of bell buoy No. '1' approximate position, Latitude 46°14'21" North, Longitude 124°09'38" West, thence southeasterly along the seaward boundary of United States territorial

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waters to the parallel of Latitude 46°10' North, and along this parallel of Latitude to the shore; and within the Columbia River to -

"A line across the Columbia River from Harrington Point, Washington, to Settler Point, Oregon;

"A north and south line across Youngs River from shore to shore at the westernmost point of Daggett Point;

"A Line across the Lewis and Clark River at and following the Oregon Coast Highway Bridge

"8. Strait of Juan de Fuca and Puget Sound Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of the Pacific Ocean, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, Admiralty Inlet, Saratoga Passage, Possession Sound, Hood Canal, Puget Sound, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters, as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running north from Tatoosh Island to the international boundary, thence easterly along the international boundary line to the easternmost point of that line in the vicinity of Middle Bank, thence to Iceberg Point on Lopez Island, thence easterly to the shore of Whidbey Island at Deception Pass;

"A line running north from Point Demock on Camano Island to the shore of Whidbey Island; and

"A line running east from Camano Head on Camano Island to the shore of the mainland.

"A vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of any of the defensive sea areas established hereby except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within any of the said defensive sea areas must be made, preferably by application at the appropriate United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call "NQO" shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs and permission to enter the port shall be requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of the master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure will be essentially the same.

"A vessel entering or navigating the waters of any of the said defensive sea areas does so at its own risk.

"Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering any one of the said defensive sea areas to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy or other United States authority.

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"A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within any of the said defensive sea areas, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"These regulations are subject to amplification by the local United States Naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"When a United States Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon any of the said described defensive sea areas, it shall be assumed that permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any one continuous passage through or within both areas.

"Any master of a vessel or other person within any of the said defensive sea areas, who shall disregard these regulations, or shall fail to obey an order of United States Naval authority to stop or heave to, or shall perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses or the safety of navigation, or shall take any action inimical to the interests of the United States, may be detained therein by force of arms and renders himself liable to attack by the armed forces of the United States, and liable to prosecution as provided in section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).

"All United States authorities shall place at the disposal of the naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations.

"The Secretary of the Navy shall be charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.

"Franklin D Roosevelt
"The White House,
"December 11, 1941."
[No. 8970]

[F.R. Doc. 41-9377; Filed December 12, 1941; 12:31 p. m.]

"Executive Order

"Establishing New York Harbor, New London, Delaware Bay and River, Chesapeake-Norfolk, and Charleston Harbor Defensive Sea Areas and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), the following-described areas are hereby established, for purposes of national defense, as naval defensive sea areas, and the following regulations are prescribed for the control thereof:

"New York Harbor Defensive Sea Area:

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"All United States territorial waters of New York Harbor and its approaches and tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts, to -

"A line from Rockaway Point Coast Guard Station, Rockaway Point, New York, to Ambrose Channel Lightship, thence to Navesink Lighthouse, Highlands, New Jersey.

"A line across the Raritan River at and following the Central Railroad of New Jersey Bridge from South Amboy to Perth Amboy, New Jersey.

"The contour line of extreme high water following the western shore of Arthur Kill and Newark Bay.

"A line across the Passaic River at and following the Erie Railroad Bridge, Arlington, New Jersey.

"A line across the Hackensack River at and following the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Bridge near Anderson Creek, New Jersey.

"A line across the Hudson River at and following the Bear Mountain Bridge.

"A line across Long Island Sound from Sands Point Lighthouse, Long Island, to Execution Rocks Lighthouse, thence to Larchmont Harbor Light, Larchmont, New York.

"New London Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Long Island Sound, Block Island Sound, Thames River, Gardiners Bay, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts, to -

"A line from Montauk Point Lighthouse, Long Island, to Block Island Southeast Lighthouse, thence to Point Judith Lighthouse, Rhode Island.

"A line across the Thames River from shore to shore at and following the parallel of Latitude 41°26' North.

"A line running from Black Point (Niantic Bay), Connecticut, to Orient Point, Long Island, thence to Long Beach Bar Lighthouse and thence to Cedar Point, Long Island.

"Delaware Bay and River Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Delaware Bay and its seaward approaches, Delaware River, and Schuylkill River, from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from Cape May East Jetty Light, Cape May, New Jersey, on bearing 147° true to the seaward limit of U. S. territorial waters, thence along the seaward boundary of territorial waters southwesterly to the parallel of Latitude 38°43'18" North, and thence west along this parallel of Latitude to the Tower, at

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Rehoboth, Delaware, in approximate position, Latitude 38°43'18", Longitude 75°04'38" West.

"A line across the Delaware River above Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at and following the Pennsylvania Railroad Bridge at Fisher Point, New Jersey.

"A line across the Schuylkill River at and following Fairmount Dam.

"Chesapeake Bay-Norfolk Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Chesapeake Bay and its approaches; Hampton Roads, Elizabeth River, James River, York River, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from the southernmost point of Cape Charles, Virginia, to Cape Charles Lighthouse on Smith Island, thence on a bearing 130° true to the seaward limit of U. S. Territorial waters, thence southwesterly along the limit of territorial waters to the parallel of Latitude 36°51'15'' and thence west meeting the shore at the U. S. Coast Guard Station, Virginia Beach, Va.

"A line across the Southern Branch, Elizabeth River, from shore to shore along the parallel of Latitude 36°46' North.

"A line across the James River at and following the James River Bridge, near Newport News, Virginia.

"A line across the York River, from shore to shore along the parallel of Latitude 37°20' North.

"A line running from New Point Comfort (Mobjack Bay), Virginia, along the parallel of Latitude 37°18' North to the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay at Westcott Point.

"Charleston Harbor Defensive Sea Area:

"All United States territorial waters of Charleston Harbor and its seaward approaches; Cooper River, Ashley River, Wando River, and their tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts, to -

"A line running from the Standpipe on Isle of Palms, South Carolina, on a bearing 180° to the seaward limit of U. S. territorial waters, thence along the seaward limit of territorial waters to the Latitude of Charleston Lighthouse (32°41'42" North), thence west along that parallel of Latitude to Charleston Lighthouse, thence on a line bearing 308° true to the tank in Edgewater Park in Latitude 32°46'06" North, Longitude 80°00'03" West.

"A line across the Ashley River, from shore to shore at and following the meridian of 80° West Longitude.

"A line across the Cooper River, from shore to shore at and following the parallel of Latitude 32°55'North.

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"A line across the Wando River, from shore to shore at and following the meridian of Longitude 79°52'43" West to a point at Latitude 32°51'48'', thence along bearing 136° true to the Standpipe on Isle of Palms.

"The following orders and regulations for the government of persons and vessels within the limits of Defensive Sea Areas, which orders and regulations are necessary for purposes of National Defense, are hereby authorized and promulgated.

"Regulations for Defensive Sea Areas:

"I. A vessel not proceeding under U. S. Naval or other U. S. authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of a Defensive Sea Area except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within a Defensive Sea Area must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call "NQO" shall be made on a Frequency of 500 Kc., and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"II. A vessel entering or navigating the waters of a Defensive Sea Area does so at its own risk.

"III. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel, entering a Defensive Sea Area, to obey any further instructions received from the U. S. Navy or other U. S. Authority.

"IV. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within a Defensive Sea Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft will be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack. The loading or unloading by vessels of oil fuel or other inflammable or explosive materials shall be under the control of the local Naval authority, who shall require such loading or unloading to be accomplished in such manner and at such times as will safeguard the other activities within a Defensive Sea Area essential to the national defense.

"V. These regulations are subject to amplification by the local U. S. Naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"VI. When a U. S. Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon any of the above-established Defensive Sea Areas, it shall be assumed that permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any

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one continuous passage through or within both areas. Permission to enter or transit the Panama Canal shall, however, continue to be a separate procedure.

"VII. Any master of a vessel or other person within a Defensive Sea Area who shall disregard these regulations, or shall fail to obey an order of U. S. Naval authority to stop or heave to, or shall perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses or the safety of navigation, or shall take any action inimical to the interests of the United States in its prosecution of the war, may be detained therein by force of arms and renders himself liable to attack by United States armed forces, and liable to prosecution as provided for in Section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, Section 96).

"VIII. All U. S. Government authorities shall place at the disposal of the Naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations. The Governors of the States concerned, the local municipal officials, and the local Civil Defense agencies are called upon to render the local Naval authorities all possible assistance in the enforcement of the regulations.

"IX. The Secretary of the Navy will be charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.

"Franklin D Roosevelt

"The White House,

"December 16, 1941"

[No. 8978]

[F. D. Doc. 41-9600; Filed, December 17, 1941; 11:66 a. m.]

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 165

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., January 14, 1942.

Proclamation Establishing Hawaiian Maritime Control Area and Executive Order Establishing Honolulu Defensive Sea Area

1. The following Proclamation and Executive Order are quoted:

"ESTABLISHING THE HAWAIIAN MARITIME CONTROL AREA AND PRESCRIBING REGULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL THEREOF

"BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

"A PROCLAMATION

"Whereas the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control area hereinafter described is necessary in the interests of national defense:

"Now, therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self-defense of the Law of Nations, do hereby proclaim and establish the following-described area as the Hawaiian Maritime Control Area, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:

"HAWAIIAN MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters contained within the area delimited by lines connecting successively the following points:

Latitude 22°30' N. Longitude 158°W.
Latitude 21°N. Longitude 155°30' W.
Latitude 20°30' N. Longitude 155°30' W.
Latitude 20°N. Longitude 156°30' W.
Latitude 21°N. Longitude 159°W.
Latitude 22"N. Longitude 159°W.
Latitude 22°30' N. Longitude 158°W.

"REGULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL OF HAWAIIAN MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"1. A vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of the Hawaiian Maritime Control Area except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrange-

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ments for entry into or navigation through or within the said Area must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call NQO shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"2. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"5. Should any vessel or person within the said Area disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law, the law applicable to violations committed on the high seas being international law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.

"In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

"Done at the City of Washington this 27th day of December in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-one, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-sixth.

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
"By the President:
"Cordell Hull,
"Secretary of State."
(No. 2532)

[F. R. Doc. 41-9898 : Filed, December 81, 1941; 10:19 a. m.]

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"Executive Order

"ESTABLISHING HONOLULU DEFENSIVE SEA AREA

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C. Title 18, Sec. 96), the following-described area is hereby established and reserved, for purposes of national defense, as a naval defensive sea area, to be known as 'Honolulu Defensive Sea Area':

"All United States territorial waters of Honolulu Harbor, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, its approaches and tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water as shown on the latest U. S. C. and G. S. charts to:

"A line running south true from the shore at Koko Head, Oahu, along the meridian of Longitude 157° 42' West, to the seaward limit of United States territorial waters;

"A line running south true from Ahua Point Lighthouse to the seaward limit of United States territorial waters; and

"A line running along the seaward limit of United States territorial waters between the above-described bearing lines.

"A vessel not proceeding under United States Naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area must be made, preferably at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limit of the area. If radio telegraph is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port shall be requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of the master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"A vessel entering or navigating the waters of the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area does so at its own risk.

"Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft or aircraft will be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack. The loading or unloading by vessels of oil fuel or other inflammable or ex-

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plosive materials shall be under the control of the local Naval authority, who shall require such loading or unloading to be accomplished in such manner and at such times as will safeguard the other activities within the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area essential to the national defense.

"These regulations are subject to amplification by the local United States Naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"When a United States Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon the above-established defensive sea area, it shall be assumed that permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any one continuous passage through or within both areas.

"Any master of a vessel or other person within the Honolulu Defensive Sea Area who disregards these regulations, or fails to obey an order of United States Naval authority to stop or heave to, or performs any act threatening the efficiency of mines or other defenses or the safety of navigation, or takes any action inimical to the interests of the United States, may be detained therein by force of arms and shall be liable to attack by United States armed forces, and liable to prosecution as provided for in section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).

"All United States Government authorities shall place at the disposal of the Naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations. The Governor of the Territory of Hawaii, the local municipal authorities, and the local civilian defense agencies are called upon to render the local Naval authorities all possible assistance in the enforcement of these regulations.

"This order shall not be construed as modifying in any way the proclamation of the Governor of the Territory of Hawaii placing the Territory of Hawaii under martial law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT
"The White House,
"December 20, 1941."
(No. 8987)

[F. R. Doc. 41-9649; Filed, December 22, 1941; 2:19 p. m.]

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 166

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., January 30, 1942.

Office of Procurement and Material.

1. By direction of the President there is hereby established in the Navy Department the Office of Procurement and Material which office shall, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, coordinate all the material procurement activities of the Navy Department, supervise programs for the procurement of ships and materials of every character as approved by the Secretary of the Navy, and perform such other duties as the Secretary of the Navy may direct. The orders of the Office of Procurement and Material shall be considered as emanating from the Secretary of the Navy and shall have full force and effect as such.

2. The Chief of the Office of Procurement and Material shall be an officer on the active list of the Navy of the rank or grade of captain or above and shall have the rank, pay, and all allowances of a vice admiral while so serving. There will be appointed by the Secretary of the Navy four Assistants to the Chief of the Office of Procurement and Material. In case of the death, resignation, absence or sickness of the Chief of Office, such assistants shall, unless otherwise directed, perform the duties of the Chief in such order as the Secretary of the Navy may direct, until a successor to the Chief is appointed or such absence or sickness shall cease.

3. The Secretary of the Navy will assign to the Office of Procurement and Material such additional assistants as he may deem necessary and will provide such technical, clerical, and other assistance as may be required.

4. The Secretary of the Navy will promulgate such additional instructions and regulations in amplification of this General Order as he may deem necessary.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 167

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Feb. 7, 1942.

Establishing the Cristobal and the Gulf of Panama Maritime Control Areas and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

1. The following proclamation is quoted:

"Establishing the Cristobal and the Gulf of Panama Maritime Control Areas and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

"by THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

"A PROCLAMATION

"WHEREAS the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control areas hereinafter described is essential in the interests of national defense; and

"WHEREAS the Government of the Republic of Panama has requested the cooperation of the Government of the United States in exercising control in Panamanian waters adjacent to the Panama Canal, in accordance with the joint obligation of the two countries under their General Treaty of March 2, 1936, and otherwise, to insure the effective protection of the said Canal: "NOW, THEREFORE, I, FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States and as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self defense of the Law of Nations, do hereby establish and proclaim the following-described areas as the Cristobal Maritime Control Area and the Gulf of Panama Maritime Control Area for the purpose of safeguarding the Panama Canal and for national and hemispheric defense, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:

"CRISTOBAL MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters contained within the seaward limit of an arc described with the western breakwater entrance light at Cristobal, Canal Zone, as a center, a radius of 36 sea miles, and meeting the shore line in the east in the vicinity of position Latitude 9°35' North, Longitude 79°21' West, and in the west in the vicinity of position Latitude 9°08' North, Longitude 80°29' West.

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"GULF OF PANAMA MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters of the Gulf of Panama to the north of Latitude 8° North.

"REGULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL OF THE CRISTOBAL AND THE GULF OF PANAMA MARITIME CONTROL AREAS

"1. A vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of the above-described Maritime Control Areas except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the said areas must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of either Area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"2. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said Areas to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said Areas, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"5. Should any vessel or person within the said areas disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.

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"IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

"DONE at the City of Washington this 13th day of January in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-two, and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-sixth.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt
"By the President:
"Cordell Hull,
"Secretary of State."
[No. 2536]

(F. R. Doc. 42-402; Filed, January 15, 1942; 10:10 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 168

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., Feb. 29, 1942.

Establishing Boston Maritime Control Area and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

1. The following Proclamation is quoted:

"Establishing Boston Maritime Control Area and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

"By the President of the United States of America

"A PROCLAMATION

"Whereas the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control area hereinafter described is necessary in the interests of national defense:

"Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self-defense of the Law of Nations, do hereby establish and proclaim the following-described area as the Boston Maritime Control Area, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:

"Boston Maritime Control Area

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:

"Beginning at the intersection of the western shore of Sandy Bay, Cape Ann, Massachusetts, and the parallel of Latitude 42°40' North, in approximate Longitude 70°37'23" West;

"thence along that parallel to Longitude 70°12'30" West;

"thence along approximate true bearing 152° to position Latitude 42°00' North, Longitude 69°44' West; and

"thence west true to the eastern shore of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, in approximate Longitude 72°01'10'' West

"Regulations for the Control of Boston Maritime Control Area

"1. A vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of the above-described Maritime Control Area except during daylight when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the said Area must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or

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by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the Area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"2. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"5. Should any vessel or person within the said Area disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.

"In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

"Done at the City of Washington this 10th day of February in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-sixth.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt
"By the President:
Cordell Hull,
"Secretary of State."
[No. 2540]

(F. R. Doc. 42-1265; Filed, February 12, 1942; 10:36 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 169

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Mar. 13, 1942.

Operational Proposals Board

1. In order to ensure that all possible sources of increased operating efficiency are adequately explored, and with a view to encouraging and developing original thought relative to naval operations, especially on the part of the seagoing personnel, there is hereby established in the Headquarters of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, an Operational Proposals Board.

2. The Board shall include officers named by -

(a) The Chief of Naval Operations.
(b) The Commandant of the Marine Corps.
(e) The Commandant of the Coast Guard.
(d) The Chief of the Bureau of Navigation.
(e) The Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics.

with a permanent Secretary, and such assistants as may be required.

3. The personnel of the Navy - particularly those in the seagoing forces of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard--are invited and urged to address letters to the Board embodying operational ideas, suggestions, plans, and proposals. Commanding Officers shall forward such letters directly to the Secretary of the Board, with appropriate comment.

4. The Board shall give full consideration to all letters so received and shall take appropriate steps looking to the implementation of such cases as they consider useful, and to the recognition of the originators.

5. The duties of this Board concern only matters of an operational nature and in no way conflict with those of the Naval Research and Development Board, whose consideration is centered on research and development of materiel matters.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 170

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., March 23, 1942.

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet

1. Pursuant to Executive Order of the President the duties of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and the duties of the Chief of Naval Operations have been combined and placed under one officer who has the title "Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations", with the rank and title of Admiral. This officer is the principal naval adviser to the President on the conduct of the war, and the principal naval adviser and executive to the Secretary of the Navy on the conduct of the activities of the Naval Establishment.

2. As Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, the officer holding the combined offices has supreme command of the operating forces comprising the several fleets, seagoing forces, and sea frontier forces of the Navy and is directly responsible, under the general direction of the Secretary of the Navy, to the President therefor.

3. The staff of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, is composed of -

(a) A Chief of Staff, with the rank of Vice Admiral, who, in the temporary absence or incapacity of the "Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations", shall act as Commander in Chief, United States Fleet;
(b) Such deputy and assistant chiefs of staff as may be necessary; and
(c) Such other officers as may be appropriate and necessary to enable the "Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations" to perform the duties of Commander in Chief, United States Fleet.

4. As Chief of Naval Operations the officer holding the combined offices is charged, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, with the preparation, readiness and logistic support of the operating forces comprising the several fleets, seagoing forces and sea frontier forces of the Navy, and with the coordination and direction of effort to this end of the bureaus and offices of the Navy Department except such offices (other than bureaus) as the Secretary of the Navy may specifically exempt. Duties as Chief of Naval Operations shall be contributory to the discharge of the paramount duties of Commander in Chief, United States Fleet.

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*****

General Order No. 171

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Apr. 10, 1942.

Proclamation Establishing the San Francisco, Columbia River, Puget Sound, Southeastern Alaska, Prince William Sound, Kodiak, and Unalaska Maritime Control Areas and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

1. The following proclamation is quoted:

"Proclamation 2543

"ESTABLISHING THE SAN FRANCISCO, COLUMBIA RIVER, PUGET SOUND, SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA, PRINCE WILLIAM SOUND, KODIAK, AND UNALASKA MARITIME CONTROL AREAS AND PRESCRIBING REGULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL THEREOF

"By the President of the United States of America

"A PROCLAMATION

"Whereas the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control areas hereinafter described is necessary in the interests of national defense:

"Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self-defense of the law of nations, do hereby establish and proclaim the following-described areas as maritime control areas, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:

"San Francisco Maritime Control Area

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:

"Beginning at Point Reyes Lighthouse, California, in approximate position lat. 37°59'45" N., long. 123°01'20'' W.; thence along approximate true bearing 225° to position lat. 37°49'08" N., long. 123°14'32" W.; thence along approximate true bearing 145°30' to position lat. 37°20' N., long. 122°49'22'' W.; and thence east true to the shore in approximate long. 122°24'08" W.

"Columbia River Maritime Control Area

"All waters contained within the seaward limit of an arc described with North Head Light. Wash as a center, a radius

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of 50 nautical miles, and meeting, the shore line in the south in the vicinity of position lat. 45°28'15" N., long. 123°58'15" W., and in the north in the vicinity of position lat. 47°08'50" N., long. 124°10'50" W.

"Puget Sound Maritime Control Area

"All waters, excluding Canadian territorial waters, contained within the seaward limit of an arc described with Cape Flattery Light, Wash., as a center, a radius of 50 nautical miles, and meeting the shore line in the south in the vicinity of position lat. 47°35' N., long. 124°22' W., and meeting the seaward limit of Canadian territorial waters in the north in the vicinity of position lat. 48°56'30" N., long. 125°40'30'' W.

"Southeastern Alaska Maritime Control Area

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:

"Beginning at a point on the international boundary line between the Territory of Alaska and Canada at the southwesterly entrance of the Portland Canal in approximate position lat. 54°44' N., long. 130°43' W.; thence along said boundary line and the seaward extension thereof an approximate true bearing 265°30' to position lat. 54°35' N., long. 134°29' W.; thence along approximate true bearing 326°24' to position lat. 58°33' N., long. 139°14'30" W.; and thence along approximate true bearing 85°30' to the north cape of Lituya Bay, Alaska, in approximate position lat. 58°36'40" N., long. 137°40'20'' W.

"Prince William Sound Maritime Control Area

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:

"Beginning at Pinnacle Rock Lighthouse on the southwesterly end of Cape St. Elias, Alaska, in approximate position lat. 59°48' N., long. 144°36' W.; thence approximately south to position lat. 59°00' N., long. 144°36' W.; thence approximately west true to position lat. 59°00' N., long. 150°26' W.; and thence approximately north true to the southwesterly end of Outer Island of the Pye Islands group in approximate position lat. 59°20'35" N., long. 150°26' W.

"Kodiak Maritime Control Area

"All waters contained within the seaward limit of a circle described with Kodiak, Alaska, as a center, a radius of 50

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p>nautical miles, and meeting the shore line in the north at Point Banks, in the vicinity of position lat. 58°36' N., long. 152°22' W.; in the south in the vicinity of position lat. 57°05' N., long. 153°13' W.; in the west in the vicinity of position lat. 57°31' N., long. 153°52' W.; and in the north in the vicinity of position lat. 58°36' N., long. 152°36' W.

"Unalaska Maritime Control Area

"All waters contained within the seaward limit of two arcs described as follows:

"The first arc described with Unalaska, Alaska, as a center, a radius of 50 nautical miles, and meeting the shore line in the vicinity of positions lat. 53°17'30" N., long. 167°35' W.; lat. 53°23' N., long. 167°43' W.; lat. 53°29' N., long. 167°49' W.; lat. 53°31'30" N., long. 167°51' W.; and intersecting the second arc in the vicinity of position lat. 54°40' N., long. 166°05' W., and lat. 53°35' N., long. 165°10' W.

"The second arc described with Scotch Cap Lighthouse on the southwesterly end of Chumiak Island, Alaska, as a center, a radius of 50 nautical miles, and meeting the shore line in the vicinity of positions lat. 54°41'15" N., long. 163°24'15" W, and lat. 55°02'10" N., long. 163°48'30'' W., and intersecting the first arc in the positions stated in the preceding paragraph.

"REGULATIONS FOR THE CONTROL OF THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED MARITIME CONTROL AREAS

"1. A vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall not enter or navigate the waters of the said Maritime Control Areas except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the said areas must be made, preferably by application at a United States naval district headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call "NQO" shall be made on a frequency of 500 kc., and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"2. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said areas to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy or other United States authority.

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"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said areas, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"5. Should any vessel or person within the said areas disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.

"In witness thereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

"Done at the city of Washington this 25th day of March in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-two, and of the independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-sixth.

"Franklin D Roosevelt
"By the President:
"Sumner Welles,
"Acting Secretary of State."

(F. R. Doc. 42-2636; filed Mar. 26, 1942; 11:35 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 172

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., April 20, 1942.

Regulations for Award of the American Defense Service Medal

1. The following Executive order pertaining to the award of the American Defense Service Medal is published below for information and guidance of the naval service:

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 8808

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is hereby ordered that the American Defense Service Medal, including suitable appurtenances, be established and that the said medal may be awarded, under such regulations as the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Secretary of the Treasury may prescribe, to personnel of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard of the United States serving during the limited emergency proclaimed by me on September 8, 1939, to exist, or during the unlimited emergency proclaimed by me on May 27, 1941.

Franklin D. Roosevelt."
The White House,
June 28, 1941.

2. The American Defense Service Medal will be awarded to all persons in the naval service who served on active duty between September 8, 1939, and December 7, 1941, both dates inclusive.

3. A service clasp, "Fleet" or "Base," is authorized to be worn on the ribbon of the medal by each person who performed duties as set forth below. No person is entitled to more than one such class.

(a) Fleet. - For service on the high seas while regularly attached to any vessel or aircraft squadron of the Atlantic, Pacific or Asiatic Fleets; to include vessels of the Naval Transportation Service and vessels operating directly under the Chief of Naval Operations.

(b) Base. - For service on shore at bases and naval stations outside the continental limits of the United States.

4. A bronze star, three-sixteenths of an inch in diameter, will be worn on the service ribbon in lieu of any clasp authorized.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 173 of May 18, 1942, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 196 of 16 June 1943.

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*****

General Order No. 174

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., June 2, 1942.

Organization of the Naval Forces of the United States

1. General Orders Nos. 142 and 143 are hereby cancelled. All pertinent Navy Regulations, General Orders, war plans, and other instructions are to be considered modified to conform to this General Order.

2. The Naval Forces of the United States are organized under the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations, as follows:
(a) Directly under the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations:

(1) United States Atlantic Fleet,
(2) United States Pacific Fleet,
(3) Sea Frontier Forces (formerly "Naval Coastal Forces"), and
(4) Special Task Forces.

(b) Under the Vice Chief of Naval Operations:

(1) Naval Local Defense Forces,
(2) Naval Transportation Service,
(3) Special Duty Ships, and
(4) Naval District Craft.

3. The assignment and administrative organization of units pertaining to the foregoing will be prescribed by the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations. The task organization of fleets and forces will be prescribed by the commander exercising operational control.

4. Coastal Frontiers are coastal divisions with geographically coterminous boundaries within which an Army officer and a Navy officer exercise command over the Army and Navy forces and activities respectively within these divisions. Coastal frontiers are divided into sectors and subsectors. The system of coastal frontiers includes outlying land, island, and sea areas, as well as the coasts of continental United States. The naval commands of the coastal frontiers are termed "Sea Frontiers," and include the coastal zones in addition to the land areas of the Coastal Frontiers. In certain cases, two sea frontiers may be included in a single coastal frontier; in other cases the sea frontier may include waters which extend beyond the limits of the coastal frontier.

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The Sea Frontiers of the United States are delimited as directed by the Commander in Chief, U. S. Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations.

5. Commanders of Sea Frontier command:

(a) Sea Frontier Forces,
(b) Naval Local Defense Forces.

As Commanders of the Sea Frontier Forces, the commanders of the sea frontiers are under the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations, and, in turn, may have under them, as task force commanders of Sea Frontier Forces, the commandants of component naval districts. As commanders of the naval local defense forces, the commanders of the sea frontiers are directly under the Vice Chief of Naval Operations, subject to the general supervision of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations, and in turn shall have under them as task force commanders the Commandants of component naval districts. When Commandants of Naval Districts are assigned as Task Force Commanders by a Sea Frontier Commander, their duty as such shall be their primary duty.

6. The Commander of the Hawaiian Sea Frontier is wholly under the command of the Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet. The commanders of all other sea frontiers are responsible to the Commanders in Chief of appropriate Fleets only for operations which involve cooperation or coordination between Fleet Forces and Sea Frontier Forces. The commanders of certain outlying naval bases or stations, such as Samoa, Bermuda, Iceland, and Newfoundland, are wholly under the command of the Commander in Chief of the appropriate Fleet, as may be prescribed.

7. For administrative matters not involving war operations. Commandants of naval districts will be governed by appropriate existing regulations, orders, and instructions.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 175

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., June 27, 1942.

Regulations for the Award of the Air Medal

1. The following Executive order pertaining to the award of the Air Medal is published below for the information and guidance of the Naval Service:

"Executive Order No. 9158
"By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is hereby ordered that an Air Medal, with accompanying ribbons, be established for award to any person who, while serving in any capacity in or with the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States subsequent to September 8, 1939, distinguishes, or has distinguished, himself by meritorious achievement while participating in an aerial flight.
"The Air Medal and appurtenances thereto shall be of appropriate design approved by the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, and the Secretary of the Treasury, and, under such regulations as said Secretaries may prescribe, may be awarded by the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, or the Secretary of the Treasury, or by such commanding officers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard as the said Secretaries may respectively designate. Awards to personnel of the Coast Guard when serving under his jurisdiction shall be made by or under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy.
"No more than one Air Medal shall be awarded to any one person, but for each succeeding meritorious achievement justifying such an award a suitable bar or other device may be awarded to be worn with the medal as prescribed by appropriate regulations. In the event of a posthumous award the medal, bar, or device may be presented to such representative of the deceased as may be designated in the award.

"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT.
"The White House,
May 11, 1942."

2. Commanders in Chief of Fleets and Commander Southwest Pacific Force are authorized to make awards and present the Air Medal in the name of the President.

3. Commanders in Chief of Fleets only may delegate their authority to Task Force Commanders for designated limited periods when lack of adequate communications may prevent awards being made within a reasonable time.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy

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*****

General Order No. 176

NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., July 1, 1942.

The China Service Medal

1. General Order No. 135 is hereby canceled.

2. To commemorate the services performed by the personnel of the Navy and Marine Corps during operations in China from July 7, 1937, to September 7, 1939, a service medal to be known as the China Service Medal will be issued to the officers and enlisted men who participated in these operations.

3. The award wall be made to the officers and enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps who served on shore in China during the period from July 7, 1937, to September 7, 1939, and to the officers and enlisted men who were attached to and serving on board any of the vessels mentioned in the following list between the dates appearing opposite each vessel.

4. Former members of the Navy and Marine Corps, whose separations from the service have been under honorable conditions and who are eligible for the medal, may apply to the Chief of Naval Personnel or the Commandant, United States Marine Corps, respectively.

5. No person is entitled to more than one medal for service during these operations.

Name of vessel

Period of service (both dates inclusive)

Name of vessel

Period of service (both dates inclusive)

From -

To -

From -

To -

Alden July 3, 1937 July 24, 1937 Bulmer July 7, 1937 Nov. 10, 1937
Aug. 3, 1937 Nov. 18, 1937 Nov. 26, 1937 Dec. 18, 1937
July 18, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938 Apr. 8, 1938 Aug. 6, 1938
Jan. 30, 1939 Feb. 27, 1939 Apr. 3, 1939 Sept. 4, 1939
June 6, 1939 Aug. 8, 1939 Canopus July 7, 1937 Sept. 21, 1937
Asheville July 7, 1937 Dec. 28, 1937 Oct. 3, 1937 Oct. 6, 1937
Mar. 24, 1938 Feb. 4, 1939 Oct. 19, 1937 Oct. 25, 1937
Apr. 6, 1939 July 17, 1939 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
Augusta July 7, 1937 July 24, 1937 May 11, 1939 Aug. 12, 1939
Aug. 3, 1937 Jan. 6, 1938 Chaumont July 7, 1937 July 19, 1937
Jan. 20, 1938 Jan. 22, 1938 Sept. 18, 1937 Oct. 4, 1937
Apr. 8, 1938 Dec. 28, 1938 Oct. 17, 1937 Oct. 23, 1937
Apr. 22, 1839 Sept. 7, 1939 Nov. 6, 1937 Nov. 13, 1937
Barker July 7, 1937 July 24, 1937 Feb. 11, 1938 Feb. 18, 1938
Aug. 3, 1937 Nov. 18, 1937 Oct. 29, 1938 Nov. 19, 1938
Feb. 9, 1938 Feb. 28, 1938 May 15, 1939 June 6, 1939
July 18, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938 Aug. 22, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Feb. 26, 1939 Apr. 3, 1939 Edsall July 7, 1937 Oct. 28, 1937
June 6, 1939 Aug. 14, 1939 Nov. 10, 1937 Dec. 18, 1937
Bittern June 7, 1937 Oct. 4, 1937 Mar. 24, 1938 July 12, 1938
May 6, 1939 May 15, 1939 Apr. 3, 1939 Sept. 4, 1939
June 8, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 Edwards, John D July 7, 1937 Nov. 18, 1937
Black hawk July 7, 1937 Nov. 18, 1937 July 18, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938
Apr. 4, 1938 Apr. 6, 1938 Jan. 30, 1939 Feb. 26, 1939
July 18, 1938 Sept. 28, 1938 June 6, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 Finch July 7, 1937 Dec. 4, 1937
Bridge Nov. 8, 1937 Mar. 9, 1938 July 10, 1938 Sept. 6, 1938
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Name of vessel

Period of service (both dates inclusive)

Name of vessel

Period of service (both dates inclusive)

From -

To -

From -

To -

Pigeon July 7, 1937 Sept. 19, 1937
June 18, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
Ford, John D July 7, 1937 Nov. 19. 1937 May 2, 1939 May 11, 1939
Jan. 15, 1938 Feb. 3, 1938 July 30, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Feb. 17, 1938 Feb. 24, 1938 Pillsbury July 7, 1937 Nov. 17, 1937
July 15, 1938 Sept. 15, 1938 Dec. 31, 1937 Jan. 6, 1938
Nov. 2, 1938 Dec. 15, 1938 Jan. 20, 1938 Feb. 2, 1938
June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 July 16, 1938 Nov. 11, 1938
Gold Star Aug. 26, 1937 Sept. 7, 1937 June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Sept. 22, 1937 Sept. 28, 1937 Pope July 7, 1937 Nov. 17, 1937
Nov. 27, 1937 Dec. 1, 1937 Dec. 15, 1937 Jan. 17, 1938
Feb. 11, 1938 Feb. 14, 1938 Jan. 31, 1938 Mar. 1, 1938
Sept. 20, 1938 Oct. 11, 1938 July 15, 1938 Sept. 20, 1938
Nov. 25, 1938 Nov. 29, 1938 Nov. 15, 1938 Dec. 16, 1938
Feb. 10, 1939 Feb. 27, 1939 June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
May 5, 1939 May 19, 1939 Ramapo Aug. 1, 1937 Aug. 15, 1937
July 18, 1939 Aug. 1, 1939 Oct. 21, 1937 Oct. 25, 1937
Guam July 7, 1937 Sept. 7, 1939 Mar. 28, 1939 Apr. 5, 1939
Henderson Oct. 24, 1937 Nov. 14, 1937 July 3, 1939 July 14, 1939
May 2, 1938 May 23, 1938 S-36 July 7, 1937 Sept. 19, 1937
Dec. 30, 1938 Jan. 20, 1939 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
July 2, 1939 July 25, 1939 May 25, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Heron July 7, 1937 Oct. 4, 1937 S-37 July 7, 1937 Aug. 25, 1937
Sept. 15, 1938 Sept. 22, 1938 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
July 27, 1939 Aug. 3, 1939 July 19, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Isabel July 7, 1937 Oct. 29, 1937 S-38 July 7, 1937 July 21, 1937
Jan. 5, 1938 Sept. 7, 1939 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
Jones, Paul July 7, 1937 July 24, 1937 May 2, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Sept. 26, 1937 Nov. 19, 1937 S-39 July 7, 1937 July 21, 1937
Aug. 12, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 July 4, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Luzon July 7, 1937 Sept. 7, 1939 S-40 July 7, 1937 July 21, 1937
Marblehead Sept. 19, 1937 Feb. 16, 1938 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
May 14, 1938 Aug. 7, 1938 May 25, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Aug. 22, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938 S-41 July 7, 1937 Aug. 25, 1937
Apr. 9, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 Oct. 13, 1938 Oct. 29, 1938
Mindanao July 7, 1937 Sept. 7, 1939 July 4, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Monocacy July 7, 1937 Jan. 31, 1939 Sacramento July 7, 1937 Sept. 26, 1937
Oahu July 7, 1937 Sept. 7, 1939 Oct. 5, 1937 Mar. 27, 1938
Panay July 7, 1937 Dec. 12, 1937 June 3, 1938 Jan. 2, 1939
Parrott July 7, 1937 Dec. 18, 1937 Stewart July 7, 1937 Oct. 17, 1937
Alar. 2, 1938 Mar. 25, 1938 Oct. 30, 1937 Dec. 18, 1937
Sept. 14, 1938 Sept. 28, 1938 Feb. 24, 1938 Apr. 7, 1938
June 3, 1939 Sept. 4, 1939 June 3, 1939 Sept. 4, 1939
Peary Aug. 16, 1937 Nov. 17, 1937 Trinity Aug. 28, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
Dec. 15, 1937 Dec. 24, 1937 Tulsa July 7, 1937 July 13, 1938
Jan. 6, 1938 Jan. 25, 1938 Sept. 17, 1938 Feb. 4, 1939
Feb. 8, 1938 Feb. 27, 1938 Apr. 6, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939
July 15, 1938 Oct. 14, 1938 Tutuila July 7, 1937 Sept. 7, 1939
June 5, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 Whipple July 7, 1937 July 24. 1937
Pecos Aug. 19, 1937 Oct. 4, 1937 Aug. 3, 1937 Nov. 18, 1937
July 16, 1938 July 31, 1938 July 18, 1938 Sept. 27, 1938
Aug. 23, 1938 Sept. 28, 1938 Feb. 20, 1939 Apr. 3, 1939
May 31, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939 June 6, 1939 Sept. 7, 1939

Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 177 of July 8, 1942, superseded by General Order No. 191 of May 28, 1943.

*****

General Order No. 178 of July 29, 1942, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 201 of 16 October 1943.

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*****

General Order No. 179

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., August 26, 1942.

Photographs of Naval Subjects introduction

The importance of and necessity for photographs is recognized by the Navy and the purpose of this General Order is to outline provisions necessary for the preservation of security of classified matter in connection with photographs concerning naval subjects.

Photographs have many and varied uses and in many cases provide the only means of transmitting essential information or adequately recording events for historical purposes. The major uses of photography as related to the Navy are:

(a) Strategical and tactical information.
(b) Technical reports and records.
(c) Public information.
(d) Recruiting.
(e) Historical.
(f) Training films.

1. General Order No. 96 is hereby canceled and the following substituted therefor:

OUTLINE

Paragraph

2. Basic considerations.

3. Responsibility:

(a) Designation of responsible officer.
(b) Supervision.
(c) Higher authority.
(d) Source of information on restricted subjects.
(e) Reference to Navy Department in cases of doubt.
(f) Designation of released photographs.
(f) Immediate release of unseen photographs.
(h) Disposal of old photograph files.

4. Naval photographers.

(a) Official photographers.
(b) Privately owned cameras.

5. Civilian photographers.

(a) Identification cards.
(b) Naval transportation of commercial photographers.
(c) Responsibility for photographs taken during passage.
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5. Civilian photographers - Continued.

(d) Agreement between competing photographers.
(e) Agreement between naval authority and photographers.
(f) Liability of civilian photographer under Espionage Act.
(g) Protective measures for prevention of compromise of confidential matter.
(h) Artists, sketchers, and draftsmen.

6. Motion pictures, commercial:

(a) Authorization for naval cooperation.
(b) Feature motion pictures.
(c) Newsreels.
(d) Latitude allowed commercial motion picture producers.
(e) Training films.
(f) Other films (except technical films).
(g) Censored material.

7. Technical photographs (motion pictures and stills):

(a) Technical photographs required by contract.
(b) Technical photographs not required by contract.

8. General guide:

(a) Standards of censorship.
(b) Photographs not to be released.
(c) Photographs which may be released.

9. General:

(a) Photographs of potential strategic and historic value.

2. Basic Considerations.

(a) In conformity with the provisions of Article 124, United States Navy Regulations, 1920, detailed instructions are hereby issued governing photography within naval Jurisdiction in order to permit prompt release and publication of photographs and motion pictures portraying non confidential Navy matter beneficial alike to the public and to the Navy.

(b) The following considerations are basic:

(1) The administration must be decentralized insofar as consistent with the security of information which, in the interest of National Defense, should be permanently or temporarily limited in circulation.
(2) The responsibility for the supervision of the taking of photographs must be placed upon the officer in command at the place where the object is photographed.
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(3) The protection of confidential matter from compromise by means of photography must depend upon knowledge of the confidential nature of material and upon the physical covering of any confidential item within the field of even a distant camera.
(4) Photographs may be released by the officer in command at the place where the object is photographed except as restricted by paragraph 8 (b) of this general order. Cases of doubt should be referred to Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations).

3. Responsibility.

(a) Subject to these instructions and orders from higher naval authority, commanding officers of naval vessels, naval inspectors, commandants of navy yards, and commanding officers of other shore stations shall have full cognizance of and responsibility for the making of photographs within their naval jurisdiction whether by naval personnel or by other than naval personnel.

(b) The taking of all photographs within naval jurisdiction shall be supervised by those in authority at the place where the photographs are taken. However, commanding officers are directed to obtain photographs at times of emergency, disaster, and combat action. Security shall be maintained by proper handling of negative material in accordance with current instructions regarding the disposition of classified matter.

(c) When competent authority higher than the commanding officer of a ship or station authorizes the taking of photographs, by despatch or official letter, such authorization in no way relieves the local authority from responsibility regarding supervision, censorship, and release of photographs taken except as specified in the order authorizing the photographs.

(d) The general policy with respect to matter considered confidential is contained in the United States Navy Regulations. Attention is invited to Article 75 1/2, 76, 113, 124, and 128, United States Navy Regulations, 1920. More detailed instructions as to the current policy with respect to publicity regarding naval vessels and naval aeronautics are issued from time to time by the Secretary of the Navy in letter form. Further detailed instructions regarding specific confidential equipment are issued from time to time by the chiefs of the bureaus having cognizance thereof.

(e) Where there is doubt as to the advisability of making or releasing any photograph for publication, reference, with recommendation, will be made to the Secretary of the Navy (Director

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of Public Relations). When an official Navy still photograph is referred to the Navy Department for review, the original negative and two prints will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations. All copies of negatives and photographs of combat action against the enemy which show loss of or damage to U. S. combatant ships, or fleet operations knowledge of which must be kept in the limited distribution category, should be forwarded via the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, who will take appropriate action as to further disposition. All still negatives and prints made by commercial photographers shall remain under naval jurisdiction until such negatives have been released. In the case of commercial photographers one additional print should be forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations) for the Department files.

(f) (1) When a still photograph made by a commercial photographer is released, a file copy of the photograph and a record with the following information will be kept:

United States Navy Photograph Record, text below image.
United States Navy Photograph Record, text below image.

Title and office file number___, Date___, To___, (Name of receiver and company, if any), By___, (Signature of releaser), Station___, Taken by___, (Source of photograph).

(2) When an "Official Navy Photograph," except of pictures of personnel, is issued to any person or activity outside naval jurisdiction, it shall bear the following statement written or stamped on the back:

WATCH YOUR CREDIT
No objection to reproducing or publishing this photograph provided this credit line
OFFICIAL U. S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH
is used.

This photograph may be used for commercial advertising if accompanying copy and layout are submitted, prior to publication, to the
OFFICE OF PUBLIC RELATIONS
PHOTOGRAPHIC SECTION
NAVY DEPARTMENT
WASHINGTON, D. C.

 

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(8) When an "Official Navy Photograph" of personnel is issued the following statement shall be written or stamped on the back:

RELEASED OFFICIAL NAVY PHOTOGRAPH
If published, credit line must read
"OFFICIAL U. S. NAVY PHOTOGRAPH"

(g) (1) When the supervision of the taking of photographs has been such as to preclude the inclusion of subjects prohibited for release, the officer granting permission to take these pictures may release them immediately for publication without prior inspection of the prints and negatives, subject to subsequent compliance with paragraph (f) above. The provisions of this paragraph do not relieve the officer releasing the unseen photographs from his responsibility as specified in subparagraph 8 (a).

(2) Unofficial pictures taken outside naval jurisdiction by Naval Personnel do not require review by Naval authority.

(h) After a photograph has been retained in file for 1 year, the photograph may be eliminated from file by forwarding the file prints, and record of release to the following offices:

(1) Photographs filed in photographic laboratories under the cognizance of the Bureau of Aeronautics will be handled in accordance with the provisions of the Bureau of Aeronautics Manual.
(2) Technical photographs to cognizant bureaus.
(3) Other photographs, in released or unreleased status, to the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations), including all prints and negatives.

4. Photographs by Naval Personnel.
(a) Official photographers. - A commanding officer, or higher authority, may grant persons in the naval service permission to act as the official photographers for the activity under his jurisdiction. Such permission does not relieve the authorizing official from responsibility for supervision of photographs taken. The development of negatives and printing will be accomplished under naval jurisdiction.
(b) Privately owned cameras. - Cameras are permitted to naval personnel on board naval ships for taking pictures outside naval jurisdiction. While on board cameras will be in custody of the commanding officer. Under no circumstances will they be used aboard ship without official permission and competent supervision. (Paragraph 8 (g) (2).) Use of or the pos-

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session of privately owned cameras at shore stations shall be in accordance with such local regulations as may be prescribed. (See par. (5) (6) (2)).

5. Civilian Photographers (still pictures).
(a) In order to facilitate identification of persons known to be engaged in photographic work and to have a legitimate interest in naval subjects, commandants of naval districts may issue annual photographer's identification cards to persons of United States citizenship, good only for the calendar year in which issued. These cards will not constitute authorization for taking pictures. The identification card will bear the photograph and signature of the person to whom issued, both stamped with the seal of the issuing office.
(b) (1) Permission for civilians to take photographs which involves taking passage on a naval ship or aircraft will be granted only by special authority of the Navy Department, except that in cases of natural catastrophe or other emergency where prompt action is indispensable, the Senior Officer may authorize the passage of photographers on a naval ship or aircraft. In such event full report of the circumstances will be made to the Navy Department.
(2) All unofficial photographs, still or motion picture, taken by naval personnel within naval jurisdiction with their own equipment shall be subject to review. If, in judgment of the reviewing authority, such photos are of public interest, prints or copies shall be released as "Official Navy Photos" without recompense to the photographer. However, the unclassified portions of the original film may be returned to the owner, at the discretion of the reviewing authority, for his unrestricted use. Classified portions which may be of use to the naval establishment will be turned over to the cognizant bureaus for their noncommercial use.
(c) Commanding officers of ships and aircraft on which civilian photographers are taking passage are responsible, in accordance with the provisions of this General Order, for all photographs taken by such photographers.
(d) In order not to adversely affect the interests of organizations engaged in photographic work, requests to make photographs featuring naval subjects will not be made known to competitors. But if more than one request is received equal privileges will be granted to all applicants at the discretion and convenience the of the naval authorities concerned. Should it be impracticable for more than one photographer to cover the subject, the photographer selected will be chosen by lot with the

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understanding, before he is chosen, that he is required to cover the event equitably for all parties who have requested permission. The terms of this equitable agreement shall be set forth before choice by lot is made, and failure of the chosen party to comply fully with such agreement will bar him from further photographic privileges.

(e) Before permission to take photographs (still) within naval jurisdiction is granted, it will be expressly agreed by the civilian photographer that -

(1) The Navy will be given one copy of every photograph (still) taken for its noncommercial use without reference to and entirely independent of any copyright.
(2) Two prints of each photograph taken will be submitted for censorship--one print for the censoring authority's file and one print for return to photographer if released by censor, except one print only required under conditions stated in paragraph 3 (g) (1). The custody of all negatives will remain in naval jurisdiction until release is completed.
(3) All prints not released by the censor and their negatives will become the property of the Navy for noncommercial use.
(4) Only those photographs specifically released by the censor will be made public.
(5) In event any photograph in this category is to be used in connection with an advertisement, all copy and text to appear with the photograph will be submitted in duplicate to naval authority for censorship prior to release of the advertisement. (See G. O. No. 201.)

(f) Civilian photographers shall he informed that the retention of negatives or prints or the publishing of photographs in violation of their agreements or failure to deliver negatives of prints to proper naval authority upon demand may render them liable to prosecution under the Espionage Act.

(g) In order to protect the interests of the Navy without adversely affecting the interests of organizations engaged in photographic work, whenever a civilian photographer ("still" or "motion picture") is authorized to take pictures of a naval subject an officer or other qualified expert will be detailed to act in an advisory capacity to the photographer in order to prevent the disclosure of objects which the Navy does not wish to be photographed. Experience has shown that a majority of the pictures requiring censorship could have been released for publication were it not for inadvertent disclosure of confidential mat-

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ter in the background. Attention is invited to paragraph 2 (b) (3) of this order.

(h) The provisions of this General Order will apply wherever applicable to artists, sketchers, and draftsmen.

6. Motion Pictures, Commercial.

(a) The Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations) may authorize naval cooperation with commercial motion-picture producers in recognition of the value to both the public at large and the naval service in the production of accurate portrayals of naval life. The cooperation between the motion picture producers and the Navy will involve, on the part of the motion-picture producer, agreement in writing to adhere to the restrictions and requirements imposed by this order and, on the part of the Navy, assistance to the motion-picture producers in the technical supervision of the taking of the picture to prevent the inclusion of matter not desired to be made public. The procedure for censorship of these pictures depends upon whether they are feature motion pictures, newsreels, or other films.

(b) Feature motion pictures. - A feature motion picture for the purpose of this General Order is interpreted to be any motion picture over 4,000 feet in length.

1. The Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations) requires that the scenarios of feature motion pictures involving any naval cooperation or the portrayal of naval personnel or naval subjects, be reviewed by that office prior to production.
2. The naval authority designated to cooperate with the producing company will provide, in the interest of security, for naval supervision of all footage taken within naval jurisdiction and where practicable, for prompt local provisional censorship of such footage as may be considered questionable for release by the supervisor. The local provisional censorship is for the purpose of promptly bringing to the attention of both the producing company and the Navy Department film which is questionable and is not for the purpose of censoring script or dialogue. One print of all the questioned footage for the given production will be forwarded as confidential matter by the naval authority concerned to the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations). The producing company will be informed when the questioned film is forwarded.
3. All feature motion pictures produced with naval cooperation, or involving naval personnel or naval subjects, will be submitted by the Producing Company to the Secre-

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tary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations) for review and censorship by that office in the Navy Department, Washington, D. C., prior to release.
4. Whenever a feature motion picture is produced with naval cooperation, the Navy Department reserves the right to acquire without cost a number of positive prints of such feature motion pictures equal to the number of positive prints called for in the current contracts for the lease of motion pictures, and to use them in any manner it may see fit, except that these prints shall not be used commercially nor shall they be exhibited at shore stations until out of their prerelease status.

(c) Newsreels. - Newsreels of naval subjects for which naval cooperation is granted will be accorded naval supervision in accordance with paragraph 5 (g) of this order. A lavender print of scenes made by newsreels of Navy subjects will be forwarded to commandant third naval district, unless otherwise directed, and the film so submitted will not be released until it has been approved, in accordance with existing orders and instructions issued by the Navy Department. This lavender print will be shipped to the Navy Department and retained for its own use and will not be released for commercial purposes without express permission of the company having proprietary right to the original negative.

(d) In view of the strict control exercised over motion pictures taken in naval jurisdiction, and in order to meet the legitimate requirements of motion-picture producers for scenes of a spectacular nature, motion-picture photographs of simple fleet maneuvers, aircraft in flight, distant views of ships firing, interior views of living quarters and similar scenes which do not disclose information of a confidential nature may be permitted subject to final censorship.

(e) Training films. - All companies producing motion pictures or film strips for the Navy Department for primary use in connection with training shall deliver the original negative to the Bureau of Aeronautics for such noncommercial use as the Navy Department may require. In the case of classified material all negatives, prints, or lavenders will be delivered to the Bureau of Aeronautics in accordance with the provisions of paragraph 6 (g) of this order. A duplicate negative of unclassified material may be retained by the producing company for reproduction purposes for nontheatrical use, except that previously released film available in library material will ordinarily have no restrictions placed upon it for theatrical use. Release of material not

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previously reviewed will be subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations).

(f) Other films (except technical films). - Documentaries, short subjects, and all other short films (except technical films), produced wholly or in part with naval cooperation, shall be submitted for review to the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations). If possible, advance scripts or outlines should be submitted prior to start of production. The Navy Department reserves the right to acquire prints in accordance with paragraph 6 (b) 4 of this general order, or a lavender print of all footage made with naval cooperation.

(g) When the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations) or the commandant, third naval district, censors and condemns any footage, the producing company will promptly submit all prints, "lavenders," and negatives of that footage to the censoring authority, together with a signed statement that all prints, "lavenders," or negatives of any nature made from the disapproved footage have been surrendered to naval authority.

7. Technical Photographs.

(a) Photographs (still and motion pictures) and sketches or drawings required by Navy contracts in connection with the manufacture or construction of articles or structures for the Navy will be handled as part of the contract and under the same restrictions as apply to drawings and other matter under the contract or under special classification. None of the above may be published, distributed, displayed, or released to the contractor's files without approval by the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations).

(b) Photographs of articles other than those of a strictly commercial character being manufactured for or under construction for the Navy, taken by or on order of the contractors and not required by the terms of the contract, will be subject to the supervision and control of the Navy inspector concerned. When a photograph of this category is released to the contractor for unrestricted use or publication, the provisions of paragraph 8, subparagraph (f) of this order will be complied with, and in addition, one copy of the released photograph, with the release date written on the back, may be forwarded at the discretion of the naval inspector to the Bureau having cognizance.

8. General Guide.

(a) The censorship of photographs requires the use of sound judgment on the part of the responsible officers in order to permit the prompt release and publication of such photographs

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and motion pictures as will be beneficial alike to the public and to the Navy, while at the same time protecting subjects which are of a classified nature. It must be kept in mind that to publish a list of the specific items which are considered most confidential would be the first step leading to compromise. As a consequence it is necessary to designate classified items in fairly broad categories and administer the security thereof in accordance with a uniform policy. Photographs listed in subparagraph (b) below will not be released except by the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations).

(b) Photographs not to be released without reference to Navy Department.

(1) Photographs which disclose classified information. The source of information on specific items is indicated in paragraph 3 (d) of this order.
(2) Naval dry docks or ships therein.
(3) Ships under construction and mechanical devices intended for use thereon.
(4) Any picture taken on board ship showing details of armament, fire control equipment, interior views or special details of construction.
(5) Underwater body views of naval vessels.
(6) Any phase of naval gunnery or any details of ordnance equipment.
(7) Fleet dispositions and tactical maneuvers.
(8) Landing force operations and equipment.
(9) Smoke screens.
(10) Naval radio and sound equipment.
(11) Aerial photographs or photographs from an elevated position of U. S. navy yards, stations and bases; U. S. Army posts, forts, depots, and stations; foreign ports and harbors.
(12) Aerial photographs or photographs from an elevated position of strategic areas as designated by the Secretary of the Navy and air space reservations as designated by the President of the United States.
(13) Loss of or damage to U. S. combatant ships resulting from enemy action.
(14) Fleet operations knowledge of which must receive only limited distribution.

(c) Photographs which may be released.

(1) Photographs taken on occasions of ceremony; of athletic events; of personnel, single or group; or other proper subjects involving personnel or naval life.
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9. General.

(a) Official Navy photographs of potential strategic or historic value without regard to release status, will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations.

(b) All commercial photographs shall be handled in accordance with provisions set forth in paragraph 5 of this general order.

10. Marine Corps.

(a) The foregoing instructions will apply to the Marine Corps in principle but with the following organizational modifications:

(1) In all photography that concerns the internal affairs of the Marine Corps, such as recruiting, training, and allied activities (except aeronautics), the Commanding General of the U. S. Marine Corps (Director of Public Relations) is delegated cognizance equivalent to that of the Secretary of the Navy (Director of Public Relations). Similarly, in applicable cases, the term "Navy" or "Navy Department" shall be construed as "Marine Corps" or "Headquarters, U. S. Marine Corps."
(2) All photographs released by the Marine Corps will be titled as in 3 (f) (2) and (3) above, except that "U. S. Marine Corps" will be substituted for "U. S. Navy"; and references for authorized publication will be made to the Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps, Washington, D. C.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 180

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., Sept. 10, 1942.

Photographs and Sketches of Military or Naval Subjects

1. An act of Congress approved June 25, 1942 (Public Law No. 627, 77th Cong.), reads as follows:

"Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That whoever, except in the performance of duty or employment in connection with the national defense, shall knowingly and willfully make any sketch, photograph, photographic negative, blueprint, plan, map, model, copy, or other representation of any navy yard, naval station, or of any military post, fort, camp, station, arsenal, airfield, or other military or naval reservation or place used for national defense purposes by the War or Navy Department, or of any vessel, aircraft, installation, equipment, or any other property whatsoever, located within any such post, fort, camp, arsenal, airfield, yard, station, reservation or place, or in the waters adjacent thereto, or in any defensive sea area established in accordance with law; or whoever, except in performance of duty or employment in connection with the national defense shall knowingly and willfully make any sketch, photograph, photographic negative, blueprints, plan, map, model, copy, or other representation of any vessel, aircraft, installation, equipment, or other property relating to the national defense being manufactured or under construction or repair for or awaiting delivery to the War, or Navy Department or the government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States under any contract or agreement with the United States or such country or otherwise on behalf of the United States or such country, located at the factory, plant, yard, storehouse, or other place of business of any contractor, subcontractor, or other person, or in the waters adjacent to any such place, shall be punished as provided herein.

"Sec. 2. Notwithstanding the provisions of section 1, the Secretary of War or the Secretary of the Navy is authorized, under such regulations as he may prescribe, to permit photographs, sketches, or other representations to be made when, in his opinion, the interests of national defense will not be adversely affected thereby.

"Sec. 3. Any person found guilty of a violation of this Act shall, upon conviction, be punished by a fine of not more than $1,000 or by imprisonment for not more than one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

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"Sec, 4. The provisions of this Act shall apply in the Philippine Islands as well as in all other places within the territory or jurisdiction of the United States.

"Sec. 5. This Act shall be effective only for the duration of the present war as determined by proclamation of the President."

2. In accordance with the authority contained in Section 2 of the above quoted Act, the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy have prescribed certain regulations for the administration of the said Act. Such regulations which have been prescribed have been duly published in the Federal Register (7 F. R. 7307), are in full force and effect in pursuance of the said Act, and appear hereafter as follows:

"Sketches, photographs, photographic negatives, blueprints, plans, maps, models, copies or other representations, may be made of any area, place, property, or thing, described in the Act of Congress approved June 25, 1942 (Public Law Number 627 -- 77th Congress), only upon the expressed permission of the Secretary, or his authorized representative, having jurisdiction of the subject matter. Such permission will be granted only if the interests of national defense will not be adversely affected thereby.

"The Authorized representatives who may grant the necessary permission are:

"WAR DEPARTMENT
"Any commanding general of a defense command, theater of operations, department or service command, Director of War Department Bureau of Public Relations or any Commander of a post, camp or station.
"NAVY DEPARTMENT
"Fleet commanders or commanders of any major subdivision thereof, commanders of sea frontiers, district commandants, the Director of the Office of Public Relations, commanding officers of ships, aircraft squadrons, or stations, or, an officer of the United States Marine Corps having a command equivalent to any of the foregoing."

3. The Naval representatives designated in the aforementioned regulations shall, in the administration of the functions therein imposed, at all times be guided by the provisions of General Order No. 179.

4. Should a violation of the law herein stated occur within the jurisdiction of the Naval Establishment, evidence of the violation such as cameras, photographs, photographic films, sketches, etc., should be acquired whenever possible. If in the

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judgment of the responsible Commander having custody of such evidence, or in the determination of the Navy Department should such officer request a decision of the Department, a criminal prosecution is desired, all evidence should be transmitted to the Federal authorities responsible for such prosecution. If, in the judgment of the responsible Commander having custody of such evidence, or, in the determination of the Navy Department should such officer request a decision of the Department, no criminal prosecution is desired, the evidence obtained should be forwarded to the Navy Department for disposition.

5. The attention of personnel is directed to the broad scope of this law which, literally, prohibits the taking of any photograph of Naval subjects without authority. It is, therefore, expected that citizens, innocent of wrongful intent, will transgress the law's comprehensive provisions. Personnel are therefore obliged to exercise tact, discretion, and sound judgment in their administration of the law as it affects the Naval Establishment.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 181

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., October 12, 1942.

Establishment of Certain Naval Air Centers, Naval Air Training Centers and the Commands Thereof

1. The provisions of this general order will become effective October 12, 1942, upon which date General Orders Nos. 45 and 121 are revised as follows:

In paragraph 6, General Order No. 45, delete the item "Naval Air Station" from the lists of administrative establishments comprised by the Naval Operating Bases, Norfolk and San Diego, respectively.

At the end of paragraph 2, General Order No. 121, add a comma and the words "and the Naval Air Stations, Pensacola and Corpus Christi shall be administered by the Commandants of the Naval Air Training Centers, Pensacola and Corpus Christi, respectively, as parts of the Air Intermediate Training Command."

2. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Center, Hampton Roads, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va.:
Naval Air Station, Norfolk, Va.

Auxiliary Air Station, Chincoteague, Va.
Auxiliary Air Station, Monogram Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Franklin Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Pungo Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Fentress Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Creeds Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Manteo Field.
Coast Guard Air Station, Elizabeth City, N. C.

3. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Training Center, Pensacola, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, Fla.

Naval Air Station, Pensacola.
Auxiliary Air Station, Corry Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Ellyson Field.
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Auxiliary Air Station, Barin Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Saufley Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Bronson Field.

4. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Training Center, Corpus Christi, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi, Tex.:

Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi.
Auxiliary Air Station, Cabaniss Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Cudahy Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Kingsville Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Rodd Field.

5. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Center, San Diego, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, San Diego, Calif.:

Naval Air Station, San Diego.
Auxiliary Air Station, Ream Field.
Auxiliary Air Station, Otay Mesa.
Auxiliary Air Station, Camp Kearney.
Aviation Facility, San Clemente Island.
Coast Guard Air Station, San Diego.

6. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Center, Seattle, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Seattle, Wash.:

Naval Air Station, Seattle.
Auxiliary Air Station, Astoria, Oreg.
Auxiliary Air Station, North Bend, Oreg.
Naval Air Station, Tongue Point.
Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island.
Coast Guard Air Station, Port Angeles, Wash.

7. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are hereby grouped together to form the Naval Air Center, Hawaiian Islands, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Pearl Harbor, T. H.

Naval Air Station, Pearl Harbor.
Naval Air Station, Kaneohe.
Naval Air Station, Barbers Point.
Naval Air Station, Maui.
Aviation Facility, Molokai.
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8. The following naval aviation activities and establishments, and such additional auxiliary air bases as may be established therein, are grouped together to form the Naval Air Center, Alameda, with headquarters at the Naval Air Station, Alameda, California:

Naval Air Station, Alameda
Auxiliary Air Station, Vernalis
Auxiliary Air Station, Crows Landing
Auxiliary Air Station, Santa Rosa
Auxiliary Air Station, Hollister
Auxiliary Air Station, Monterey
Auxiliary Air Station, Watsonville
Auxiliary Air Station, Eureka
Coast Guard Air Station, San Francisco.

9. A line officer of the Navy (Naval Aviator) of suitable rank C. G. will be ordered to duty as Commandant of each Naval Air Center and Naval Air Training Center established hereby. The Commandants of the Naval Air Centers will report to the Commandants of the Naval Districts in which their respective centers are located. The Commandants of the Naval Air Training Centers, Pensacola and Corpus Christi, will report to the Chief of Air Intermediate Training. The commands hereby established will be administered in accordance with article 1487, U. S. Navy Regulations, 1920.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 182

Navy Department
Washington, D. C., October 29, 1942.

Establishing the Casco Bay, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Cape Hatteras, Key West and Los Angeles Maritime Control Areas and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof.

1. The following proclamation is quoted:
"PROCLAMATION 2569
"Establishing The Casco Bay, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, Cape Hatteras. Key West and Los Angeles Maritime Control Areas and Prescribing Regulations for The Control Thereof
"By The President of the United States of America
"A Proclamation

"Whereas the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control areas hereinafter described is necessary in the interests of national defense:
"Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander-in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self-defense of the Law of Nations, do hereby establish and proclaim the following-described areas as Maritime Control Areas, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:

"CASCO BAY MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:
"Beginning at a point on Small Point, Cape Small, in approximate position Latitude 43°42'06" North, Longitude 69°50'03" West; thence due south through Fuller Rock Light to an approximate position Latitude 43°32'19'' North, Longitude 69°50'03" West; and thence due west to a point on Adam Head, Richmond Island, in approximate position Latitude 43°32'19" North, Longitude 70°13'48'' West.

"PORTSMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE, MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows:
"Beginning at Cape Neddick Light in approximate position Latitude 43°09'54" North, Longitude 70°35'30" West; thence southeasterly to Boon Island Light in approximate position Latitude 43°07'16" North, Longitude 70°28'36" West;

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thence due south to approximate position Latitude 42"55'05" North, Longitude 70°28'36" West; and
thence due west to a point on Great Boars Head in approximate position Latitude 42°55'05'' North, Longitude 70°47'42" West.

"CAPE HATTERAS MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters within the area enclosed by lines running as follows; "Beginning at a point on the beach near Swash Inlet in approximate position Latitude 34°58'02'' North, Longitude 76°10' West;
thence southeasterly to position Latitude 34°53' North, Longitude 75°58' West;
thence due east to position Latitude 34°53' North, Longitude 75°31' West;
thence northeasterly to position Latitude 35°05' North, Longitude 75°22' West;
thence due north to position Latitude 35°08' North, Longitude 75°22' West;
thence northwesterly to position Latitude 35°17' North, Longitude 75°28' West; and thence due west to the beach in approximate position Latitude 35°17' North, Longitude 75°30'43" West.

"KEY WEST MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"All waters within the area enclosed by the following parallels of latitude and meridians of longitude:
"Between the parallels of Latitude 24°36' North and Latitude 25°10' North; and between the meridians of Longitude 81°23' West and Longitude 82°10' West.

"LOS ANGELES MARITIME CONTROL AREA

"That sea area lying within the following boundaries:
"From Point Dume, California, to the Northwesterly point of Santa Catalina Island;
thence along the Northern shore of Santa Catalina Island to the Southeasterly point of that island;
from the Southeasterly point of Santa Catalina Island to Dana Point, California.
"Regulations for the Control of the Above Described Maritime Control Areas
"1. No vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall enter or navigate the waters of the said Maritime Control Areas except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after

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specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the said Areas must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters in advance of sailing, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call "NQO" shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.

"2. Even though permission has been obtained it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said Areas to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.

"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said Areas, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.

"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.

"5. Should any vessel or person within the said Areas disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law.

"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.

"In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.

"Done at the City of Washington this 21st day of October in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-seventh.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt
"By the President:
"Cordell Hull
"Secretary of State."

(F. R. Doc. 42-10716; Filed, October 23, 1942; 11:01 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 183

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., November 18, 1942.

Establishing Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area

1. The following executive order is quoted:

"EXECUTIVE ORDER 9266

"Establishing Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area

"By virtue of the authority vested in me by section 44 of the Criminal Code, as amended U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96), the following-described area is hereby established and reserved, for purposes of national defense, as a defensive sea area, to be known as 'Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area':
"All United States territorial waters of Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound and their seaward approaches and tributaries from the contour line of extreme high water on the shores of these waters as shown on the latest U. S. C. & G. S. Charts to:
"A line running from the southernmost tip of Sakonnet Point;
thence to Bell Buoy #2 off Schuyler Ledge in approximate position Latitude 41°26'24" North, Longitude 71°11'39'' West;
thence on a side line due south to approximate position Latitude 41°18'03" North, Longitude 71°11'39" West;
thence due east to the southernmost tip of Squibnocket Point on Martha's Vineyard;
thence along the western and northern shore line of Martha's Vineyard to West Chop Light;
thence due north to the mainland in approximate Latitude 41°32'36" North, Longitude 70°36'00" West.
"No vessel not proceeding under United States Naval or other United States authorized supervision shall enter or navigate the waters of the said Defensive Sea Area, except during daylight whan good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Such permission for entry into or navigation through or within the said Area must be

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obtained in advance of entry, preferably by application at a United States Naval District Headquarters prior to leaving port of origin of voyage, or by radio or visual communication on approaching the seaward limits of the Area. If radio telegraphy is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs., and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of the master must be given in the request, which should be addressed to the Commandant of the Naval District or his local representative as may be designated and published in local regulations issued by the District Commandant if visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.
"A vessel entering or navigating the waters of the Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area does so at its own risk.
"Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.
"The movements of vessels within the Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area shall be subject to supervision, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft or aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.
"In the event that a United States Maritime Control Area is established adjacent to or abutting upon the above-established defensive sea area, permission to enter, and other instructions issued by proper authority, shall apply to any one continuous passage through or within both areas.
"Any master of a vessel or other person within the Buzzards Bay and Vineyard Sound Defensive Sea Area who disregards these regulations, or falls to obey an order of United States Naval authority to stop or heave to, or performs any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses or the safety of navigation, or takes any action inimical to the interests of the United States, may be detained therein by force of arms and shall be liable to attack by United States armed forces, and liable to prosecution as provided for in section 44 of the Criminal Code as amended (U. S. C., title 18, sec. 96).
"All United States Government authorities shall place at the disposal of the Naval authorities their facilities for aiding in the enforcement of these regulations. The Governor of the State of Massachusetts, the local municipal authorities, and the local

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civilian defense agencies are called upon to render the local Naval authorities all possible assistance in the enforcement of these regulations.
"These regulations are subject to amplification by the local United States Naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.
"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the publication and enforcement of these regulations.
"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"November 6, 1942."

(F. R. Doc. 42-11616; filed November 7, 1942; 11:52 a. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

GENERAL ORDER No. 184

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., November 28, 1942.

Establishing the San Diego Maritime Control Area and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

1. The following Proclamation is quoted:

"Proclamation 2573

"Establishing the San Diego Maritime Control Area and Prescribing Regulations for the Control Thereof

"By the President of the United States of America
"A Proclamation
"Whereas the United States is now at war, and the establishment of the maritime control area hereinafter described is necessary in the interests of national defense:
"Now, Therefore, I, Franklin D. Roosevelt, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, and in accordance with the principle of self-defense of the Law of Nations, do hereby establish and proclaim the following-described area as a Maritime Control Area, and prescribe the following regulations for the control thereof:
"San Diego Maritime Control Area
"That sea area lying within the following boundaries:
"From Point La Jolla, California, on a line approximately 249° true to a point Latitude 32°45' North, Longitude 117°35' West; thence along a line approximately 160° true to a point Latitude 32° 32' North, Longitude 117°29'20" West; thence Easterly to the United States-Mexico border.
"Regulations for the Control of the San Diego Maritime Control Area
"1. No vessel not proceeding under United States naval or other United States authorized supervision shall enter or navigate the waters of the said Maritime Control Area except during daylight, when good visibility conditions prevail, and then only after specific permission has been obtained. Advance arrangements for entry into or navigation through or within the said Area must be made, preferably by application at a United States Naval

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If radio telegraphy is used, the call 'NQO' shall be made on a frequency of 500 kcs, and permission to enter the port requested. The name of the vessel, purpose of entry, and name of master must be given in the request. If visual communications are used, the procedure shall be essentially the same.
"2. Even though permission has been obtained, it is incumbent upon a vessel entering the said Area to obey any further instructions received from the United States Navy, or other United States authority.
"3. A vessel may expect supervision of its movements within the said Area, either through surface craft or aircraft. Such controlling surface craft and aircraft shall be identified by a prominent display of the Union Jack.
"4. These regulations may be supplemented by regulations of the local United States naval authority as necessary to meet local circumstances and conditions.
"5. Should any vessel or person within the said Area disregard these regulations, or regulations issued pursuant hereto, or fail to obey an order of the United States naval authority, or perform any act threatening the efficiency of mine or other defenses, or take any action therein inimical to the defense of the United States, such vessel or person may be subjected to the force necessary to require compliance, and may be liable to detention or arrest, or penalties or forfeiture, in accordance with law.
"The Secretary of the Navy is charged with the enforcement of these regulations.
"In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States of America to be affixed.
"Done at the City of Washington this 17th day of November in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred and forty-two, and of the Independence of the United States of America the one hundred and sixty-seventh.
"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"By the President:
"Cordell Hull,
"Secretary of State."

(F. R. Doc. 42--12077; Filed, November 18, 1942; 12:43 p. m.)

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 185 of Jan. 4, 1943, canceled and superseded by General Order No. 194 of 4 June 1943.

*****

General Order No. 186

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., January 21, 1943.

Award of the Purple Heart to Persons Serving With the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States

1. Executive Order No. 9277 is quoted:

"EXECUTIVE ORDER 9277

"Award of the Purple Heart to Persons Serving With the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States

"Whereas the decoration of the Purple Heart is awarded, as prescribed by Army Regulations of September 4, 1942, to persons serving with the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States:
"Now, therefore, by virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is hereby ordered as follows:
"1. The Secretary of the Navy is authorized and directed to award the Purple Heart in the name of the President of the United States to persons who, while heretofore or hereafter serving in any capacity with the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States, are wounded in action against an enemy of the United States, or as a result of an act of such enemy, provided such wound necessitates treatment by a medical officer.
"2. Except as authorized in paragraph three hereof, no more than one Purple Heart shall be awarded to any one person, but for each subsequent justification for such an award a Gold Star, or other suitable device shall be awarded, to be worn with the Purple Heart as prescribed by appropriate regulations,
"3. The Secretary of the Navy is further authorized and directed to award the Purple Heart posthumously, in the name of the President of the United States, to any persons who, while serving in any capacity with the Navy, Marine Corps, or Coast Guard of the United States, since December 6, 1941, are killed in action or who die as a direct result of wounds received

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in action with an enemy of the United States, or as a result of an act of such enemy. The Purple Heart will be forwarded to the nearest of kin of any person entitled to the posthumous award regardless of whether a previous award has been made to such person.
"4. If so authorized by the Secretary of the Navy the award of the Purple Heart may be made by the Commander in Chief of a fleet, or by such other appropriate officers as the Secretary of the Navy may designate.
"5. The Secretary of the Navy is authorized to promulgate such regulations as he may deem appropriate to effectuate the purposes hereof. The regulations of the Secretary of the Navy hereunder, and the regulations of the Secretary of War with respect to the award of the Purple Heart to persons serving in any capacity with the Army of the United States, shall, so far as practicable, be of uniform application.
"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"December 3,1942."

2. Commanders in Chief of Fleets and Commander Southwest Pacific Force are authorized to make awards and present the Purple Heart in the name of the President. Commanders in Chief of Fleets only may delegate their authority to Task Force Commanders for designated periods when lack of adequate communications may prevent awards being made within a reasonable time.
3. One award (the Purple Heart for the first wound, the Gold Star thereafter) is authorized for each wound, except that one such award only is authorized for two or more wounds received contemporaneously from the same agent or missile, or from two or more agents or missiles. An award is not authorized for wounds in any case where medical treatment was not given.
4. When a person entitled to the award under paragraph 3 is admitted to a hospital for treatment of a wound, or when any such person is treated for a wound without being admitted to a hospital, the Commanding Officer of the hospital or, in the latter case, the medical officer treating the wound will furnish the Commanding Officer of the wounded person with a report of the nature of the wound and certifying as to the necessity for treatment. This information may be furnished to the commanders of higher units in the form of certified lists and will be transmitted by them to the officer having authority to make the award. Lists of such persons serving in units not under the command of an officer having such delegated authority will

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be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel, the Commandant, United States Marine Corps or the Commandant, United States Coast Guard as appropriate.
5. Persons entitled to the award of the Purple Heart by reason of wounds, who have been transferred to other commands prior to date of the order and who have not received the award, may make application to their respective commanding officers for the award. The commanding officers will substantiate, if possible, the basis for the award by health record, physical examination or other factual evidence and forward certified lists indicating evidence of basis of award in the manner described in paragraph 4 above. In doubtful cases the evidence will be amplified in order that the awarding office or officer may determine the merits of the case.
6. Awards will be made by the officers to whom authority is delegated in paragraph 2 above and by the Chief of Naval Personnel, the Commandant, United States Marine Corps, and the Commandant, United States Coast Guard as appropriate, each award to be accompanied by proper transmittal containing the phraseology "In the name of the President and by direction of the Secretary of the Navy."
7. Applications for the award of the Purple Heart for wounds received prior to December 7, 1941, will be forwarded to the Chief of Naval Personnel, the Commandant, United States Marine Corps, or the Commandant, United States Coast Guard as appropriate.
8. The Purple Heart will be awarded posthumously by the Navy Department in accordance with paragraph 3 of Executive Order No. 9277. The Chief of Naval Personnel, The Commandant, United States Marine Corps, or the Commandant, United States Coast Guard will cause the Purple Heart, together with appropriate transmittal to be sent to the nearest of kin of persons entitled to the posthumous award as nearly coincidental as practicable with the receipt of the report of death, by the Bureau of Personnel, Headquarters, United States Marine Corps or Headquarters, United States Coast Guard, regardless of the fact that the records may show that a previous award of this decoration has been made.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 187

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., February 3, 1943.

Regulations for the Award of the Presidential Unit Citation

1. Executive Order No. 9050 which authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Navy to issue a citation in the name of the President, to Navy and Marine Corps Units for outstanding performance in action, is quoted:

EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9050

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States, and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is ordered as follows:
"1. The Secretary of the Navy is hereby authorized and directed to issue a citation in the name of the President of the United States, as public evidence of deserved honor and distinction, to any ship, aircraft, or other Naval unit and to any Marine Corps aircraft, detachment, or higher unit, for outstanding performance in action on or after October 16, 1941.
"2. Appropriate insignia of such form and design as may be determined by the Secretary of the Navy may be displayed by any ship, aircraft, naval unit, or any Marine Corps aircraft, detachment, or higher unit, to which such citation is issued.
"3. After any Nava] or Marine Corps unit is so cited on two or more separate occasions for outstanding performance in action occurring on or after October 16, 1941, such insignia shall become a part of the uniform of such unit, and shall be issued to officers and men who may thereafter become members of such unit; and such insignia may be worn at all times by individuals who were attached to the unit so cited on one of the two or more occasions in connection with which the citation was issued, whether they thereafter serve with such unit or with a different unit.

"Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
February 6, 1942."

2. Commanders of forces afloat will make recommendations to the Secretary of the Navy via official channels for the Presidential Unit Citation for such units of their commands as from time to time they deem worthy of such distinction. Recommendations will be confined to cases wherein the unit performs services in action above and beyond the high standard expected of our forces and is considered outstanding as compared to services of other comparable units engaged in the same or similar actions. Each recommendation will be submitted separately and will be accom-

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panied by sufficient data forming the basis of the recommendation to enable the Navy Department Board of Decorations and Medals adequately to consider the case.

3. The insignia of the Unit Citation authorized by the above Executive Order shall be in the following form and design:
(a) A burgee pennant design of blue, gold, and scarlet of twenty-seven (27) units on the hoist by fifty-seven (57) units on the fly, with the gold measuring thirteen (13) units on the hoist and forty-eight (48) units on the fly centered between the blue above and the scarlet below.

Burgee pennant design image, text below image.
Burgee pennant design image, text below image.

Top: blue; middle: gold; bottom: scarlet.

(b) For ships, aircraft units, tank units, etc., a bronze plaque is authorized to be displayed, such plaque to be of appropriate size and to have the Unit Citation Insignia centered in the upper part and the citation engraved below it. Individual planes, tanks, etc., of a cited unit are authorized to paint the design of appropriate size in a suitable place upon the plane, tank, etc.
(c) For companies, battalions, regiments, etc., awarded the Unit Citation, a battle streamer of appropriate size with the citation engraved upon the standard is authorized.
(d) Should a unit be cited more than once, for each citation in addition to the first for which the insignia is authorized, there shall be added one blue star up to a total of five stars. Stars will be displayed upon the gold part of the insignia. The additional citation for each star is authorized to be engraved upon the plaque.
(e) In time of peace ships shall carry an additional display of pennant of the insignia design to be displayed at some place on the top hamper to be visible to other units.
(f) Should a cited ship be lost, provision will be made for the display of the plaque by the namesake, if appropriate, with a notation of when and where the ship was lost; or in the event that no new ship is named for the one cited and lost, the plaque will be sent to the United States Naval Academy for appropriate display.

4. The uniform insignia of the unit citation shall be as follows:
(a) A ribbon bar similar to those worn for service medals except that the ribbon shall be 1 1/2 by 1 1/2 inches. The ribbon shall

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consist of three horizontal stripes, the top stripe blue, the center stripe gold, and the lower stripe scarlet, the blue and scarlet stripes to be 1/8 inch in width and the gold stripe to be 1/4 inch in width.
Citation stars 1/4 inch in diameter will be placed upon the gold stripe and will be blue. The citation ribbon shall be worn on the left breast between personal decoration ribbons and service medal ribbons.
(b) When medals are worn on the uniform, the Presidential Unit Citation insignia will be worn on the right breast of the uniform. When so worn, the size of the ribbon shall be 1 1/2 inches in length, 1/2 inch in width, the blue and scarlet bars 1/8 inch in width, the gold bar 1/4 inch in width, and the blue citation stars indicative of additional awards shall be 1/4 inch in diameter.
(c) (1) When a unit has received the Presidential Unit Citation all personnel serving in that unit during the occasion for which cited, or any part thereof, shall wear the citation ribbon with one star permanently, regardless of where serving.
(2) Personnel authorized to wear the citation ribbon with one star as above shall wear an additional star for each additional citation of the unit upon which they serve during the occasion for which the unit is cited, whether it be the same or another unit.
(3) Personnel who subsequently join a unit which has been cited shall wear the plain citation ribbon without star and only while attached to that unit.
(4) Flag officers and members of their staffs serving in a unit upon the occasion for which cited, or any part thereof, shall be included in the unit citation.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 188 of Feb. 13, 1943, is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 181 of Oct. 12, 1942.

--211--
*****

General Order No. 189

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., April 30, 1943.

Regulations Governing the Payment of Rental Allowances to Officers

1. General Order No. 18 is hereby superseded.

2. The following Executive Order, relative to assignment of Government quarters and payment of rental allowances, is published below for information and guidance of the naval service:

"EXECUTIVE ORDER NO. 9255

"Prescribing Regulations Governing the Payment of Rental Allowances to Officers

"By virtue of and pursuant to the authority vested in me by section 6 of the Pay Readjustment Act of 1942, approved June 16, 1942 (Public Law 607, 77th Cong.), I hereby prescribe the following regulations governing the payment of rental allowances to officers of the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Coast Guard, Coast and Geodetic Survey, and Public Health Service, including adjunct forces thereof.
"I. Definitions. - As used in these regulations or in regulations prescribed pursuant hereto:
"(a) The terms "on active duty" and "entitled to active-duty pay", shall apply to an officer while on the active list or while required to perform duty in accordance with law for which he is entitled to active-duty pay: Provided, that such terms shall not apply to any officer while absent from duty under conditions which, under the laws governing the particular service concerned, would prevent him from receiving full pay.
"(b) The term "field duty" shall mean service, under orders, with troops operating against an enemy, actual or potential.
"(c) The term "sea duty" shall mean service at sea by an officer on a vessel under orders (1) requiring the officer to report for duty on board a designated vessel or (2) assigning him to duty in command of vessels, or as a member of the staff of an officer in command of vessels: Provided, that the officer concerned is not during the same period required to render service on shore of a character determined by the department concerned to be paramount to the duty which he is required to render at sea.

--212--

"(d) The term "permanent station" shall mean the place on shore where an officer is assigned to duty, or the home yard or the home port of a vessel on board which an officer is required to perform duty, under orders in each case which do not in terms provide for the termination thereof; and any station on shore or any receiving ship where an officer in fact occupies with dependents public quarters assigned to him without charge shall also be deemed during such occupancy to be his permanent station.

"(e) The terms "competent superior authority" and "competent authority" shall mean the officer required by regulations of the department concerned to assign public quarters.

"(f) The term "dependent" shall include at all times and in all places a lawful wife and unmarried children under twenty-one years of age. It shall also include the father or mother of the person concerned provided he or she is in fact dependent upon such person for his or her chief support: Provided, that the term "children" shall be held to include stepchildren and adopted children when such stepchildren or adopted children are in fact dependent upon the person claiming dependency allowance.

"II. Assignment of quarters. - (a) The assignment of quarters to an officer shall consist of the designation in accordance with regulations of the department concerned of quarters controlled by the Government for occupancy without charge by the officer and his dependents, if any.

"(b) No officer who, when adequate quarters are not available for assignment to him at his permanent station, is permitted or required personally to occupy inadequate quarters at such station shall so occupy more than one room and a bath.

"(c) Any unassigned quarters at a post, yard, or station may, with the permission of competent superior authority and so long as not needed for assignment to officers on permanent duty thereat, be occupied by officers not permanently stationed thereat, but no officer unaccompanied by dependents shall be permitted to occupy as quarters at a post, yard, or station other than his permanent station more than one room and a bath.

"III. Payments. - (a) Payment of the money allowance for rental of quarters to the officers entitled thereto shall be made periodically by appropriate disbursing officers upon submission

--213--

of the evidence necessary to substantiate the payee's right to such allowance.

"(b) No officer shall be paid a rental allowance for any period during which he is assigned quarters at his permanent station which have been determined to be adequate in accordance with regulations prescribed by the head of the department concerned.

"IV. The head of any department concerned is authorized to prescribe such supplementary regulations not inconsistent herewith as he may deem necessary or desirable for carrying out these regulations.

"This order shall supersede Executive Order No. 4063 of August 13, 1924, and shall he effective as of June 1, 1942.

(s) Franklin D. Roosevelt.
"The White House,
"October 13, 1942."

3. Section 6 of the Pay Readjustment Act of 1942, as amended by the Act approved March 6, 1943 (Public No. 5 - 78th Congress), provides as follows:
"Except as otherwise provided in this section, each commissioned officer below the grade of brigadier general or its equivalent, in any of the services mentioned in the title of this Act, while either on active duty or entitled to active-duty pay shall be entitled at all times to a money allowance for rental of quarters.
"To an officer having a dependent, receiving the base pay of the first period the amount of said allowance shall be $80 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the second period the amount of this allowance shall be $75 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the third period the amount of this allowance shall be $90 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the fourth period the amount of this allowance shall be $105 per month, and to such an officer receiving the base pay of the fifth or sixth period the amount of this allowance shall be $120 per month.

"To an officer having no dependents, receiving the base pay of the first period the amount of said allowance shall be $45 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the second period the amount of said allowance shall be $60 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the third period the amount of said allowance shall be $75 per month, to such an officer receiving the base pay of the fourth period the amount of

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said allowance shall be $90 per month, and to such an officer receiving the base pay of the fifth or sixth period the amount of said allowance shall be $105 per month.

"No rental allowance shall accrue to an officer having no dependents while he is on field duty unless his commanding officer certifies that he was necessarily required to procure quarters at his own expense, or while on sea duty, except for temporary periods of sea duty not exceeding three months, nor shall any rental allowance accrue to an officer with or without dependents who is assigned quarters at his permanent station unless a competent superior authority of the service concerned certifies that such quarters are not occupied because of being inadequate for the occupancy of the officer and his dependents, if any, and such certifications shall be conclusive: Provided, That an officer although furnished with quarters shall be entitled to rental allowance as authorized in this section if by reason of orders of competent authority his dependents are prevented from occupying such quarters.

"Regulations in execution of the provisions of this section shall be made by the President and shall, whenever practicable, in his judgment, be uniform for all of the services concerned, including adjunct forces thereof."

4. Section 7 of the Pay Readjustment Act of 1942 provides that the rental allowance authorized by Section 6 of said act for officers receiving the pay of the sixth period shall be paid to a brigadier general of the Army or the Marine Corps, rear admiral (lower half) of the Navy, the Coast Guard, or the Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Assistant Commandant of the Coast Guard, the Engineer in Chief of the Coast Guard, commodore of the Navy, an assistant director of the Coast and Geodetic Survey, an assistant to the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service, a major general of the Army or the Marine Corps, a rear admiral (upper half) of the Navy, the Coast Guard, or the Coast and Geodetic Survey or the Surgeon General of the Public Health Service.

5. In connection with the above Executive Order, attention is called to Article 1819, U. S. Navy Regulations, 1920.

6. Where bachelor officers' quarters are constructed in accordance with approved specifications of the Navy Department and

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such quarters are specifically designated as such and furnished accordingly, it is not anticipated that such bachelor officers' quarters will be certified by competent superior authority as not adequate for occupancy by any bachelor officer.

Frank Knox
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 190

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 11, 1943.

Recognition of Services Afloat in Actual or Potential Belligerent Contact with Axis Forces Prior to December 7, 1941.

1. In order that services of Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard personnel, who served on vessels operating in actual or potential belligerent contact with the Axis Forces in the Atlantic Ocean at any time prior to December 7, 1941, may be recognized, such personnel are authorized to wear upon the American Defense Medal service ribbon, a bronze letter "A" in lieu of the bronze star. Such letter shall be 3/8 inch in height and shall be worn centered in the ribbon. When the "A" is worn, no star shall be worn upon the ribbon.

2. Officers and enlisted personnel who served in the following ships, between the dates set opposite the ship in the table given below are authorized to wear this letter "A":

Name Operating
From - To -
Albemarle June 23, 1941 July 22, 1941
Do Aug. 15, 1941 Nov. 1, 1941
Alcyone Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Algonquin (CG) June 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Algorab Oct. 6, 1941 Nov. 22, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 4, 1941
Alhena Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 3, 1941
Almaack Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Anderson Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Arcturus June 26, 1941 July 18, 9141
Do Aug. 12, 1941 Sept. 17, 1941
Arkansas June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 7, 1941 Oct. 15, 1941
Do Nov. 22, 1941 Dec. 3, 1941
Augusta Aug. 7, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Babbitt Sept. 16, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Do Nov. 13, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Badger Oct. 6, 1941 Do.
--217--
Name Operating
From - To -
Badger, G. E. June 24, 1941 July 24, 1941
Do Aug. 5, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Bainbridge Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 18, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Nov. 17, 1941
Bear July 4, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Belknap July 20, 1941 Aug. 19, 1941
Do Sept. 12, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Benson June 30, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do July 31, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Oct. 20, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Do Dec. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Bernadou Aug. 6, 1941 Sept 13, 1941
Do Sept. 23, 1941 Nov. 3, 1941
Do Nov. 18, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Biddle, W. P. June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 3, 1941
Bowdoin June 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Brant Nov. 24, 1941 Do
Brooklyn June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Sept. 21, 1941 Oct. 15, 1941
Broome July 29, 1941 Sept. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 26, 1941 Oct. 28, 1941
Buck Oct. 14, 1941 Dec. 1, 1941
Campbell (CG) Sept. 17, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Capella July 24, 1941 July 30, 1941
Do Oct. 27, 1941 Nov. 5, 1941
Do Nov. 17, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
ChateauThierry Sept. 16, 1941 Nov, 15, 1941
Cherokee June 27, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Chimango Aug. 1, 1941 Oct. 8, 1941
Cimarron Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 3, 1941
Do Oct. 25, 1941 Nov. 1, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Cole July 29, 1941 Sept. 12, 1941
Do Sept. 29, 1941 Oct. 14, 1941
Do Nov. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Comanche (CG) June 22, 1941 Do.
Cotinga Sept. 1, 1941 Oct. 8, 1941
--218--
Name Operating
From - To -
Dallas July 10, 1941 July 31, 1941
Do Aug. 18, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
Do Oct. 26, 1941 Nov. 28, 1941
Davis Oct. 23, 1941 Nov. 5, 1941
Decatur Sept. 13, 1941 Oct. 22, 1941
Do Nov. 4, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Delta Sept. 7, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Nov. 10, 1941 Nov. 16, 1941
Dickman, J. T. Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Dupont July 9, 1941 Aug. 1, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Sept. 23, 1941
Do Oct. 2, 1941 Nov. 3, 1941
Do Nov. 16, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Eberle Sept. 11, 1941 Oct. 14, 1941
Do Oct. 26, 1941 Nov. 28, 1941
Edison Nov. 1, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Do Dec. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Ellis Aug. 16, 1941 Oct. 17 1941
Do Oct. 26, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Ericsson Sept. 11, 1941 Oct. 14, 1941
Do Oct. 26, 1941 Nov. 28, 1941
Fuller June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Gannet Sept. 19, 1941 Nov. 6, 1941
Gleaves June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 18, 1941 Nov. 7, 1941
Do Nov. 26, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Goldfinch Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Oct. 2, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Goldsborough June 22, 1941 July 22, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Oct. 18, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Grackle Oct. 2, 1941 Do.
Grayson Sept. 12, 1941 Do.
Greer July 10, 1941 July 30, 1941
Do Aug. 29, 1941 Sept. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 21, 1941 Oct. 27, 1941
Do Nov. 4, 1941 Dec. 2, 1941
Griffin Nov. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Gull Sept. 1, 1941 Do.
Gwin Sept. 23, 1941 Do.
--219--
Name Operating
From - To -
Hammann Sept. 9, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Hamul Sept. 9, 1941 Oct. 4, 1941
Do Oct. 18, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Heywood June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 3, 1941
Hughes June 26, 1941 July 4, 1941
Do July 25, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 13, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Hughes, C. F. June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 18, 1941 Nov. 7, 1941
Do Nov. 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Idaho July 10, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Ingraham (CG) Oct. 16, 1941 Nov. 28, 1941
Jacamar Aug. 1, 1941 Oct. 8, 1941
Jones, H. P. June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 4, 1941 Aug. 17, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 9, 1941
Do Oct. 20, 1941 Nov. 21, 1941
Do Dec. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Jouett Oct. 21, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Kaweah Nov. 15, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Kearny Sept. 13, 1941 Do.
Kilauea Oct. 3, 1941 Oct. 8, 1941
Do Nov. 18, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Kite Sept. 1, 1941 Nov. 28, 1941
Lansdale June 27, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 18, 1941 Oct. 2, 1941
Do Nov. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Lapwing June 27, 1941 Aug. 31, 1941
Laramie Oct. 17, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Lea June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 12, 1941 Sept. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 26, 1941 Nov. 5, 1941
Do Nov. 16, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Leary Sept. 16, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Do Nov. 13, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Lee, Harry Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 3, 1941
--220--
Name Operating
From - To -
Livermore Sept. 13, 1941 Oct. 21, 1941
Do Nov. 3, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Ludlow Oct. 21, 1941 Dec. 2, 1941
McCormick June 22, 1941. July 13, 1941
Do July 29, 1941 Oct. 9, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Dec. 2, 1941
McDougal July 11, 1941 July 26, 1941
Do Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Aug. 26, 1941 Oct. 12, 1941
Do Nov. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Mackerel Nov. 24, 1941 Do.
Macleish June 23, 1941 July 3, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 17, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Do Nov. 16, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Madison June 26, 1941 June 29, 1941
Do Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 12, 1941
Do Aug. 18, 1941 Nov. 10, 1941
Do Nov. 27, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Markab Oct. 13, 1941 Nov. 19, 1941
Mattole Sept. 12, 1941 Sept. 15, 1941
Do Oct. 6, 1941 Nov. 16, 1941
Mayo June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 6, 1941 Sept. 2, 1941
Do Sept. 27, 1941 Oct. 28, 1941
Do Nov. 11, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Mayrant July 17, 1941 July 25, 1941
Do Aug. 6, 1941 Sept. 12, 1941
Do Sept. 20, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Nov. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Memphis Oct. 23, 1941 Nov. 5, 1941
Meredith Sept. 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Mississippi July 3, 1941 July 11, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Do Aug. 27, 1941 Sept. 11, 1941
Do Sept. 20, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Mizar Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 18, 1941
Do Aug. 30, 1941 Sept. 4, 1941
Do Sept. 19, 1941 Sept. 24, 1941
Do Oct. 13, 1941 Oct. 19, 1941
--221--
Name Operating
From - To -
Modoc (CG) June 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Moffett Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Aug. 27, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Monssen Sept. 22, 1941 Do.
Morris July 11, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 21, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Mt. Vernon Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Munargo June 22, 1941 Aug. 4, 1941
Do Aug. 26, 1941 Aug. 30, 1941
Do Sept. 19, 1941 Sept. 22, 1941
Do Oct. 2, 1941 Oct. 28, 1941
Mustin Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 21, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Nashville June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
New Mexico do July 4, 1941
Do July 25, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
New York June 26, 1941 July 19, 1941
Do Sept. 9, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Niblack June 27, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 4, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 7, 1941
Do Oct. 23, 1941 Nov. 22, 1941
Do Dec. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Nicholson Nov. 11, 1941 Do.
Northland (CG) June 22, 1941 Do.
North Star (CG) Do Do.
O'Brien July 3, 1941 July 11, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 20, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Omaha Nov. 5, 1941 Nov. 6, 1941
Orizaba June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Overton Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 18, 1941
--222--
Operating
From - To -
Overton Sept. 8, 1941 Nov. 15, 1941
Pequot (CG) Aug. 9, 1941 Sept. 20, 1941
Philadelphia Oct.. 31, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Plunkett June 26, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 7, 1941 Sept. 2, 1941
Do Sept. 22, 1941 Oct. 21, 1941
Do Nov. 4, 1941 Deo. 7, 1941
Pocomoke Oct. 12, 1941 Do.
Pollux Oct. 19, 1941 Oct. 28, 1941
Do Nov. 27, 1941 Dec. 4, 1941
Prairie Sept. 17, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Quincy Aug. 1, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Nov. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Ranger Sept. 24, 1941 Oct. 26, 1941
Ranger Air Group:  
VF-42 do Oct. 20, 1941
VS-41 do Do.
VS-42 do Do.
Rapidan Sept. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Raritan (CG) June 22, 1941 Do.
Redwing Nov. 23, 1941 Do.
Relief Oct. 9, 1941 Oct. 19 1941
Do Oct. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Reuben James June 22, 1941 July 13, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 17, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Rhind July 17, 1941 July 25, 1941
Do Aug. 6, 1941 Sept. 11, 1941
Do Sept. 20, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Roe Oct. 10, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Rowan Aug. 27, 1941 Sept. 10, 1941
Do Sept. 21, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Nov. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Russell June 26, 1941 July 4, 1941
Do July 24, 1941 Oct. 15, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
S-22 Nov. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
S-30 do Do.
--223--
Name Operating
From - To -
S-33 Nov. 25, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
S-43 do Do.
S-47 do Do.
St. Augustine Nov. 1, 1941 Do.
Salamonie June 26, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Do Sept. 24, 1941 Sept. 27, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 2, 1941
Salinas July 27, 1941 Nov. 22, 1941
Sampson Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Sangamon Aug. 8, 1941 Sept. 13, 1941
Do Oct. 9, 1941 Oct. 14, 1941
Sapelo June 22, 1941 Aug. 15, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Savannah Sept. 23, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov, 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Schenck Sept. 16, 1941 Oct. 31, 1941
Do Nov. 16, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Simpson June 22, 1941 July 13, 1941
Do July 29, 1941 Nov. 7, 1941
Sims July 11, 1941 July 18, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Oct 2, 1941
Somers Nov. 5, 1941 Nov. 6, 1941
Stack Aug. 27, 1941 Sept. 6, 1941
Do Sept. 24, 1941 Sept. 26, 1941
Do Oct. 16, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
Sterett Aug. 27, 1941 Sept 6, 1941
Do Sept. 24, 1941 Sept. 25, 1941
Stratford Nov. 1, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Sturtevant June 22, 1941 July 13, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Do Oct. 10, 1941 Nov. 17, 1941
Do Nov. 28, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Suwannee Nov. 16, 1941 Nov. 22, 1941
Swanson Oct. 30, 1941 Deo. 2, 1941
Tarazed Sept. 8, 1941 Nov. 22, 1941
Tarbell July 9, 1941 Aug. 1, 1941
Do Sept. 7, 1941 Oct. 10, 1941
Do Oct. 21, 1941 Nov. 21, 1941
--224--
Name Operating
From - To -
Tarbell Dec. 5, 1941 Deo. 7, 1941
Texas July 17, 1941 July 25, 1941
Do Oct. 13, 1941 Nov. 26, 1941
Trippe July 17, 1941 July 25, 1941
Do Aug. 27, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Truxtun July 21, 1941 Aug. 4, 1941
Do Sept, 8, 1941 Nov. 13, 1941
Tuscaloosa Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Deo. 7, 1941
Upshur Aug. 20, 1941 Sept. 3, 1941
Do Sept. 10, 1941 Oct. 14, 1941
Do Oct. 26, 1941 Nov. 29, 1941
Vincennes Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 25, 1941
Do Nov. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Vixen Nov. 25, 1941 Dec. 1, 1941
VP-71 June 22, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
VP-72 do Do.
VP-73 do July 20, 1941
Do July 21, 1941 Sept. 9, 1941
VP-74 June 24, 1941 July 26, 1941
Vulcan Aug. 30, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Wainwright Sept. 9, 1941 Sept. 10, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Wakefield do Do.
Walke July 3, 1941 July 11, 1941
Do Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 20, 1941
Do Oct. 30, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Do Nov. 14, 1941 Nov. 23, 1941
Wasp Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 23, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
Wasp, Air Group  
VF-72 Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 23, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
VS-71 Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 23, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
VS-72 Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 9, 1941
Do Sept. 23, 1941 Oct. 17, 1941
West Point Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
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Name Operating
From - To -
Wichita Aug. 1, 1941 Aug. 16, 1941
Do Aug. 28, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Wilkes Nov. 1, 1941 Do.
Winslow Aug. 6, 1941 Aug. 13, 1941
Do Sept. 8, 1941 Oct. 8, 1941
Do Nov. 29, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Wood, Leonard do Do.
Woolsey Nov. 1, 1941 Do.
Yorktown Sept. 21, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
Do Oct. 31, 1941 Nov. 4, 1941
Yorktown Air Group:  
VB-5 Sept. 21, 1941 Oct. 11, 1941
VS-41 do Do.
VT-5 do Do.
Yukon Oct. 28, 1941 Dec. 7, 1941
Zircon Oct. 11, 1941 Do.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 191

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., May 28, 1943.

Annual Physical Examinations

1. General Order No. 177 is hereby superseded.

2. Annual physical examinations as conducted in the past are not feasible under present conditions. It is, however, considered necessary that each officer and nurse receive a complete and careful physical examination at least once in each calendar year and that prompt and effective steps be taken to correct any conditions which may adversely affect the individual's efficiency. To this end commanders of fleets, forces, and Marine Corps organizations, and commandants of Naval Districts, and commanding officers of independent stations shall provide for the appointment of boards of medical officers in appropriate units or subdivisions of their commands to conduct physical examinations at such times as the exigencies of the service may permit. Where practicable these boards shall consist of not less than two medical officers, one of whom shall be a flight surgeon or qualified aviation medical examiner when flying personnel are to be examined.

3. All officers and nurses shall receive a complete physical examination during each calendar year. The examination shall be conducted with a view to discovering physical or nervous ailments which might impair the individual's efficiency under present conditions of service. In the case of flying personnel the examination shall be made to determine the individual's fitness to perform aviation duties. The medical examining board in each case shall enter in the health record the date and the result of the examination. Should defects be discovered which are regarded as sufficient to impair the examinee's ability to perform his duties, the board shall describe them fully in the health record and in addition shall submit a report of the examination to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery on NMS Form Y, except that in the case of flying personnel who are found unfit for aviation duties or when a change in their flight service group appears indicated the complete report shall be submitted on NMS Av-Form 1. Individuals on duty where examination by a Naval medical officer is not practicable shall endeavor to obtain an examination by a medical officer of some other Federal department or of an allied government. Travel or other expenses shall not be incurred in connection with such examinations unless specifically authorized. The results of these examinations will be submitted to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery separately

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by letter. Should it not be practicable to obtain an examination prior to December 31 of any calendar year, the individual concerned shall report the state of his health to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery by letter.

4. Should conditions be discovered which temporarily or indefinitely unfit the individual for performance of his duties, and in the case of flying personnel for aviation duties, appropriate action shall be taken locally as promptly as may be practicable. In arriving at conclusions and making recommendations medical examining boards shall evaluate any defects discovered in relation to the duties to which the officer may be assigned. They shall not recommend immediate hospitalization for the correction of minor conditions which do not adversely affect the officer's efficiency in performing his duties. Correction of such defects should be deferred until such time as the services of the officer concerned can best be spared from the unit to which he is attached.

5. As soon as practicable after the end of any calendar year, medical officers having custody of officers' health records shall forward to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery the medical history sheets containing entries, together with a letter of transmittal. The medical history sheets so forwarded shall contain an entry indicating the results of examination made in accordance with this letter or the date and purpose of any previous examination made during the previous calendar year. The full name and rank and the place and date of birth shall be entered on each medical history sheet.

6. Commanding officers should carefully observe the officers attached to their units with a view to detecting any impairment of health. If such condition appears evident, the facts should be brought to the attention of the medical officer. When the circumstances warrant, the officer in question should be ordered to appear before a medical examining board for examination to include such special diagnostic procedures as may be indicated. Report of such an examination shall be submitted to the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery on NMS Form Y or NMS Av-Form 1, as may be appropriate, and shall contain a statement showing the action taken in the case.

7. Medical officers should be alert at all times to detect any impairment of the health of the individual officers of the units to which they are attached and should promptly advise their commanding officers of any evidence of decrease in efficiency due to ill health and make appropriate recommendations. They should also be alert to detect impairment of mental vigor and

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endurance among the officers of the unit as a whole resulting from current operating conditions. They should keep their commanding officers advised and make appropriate recommendations with a view to preventing physical or nervous ailments which may result from continuous intensive mental or physical effort.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 192.

Navy Depart,
Washington, D. C . 3 January 1944.

Establishment of the Severn River and the Potomac River Naval Commands

1. General order No. 163 is canceled and superseded by this order.

2. The naval shore activities located in the Severn River Area are grouped together for the purpose of military control to constitute the Severn River Naval Command. The Commandant will be the Superintendent, United States Naval Academy, who will be additionally ordered as such. Among the naval activities included are:

United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md., including the Engineering Experiment Station, Annapolis, Md. High Power Radio Station, Annapolis, Md.
Naval Hospital, Annapolis, Md.
Post Graduate School, Annapolis, Md.

The Severn River Area is geographically defined as comprising the County of Anne Arundel, Md.

3. The naval shore activities located in the Potomac River Area, subject to paragraph 4 below, are grouped together for the purpose of military control to form the Potomac River Naval Command. The Commandant will be the Commandant, Washington Navy Yard, who will be additionally ordered as such. Among the naval activities included are:

Hydrographic Office, Suitland, Md.
David Taylor Model Basin, Carderock, Md.
Naval Air Station, Anacostia, D. C.
National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda 14, Md.
Naval Mine Warfare Test Station, Solomons, Md.
Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C.
Naval Powder Factory, Indian Head, Md.
Naval Proving Ground, Dahlgren, Va.
Naval Radio Station, Arlington, Va.
Naval Radio Station, Cheltenham, Md.
Naval Research Laboratory, Anacostia Station, Washington, D. C.
Naval Reserves, Potomac River Area.
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Naval Torpedo Station, Alexandria, Va., including the Torpedo Testing Range, Piney Point, Md.
Navy Yard and Naval Gun Factory, Washington, D. C., including the Naval Magazine, Bellevue, D. C.
Naval Air Station, Patuxent River, Md.

The Potomac River Area is geographically defined as comprising the Potomac River up to the Great Falls, the District of Columbia, and the counties of Prince Georges, Montgomery, St. Marys, Calvert, and Charles in Maryland, and Arlington, Fairfax, Stafford, King George, Prince William and Westmoreland in Virginia.

4. The Marine Barracks, Quantico, Virginia, and the Marine Barracks, Washington, D. C., will be excluded from the jurisdiction of the Commandant, Potomac River Naval Command, with the exception of coordination with the general plan of the military defense of the Command.

5. The duties and responsibilities of the Commanders of these Commands are in general as set forth in Chapter 41, Part I, Sections 2 and 3, U. S. Navy Regulations, 1920.

6. The following change in U. S. Navy Regulations, 1920, which delimits the Fifth Naval District, including water areas therein, has been approved; Article 1480(1) - In table opposite Fifth Naval District, change to read as follows:
"Maryland less Anne Arundel, Prince Georges, Montgomery, St. Marys, Calvert and Charles Counties; West Virginia; Virginia less Arlington, Fairfax, Stafford, King George, Prince William and Westmoreland Counties; and the Counties of Currituck, Camden, Pasquotank, Gates, Perquimans, Chowan, Tyrell, Washington, Hyde, Beaufort, Pamlico, Craven, Jones, Carteret, Onslow, and Dare in North Carolina; also Diamond Shoal Lightship and all waters of Chesapeake Bay including its arms and tributaries except waters within the Fourth Naval District and the counties comprising the Potomac River and Severn River Naval Commands west of a line extending from Smith Point to Point Lookout thence following the general contour of the shore line of St Marys, Calvert, and Anne Arundel Counties, as faired by straight lines from headland to headland across rivers and estuaries."

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 193 of 1 June 1943 is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 164 of Dec. 23, 1941.

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*****

General Order No. 194

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 4 June 1943.

American, European-African-Middix Eastern, and Asiatic-Pacifc Campaign Medals
1. General Order No. 185 is hereby canceled and superseded by this order.

2. Executive Order No. 9265 which provides that the subject campaign medals be established is quoted:

"Executive Order No. 9265

"By virtue of the authority vested in me as President of the United States and as Commander in Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States, it is hereby ordered that the American, European-African-Middle Eastern, and Asiatic-Pacific campaign medals, including suitable appurtenances, be established, and that the said medals may be awarded, under such regulations as the Secretary of War and the Secretary of the Navy may severally prescribe, to members of the land and naval forces of the United States, including the Women's Reserve of the United States Naval Reserve, and to members of the Women's Auxiliary Corps who, during any period between December 7, 1941, inclusive, and a date six months subsequent to the termination of the present war, shall have served outside the continental limits of the United States in any of the respective areas as indicated by the name of the medals, such areas to be more precisely defined in the regulations hereby authorized.
"For the purposes of this order, the Territory of Alaska shall be considered as outside the continental limits of the United States.

"Frankiln D. Roosevelt
"The White House,
"November 6, 1942."

2. The geographical definitions of the respective areas are defined as follows:

AMERICAN AREA

East boundary - From the North Pole, south along the 75th meridian west longitude to the 77th parallel north latitude, thence

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southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the 40th parallel north latitude and the 35th meridian west longitude, thence south along that meridian to the 10th parallel north latitude, thence southeast to the intersection of the equator and the 20th meridian west longitude, thence along the 20th meridian west longitude to the South Pole.

West boundary - From the North Pole, south along the 141st meridian west longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, thence south and southeast along the Alaskan boundary to the Pacific Ocean, thence south along the 130th meridian to its intersection with the 30th parallel north latitude, thence southeast to the intersection of the equator and the 100th meridian west longitude, thence south along the 100th meridian west longitude to the South Pole.

EUROPEAN - AFRICAN - MIDDLE EASTERN AREA

East boundary - From the North Pole, south along the 60th meridian east longitude to its intersection with the eastern border of Iran, thence south along that border to the Gulf of Oman and the intersection of the 60th meridian east longitude, thence south along the 60th meridian east longitude to the South Pole.

West boundary - Coincident with the east boundary of the American Area.

ASIATIC - PACIFIC AREA

East boundary - Coincident with the west boundary of the American Area.

West boundary - Coincident with the east boundary of the European - African - Middle Eastern Area.

3. Appropriate area campaign medals as defined above are authorized for all personnel of the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard who, during the period from December 7, 1941, to a date 6 months after the termination of the present war, shall have served in the designated area outside the continental limits of the United States under any one of the following conditions:
(a) Sea duty - Attached to and serving on board a vessel of the Navy, or Coast Guard, or upon other vessel to which regularly assigned for duty, in the designated area, or as a member of an organization being transported for duty in an area aboard such vessels, for a period of 30 days. This service need not be continuous nor in the same vessel.
(b) Shore duty - Attached to and regularly serving on shore in a designated area for a period of 30 days. Such service need not be continuous nor in the same locality but must be within the designated area.

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(c) Any combination of (a) and (b) above that will aggregate 30 days in a designated area.
(d) Patrols - Service in patrol vessels or aircraft operating in or above ocean waters, provided the individual has been attached to such units for a period of 30 days and has performed regularly required patrols. This provision is applicable even though the base from which such vessels or aircraft operate is within the continental limits of the United States.
(e) Combat - In all cases wherein a vessel, aircraft or other unit engages in combat with, attacks, or is attacked by enemy forces, all personnel serving in the vessel, aircraft, or other unit shall immediately become eligible for the appropriate campaign medal without reference to the 30 day provision above. However, the certain presence of enemy forces, especially in the case of enemy submarines, shall be established before this provision shall apply.
(f) Hazardous duty - The engagement in any service in a designated area which, in the opinion of the appropriate Fleet or Frontier Commander or Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps, is equally as hazardous as combat duty shall render the individuals concerned immediately eligible for the appropriate area medal without reference to any time limitation. This provision shall apply to such operations as mine recovery and disposal, bomb disposal, etc., or equally hazardous operations.
(g) Passengers - No individual en route in a purely passenger status shall become eligible for any area campaign medal unless he or the means of conveyance on which he is traveling is attacked by or engages in combat with the enemy. in the latter case, he shall immediately become eligible for the appropriate medal upon the occasion of the attack or combat in this provision passage as a patient in a hospital ship shall be considered as attached to the ship and not in a passenger status.
(h) Temporary or temporary additional duty - No individual engaged on temporary or temporary additional duty shall become eligible unless such duty includes a period of at least 30 days in a designated area or unless he engages in combat with or is subjected to attack by enemy forces. In the latter case, he will immediately become eligible, upon the occasion of the attack or combat, without reference to time limit.
(i) In any case, service which entitled an individual to a clasp or star as defined in existing orders shall also entitle him to the ribbon of the area in which the service is rendered.

4. The Chief of Naval Personnel, Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps, and Commandant, U. S. Coast Guard, shall issue the necessary orders for appropriate entries to be made in the records

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of personnel entitled to the area campaign medals, for other required reports and records, and for procedure in case records are lost or destroyed.

5. Appropriate clasps will be authorized from time to time indicating actual combat service in the several campaigns or engagements of the war. Campaigns or engagements considered to be worthy of such commemoration will be designated by the Commander in Chief, U. S. Fleet, and the Chief of Naval Operations.

6. Pending issue of the medals, the service ribbons are authorized to be worn in lieu thereof. For participation in each campaign or engagement for which a clasp is authorized, a bronze star shall be worn. For five or more campaigns or engagements, a silver star shall be worn on the ribbon in lien of each five bronze stars.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 195

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 18 June 1943.

Personal Flags of the Secretary of the Navy, the Under Secretary of the Navy, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air.

1. General Order No. 51 is hereby canceled.

2. The personal flags of the Secretary of the Navy, the Under Secretary of the Navy, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, and the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air are:
(a) For the Secretary of the Navy:
A blue flag with four white stars, one in each corner, with a white foul anchor in the center.
(b) For the Under Secretary of the Navy:
The same design as the personal flag of the Secretary of the Navy but the flag shall be red; the anchor and stars white.
(c) For the Assistant Secretary of the Navy:
The same design as the personal flag of the Secretary of the Navy but the flag shall be white; the anchor and stars blue.
(d) For the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air:
The same design as the personal flag of the Secretary of the Navy but the flag shall be white; the anchor and stars red.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 196

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 16 June 1943.

Office of the Naval Inspector General

1. General Order 173, dated 18 May 1942, is hereby canceled and superseded by this order.

2. There is hereby established in the Headquarters of the Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations, the Office of Naval Inspector General The Naval Inspector General shall be charged with the inquiry into, and the report upon all matters which affect the efficiency and economy of, the United States Naval Service. He shall make such inspections, investigations, and reports as may be required by law or directed by the Commander In Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations, or by higher authority.

3. The Naval Inspector General shall be an officer of the line of the Navy, of the rank of Rear Admiral or above, not designated for engineering duty only.

4. There will be assigned to the Office of the Naval Inspector General a Deputy Naval Inspector General, three Assistant Naval Inspectors General, and such naval, technical, clerical, and other assistance as may be required.

5. The Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, and Chief of Naval Operations will promulgate such additional instructions as he may deem necessary for carrying out this general order.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 197

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 16 July, 1943.

Regulations for the Award of the Legion of Merit

1. Public Law 671, 77th Congress, section 2, approved 20 July 1942, creates a decoration to be known as the "Legion of Merit" which shall have suitable appurtenances and devices and not more than four degrees and which the President, under such rules and regulations as he shall prescribe, may award to (a) personnel of the armed forces of the United States and of the Government of the Philippines and (b) personnel of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations who, since the proclamation of an emergency by the President on 8 September 1939 shall have distinguished themselves by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services.

2. Executive Order No. 9260 of 29 October 1942 prescribes general rules and regulations for the award of the Legion of Merit.

3. The following detailed regulations shall govern the award of the Legion of Merit, and the preparation and submission of recommendations therefor:
(a) Personnel of armed forces of the United States and of the Government of the Philippines:

(1) The award of the Legion of Merit to personnel of the armed forces of the United States and of the Government of the Philippines shall he made as the "Legion of Merit" without reference to any degree, to such personnel who qualify therefor in accordance with the creating law.
(2) For this purpose, the medal and ribbon for the degree of Legionnaire as prescribed for award to foreign personnel will be used. For a second award of the Legion of Merit to an individual a gold star to be worn upon the ribbon will be awarded in lieu of a second medal.
(3) The Legion of Merit will take precedence next after the Distinguished Service Medal.
(4) Recommendations shall he made to the Secretary of the Navy, or to those fleet commanders to whom authority to make the award has been delegated, in accordance with instructions now in force for award of other decorations.
(5) No award of the Legion of Merit will be made to a civilian.
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(b) Personnel of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations:

(1) The award of the Legion of Merit to personnel of friendly foreign nations shall be made in the appropriate one of four degrees as follows:
a. Chief Commander.
b. Commander.
c. Officer.
d. Legionnaire.

(2) No award of the Legion of Merit in any degree will be made to a civilian.

(3) This award will be made to personnel of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations only with the approval of the President of the United States in each case.

(4) Each case will be submitted separately.

(5) Recommendations for this award of a specific degree, or of appropriate degree, via official channels, to the Secretary of the Navy may be made by an officer of the armed forces of the United States who has personal knowledge of the service performed. The service will be described specifically and in detail. When practicable, testimony of other individuals having personal knowledge of the service performed will be submitted with the recommendation. Each recommendation will contain a draft of an appropriate citation. The recommendation must show that the individual recommended has distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services. Each basic recommendation will show the exact status of the recommended individual at the time of the performance of the service upon which the recommendation is based. In recommendations based upon services covering an appreciable period of time, the exact period will be stated.

(6) No award of the same, or of a lower degree will be made to an individual who has previously been awarded the Legion of Merit. A higher degree may be awarded if subsequent services warrant.

(7) In cases where the Legion of Merit is to be awarded for exceptionally meritorious conduct based upon a specific act, recommendation for such award should be made as promptly as practicable.

(8) Awards to foreign personnel generally, where the award is made primarily for exceptionally meritorious service over a period of time, should normally be made upon the completion of the service or upon the occasion of change in

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command. Recommendations in these cases should be forwarded a reasonable time in advance by the officer making the recommendation.

(9) Actual heroism in the case of personnel of the armed forces of friendly foreign nations, who are serving in any capacity with the Navy of the United States, is more properly rewarded by the appropriate one of the awards for heroism than by the Legion of Merit Recommendations from fleet commanders should be made accordingly.

4. Presentation of the Legion of Merit will be made with ceremonies appropriate to the individual case and as practicable under existing circumstances.

5. Awards of the legion of Merit may be made posthumously and presented to such representatives as may be designated.

6. All awards of the Legion of Merit shall be made in the name of the President of the United States.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 198

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 14 July, 1943.

Establishment of the Naval Air Material Center, Philadelphia

1. The provisions of this general order shall be effective 20 July, 1943.

2. The following naval air facilities and activities, and such facilities and activities as may be subsequently added thereto, are hereby established as separate commands and grouped together to form the Naval Air Material Center, Philadelphia, with headquarters at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia:

Naval Aircraft Factory, Philadelphia.
Naval Aircraft Modification Unit, Philadelphia.
Naval Air Experimental Station, Philadelphia.
Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Mustin Field, Philadelphia.

3. The Naval Aircraft Factory, Philadelphia, shall comprise basic manufacturing facilities and activities. It shall be administered by an officer of suitable rank with the title of manager.

4. The Naval Aircraft Modification Unit, Philadelphia, shall comprise separate facilities and activities as necessary to perform aircraft modification and conversion work assigned to the Naval Air Material Center. It shall be administered by a commanding officer.

5. The Naval Air Experimental Station, Philadelphia, shall comprise such research and material laboratories as are necessary to the function of the Naval Air Material Center. These may include an engine laboratory, an aeronautical materials laboratory, a radio and radar laboratory, and experimental and development facilities concerned with ships' installations and other special projects. It shall be administered by a director.

6. The Naval Auxiliary Air Station, Mustin Field, Philadelphia, shall comprise airport, hangar, shop and flight-testing facilities and operational activities incident thereto. Such facilities and activities shall include those under the cognizance of the Naval Air Material Center at other airports in the Fourth Naval District. It shall be administered by a commanding officer (naval aviator).

7. A line officer of the Navy of suitable rank will be ordered to duty to command the Naval Air Material Center, Philadelphia. He shall report to the Commandant, Fourth Naval District. With respect to its material mission, the Naval Air Material Center shall be managed in accordance with instructions approved by the Bureau of Aeronautics.

Frank Knox,
Secretary of the Navy.

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*****

General Order No. 199

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 2 August, 1941.

Parrots - Discontinuance of Importation

1. General Order No. 42 is hereby canceled.

2. Foreign Quarantine Division Circular Letter No. 67, U. S. Public Health Service, provides that private shipments or importation of birds of the parrot family can be made into the United States only under the following circumstances:

(a) Must be accompanied by owner.
(b) The accompanying owner must present a sworn statement that they have been in his possession for at least 2 years immediately preceding their importation, and that during that time the birds have not had contact with other birds of the parrot family.
(c) The accompanying owner must also certify that the birds will be transported immediately to his private residence where they will be domiciled as pets and will not be offered for sale, barter, or as gifts or for public exhibition.
(d) Must appear to be in good health, as determined by inspection by a medical officer of the U. S. Public Health Service.
(e) Their number must not exceed three.

3. For the purpose of the quarantine regulations, the term "birds of the parrot family" are held to include all birds commonly known as parrots, Amazons, Mexican double heads, African grays, cockatoos, macaws, parakeets, love birds, lories, lorikeets, and all similar birds. Birds of the parrot family may harbor a virus dangerous to Naval personnel and in these instances would not be eligible for entry into the United States. In view of the fact that very few of the Naval personnel can comply with quarantine regulations noted in paragraph 2 above, and, as a precaution against introducing psittacosis into the Fleet, it is directed that no person be permitted to take aboard Naval vessels any bird of the parrot family.

James Forrestal,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

*****

General Order No. 200 of 13 September 1943 is incorporated in reprint of General Order No. 81 of July 18, 1936.

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*****

General Order No. 201

Navy Department,
Washington, D. C., 16 October 1943.

Commercial Advertising

1. General Order No. 178 is hereby canceled.

2. The Navy Department will not object to commercial firms advertising that their products are or have been supplied to, or used by the Navy, provided:
(a) That no information held as confidential by the Navy is divulged.
(b) That the advertising constitutes a statement of fact with no misleading or otherwise objectionable features.
(c) That no mention is made of the fact that a product has undergone or is undergoing test at the instance of or under the cognizance of the Navy Department, and that there are included no data derived from tests made in Government laboratories or on board naval vessels.
(d) That no statement is made that the product is used by the Navy to the exclusion of other similar products.
(e) That all copy, text, and photographs to appear are submitted for review prior to release.

3. The following regulations govern the use of naval insignia, uniforms, and personnel in advertisements or publicity stories:
(a) Insignia. - Reproductions of naval insignia may be used in advertising and publicity provided that the dignity of such insignia is not compromised.
(b) Uniforms. - Actual uniforms may be used for illustrations, provided that the dignity of such uniforms is not compromised. There is no objection to the use of professional models photographed in naval uniforms provided that the foregoing regulations are observed.
(c) Personnel. - Navy personnel may be used under the following conditions:
(1) The action may not in any way reflect discredit upon the Navy.
(2) The action or pose shall in no way infer the products advertised are endorsed by the Navy to the exclusion of other products.
(3) Testimonials from Navy Personnel are not banned per se, but the person giving the testimonial cannot be specifically identified. The use of name, initials or rank of Navy personnel appearing in testimonial advertising is not permitted. However, it is permissible to use the expression "says a Navy captain," etc. Care should be taken to phrase testimonials from Navy personnel so as to make clear that the views expressed are those of individuals and not of the Navy Department.
(4) Names and pictures of naval personnel shall not be used for advertising purposes without first obtaining the permission of the man in question and without submission of the advertise-

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ment. In completed form, to the Office of Public Relations for review and approval prior to publication.
(5) Should an advertiser