Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

Secretaryof the Navy John D. Long to Rear Admiral George Dewey, Commander, Asiatic Squadron

From...Secretary of Navy.

To...COM’D’R-IN-CHIEF  

Date...May 7, 1898.    

Subject...President’s thanks.

Promotion.   

Charleston, Pekin

and troops coming.

The President1 in name of the American people thanks you and your officers and men for your splendid achievement and overwhelming victory.

In recognition he has appointed you acting Rear Admiral and will recommend a vote of thanks to you by Congress as a foundation for further promotion.2

The Charleston will leave at once with Pacific Mail S.S.Co’s Steamer Pekin will follow with ammunition and supplies, and will take troops unless you telegraph otherwise.3

How many will you require?4

Source Note: Cy, DLC-MSS, PGD. “Received Cavite May 10.“

Footnote 1: President William McKinley.

Footnote 2: On this same date Dewey was given the permanent rank of Rear Admiral and was later given the rank and title, Admiral of the Navy, the highest rank ever bestowed in the naval service of the United States. In a 12 May letter of thanks to Long Dewey requested that the senior officers of his squadron be advanced on the seniority list in recognition for their role in the victory. DLC-MSS, PGD.

Footnote 3: The protected cruiser Charleston did not depart San Francisco until 21 May. The armed steamer City of Peking sailed with a small convoy on 25 May. See: William A. Kirkland to Long, 16 May 1898; and William C. Gibson to Long, 25 May 1898.

Footnote 4: For response, see: Dewey to Long, 13 May 1898.

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