Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

Rear Admiral Herbert O. Dunn, Commander, Azores Detachment, to Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters

[Extract]

CONFIDENTIAL

  File 106.

U.S. NAVAL FORCES OPERATING IN EUROPEAN WATERS.

AZORES DETACHMENT,

OFFICE OF DETACHMENT COMMANDER.

                         Naval Base Azores, 28 September 1918.

From:          Detachment Commander.

To:            Force Commander.

Subject:       Report of Operations for week ending 28 September 1918.

Reference:     (a) Force Instructions No. 2 of 22 September 1917.1

2.   OPERATIONS

         (a) 22 September     Canadian Drifters2 1 and 59 swept harbor entrance channel.

                         Italian S. S. FAGERNES arrived from Philadelphia, enroute Genoa, having put in here to obtain routing instructions.

                         U.S.S. WICKS arrived from Queenstown and later sailed for New York.

                         Portuguese Gunboat ACOR returned from Fayal and Flores.

                         K-2 on night patrol.

          23 September   Canadian Drifters 1 and 69 swept harbor entrance channel.

                         Army Tug PENGUIN with the last barge in tow, Army Tug LEOPOLD ADLER and U.S.S. MONTAUK returned.

                         U.S.S. STRINGHAM arrived from Norfolk, Va., and from convoy duty.

                         Portuguese S. S. SAN MIGUEL arrived from Lisbon convoyed by Portuguese Gunboat CELESTINO SOARES.

                         Norwegian S. S. SVERRE convoyed by U. S. S. STRINGHAM sailed for Quiberon Bay, France.

                         K-2 on night patrol.

          24 September   Canadian Drifters 1 and 9 swept harbor entrance channel.

                         Portuguese S.S. LOURECCO MARQUES arrived from Lourenco Marques, Africa, enroute to Lisbon. This vessel reported sighting a submarine last night 30 miles S. W. of Santa Maria, time not stated.

                         K-6 on night patrol.

          25 September   Necessary repairs to Army Tugs PENGUIN and LEOPOLD ADLER are estimated to require 8 days.

U.S.S. MIDDLESEX sailed for Baltimore, Md.

                         Portuguese Gunboat IBO left.

                        K-6 on night patrol.

                             Portuguese S. S. SAN MIGUEL sailed for neighboring islands.

          26 September   U.S.S. WALKE sailed for New York.

                         Canadians Drifters 1 and 69 swept harbor entrance channel.

                         K-2 on night patrol.

          27 September   American S. S. PARTHIAN enroute from New York to Bordeaux, put into this port for coal.

                         U.S.S. STRIBLING arrived from New York and from convoy duty.

                         The following convoy arrived from Bermuda: U. S. S. CHICAGO, U.S.S. ARETHUSA, U.S.S. YACONA, U. S. S. ARCTIC, U. S. S. UNDAUNTED, U.S.S. DREADNAUGHT, U. S. S. GOLIATH AND 24 French submarine chasers, numbers 357, 358, 359, 361, 362, 363, 364, 365, 366, 367, 371, 372, 373, 374, 376, 377, 378, 379, 381, 382, 393, 395, 396,394.

                         U.S.S. CHICAGO has 34 men ill with influenza and two have died.

                         K-2 on night patrol.

                         11:00 p.m. Received following radiogram from U.S.S. NEW HAMPSHIRE, - “Lubricating systems of both engines are failing. Maximum speed is 12 knots which may have to be reduced at any time. Position at 9:00 p.m. was 44-05’ N. Long. 23°-12’ W., steering for west and San Miguel. Request destroyer escort.”

          28 September   U.S.S. STRIBLING sailed at daybreak to escort U.S.S. NEW HAMPSHIRE to this port.

                         K-6 on night patrol...

H.O. Dunn.

Source Note: TDS, RG 45, Entry 520, Box 446. Note after close: “Copies to:/Force Commander (3)/Operations./File.”

Footnote 1: See: Sims, Force Instructions No. 2, 22 September 1917.

Footnote 2: A drifter was similar to a commercial fishing drifter, which was designed to deploy and retrieve drift nets. They were also akin to naval trawlers but usually slower and smaller.