Naval History and Heritage Command

Starting with the anniversary of the United States' entry into the war on 6 April 2017, through the anniversary of Armistice Day on November 11, 2018, the Naval History and Heritage Command will commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Navy’s experiences in World War I. Throughout the commemoration, the Naval History and Heritage Command will feature documents that will allow you to see the war through the eyes of the participants. In addition to these highlights, you can learn more by exploring additional resources from the command.

 

Featured Documents

Disaster at Halifax, war with Austria-Hungary, loss of USS Jacob Jones (Destroyer No. 61), CNO wraps up his European visit—a busy and varied week.

 

3 December 1917. Lieutenant Commander Kenneth Whiting to Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels. Makes case for seaplanes as effective anti-submarine warfare weapon.

 

4 December 1917. Diary of Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels. United States goes to war against Austria-Hungary.

 

5 December 1917. Vice Admiral Henry T. Mayo, Commander, Atlantic Fleet, Standing Order. Navy revises structure and operational procedures of its fleet in light of new antisubmarine warfare focus.

 

6 December 1917. Commander Powers Symington to Rear Admiral Marbury Johnston, Commander, Squadron Two, Cruiser Force. Disaster at Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

 

7 December 1917. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to  Captain Richard H. Jackson, American Naval Representative in Paris. Setting up naval air operations in France.

 

8 December 1917. Rear Admiral William S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations, to Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. Benson summarizes his impressions and changes he believes are needed after his visit to Europe.

 

9 December 1917. Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, to Anne Hitchcock Sims. Torpedoing of U.S.S. Jacob Jones (Destroyer No. 61), first Navy destroyer to be lost to enemy action.

 

Learn More

Click the links below to access additional Naval History and Heritage Command resources on the Great War including photo and art collections, archival material, and publications.