Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

Admiral William S. Benson, Chief of Naval Operations, to Vice Admiral William S. Sims, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters

File No. 8-2-3     

CABLEGRAM RECEIVED  August <5, 1918,> 07406       AHI

Origin Opnav Washington            Serial No. 9474

Ref’d to

Date

Action, Notes and Initials.

C-1

7 August

 

C-H

   

See on 2507 to Opnav

33 ADR                  SECRET.

Simsadus

9474 General Pershing1 has stated in cable to War Department that Navy messages reporting time of sailing of troops are never received at his headquarters until troops are almost in port often after it is too late to make arrangements for their disposition.

     Messages are received at Navy Department from 24 to 96 hours after sailings of the ships, usually about 48 hours elapsed before we get them, they are transmitted to you within next 12 hours notice after receipt.

     What is method of forwarding these messages to army authorities in France and why should there be such great delay in reaching General Pershing.

     It is our understanding here that messages referring to troops for France are relayed through your Office to Paris without any delay to decoding and also to army disembarking center in France. 16005 9474.

Benson.                     

Source Note: Cy, DNA, RG 45, Entry 517B.

Footnote 1: Maj. Gen. John J. Pershing, Commander, American Expeditionary Forces.

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