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Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy - 1841

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

Navy Department, December 4, 1841.

Sir:

I have the honor to submit the following report:

The navy of the United States is composed of—

Eleven ships of the line; of which one is rated for 120 guns, and ten for 74 guns.

Fifteen frigates of the first class; of which one is rated for 54 guns, and fourteen for 44 guns.

Two frigates of the second class, of 36 guns each.

Eighteen sloops of war; of which eleven are rated for 20 guns, two for 18 guns, and five for 16 guns.

Two brigs and four schooners, rated for 10 guns each.

Four steamers; beside—

Three store-ships, three vessels used as receiving vessels, and five small schooners.

At the date of the last annual report from this Department, the ships in commission were employed as follows:

In the Mediterranean, the Ohio, of 74 guns, Captain Lavallette; the Brandywine, of 44 guns, Captain Bolton; and the Cyane, of 20 guns, Commander Percival, who was relieved on account of ill health, and succeeded by Commander Latimer; the whole squadron under the command of Commodore Hull. The Cyane was relieved by the sloop of war Preble, Commander Voorhees, and returned to the United States in May last, her cruise having been performed. The Ohio returned on the 17th of July last, and the Brandywine on the 9th of May last. The return of the Brandywine was owing to particular causes, not connected with the original purposes of her cruise; and, as her presence in the Mediterranean was important, she was ordered back, under the command of Captain Geisinger. In July last, the sloop of war Fairfield, Commander Tattnall, sailed for the Mediterranean, taking out Commodore Charles W. Morgan, who now commands the squadron on that station. The squadron consists at present of the Brandywine, Fairfield, and Preble. The honor of the flag, in its intercourse with those of other nations, appears to have been properly sustained by this squadron; a due support and countenance have been afforded to our mercantile interest; and the amicable relations of our country with foreign nations have been respected and preserved.

In the Pacific ocean, the frigate Constitution, Captain Turner; the sloop of war St. Louis, Commander French Forrest; the sloop of war Yorktown, Commander Aulick; the sloop of war Dale, Commander Gauntt; and the schooner Shark, Lieutenant Bigelow; the whole under the command of

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Commodore Alexander Claxton. Commodore Claxton died at Talcuahana in March last, to the great loss of the service, and the just regret of the country. Upon that event, the chief command of the squadron devolved on Captain Daniel Turner, who returned to the United States with the Constitution on the 31st of October last, the time of her cruise having expired. Commodore Thomas Ap C. Jones, having been appointed to the command of that station, will sail in the frigate United States in the course of the next fortnight. The sloop of war Cyane, Commander Stripling, sailed for the same station early in November. Upon the arrival of Commodore Jones, the squadron in the Pacific will consist of the frigate United States, the sloops of war St. Louis, Yorktown, Cyane, and Dale, and the schooner Shark.

Orders were given to Commodore Claxton to employ one of his vessels in cruising in the gulf of California and along the northwest coast of America, and, if circumstances should permit, to despatch another to visit the Sandwich and Friendly islands, in order to afford protection and assistance to our citizens engaged in the whale fisheries. In obedience to this order, the sloop of war St. Louis, Commander French Forrest, was ordered to cruise in the gulf and along the western coast of California. This duty was performed in a manner highly creditable to Commander Forrest. The atrocities committed on American and English residents at Monterey and its neighborhood, by the Mexican authorities, are well known. Under the unfounded pretence of a conspiracy among the foreigners to wrest the country from Mexico, and to set up a separate and independent Government of their own, they were attacked by armed soldiers in the night, wounded, beaten, imprisoned, sent in chains to a distant place, and their property destroyed, without even the forms of trial. In the midst of these outrages, Commander Forrest arrived upon the coast, and, by his prompt and spirited interposition, vindicated and secured the rights, not only of American citizens, but of British subjects resident in Upper California. For these services, Commander Forrest received, and appears to have well deserved, a formal expression of the thanks both of American and English residents.

In consequence of the civil disturbances in Upper Peru, it was deemed proper to despatch the Shark, under the command of Lieutenant A. Bigelow, to cruise upon that coast. The movement was judicious and well-timed; and the delicate trust reposed in Lieutenant Bigelow was discharged in a manner highly satisfactory to this Department. The properly of American citizens, exposed to the rapacity and lawless violence of contending factions in the midst of civil war, was effectually protected, while all who witnessed the operations of the Shark were inspired with increased respect for the American flag. It is highly gratifying to observe, that Lieutenant Bigelow, as well as Commander Forrest, extended the protection of our flag to the citizens and subjects of other countries, as well as to those of our own.

In further execution of the orders of the Department, the sloop of war Yorktown, Commander Aulick, was despatched in May last to the Sandwich and Friendly islands, with a view to render such assistance as might be necessary to our whale-fishers and other citizens trading in that part of the Pacific. No intelligence has been received from her since she left Valparaiso.

The conduct of this squadron, as well under the command of Commodore Claxton as under that of Captain Turner, has been highly satisfactory

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to the Department. No disorder nor failure in duty has yet been reported to me calling for my censure or disapprobation. On the contrary, the strictest regard appears to have been paid to the honor of the flag, and to the duties which it owed to the country and its citizens. Captain Turner very properly availed himself of an opportunity to show respect to a friendly Power, by receiving on board the Constitution at Callao, and conveying to Rio, the Brazilian chargé d'affaires. For this act of courtesy he received the thanks of the Imperial Government.

I would respectfully solicit your attention, in a particular manner, to the situation of American interests in the Pacific ocean. According to an estimate made by an intelligent gentleman lately returned from the Pacific, there are at this time not less than forty millions of dollars engaged in the whale-fisheries alone, of which a greater part is American. I have great confidence in the accuracy of this estimate; but, even if it be too large, there will remain, after all reasonable deductions, an interest of vast magnitude and importance. American merchants have formed establishments indifferent parts of the coast, from Chili to Columbia river—some of them very extensive and important, and all of them worthy the attention of Government. In Upper California there are already considerable settlements of Americans, and others are daily resorting to that fertile and delightful region. Such, however, is the unsettled condition of that whole country, that they cannot be safe, either in their persons or property, except under the protection of our naval power. This protection cannot be afforded in proper degree, and with suitable promptness, by so small a squadron as we have usually kept in that sea. To cruise along so extensive a coast, calling at all necessary points, and at the same time to visit those parts of the Pacific in which the presence of our ships is necessary for the protection and assistance of our whale-fisheries, requires twice the number of vessels now employed in that service. It is highly desirable, too, that the Gulf of California should be fully explored; and this duty alone will give employment for a long time to one or two vessels of the smallest class. For these reasons, I have caused estimates to be prepared for a large increase of the Pacific squadron.

I also respectfully submit to your consideration the propriety of establishing, at some suitable point on our territory bordering that ocean, a post to which our vessels may resort. Many positions well adapted to this object may be found between the mouth of Columbia river and Guayaquil, which it is presumed may be procured, if they he not to be found on our own territory. Our public vessels cruising in that ocean are generally absent from the United States not less than four years; within which time they necessarily require a variety of supplies which cannot now be obtained without very great difficulty and expense. Any considerable repair is almost impossible, with all the means which can be furnished by all the nations of the coast. Such a post would also be of incalculable value as a place of refuge and refreshment to our commercial marine. I need not enlarge on the many and great benefits which might be expected from the establishment of some general rendezvous for all our vessels trading and cruising in this distant sea.

In addition to this, a naval depot at the Sandwich islands would be of very great advantage. It is a central point of the trade carried on in the Pacific, and possesses many peculiar recommendations of climate, and local conveniences, and accommodations.

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On the coast of Brazil, the frigate Potomac, of 44 guns, Captain Storer; the sloops of war Concord, Commander Boerum; Marion, Commander Belt; Decatur, Commander Ogden; and schooner Enterprise, Lieutenant Goldsborough; all under the command of Commodore Charles G. Ridgely.

Commodore Ridgely, having desired to be relieved, in consequence of ill health, and having been informed that his successor would soon leave the United States, returned home in the Constitution, leaving the squadron under the command of Captain Storer. This was in nowise injurious to the service; and the reasons assigned by Commodore Ridgely for his return before the arrival of his successor are altogether satisfactory to the Department. On the 1st of November, the Delaware, of 74 guns, Captain C. S. McCauley, having on board Commodore Charles Morris, left Hampton Roads for this station. On her arrival, the squadron will consist of the Delaware, Potomac, Concord, Marion, Decatur, and Enterprise; all under the command of Commodore Morris.

Nothing of particular interest has occurred in the operations of this squadron. The friendly relations of our country with the Governments of the coast have been strictly maintained, and the rights of our citizens have been duly respected by the local authorities.

In the West Indies, the Macedonian, of thirty-six guns, Commodore Jesse Wilkinson; the sloops of war Levant, Commander Fitzhugh, and Warren, Commander Jamesson. This squadron was ordered to return to the United States, to avoid the hurricane season in the West Indies, and is still here. The sloop of war Vandalia, Commander Ramsay, will take the place of the Levant, and the whole squadron will be ordered back to its station as soon as the vessels can be supplied with crews.

In the East Indies, the frigate Constellation, of thirty-six guns, Commodore Laurence Kearny, and sloop of war Boston, Commander Long, all under the command of Commodore Kearny. The latest despatches from this squadron are dated at sea, off the Cape of Good Hope, 31st July, 1841. At that time the officers and crews of both vessels were in good health, and they were making the best of their way to the place of their destination.

The exploring squadron, under the command of Lieutenant Charles Wilkes, consists of the sloop of war Vincennes, commanded by that officer; the Peacock, Lieutenant Hudson; the brig Porpoise, Lieutenant Ringgold; and the schooner Flying Fish, as a tender to the squadron.

Intelligence down to the 6th of April, 1849, has been communicated in previous reports from this Department. At that time the squadron was in New Zealand. In further prosecution of his cruise, Lieutenant Wilkes visited the Fejee islands, and succeeded in establishing useful regulations of trade and intercourse with some of the principal chiefs. His surveys of this group were prosecuted with great care and industry, and have served to ascertain the positions of a large number of dangerous reefs, and to indicate many secure and convenient harbors. This will be of great value to our citizens trading with that group, and particularly to the whalers. In many of the harbors, in which hitherto it was considered too dangerous to enter, whales abound, although very few are to be found in the neighboring sea.

The melancholy tragedy, which has already been announced in the public journals, was enacted at this group. Lieutenant Joseph A. Underwood

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and Midshipman Wilkes Henry, while engaged in surveying, were treacherously assailed by the natives, and, after a brave but ineffectual resistance, were murdered, before it was possible to relieve them. Their bodies were rescued and properly interred, and Lieutenant Wilkes inflicted on the offending savages a severe chastisement, which will probably deter them from similar outrages in future. He was also fortunate enough to capture a noted chief, who instigated the massacre of a greater part of the crew of the brig Charles Dagget, of Salem, in 1834. This chief he proposes to bring to the United States, to be dealt with as the Government shall direct.

At the last dates (24th November, 1840), the squadron was at the Sandwich islands, undergoing repairs. It was the intention of Lieut. Wilkes to visit the northwest coast of America, and to return to the United States early in the summer of 1842.

A squadron of small schooners, under the command of Lieutenant John T. McLaughlin, has for some time been co-operating with the army in Florida. This force has been increased, since the last annual report from this department, by the addition of three revenue-cutters, placed under the direction of the Department for that purpose, by the Secretary of the Treasury, and a new schooner built under the direction of the War Department. The whole force now consists of seven schooners.

Important assistance has been rendered by this little squadron in the military operations in Florida. It has furnished the means of penetrating the interior of the country and attacking the enemy in his fastnesses. Lieutenant McLaughlin has manifested great bravery, energy, and zeal, and much credit is due to him, and to the force under his command, for the handsome manner in which they have acquitted themselves.

In obedience to the act of July, 1840, the brig Consort, under the command of Lieutenant Powell, has been diligently engaged in the survey of the coast, from the bay of Appalachicola to the mouth of the Mississippi. This survey was completed in June last, and Lieutenant Powell has since been engaged in the survey of the South shoals of Nantucket.

The brig Dolphin, Commander Bell, and schooner Grampus, Lieutenant Paine, returned, the former in May, and the latter in August last, from their second cruise on the coast of Africa. These vessels have been actively and efficiently engaged in the suppression of the slave-trade, and in the protection of our citizens engaged in commerce on that coast. I regret to say that their officers and crews have suffered severely from the diseases of the climate; and it is owing, in a great degree, to the constant vigilance and prudent precautions of the commanders that their sufferings were not still greater. Notwithstanding the extreme sickliness of the climate, it is impossible to dispense with a squadron on that coast. In addition to the interesting duty of suppressing the slave-trade, which could not be otherwise effected, the lawful commerce of our citizens with all parts of the coast is rapidly increasing, and already employs a very large capital. This trade is an object of so much importance, and is contended for in so strong a spirit of rivalry by traders of different countries, that the presence of national vessels is absolutely necessary to protect them in their just rights, and to prevent those outrages, unfriendly to the harmony of nations, to which men are often driven by the thirst of gain. It is also worthy of consideration that the presence of our public vessels is of great, importance to our colonists, by giving them consequence in the eyes of the neighboring native tribes. These views give great interest to this squadron, and render it desirable that it should be placed

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upon the most effective footing. Many additional precautions, however, are necessary, in order to protect the crews from the fatal diseases of the climate, and thus to enable the squadron properly to discharge its duties. I have taken measures to obtain the requisite information upon this point, and hope to he able to avail myself of it when a new squadron shall be appointed to that service.

The operations of these vessels have been highly valuable in protecting the rights of our citizens engaged in trade, and in preventing the traffic in slaves. They have performed all that could have been reasonably expected of so small a force. An additional number of vessels, some of which should be of larger size, will undoubtedly be necessary for the security of our increasing trade in that quarter, and for the effectual suppression of the slave-trade. This trade, I regret to say, is still carried on to a considerable extent, notwithstanding the vigilance of our cruisers, aided by the active co-operation of those of England.

Representations having been made to the Department of an act of unlawful violence committed against American citizens on the coast of New Grenada, the brig Dolphin, under the command of Lieutenant McKean, was despatched to that quarter in September last, with such instructions as were deemed necessary to redress the wrong, and to guard against the commission of similar outrages in future. Intelligence has been received as late as 15th October, at which time she had reached her place of destination. The particular outrage complained of was not committed upon an American vessel; but the presence of the Dolphin was nevertheless considered by our consular agent highly advantageous to American interests in the then disturbed state of the country.

The steamships Missouri and Mississippi, built under the act of 3d March, 1839, the former at New York, and the latter at Philadelphia, are nearly ready for service, and will form a part of the home squadron.

Orders have been given for the construction of three steamers of medium size, under the act of 3d March, 1841, one at New York, one at Philadelphia, and one at Norfolk. In addition to these, Captain R. F. Stockton is superintending the construction, at Philadelphia, of a steamer of 600 tons, to be propelled by Ericcson's propeller; and Lieutenant W. W. Hunter is engaged in like manner at Norfolk with one of 300 tons, to be propelled by submerged water-wheels, invented by himself. Very valuable results are anticipated from these experiments.

Orders have been given to build a first-class sloop and three small vessels of war, and to finish the frigates Cumberland, Savannah, Raritan, and St. Lawrence.

The balance in the Treasury to the credit of the navy hospital fund is $217,907 53. This fund is gradually increasing, from the assessment of 20 cents per month upon the pay of officers, seamen, and marines, so that a continuing surplus may be expected. I recommend that authority be given to invest these surpluses, as they accrue, in some interest-bearing fund. So much of its annual increase as may not be needed for the particular purposes of the fund may be advantageously applied, in other forms, to the comfort of our seamen. The average annual increase of this fund from the 1st January, 1836, has been $27,223 67; which, if it had been invested in 6 per cent. stock, would have added to the amount $57,482 04 on the 1st of January next.

Of the appropriation for the "suppression of the slave-trade," there

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remains unexpended the sum of $4,365 14, which has been carried to the surplus fund. I recommend that it be reappropriated, and the further sum of $3,000 be added, in order to meet outstanding liabilities of this fund.

Under the head of "contingencies not enumerated" there remains, of the appropriations of the last three years, the sum of $9,246 76; of which $3,246 76 will be carried to the surplus fund on the 1st of January next, if not previously applied to the proper purposes of the fund.

For the condition of the "navy pension fund," I respectfully refer you to the annexed report of the Commissioner of Pensions.

The operation of the apprentice system continues to be highly encouraging. Complaints are occasionally made that the pledges of the Government are not redeemed, but no sufficient evidence has yet reached the Department of the existence of any serious abuse. Great interest is felt in the success of this experiment, and every effort is used to secure to the apprentices all the benefits and advantages promised by the terms of enlistment. The vigilance of the Department will be constantly exerted to guard against all abuses, and to introduce into the system every practicable improvement. The number of apprentices now enlisted is about 1,000. This is not so favorable a result as might have been expected. An extension of the system is contemplated, so as to give to boys in the interior of the country an opportunity to join the service, without subjecting them to the expense of a journey to the rendezvous on the seaboard.

Great difficulty is experienced in the enlistment of seamen. To what cause this should be attributed I am unable to say; and, consequently, I am not prepared to suggest any remedy. It is, however, probably true, that the mere seaman is of too little consideration in the general estimate of the service. Laws and regulations securing to him the enjoyment of his just rights, liberal wages punctually paid, and a strict application, if not an extension, of the benevolent policy which provides for him or his family when he is disabled or killed in the service, would probably secure for our ships of war the preference in most cases over those of the merchant service.

Experiments in gunnery and projectiles, which have been conducted for several successive seasons, under the direction of Captain M. C. Perry, in the vicinity of New York, have been continued on board the United States steamer Fulton, Captain John T. Newton, but under the general control of Captain Perry. In testing a gun in the usual mode, it unfortunately burst, killing several men and wounding others. I have caused the subject to be investigated by a court of inquiry, whose finding shows that, however distressing and deplorable the accident may have been, no just censure can be attached to the officers who conducted the experiment.

Measures have been adopted, and are now in process of execution, for supplying the navy with the requisite guns. Less progress has been made than was desirable, because of the great pains which have been taken to obtain the best guns which could be procured in the country. In a short time they will be furnished of the various descriptions used in the service, including the Paixhan guns.

Under the appropriation of the last session, for the purpose of "making experiments to test the value of improvements in ordnance, in the construction of steamers and other vessels of war, and in other matters connected with the naval service and the national defence" nothing has yet been actually paid. Some experiments, however, have already been authorized, and others are now under the consideration of the Department, from which

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very beneficial results are confidently anticipated. It is not proper, however, to make them public at this time. So many scientific and practical men throughout the country are now turning their attention to this subject that we may reasonably expect great advantages from a judicious use of this appropriation.

I have, under your directions, taken measures for the construction of a steamer on Lake Erie, in compliance with the act of 9th September, 1841.

I regret to say that the measures which have been adopted for the preservation of live-oak and red cedar timber, under existing laws, have not been attended with the desired results. Whether this is owing to the inefficiency in the laws themselves, or to want of due vigilance and fidelity in the agents employed, I am unable to say; but I have the most conclusive evidence that the timber is daily taken in large quantities from the public lands, without authority and contrary to law. This is a serious mischief, and one which calls for prompt remedy. It is confidently believed that the agencies now authorized by law will not answer the purpose. The lawless bands who are engaged in these depredations pay no respect to the unsupported authority of the agents; and, as it is almost impossible to bring them to justice through the ordinary forms of trial, they are left to plunder unrestrained. The presence of a military force, charged with that especial duty, is believed to be absolutely necessary to preserve this most valuable timber. A very small force would answer the purpose. A single steamboat, with her ordinary crew and a few marines, under the command of an active and judicious navy officer, would be able to pass rapidly from point to point, and extend full protection to every timber district which is accessible by water. The co-operation of revenue-cutters might be afforded, if required. This would be at once the most effectual and the cheapest expedient. Agents might still be employed to watch the interior districts, and to give notice of all trespasses committed on them. Power should be given to arrest offenders, and to bring them before the proper tribunals for trial. The penalties and forfeitures prescribed by the acts of 1817 and 1831 are supposed to be sufficiently severe; the only difficulty now is to detect offenders and bring them to justice. Additional legislation, also, is probably necessary, to define accurately the limits of the reserved districts, and to prevent all interference with private rights. The whole subject is respectfully submitted as one which claims the early and serious attention of Congress.

Every effort has been made, in compliance with the law, to obtain water-rotted American hemp for the use of the navy, but hitherto without success. One contract has been made, but the contractor has been unable to comply with its terms. We are, therefore, for the present, thrown upon our former resources for a supply of this article, but I shall continue to use all possible exertions to carry out the wise policy of Congress upon this point.

That reform is necessary, in every part of our naval establishment, is on all hands admitted; and it is a subject of general regret that it has been so long delayed. The delay has been in the highest degree injurious to the service, and is daily rendering reform more and more difficult, as it becomes more and more indispensable. Impressed with this truth, and anxious that no time should be lost in commencing this important work, I respectfully bring it to your notice at the earliest day. I do not propose, however, to present at this time more than the mere outlines of the many important subjects to which I desire to invite your attention. It is presumed that Congress, if it should act upon the subject at all, will refer it to committees of their own

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body, before whom I hope to be prepared to lay all the information that may be required.

The first step ought to be the preparation of a full code of laws and rules for the government and regulation of the naval service. Without this, every other measure of reform will be unavailing. It is of the essence of free government that the rights, the duties and the responsibilities of all men, in all conditions, should be ascertained and accurately defined; and it is of the essence of tyranny that men should be punished for imputed offences, or at the arbitrary discretion of their judges. This truth applies with peculiar force to those who are engaged in military service. The strict discipline which that service requires, renders necessary a great variety of rules which would be useless in the ordinary conditions of society, which involve no moral or social crime, but which, nevertheless, it is often necessary to enforce by the most rigorous sanctions. It is in the highest degree unjust in itself, and violative of the spirit of our institutions, that these new and peculiar responsibilities should be in any respect uncertain. And yet it is in many cases extremely difficult to determine, according to existing rules, what is and what is not an offence in our naval service; and in a great variety of bases it is altogether uncertain, and dependant upon the arbitrary will of courts-martial, in what mode, and to what extent, offences, real or imputed; shall be punished. A short review of our legislation upon this subject, will serve to present it in its proper light.

By the act of Congress approved 23d of April, 1800, certain general rules and regulations were enacted, embracing the most prominent and important subjects relating to the service. These are still in force; but, although they are of a character to apply to the navy, in whatever condition it may be placed, and were deemed altogether sufficient for it in its then infant state, they are too few in number, and enter too little into details, to answer their purposed the present day. Acting upon this idea, the Board of Navy Commissioners, soon after its establishment in 1815, compiled "Rules, Regulations, and Instructions for the Naval Service of the United States," "with the consent of the Secretary of the Navy, in obedience to ah act of Congress passed the 7th of February, 1815, entitled 'An act to alter and amend the several acts for establishing a Navy Department, by adding thereto a Board of Commissioners.'" This compilation, commonly called the Blue Book, is still practically in force, and, together with the act of 1800, constitutes the only system of rules and regulations for the government of the navy.

By the act establishing the Board of Navy Commissioners, it is provided "that the said Board of Commissioners, by and with the' consent of the Secretary of the Navy, be, and are hereby, authorized to prepare such rules and regulations, as shall be necessary for securing a uniformity in the several classes of vessels and their equipments, and for repairing and refitting them, and for securing responsibility in the subordinate officers and agents; which regulations, when approved by the President of the United States, shall be respected and obeyed, until altered and revoked by the same authority; and the said rules and regulations, thus prepared and approved, shall be laid before Congress at their session." Whether or not the Blue Book (which derives its authority from this law alone) was ever approved by the President of the United States, or laid before Congress, I have no means of ascertaining. The probability is that it was not approved, as the book itself contains no evidence upon the subject. But, even if both these formalities were observed, it is altogether clear to my mind, that the Commissioners acted with-

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out authority in proscribing many of the rules and regulations contained in that book.

The obvious intention of the act of Congress is to make the Navy Commissioners the ministerial agents of the Secretary of the Navy, for certain purposes. He has no authority to employ any other agents for those purposes. Among other things, it is their duty, under the second section of the act, "by and with the consent of the Secretary of the Navy, to prepare such rules and regulations as shall be necessary," in the execution of the specific duties therein assigned to them, and for "securing responsibility in the subordinate officers and agents" employed in those duties. There is nothing in the terms of the act, and nothing in its plain purpose and intention, to authorize the Commissioners to prepare a general code of rules and regulations for the government of the navy. They were strictly confined to the purposes mentioned in the act, to wit, "securing a uniformity in the several classes of vessels and their equipments, and repairing and refitting them." For these purposes, and for no other, they had authority to prepare, by and with the consent of the Secretary of the Navy, such rules and regulations as they might deem proper; and, as a necessary incident of this authority, to prepare additional rules for securing responsibility in their subordinate agents.

That this is the true meaning of the act of Congress is so apparent that I deem it wholly unnecessary to enter into a more critical examination in order to prove it.

But the Blue Book is not confined to these objects. It contains a great variety of rules and regulations applying to every department of naval duty, and to every officer and man connected with the naval service. It is designed as a general code of rules and regulations for the government of the navy, and, as such, it is universally received, and daily acted on.

Under this code, thus questionable in its authority, and altogether insufficient in itself, the navy has been governed for twenty-three years! There is, in truth, no law upon the subject—no obligatory rule whatever, except what is found in the act of 1800; and that is altogether imperfect and inadequate.

This subject was brought before Congress in 1832. A law was passed in that year authorizing the President to constitute a board of naval officers, to be composed of the navy commissioners and two post-captains, whose duty it should be, "with the aid and assistance of the Attorney General, carefully to revise the rules and regulations governing the naval service, with the view to adapt them to the present and future exigencies of the service; which rules and regulations, when approved by him and sanctioned by Congress, should have the force of law, and stand in lieu of all others theretofore enacted." The board, thus constituted, convened in November of the same year. In November, 1833, they submitted the result of their labors to the Secretary of the Navy, and on the 23d of the following month the rules and regulations thus prepared were approved by the President of the United States, and submitted to Congress. On the 7th February, 1834, the chairman of the Naval Committee of the House of Representatives moved that 1,000 additional copies be printed, which was directed on the following day. On the 1st May, 1834, the President submitted to Congress "certain proposals for amending the present laws in relation to the naval service." Whether or not these were the same proposals which he had previously submitted (viz. on the 23d December, 1833) I am not informed, nor is it of any importance in itself. The probability is, that some amendment of the rules

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originally prepared was presented in May, 1834. On the 8th of the same month, the chairman of the Naval Committee of the House of Representatives reported a resolution for the printing of 1,000 additional copies of the amended rules and regulations for the government of the navy. No further action was had upon the subject, and Congress adjourned on the 30th of the following month.

From this statement it appears that this important subject has been before Congress ever since the year 1832, and that nothing effectual has yet been done to accomplish the object of the act of that year. Soon after the appointment of Mr. Paulding as Secretary of the Navy, he took the subject up and urged it with all proper zeal. Such, however, was the pressure of other duties upon the board, that it was impossible for them to attend to the revision of the naval code, as Mr. Paulding desired, until December, 1840. On the 19th of February, 1841, they submitted their report to the Secretary of the Navy, who approved thereof, but did not lay it before Congress, as the act of 1832 directed. Neither was this done at the called session of May last. I have now the honor to lay this report before you, and to ask that it be submitted to Congress.

I cannot recommend the approval of these rules and regulations. I believe them to be objectionable in many important respects; and, as the further action of Congress in regard to them is necessary, I recommend that they be again submitted to revision. I would respectfully suggest that the preparation of rules and regulations for the government of all classes and grades in the navy ought not to be intrusted to any one of them exclusively. A mixed commission, embracing the civil as well as the military departments of service, would, it is believed, be best qualified to adapt to every part of the service the proper laws and rules for the government and regulation of it. Such a commission might, with the aid of the rules now submitted, easily report to Congress in time for its action during the present session.

The evils resulting from the want of a proper naval code are of the most serious character, and will, if not remedied, ultimately ruin the naval service of our country. What can be expected of a community of men, living together under circumstances tending to constant excitement and collisions, with no fixed law to govern them, and where even rank and station are imperfectly defined? The necessary consequence of such a state of things must be, disputes, contests, disorder, and confusion. Sometimes unauthorized power will be assumed, and at other times lawful authority will be disobeyed. It is impossible that a wholesome discipline can prevail in this uncertain condition of official rank and authority. The same uncertainty prevails in regard to punishments. The unbounded latitude of discretion allowed to courts-martial in this respect is of most evil consequence, and calls loudly for correction. It invites to the indulgence of prejudice and favoritism! —subjecting light offences to undue punishment, and suffering great offenders to escape with trivial penalties. And, even if no such improper bias could be supposed to exist, it is not to be expected that all courts will look upon all offences with the same eye. Men of lenient and indulgent feelings will punish lightly the same offences which those of a different character will punish with the most rigorous severity. Hence an inequality of punishment will prevail, odious in itself, calculated to excite discontent, to bring courts-martial into disrepute, and to destroy the just influence of their sentences, as a means of preserving the honor and discipline of the service. To prevent these evils, to remedy the disorders which now prevail, and to place

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the navy in a healthy and efficient condition, it is absolutely necessary to provide for it a code of laws and rules which shall accurately define rank and authority, plainly prescribe duties and responsibilities, and ascertain crimes and their punishments. And I would respectfully urge upon the proper departments of the Government the indispensable necessity of entering upon this important work without loss of time.

The subject next in importance is the reorganization of the Navy Department. I have had but a short experience in this Department; but a short experience is enough to display its defects, even to the most superficial observation. It is, in truth, not organized at all. The labor to be performed must, under any circumstances, be great and onerous; but it is rendered doubly so by the want of a proper arrangement and distribution of duties. At present, a multitude of duties are imposed upon the head of the Department, which anyone of its clerks could discharge as well as himself, but which, from their pressing nature, he is not permitted to postpone. Hence, his whole time is occupied in trifling details, rendering it impossible for him to bestow the requisite attention upon more important subjects, involving the great interests of the service. These details are, indeed, so numerous and multifarious, as to constitute in themselves an amount of duties fully equal to the powers of any one man. In addition to this, the present want of proper arrangement is extremely unfavorable to that direct individual responsibility which it is so necessary to impose on every public officer. The same cause occasions delays in the operations of the Department, by rendering necessary a variety of tedious official forms, and, consequently, preventing that promptness of action which is indispensable to its due efficiency. And it is not the least among the evils of this state of things, that the precise condition of the several branches of the service cannot be ascertained without much time and labor; thus adding to the cost of the Department, while it diminishes its usefulness. These inconveniences and embarrassments, and many others which are daily felt in the administration of the Department, would in some degree be removed by a mere rearrangement and proper distribution of the labor now employed in it; but additional labor is absolutely necessary, in order to enable it to discharge its functions in the manner required by the interest of the service. It would not be proper to enter into all the details of the subject in this report. It is already before Congress, and will doubtless receive the early attention of that body. A resolution was adopted by the House of Representatives, on the 19th February, 1839, directing the Secretary of the Navy to "report to this House, at the commencement of the next Congress, a plan for the reorganization of this branch of the public service, adopting as the basis of his plan the division of the duties now performed by the Board of Navy Commissioners, and their assignment to separate bureaux." In obedience to this resolution, Mr. Paulding, the then Secretary, submitted, on the 30th December, 1839, a long and elaborate report, "based on the principle presented in the resolution." To this report I respectfully refer. In most of its views, and in all of its more important conclusions, I fully concur. I do not, however, adopt his plan precisely as he has proposed it. Some change in the principles, and some additional provisions, will probably be necessary, which the experience of the Department will enable it to suggest, in arranging the details of the law. I earnestly invoke immediate attention to the subject, firmly believing that the proposed reform is indispensable to the due administration of the Department, and that it cannot be longer delayed without serious injury to the service

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There is reason to believe that it is now the settled policy of the Government to increase the navy as rapidly as the means at its disposal will admit, and it may therefore be unnecessary that I should oiler any suggestions upon that subject. I should not feel, however, that my duty was properly discharged, if I should fail to add whatever influence my own recommendation may possess to the many considerations which suggest this as our true policy.

We may safely estimate the mercantile property of our citizens annually afloat on the ocean, and employed in foreign trade, at not less than one hundred and twenty millions of dollars; and to this is to be added the value of the vessels in which that property is conveyed, and the value of American interests vested in mercantile establishments abroad, and dependant on American trade. The coasting trade, not including such articles as are exported, cannot be accurately estimated, but it, certainly amounts to many millions of dollars. Taking the aggregate of all property annually exposed to an enemy on the ocean, on the lakes, and on our principal buys and rivers, it will probably be found that it does not fall short of one hundred and fifty millions of dollars. So large an interest is entitled to demand, and justly expects to receive, the most certain and ample protection. This is due alike to the citizen whose property is thus exposed, and to the Government whose revenues are derived principally from the duties which that property pays. But that protection can be found only on the ocean. Trade is never secure unless it can, at all times and in all places, appeal for support to the national flag; and it ought to feel that it is safe wherever that flag is displayed.

Every nation engaged in foreign commerce, to any valuable extent, provides, as a part of its established policy, an adequate military marine. Our own country is far behind all the considerable nations of the world in this respect. As compared with England and France, the two principal commercial nations of Europe, it is found that England, with much less than twice our foreign tonnage, has more than eight times as many vessels of war, exclusive of her steamships; France, with only one third of our foreign tonnage, has more than five times as many vessels of war. The comparison might be still further extended, scarcely less to the disadvantage of our own country. It may well excite surprise that, with so large an interest at stake, and with a certainty that it will rapidly increase from year to year, so little preparation should have been made for its protection and security; and this surprise will not be diminished when we reflect on the vast interests which are connected with, and dependent upon, our foreign commerce, and which must necessarily flourish or decay along with it. The farmer, the planter, the mechanic, the manufacturer, and even the day-laborer, depends, in a greater or less degree, upon this for the success of his own peculiar branch of industry; and even the fine arts themselves are not exempt from the same influences. Commerce may be regarded as our principal interest, because, to a great extent, it includes within it every other interest. Wars often arise from rivalry in trade, and from the conflicts of interests which belong to it. The presence of an adequate naval force, to protect commerce, by promptly redressing the injuries which are done to it, is one of the best means of preventing those disputes and collisions which are so apt to interrupt the peace and harmony of nations

But these views, although sufficiently important in themselves to justify and require a very large increase of our naval force, are by no means the most interesting which the subject suggests. Ranking in the first class of

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nations, we are under an absolute necessity to regulate our policy, in some degree, by that of other countries, so far as their policy may affect us. All the considerable maritime Powers have, within late years, added greatly to their naval forces, and are at this moment actively engaged in the same work. This fact alone would seem to render it absolutely necessary that we should make similar preparation on our part. In proportion as other countries multiply the means by which they may annoy us, we ought, in common prudence, to add to our own defences and to our own means of resisting insult and injury. Any other course will only invite aggressions upon our rights, which will continue to increase so long as we shall patiently bear them, and which must ultimately force us to resistance, at the precise time when we are least prepared to make it successfully.

Free governments, which are necessarily more embarrassed in their councils and slower in their action than those which are not bound to observe the necessary forms of free government, have a peculiar interest to guard their soil from invasion. The nature of our institutions presents a very strong appeal upon this point. A war between the United States and any considerable maritime Power, would not be conducted at this day as it would have been even twenty years ago. It would be a war of incursions, aiming at revolution. The first blow would be struck at us through our own institutions. No nation, it is presumed, would expect to be successful over us, for any length of time, in a fair contest of arms upon our own soil: and no wise nation would attempt it. A more promising expedient would be sought, in arraying what are supposed to be the hostile elements of our social system against one another. An enemy so disposed, and free to land upon any part of our soil which might promise success to his enterprise, would be armed with a four-fold power of annoyance. Of the ultimate result of such incursions, we have no reason to be afraid; but, even in the best event, war upon our own soil would be the more expensive, the more embarrassing, and the more horrible in its effects, by compelling us at the same time to oppose an enemy in the field, and to guard against attempts to subvert our social systems.

Heretofore we have found, in the shallowness of many of our waters, security, to a certain extent, against invasion by sea. So long as maritime wars were conducted in vessels of large size and great draught, we had little to apprehend from them except at a few points, and those were susceptible of adequate defence on land. But this security can no longer be relied on. The application of steam-power to vessels of war, and the improvements which have recently been made in artillery, are destined to change the whole system of maritime war. Steamboats of light draught, and which may be easily transported across the ocean in vessels of a larger class, may invade, us at almost any point of our extended coast, may penetrate the interior through our shallow rivers, and thus expose half our country to hostile attacks. The celerity with which these movements could be made, the facility with which such vessels could escape, and the promptness with which they could change the point of attack, would enable an enemy, with a comparatively inconsiderable force, to harass our whole seaboard, and to carry all the honors of war into the securest retreats of our people. The effect of these incursions would be terrible everywhere; but in the southern portion of our country they might, and probably would be disastrous in the extreme.

It is obvious that a war thus conducted must be successful, to a very great extent, in spite of all the defences on land which we could contrive. Nothing

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less than the conversion of half our country into a military garrison could protect us against it. Such is the exposed condition of our country, such is the character of our institutions, and such the position of our people, that a population of twice our present number, under the best possible military organization, would avail us but little. While the combined Powers of the world could not subdue us, even a secondary naval Power could avoid our land-defences, set our armies at defiance, and prosecute against us a war intolerably harassing and disastrous.

The single question, then, which we have to decide, in reference to this subject, is, where and by whom shall those battles be fought, which may hereafter become necessary in defence of our property, our institutions, our honor, and our lives? Shall we meet the enemy upon the ocean, with men trained and disciplined for the contest, or suffer him to land upon our shores, trusting to a scattered and harassed people to expel him from their farms and their firesides? This question admits of but one answer. But it is worse than idle to suppose that all those high interests, to which I have alluded, can be adequately protected by our present naval force. Four thousand miles of exposed sea and lake coast, a foreign commerce scattered through the most distant seas, and a domestic trade exposed alike upon the ocean and upon our interior waters, are, in effect, surrendered to the enemy, when they are intrusted to the protection of some twenty ships in commission.

If these views be not altogether deceptive, the policy of increasing our navy, without further delay, is obvious. How far it shall be increased, the wisdom of Congress will decide. Looking to it as the chief, if not the only adequate defence of our country against those wars of incursions from which so much evil is to be apprehended, I respectfully suggest, that we cannot safely stop short of half the naval force of the strongest maritime power in the world. Our policy is peace, and we do not propose to ourselves a war of aggression in any case, except so far as may be necessary as a measure of defence. It is not probable that any nation could detach from other service more than one fourth of its whole naval force, to attack us upon our own coast; so that, after deducting such part of our own force as we could not employ at all, and such part as we should be compelled to employ elsewhere, we might reasonably hope to repel from our shores any maritime power, with only half its force in ships. With less than this, our fleets would serve only to swell the triumphs and feed the cupidity of our enemy. It is better to have none at, all than to have less than enough. I am aware that this great increase of our naval power cannot be effected in any short time. I propose it only as the object at which our policy ought to aim, and toward the attainment of which your measures ought to be steadily directed. An annual appropriation, as liberal as the means of the Treasury will allow, will in a few years accomplish all that is desirable.

Of what descriptions of vessels our navy ought to be composed, is a question of great importance, and one which we are compelled to decide with reference to the practice of other countries. Doubtless a very large part of it ought to consist of steamships. Experience has shown that these vessels may be rendered perfectly safe at sea, and that they may be so constructed as to adapt them, in other respects, to purposes of war. Of their great usefulness the world has had a striking proof in the recent operations of the British squadron on the coast of Syria; troops were transported a distance of two thousand miles over the ocean, and were engaged in battle in Asia Minor on the sixteenth day after leaving England. This and other facilities afforded

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by this class of vessels were so great and effective that the admiral declared that "his success was owing to the efficiency of his steamers." We may well profit by the lesson thus taught us. I respectfully suggest, however, that it would not be wise in us to engage very extensively in the construction of steamships of war of the largest class at this time. Imitating the example of England, our wisest policy would be to aid the private enterprise of our citizens in constructing packet-ships, to ply between this country and foreign ports. These should, of course, be so constructed as to fit them for war purposes, and should be held subject to the demand of the Government, upon equitable conditions. There will, in all probability, be enough of such vessels to answer all the purposes for which steamships of the largest class would be required, and they would be furnished at a comparatively small cost to the Government. Improvements are daily made, not only in steam machinery, but in the propelling power applied to steam-vessels. Experiments are now in progress which promise important results in these respects, and it would probably be judicious not to expend large sums in the construction of steamships for distant cruises until these results shall be made known. But the same reasoning does not apply to steam-vessels of a smaller class, destined for the defence of our own coast and harbors. These ought not, under any circumstances, to be delayed. They would be particularly useful on the lakes and in the Gulf of Mexico. On the lakes they might be advantageously employed, under proper regulations, in the revenue service. They would be peculiarly adapted to the Gulf of Mexico, in consequence of the calms and currents which prevail there, and of their greater facility in making harbor in the violent tempests which are common in that latitude. There is, in truth, but the single harbor of Pensacola in which a ship of large draught can find shelter, although there are many which afford sufficient depth of water for steam-vessels of the proper size. These vessels should be built of white oak, reserving the live oak for those of a different class.

Steamships have been built in Europe altogether of iron. As far as the experiment has been made, it is understood to have been successful. I recommend that it be made here also, with at least one vessel of medium size, sufficiently large to afford a fair test, without exposing too much to the hazard of failure. The great abundance of that material found in all parts of our country affords us every facility which can be desired; and our workmen will soon acquire, if they do not now possess, the requisite skill in converting it into vessels. We may thus acquire a cheap and almost an imperishable naval force, while, at the same time, we afford encouragement to some of the most useful branches of our home industry.

In my opinion, there is no necessity at present to increase the number of our line-of-battle ships. Some of those which we now have would be more useful if cut down to frigates of the largest class. There is, even in the present condition of the service, a pressing demand for sloops of war, brigs, and schooners; and I recommend that a suitable number of them be immediately built. Not less than fen are necessary, even in the present condition of our navy. One of them should be kept in commission and ready for service at each of our principal ports; and this may be done without any considerable additional expense, because they will always be prepared to perform a variety of duties for which the Government now pays high prices to merchant vessels. Moreover, they may be built of such timber as is rejected in the construction of larger vessels. It is proper that we should have some of our vessels always ready for sudden emergencies, and none are so cheap or so convenient as brigs and schooners.

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In view of any considerable increase of the navy, a large addition to our frigates of the first class ought to be made. Our present 44-gun frigates would not encounter, upon equal terms, the modern frigates of the first class of England and France. To enable us to contend successfully with these, the principal maritime powers of Europe, we must not only increase our general naval force in proportion as they increase theirs, but we must also build vessels of corresponding size and description with those which they will use against us.

I renew, with anxious desire for its success, the recommendation so often made by my predecessors for the establishment of higher grades in the naval service. This will be absolutely necessary if the navy should be considerably increased, and would be highly useful even in its present condition. The rank of admiral is known in all the navies of the world except our own; it has existed through a long course of past ages, and has been fully tested in the experience of all nations. It still exists, and is still approved. I can perceive nothing in our peculiar situation to prevent us from profiting by the lesson thus afforded. That which has been found valuable in the naval service of other countries, we have good reason to believe, will be equally valuable in our own. But, apart from this view of the subject, there are many reasons, of a positive character, why we should no longer delay to place ourselves upon an equality, in this respect, with all the considerable nations of the world.

It is, as a general rule, wise and politic to establish as many grades as possible in all military service. The officer should always have before him some station, yet to be reached, and worthy of a high and generous ambition. He who has attained all that is attainable, has no need of any further exertions than just enough to sustain him where he is; all beyond this is supererogatory, for he is not permitted to hope that either the utmost exertion of his powers, or the most generous self-sacrifices in the public service, will ever raise him one grade higher in the ranks of his countrymen.

A captaincy in the navy is of very difficult attainment, according to our slow rate of promotion; yet all those who are fortunate enough to reach it, continue to feel, in no less degree than before, the depressing influences to which I have alluded. They daily see, in the navies of other countries, men, not older in the service than themselves, nor more worthy in any respect, filling higher stations, and enjoying more distinguishing proofs of the confidence and gratitude of their country. They also see men of equal grade with themselves, cheered and encouraged by the hope of a well-deserved preferment, to which they know that their own country does not permit them to aspire. What can be more natural than that they should feel disheartened and mortified, and ultimately be forced to compare, disadvantageously to their own country, its naval service with that of other nations?

It is considered wise and proper in the army, to raise the rank of the officer in proportion to the number of men subjected to his command. There are in that service nine different grades of commissioned officers, while in the navy there are but three; hence, it is very difficult to arrange the comparative ranks of the two services. Indeed, it is impossible to do it without supposing new ranks in the navy, unknown to the law. This, though not a very serious evil, is an inconvenience which it is desirable to avoid; and, so far as the good of the service is concerned, it is not perceived why a captain in the navy should be considered better adapted to the command of a fleet, than a brigadier general in the army to the command of a division. The two services

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equally require rank according to the extent of command. It is true there is no necessity for so many grades in the navy as in the army; but the difference is in the lower grades only, and not in the higher.

Our naval officers are often subjected to serious difficulties and embarrassments in the interchange of civilities with those of other countries on foreign stations. The admiral of England, France, or Russia, is not willing to admit that he is of no higher grade than the post-captain of the United States. Our commanders, in order to enforce from other countries the same respect which they themselves are willing to pay, are compelled to insist that the highest grade of service, in the United States, by whatever title it may be distinguished, is equal to the highest grade of service in any other country; and, of course, that an American post-captain is of equal rank with the admiral of any other country, whose commission is not of older date. This claim is at least very questionable. Rank is a positive thing; and, by the consent and usage of nations, is indicated, in the naval service, by the flag which the commander wears. It is not surprising, therefore, that the admirals of Europe should refuse to recognise, as their equals in rank, the captains of the United States, whose very flag affords conclusive proof that their own country regards them as inferior. It is true, this claim of equality has in some instances been allowed, but it is generally denied; and hence that interchange of friendly courtesies, so useful in preserving the harmony and good understanding of nations, has often been prevented. In war, the inconvenience would be still more serious. Whatever concessions might he made in time of peace, from feelings of respect and courtesy, no just claim of rank would be yielded in time of war. The American captain, called to act in concert with the admiral of a friendly nation, of younger date, would necessarily be compelled to yield the honor of the chief command, or to contest it at the price of that harmony which would be necessary to the success of their joint enterprise. It is not to be supposed that nations, whose systems have been so long established and acted on, will yield, in this respect, to the peculiar views and wishes of the United States. The inconveniences resulting from our anomalous position, are seriously felt, and ought, in my opinion, to be removed, by placing our officers on a ground equally advantageous with that which is occupied by those of other countries and corresponding commands.

Additional ranks in the navy would be eminently useful as an instrument of discipline. The post-captain of to-day is precisely equal, in rank, to the oldest post-captain in the service. He feels his equality from the first moment that he attains it; and, at the same moment, the disinclination to be commanded and controlled by his equal rises within him. He will not willingly submit to learn, as a scholar, what his own position authorizes him to teach. He looks to a separate command for himself; he begins to lay down systems of his own, and turns a deaf ear to the lessons of experience, imparted by older heads, because they cannot claim any higher rank. The respect and deference, so necessary to discipline, ore rarely felt, except where there is a difference of rank; and they are most strongly felt where that difference is greatest. In this way the creation of higher grades would be advantageously felt through all the grades below them. It would be particularly beneficial in its influences upon the younger classes of officers, upon whom it is so important that correct impressions should be made.

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There is yet another encouragement which should be held out to our navy, in a much more liberal spirit than has heretofore been manifested. Advancement in the service has been so slow, as to render it almost hopeless to a large number of our most promising officers of the lower grades. Many would long since have retired from it in despair, but for the fact that their education and pursuits unfit them for profitable occupations on shore. Surely an officer, who has faithfully devoted to his country 12 or 15 years of the prime of his life, and at the expense of all qualification for other pursuits, is entitled to be advanced at least one grade in the ranks of her service. I respectfully submit, that it is not wise in us to place ourselves in a position to be compelled to intrust to age and imbecility the duties which require the vigor and energy of younger years; and yet, under the systems which have heretofore prevailed, there are few who can hope to attain the higher commands, until they have also attained a period of life, at which the best powers of man begin to decay.

If it be our purpose to increase our naval force, we cannot too soon begin to train a suitable band of officers to take charge of it. It is to be borne in mind, that, although we can build a good ship in a few weeks, it require twenty years of arduous service, of active instructor, and of strict discipline, to qualify an officer to command her. If, therefore, we would be prepared for the exigencies of the next twenty years, we must begin our preparations to-day. It is more prodigality to build ships, if we have no officers to command them. There is no school for the sea-officer but the ship itself. The theory which he may acquire on shore, although a necessary part of his education, only prepares him to begin to learn what he is required to know as a naval commander. A small fleet, properly employed, will afford such a school to pupils enough to supply a large one. We should not. therefore, wait to build new ships, before we begin to train their officers. We have, at present, not enough for our navy, if all our ships were in commission. Those ships, if actively employed, together with such as shall be built, from time to time, even under the most restricted scheme for the increase of our naval force, will afford all necessary means of employing and training twice the present number of our officers, of every grade.

There is an absolute necessity for a large increase of the marine corps. On this subject I refer to the accompanying letter of Colonel Henderson, and the tables which he has prepared for the information of this Department (No 16). From these it will be seen that nothing less than three times the present number of marines will answer the exigencies of the service, even without any increase of our present naval force. Requisitions are frequently made for marines, with which it is impossible to comply, however necessary their services may he. In some cases, officers in command of important posts have felt it. due to themselves to inform the Department that they could not hold themselves justly responsible for the safety of the public property intrusted to their charge, for want of the force necessary to protect it. At present, citizens are employed as watchmen at navy-yards, at prices greater, in some instances, than the wages of marines; and as they are not liable to martial-law, and are. free to quit the service when they please, great inconvenience is frequently experienced, and the property is not always duly secure. A sufficient force for all such purposes ought to be provided, of men belonging to the service, and amenable to the laws which regulate it.

Of the importance of marines in the naval service, but one opinion is now

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entertained. The principal maritime nations of the world, with the exception of ourselves alone, have, within late years, greatly increased this part of their force. I respectfully suggest that there should he provided for each ship not less than one marine for every gun, beside a sufficient number for the police of naval stations on shore. A still larger proportion of marines would, in the opinion of experienced officers, he highly valuable in the service.

The laws and regulations for the government of the marine corps are extremely imperfect, and require amendment. A new code has already been prepared by a board of officers, constituted for the purpose, which it is proposed to incorporate in the general revision of the naval code, hereinbefore recommended.

The propriety of establishing naval schools has frequently been submitted to the consideration of Congress. I again respectfully bring it to your notice, as a subject of increasing interest to the navy. The use of steam-vessels, in war, will render necessary a different order of scientific knowledge from that which has heretofore been required. If our navy should be increased by the addition of any considerable number of steam-vessels, engineers will form an important class of naval officers. It will be necessary to assign to them an appropriate rank, and to subject them to all the laws of the service. Great care should be used in the selection of them, because a great deal will depend on their skill and competency; hence it is necessary that they should pass through a prescribed course of instruction, and that the Government should have the proof of their competency which an examination, conducted under their own rules, would afford. The important object can be best attained by the establishment of naval schools, provided with all necessary means of uniting practice with theory. The advantages which the army has derived from the academy at West Point, afford a sufficient proof that a similar institution for the navy would produce like results.

In connexion with this subject, I would ask your attention to the situation of the professors of mathematics, now employed in the service. This useful class of men have no permanent connexion with the navy, but are called in only as their services are needed, and are not paid except when on actual duty. The consequence is, that they cannot rely on this employment for support, and are often reluctantly driven to other pursuits. It is to be presumed that men, whose talents and attainments qualify them to be teachers in the navy, are equally qualified to be teachers on land; and, as this latter is the less precarious position, the best qualified will be the most apt to seek it. Hence the Department cannot rely with any assurance on being able to command suitable professors, at all times, when their services may be required. It is, I think, of great importance that some provision should be made upon this subject. I also recommend that a certain rank or position be given to the professors, which will relieve them from the necessity of messing and sleeping with their pupils. This close and constant association is well calculated to weaken the respect and influence which their relation to the young officers ought to inspire, and which is absolutely necessary to give due effect to their instructions. I doubt whether their services, upon the present system, are worth the money which they cost, although they would be highly valuable under proper regulations.

It will be perceived that the estimates for the ensuing year are much larger than they have heretofore been. It is confidently believed, however, that nothing has been asked for which is not necessary, and that nothing which is deemed necessary has been over-estimated.

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Having recommended a large increase in most of our squadrons, it followed, of course, that I should ask the requisite appropriations to support them. Presuming that Government does not build ships without designing to use them, it would appear to be the obvious duty of this Department to keep as many of them in constant service as. can be profitably employed. This is, indeed, the true economy. Some of our finest ships have decayed to a serious extent, while yet upon the stocks, and still more have, after having been launched, required expensive repairs before they have been sent to sea. This is the necessary consequence of keeping them in our docks. Ships in actual service are generally clean, tight, dry, and properly ventilated. A careful guard is kept over them, so that slight decays are immediately detected, and repaired without any considerable expense. It has frequently happened that our vessels have been found, after their return from long cruises, in better order for service than when they left the docks. On the other hand, when they are kept in port without crews, they decay rapidly, for want of the care and attention necessary to preserve them. It may well be doubted whether the aggregate of losses sustained and repairs rendered necessary, by the non-use of our vessels, has fallen very far short of what it would have cost to keep them in commission.

But this is the least part of the evil. While our vessels are unemployed, our officers are idle. They thus lose the opportunity of acquiring a due knowledge of their profession, and naturally fall into those injurious habits which idleness always engenders. It would not be surprising if they should forget, in some degree, their respect for the flag which they are so rarely permitted to hoist, and lose, in indolence and despondency, the lofty spirit and generous aspirations to which the navy owes its past renown. I am happy to assure you that its present personnel does not deserve this neglect. At no previous time has it been able to boast of so many able officers of the higher grades, or of so many young officers of fine spirit, good attainment, and fair promise. Nothing is required but to brush off the rust of idleness by giving them employment, and to hold out to them the encouragement of a reasonable hope that a life devoted to the country, in the arduous service of the sea, may claim, at least, the reward of that country's notice and respect.

Other reasons for the present increased estimates will be found in the report of the Navy Commissioners, which I herewith present. Their statement is so minute and specific, and at the same time so condensed, that it conveys all needful information upon this point, in as few words as I could use for the same purpose. I content myself, therefore, with a simple reference to that document, remarking, at the same time, that it meets my entire approval.

It will be perceived that a very small appropriation is asked for continuing the necessary work at the navy-yard at Pensacola. The great importance of that yard is fully appreciated, and every effort will be used to complete it in as short a time as possible. It is believed, however, that the appropriation now asked is as large as can be advantageously used during the next year. I shall not hesitate to ask an additional appropriation should it hereafter appear to be necessary.

I invite your attention in an especial manner to the navy-yard at Brooklyn. Should the Government proceed with the construction of the dry-dock at that place, it is believed to be absolutely necessary to enlarge the yard to a very considerable extent. There is not at present a sufficient water front for the accommodation of half the number of vessels which will probably be assem-

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bled there at one time; nor is there within the yard space enough for conducting advantageously the necessary mechanical operations of such an establishment. It is also worthy of consideration that the safety of the yard is much endangered by the adjoining private buildings, one of which is a turpentine distillery, and nearly all of which are built of wood. In case of fire on that side of the yard, it would be extremely difficult to save the public property. I respectfully suggest that an establishment of such magnitude and value should be bounded on all sides either by water or by a public street, so as to afford the greatest possible security against danger from fire. The present is a very favorable time for the purchase of the additional ground necessary to the attainment of this object. I recommend this subject to your consideration before any large additional expenditure shall be made for permanent improvements under the present arrangement.

A suit has been commenced, by an individual, for the recovery of eight or ten acres of the land attached to the navy hospital at Norfolk. So much of that land as is unclaimed by individuals, has now growing upon it a grove of flourishing trees, which would, if properly protected, afford great comfort and refreshment to the invalids, while it would add much to the beauty of the grounds. At present, however, it is not enclosed, and consequently is subject to depredations which there are no means of preventing. These depredations will in a short time destroy the whole growth. A very small expenditure would protect it, and would be very beneficially applied to that object.

You will perceive that the Commissioners ask for additional clerks. Fully convinced that these are altogether necessary, I should strenuously urge the subject upon your attention but for the hope that the wants of the entire Department in that respect will be provided for in the reorganization of it, which I have herein so earnestly recommended.

Additional marine barracks are required, and, if that corps should be considerably increased, will be absolutely necessary.

Permit me to express my entire approval of the suggestion of the Commissioners in relation to a suitable depot for the charts and nautical instruments belonging to the navy. These have been procured at great labor and expense, and are indispensable in the naval service. The small expenditure which will be necessary to preserve them in a condition always ready for use, is not worthy a moment's consideration when compared with the great purposes which they are designed to answer. They are a necessary part of a naval establishment worthy of the present and growing greatness of our country.

In the administration of this Department, it will ever be an object of great solicitude with me to practise a prudent economy in all things. But I have not sought to save the public money, by simply declining to apply it to its most valuable public uses. Believing it to be an object of the first importance to place our navy upon the most efficient establishment, I have not expected to effect that object at any small cost The saving which exposes the country, in a defenceless condition, to hostile attacks, will not be recommended by me. The spirit which pauses to calculate the cost of measures rendered necessary for the support of the honor and glory of our country, will never, it is hoped, display itself in this Department I have felt it to be my duty to place the alternative fairly and fully before the country. An efficient navy cannot be built and supported without very great expense; but this expense is more than repaid, even in time of peace, by the services which suck a navy can render. In war, it will be worth to us all the value which we

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place on the safety of our exposed seacoast, on the security of millions of our people, and on the well-earned glory of our naval flag. It is enough that a necessity for this expenditure can be shown; the amount of it will be a secondary consideration with a people who truly love their country and properly value its institutions.

All which is respectfully submitted.

A. P. UPSHUR.

To the President of the United States.

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[Note: Page numbers from this point on begin with page 369.] 

Schedule of papers accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy to the President of the United States, of December 4, 1841.

No. 1. Report of the Commissioners of the Navy, transmitting estimates for the naval service for the year 1842.

2. Estimate for the office of the Secretary of the Navy.

3. Estimate for the office of the Navy Commissioners.

4. Estimate for the expenses of the southwest executive building.

5. General estimate for the navy.

Detailed estimate:

A 5. Vessels in commission.

B 5. Receiving vessels.

C 5. Recruiting stations.

D 5. Yards and stations—pay of officers and others at.

E 5. Pay of officers waiting orders.

F 5. For provisions.

G 5. Improvement of navy yards.

H 5. Hospitals.

6. Estimate for the marine corps.

7. List of vessels in commission, their commanders, and stations.

8. Statement of vessels in ordinary.

9. Statement of vessels on the stocks.

10. Statement of labor, (days' work and amount.)

11. Statement of stores and materials on hand.

12. List of deaths in the navy.

13. List of dismissions in the navy.

14. List of resignations in the navy.

15. Report of the Commissioner of Pensions.

A 15. List of invalid navy pensioners.

B 15. List of widow pensioners.

C 15. List of minor children pensioners.

D 15. Receipts and expenditures on account of the navy pension fund.

16. Report of the commandant of the marine corps, on the increase of the corps, with tables No. 1 and No. 2.

____________

No. 1.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

Sir:

The Commissioners of the Navy have the honor to lay before you the estimates for the navy, for the year 1842, made out in conformity with your directions.

The principal of these are divided into the four general heads of pay and subsistence; increase, repair, armament, &c.; improvement of navy yards; and contingent.

Under the first head are included the pay and provisions for the subsistence of every person belonging to the navy, at present employed, and intended to be employed in the ensuing year, so far as any probable estimate can be made of the employment of the vessels and the wants of the

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service, founded on your design to increase the squadrons on foreign stations, to prepare the home squadron in the most efficient manner, and also to add to the public utility, by a small increase in the number of vessels.

The second head includes the preparation of materials of every kind for building such vessels as it may be deemed proper to build, or to commence the building of, in the course of the year. The repairs of all vessels, whose repairs are to be undertaken, are also included in this estimate, during the above-mentioned period of time, under the two heads of labor and materials, with the preparation and procurement of materials of wood, iron, cordage, canvass, and every other article which enters into their repair; looking forward to a small but gradual accumulation of them beyond the annual expenditure, so that, in a case of emergency, the means may be at hand to commence an immediate preparation for it.

Under the third head is embraced an estimate for such additions to the present existing establishments, in which the various duties appertaining to the navy, in almost every respect, are carried on, as may be necessary to put into successful operation the objects enumerated under the second head; and at the same time to increase their facilities for business, whilst they forward the general design of making them, at a gradual but not far distant period, as efficient as their several capacities will admit of.

Under the fourth head is placed an estimate for those articles, services, and duty, such as it is found impracticable to appropriate for, without entering into details of such small amounts and such numerous items as to embarrass and multiply the duty of the disbursing officers, without an adequate remuneration, by the economy of time and labor.

It will be perceived, by a comparison of the estimates for the present with those of the approaching year, that there is a considerable increase in the amount of those of the latter, which is to be accounted for in the two following modes: the increase of the number of officers of every rank, from midshipmen to captains; and the increase of our naval force, abroad and at home. It may more properly be said, with reference to the last named, by the establishment of a squadron to act on our own coast and in its vicinity, which, although not established now for the first time, has not existed for many years. For the increased amount of that of the second head, viz: increase, armament, repair, &c., over that which was estimated for as necessary for the present year, we must look at the various objects which it is intended to provide for in the coming year; and the number of them will show the propriety, as well as the expediency, of enlarging the appropriation for this purpose.

In the first place, the intention of the Government to increase its defensive means by the aid of steam power, applied to vessels of a sufficient size, to act in harbor defensively, or at sea offensively, is to be fulfilled, so far as those means have been indicated by the late act of Congress on the subject, and the directions of your predecessor. These were and are to provide, medium-sized steamers, of which three are already directed to be built, of the usual form, and to be worked by engines of the proper capacity, in the usual way; whilst two others, on a plan entirely new, but differing essentially in manner and form, are to be constructed with the view of ascertaining their efficiency and superiority, according to which their increase or discontinuance will, it is presumed, be determined. The first, of 600

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tons, is upon a plan presented by Captain Stockton, of the navy; and the second, of 300 tons, by Lieutenant W. W. Hunter, of the navy.

In the second place, the completion of several of the first class frigates, at Norfolk, New York, and Philadelphia, and the contemplated completion of others at Boston and Portsmouth, N. H., as well as a strict examination of all the ships of the line building at the different ports, with a view to remedying any defects that may be found in them, as the consequence of decay or of early exposure to the weather, before the erection of ship-houses, will add considerably to this item; and it seems to be a measure imperiously called for by a proper regard for the interests of the navy, and, a more important consideration, the object for which that navy is intended.

In the third place, it has been considered at this time proper to direct a thorough survey of several vessels which have for years remained in a doubtful state, either as to condemnation or repair, in order to put them in a condition beyond the necessity of a further expenditure, if found unserviceable; and if, on the other, they or either of them should be found worthy of repair, to commence it at once, as it is believed no more opportune occasion than the present will be afforded for that purpose. One, at least, of these will be, it is confidently anticipated, a valuable acquisition to the service by this operation; for, if not found fit for equipment as a ship of the line, (her present designation,) she may become a most serviceable vessel in that useful class of ships of war called frigates, an increase of which is at all limes desirable, as the most easy and expeditious of equipment, in proportion to their force, and the most useful when equipped.

In the fourth place, the building of an additional sloop of war of the first class, with the building of three vessels of an inferior size, the frames of all of which, with those of many others of larger sizes, have, by a becoming forecast, been provided, will, independent of them, by the necessary outlay for materials of timber, metal, cordage, and canvass, add considerably to this item, although the expense will be amply compensated by the increase of our naval means, in providing a class of vessels, the want of which is yearly felt as an evil, and to which a remedy should be applied.

In the fifth place, a general provision for such durable and imperishable articles as always enter into the construction and repair of vessels, beyond the contemplated wants of the year, to supply an unlooked-for deficiency try accident of any sort, or by the unexpected demand for these articles, which could neither be calculated on fairly nor foreseen, will add somewhat, although not much, to this item.

Under the third head, "improvements of navy yards," the amount has been made as large as in all probability the opportunities for work and their situation will allow to be expended in the coming year, in addition to the balances which may be on hand. With the exception of the sum assigned to the dock at New York, the remainder is to be expended in prosecuting those works which have been commenced hitherto, in pursuance of the plans adopted under the act of Congress of March, 1827, commonly called the gradual-improvement law. To this, the only exception is that presented by the yard at New York, for which no regular and permanent plan has yet been made, on account of the doubt existing, at the time the others were laid off, as to the propriety of continuing it at the present place. That doubt, however, it would appear, has been solved, substantially at least, by the commencement of the dock in that yard, for which

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an appropriation of $50,000 was made last year. To this an addition is made, in the estimates for the present year, of $150,000, which it is believed will be as much as can be expended, until a further appropriation is made in the session of Congress subsequent to that which takes place in a short time. The above sums will be principally absorbed by the payment for materials of wood and stone, for coffer dams and the foundation, for excavation and embankment; of which two last an unusual proportion must be performed, by reason of the position of the dock. The enlargement of this yard and the preparation of a plan by which the improvements may be permanently made, as is the case at the other yards, is of great importance, and seems to be a very proper subject for consideration at this time, as the workmen and materials for the dock will necessarily occupy a large portion of that space which is not now sufficient for naval purposes. To preserve in proper repair all, to increase the accommodations in some, and to extend the buildings of other of our hospitals near the principal navy yards, including that at Pensacola, which is almost daily becoming more important, a considerable increase of the amount last appropriated for those objects has been considered necessary, as will be seen by a comparison of the sums for the present and coming years.

Under the fourth head of contingent, embracing the two items enumerated and unenumerated, no change has been made in the estimate for either, as it is presumed there will be little or no difference in the expenditures under that head.

Having briefly explained the nature of the four principal appropriations, and entered into a detail of their constituent parts, which it is hoped, and indeed desired, may be satisfactory, we beg leave to pass on to another subject, believing it may be equally important to have it presented to your view; and that is, the progress made since the last report in the materials for and the vessels of the navy. Under the first of these items, a considerable quantity of live oak, engaged for several years, to be delivered by various contractors, although not in quantities as large as could have been wished, owing to mishaps and other interruptions, has been delivered. Quantities of other kinds of timber, (oak and pine, for instance,) for the repair of vessels, with large proportions of iron and copper, have also been received from the persons engaged to furnish them. Iron, also, for chain cables and for tanks, has been received to nearly the whole amount under engagement. The present estimates are intended to embrace the acquisition of quantities of all the above-enumerated articles but the first.

Under the law for procuring ordnance, preliminary steps have been taken to procure a large addition to the cannon of the navy, and particularly with reference to the Paixhan guns and shells. Provision will also be made for adding considerably to the stock of powder and shot. Whilst on this subject, we take the occasion to state that our attention will be turned to the advantage of reducing the number of the caliber of the guns for the navy, so as to have them, as nearly as practicable, of one size hereafter. The advantage of such an equality is too obvious to need explanation; and the subject may be dismissed by saying, the only variation, excluding Paixhan guns, is to be in the length and weight, instead of both those and the size of the bore, as is now the case.

Since our last annual report, the Congress, a frigate of the first class, has been launched at Portsmouth, N. H., and finished, with the exception of her equipment, which is going on rapidly, and it is expected will soon be

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completed. The two sea steamers, Missouri and Mississippi, built at New York and Philadelphia, have been launched, and are equipping with despatch, and will in a short time be ready for service, as a part of the home squadron, for which they are intended. As these vessels, though of the same size and form, have engines of different kinds, it is desirable that they may have an opportunity of testing their relative qualities and power by frequent trials at sea in all kinds of weather. The frigate United States has been prepared for service, as well as the sloop Cyane, for the Pacific. The Delaware (74) has sailed for the Brazils, as the ship for the commander of that squadron. The Brandywine, a frigate of the first class, having been refitted, has returned to the Mediterranean, as the commanding ship of that squadron; and the Fairfield, sloop of war, has also been sent thither. The Macedonian, Warren, and Vandalia, are preparing, and are nearly ready for the service of the West India squadron. The Independence, razee, intended for the commanding ship of the home squadron, the Columbia, a frigate of the first class, with the John Adams and Falmouth, first class sloops, are preparing, and are nearly ready for the home squadron, of which the small vessels, Boxer and Grampus, form the remainder.

In concluding this general but condensed view of the wants and resources of the navy, its operations in the present, and the contemplated arrangements for the next twelve months, it may be proper to state, that the excess of the sum called for, on account of the navy, for the ensuing year, over that of the present, is to be found in the increased number of promotions and original appointments of officers of the junior rank and other ranks; an increase of the number of vessels beyond those at present employed, and the subsequent addition to the number of officers on sea pay, with the requisite proportion of persons to man them. The addition of two steamers, one first class sloop of war, and three smaller vessels, with the outfits and stores of the first mentioned, as well as the last, contribute essentially to swell the amount.

Believing that a short statement of the necessity for the employment of additional clerks in the office of the Navy Commissioners may be proper, we must observe that, for several years, the inconvenience arising from their want has been so sensibly felt as to induce representations and estimates, hitherto without effect. The present number allowed to this office is insufficient to discharge the duties of the board. These duties comprise subjects nearly if not quite equal in amount to those of a similar nature in the army, which are assigned to separate bureaux, and require twenty clerks, it is believed, in addition to the officers employed as assistants to the heads of those bureaux; whilst to the Commissioners are allowed only six clerks and a draughtsman, with a secretary to the Board. We earnestly remark, that we consider those now asked for as indispensably necessary, to enable us to answer the numerous calls for information that so frequently occur during a session of Congress, in addition to the already onerous, heavy, and increasing current duties of the office. With this addition, we might be enabled so to arrange the business to be performed as to present, at a very short notice, a lucid statement of any subject required, besides the compilation and digestion, for hourly use, of a mass of important matter, which, for such a want, is almost unavailable.

The Commissioners of the Navy have to remark, in laying before you the estimate for the marine corps, the necessity, in their opinion, for barracks at the four principal navy yards, or ports, for the portion of marines

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which it may be necessary to retain in the vicinity of each, for supplying detachments to the ships preparing for sea, and those returned from sea service, &c. They believe the establishment of them, as above mentioned, will add much to the efficiency and comfort of the corps, and be a measure of sound economy. The sum proposed appears to them sufficient for the purchase of sites, and for the expenditure upon materials for the ensuing year; which, it is presumed, will be effecting as much as can be done within the period for which the appropriation is to be made. The amount asked for (viz: $175,000) is the same that was asked for last year, but reduced, by the direction of your predecessor, Mr. Secretary Paulding, to $100,000.

We have considered it proper to enumerate the several heads of the general estimate for the year 1842, by which you will perceive, at a glance, the amount of the whole appropriation asked for, as shown by the sheet marked No. 5.

In concluding this communication, the Board beg leave to call your attention to the subject of a permanent depot for the charts and instruments belonging to the navy.

The buildings which have hitherto been used as a temporary depot have been rented, and are inconvenient and unsuited to the wants of such an establishment; the utility of which, as a matter of economy only, is fully manifested in the careful preservation, and distribution to sea-going vessels, of the valuable instruments and charts which have been carefully selected and procured for the service, at considerable expense. To this may be added the facilities which such an establishment presents to officers of the navy, for obtaining useful, valuable, and, indeed, necessary knowledge, in some of the higher branches of their profession.

The Board are fully convinced of the advantage of such a permanent establishment, properly constructed and judiciously located, and earnestly recommend it to your favorable consideration. The probable cost of a suitable site and buildings would not exceed $50,000. If half this sum was appropriated, it could be commenced the ensuing season with advantage, and be completed in 1843.

We have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your obedient servants,

L. WARRINGTON.
W. M. CRANE.
D. CONNER.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

_____________

No. 2.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy for the year 1842.

Secretary of the Navy   $6,000 00
Six clerks, per act of April 20, 1818 $8,200  
One clerk, per act of May 26, 1824 1,000  
One clerk, per act of March 2, 1827 1,000  
    10,200 00
Messenger and assistant messenger   1,050 00
Contingent expenses   5,000 00
    22,250 00

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SUBMITTED.

For increasing the salary of one of the clerks under the act of 20th April, 1818, now $800, to $1,000 $200 00

____________

No. 3.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the Navy Commissioners' office for the year 1842, as at present established by law.

For the salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy $10,500 00
For the salary of their secretary 2,000 00
For the salaries of their clerks, draughtsman, and messenger, per acts of 20th April, 1818, 24th May, 1824, and 2d March, 1827 8,450 00
For contingent expenses 3,600 00
  24,550 00

SUBMITTED.

For two additional clerks, at $1,400 each 2,800 00
For two additional clerks, at $1,200 each 2,400 00
  5,200 00
For this sum to pay arrearage for clerk's salary heretofore appropriated, the same having been carried to the surplus fund in 1835, and now estimated for, in conformity with the direction of the Secretary of the Navy 618 33

The amount asked for the contingent expenses of the office is increased beyond the ordinary contingent demands, in order to meet the expenses of extra clerical assistance, which has been and which it will be indispensably necessary to employ, to keep up the current business of the office, until the additional aid asked shall be authorized by law.

L. WARRINGTON.
W. M. CRANE.
D. CONNER.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

____________

No. 4.

Estimate of sums required for the expenses of the southwest executive building for the year 1842.

Superintendent $250 00
Two watchmen, at $700 each, watching day and night 1,400 00
Contingent expenses, including oil, fuel, labor, repairs of building, engine, and improvement of grounds 3,350 00
  5,000 00

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Note.—The additional sum of $200 each is included in the above item of estimates for the watchmen, in consideration of being required to watch day and night, to wit: from 3 o'clock, P. M., till relieved by the messengers of the Department, about 8 o'clock, A. M. When their salaries were fixed at $500, they were required to watch only from sunset till sunrise.

_____________

No. 5.

GENERAL ESTIMATE.

There will be required for the general service of the navy during the year 1842, exclusive of the amount required for the marine corps, the sum of eight millions two hundred and thirteen thousand two hundred and eighty-seven dollars twenty-three cents, in addition to any balance that way remain in the Treasury on the 1st of January, 1842.

 

  For 1842. For 1841.
1. For the pay of commission, warrant, petty officers, and seamen $3,195,432 23 $2,434,280 59
2. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishments at the several yards 78,420 00 75,170 00
3. For provisions 720,000 00 500,000 00
4. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick 30,000 00 30,000 00
5. For the increase, repair, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission 3,165,000 00 2,000,000 00
6. For the improvement and necessary repairs of navy yards, viz:    
Portsmouth, N. H. 47,425 00 25,000 00
Charlestown, Mass. 86,000 00 42,200 00
Brooklyn, N. Y. 183,600 00 78,800 00
Philadelphia 17,100 00 9,000 00
Washington, D. C. 43,700 00 11,000 00
Gosport, Va. 92,800 00 49,000 00
Pensacola 33,800 00 20,000 00
7. For hospital buildings and their dependencies, viz:    
Charlestown, Mass. 3,960 00 1,500 00
Brooklyn, N. Y. 20,000 00 3,000 00
Norfolk, Va. 13,750 00 2,000 00
Pensacola, Fl. 28,000 00 1,500 00
Philadelphia naval asylum 1,300 00  

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No 5—Continued.

8. For contingent expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz:    
For the freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent, travelling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; for house rent to pursers when duly authorized; for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, office rent, stationery, and fuel, to navy agents; for premiums and incidental expenses for recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judges advocate; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, or other services, as authorized by law; for printing and stationery, of every description, and for working the lithographic press; for books, maps, charts, mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers) models, and drawings; for the purchase and repair of fire engines and machinery; for the repair of steam engines in navy yards; for the purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber-wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships of war; for taxes and assessments on public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel, and for candles and oil, for the use of navy yards and shore stations; and for no other object or purpose whatever $450,000 00 $450,000 00
9. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated 3,000 00 3,000 00
  8,213,287 23 5,735,450 59

L. WARRINGTON.
W. M. CRANE.
D. CONNER.

Navy Commissioners' Office, Nov. 30, 1841.

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____________

A No. 5.

VESSELS IN COMMISSION.

Estimate of the amount of pay that will be required for the year 1842, for the following vessels in commission, viz:

2 ships of the line, 5 sloops of the 3d class,
1 razee, 11 brigs and schooners,
4 frigates of the 1st class, 3 steamers,
2 frigates of the 2d class, 3 store ships,
13 sloops of the 1st class, 8 small vessels.
1 sloop of the 2d class,  

 

Eight commanders of squadrons $32,000 00
2 ships of the line 297,342 50
1 razee 112,845 25
4 frigates of the 1st class 352,485 00
2 frigates of the 2d class 146,287 82
13 sloops of the 1st class 574,796 25
1 sloop of the 2d class 40,695 91
5 sloops of the 3d class 164,946 25
11 brigs and schooners 201,247 75
3 steamers 168,009 75
3 storeships 38,563 75
8 small vessels 146,362 00
Scientific corps 20,700 00
Estimate for 1842 2,296,284 23
Estimate for 1841 1,687,350 34
  608,933 89

Note.—The increase in this item, of the first head in the general estimate, arises from the provision made for a home squadron, some change in the force to be employed, and the increase of force on some of the foreign stations.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

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B No. 5.

Estimate of the number and pay of officers, &c., required for eight receiving vessels for the year 1842, being part of the first item in the general estimate for that year.

  Portland. New Bedford. Boston. New York. Philadelphia. Baltimore. Norfolk. New Orleans. Total. Amount.
Captains     1 1     1   3 $10,500 00
Commanders 1 1     1 1   1 5 10,500 00
Lieutenants 2 2 6 6 2 2 6 2 28 42,000 00
Masters 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 8,000 00
Pursers     1 1     1   3 1,987 50
Surgeons     1 1     1   3 7,200 00
Assistant surgeons     1 1     1   3 3,600 00
Passed midshipmen     18 18     18   54 40,500 00
Midshipmen 3 3     3 3   3 15 5,250 00
Clerks     1 1     1   3 1,500 00
Boatswains     1 1     1   3 2,250 00
Gunners     1 1     1   3 2,250 00
Carpenters     1 1     1   3 2,250 00
Sailmakers     1 1     1   3 2,250 00
Yeomen     1 1     1   3 1,440 00
Boatswains' mates 1 1 4 4 1 1 4 1 17 3,876 00
Gunners' mates     1 1     1   3 684 00
Carpenters' mates 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1,824 00
Quartermasters     4 4     4   12 2,592 00
Masters-at-arms     1 1     1   3 648 00
Ships' corporals     1 1     1   3 540 00
Ships' stewards 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1,728 00
Officers' stewards 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 11 2,376 00
Surgeons' stewards     1 1     1   3 648 00
Ships' cooks 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 8 1,728 00
Officers' cooks 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 11 2,376 00
Captains of the hold     1 1     1   3 540 00
Seamen 2 2 100 100 2 2 100 2 310 44,640 00
Ordinary seamen 4 4 100 100 4 4 100 4 320 38,400 00
Landsmen and apprentices     75 75     75   225 18,900 00
Estimate for 1842 19 19 330 330 19 19 330 19 1085 262,977 50
Estimate for 1841 0 0 330 330 19 16 330 0 1025 200,147 50
Increase for 1842 19 19       3   19 60 62,830 00

 

Note.—-The increase in the estimate for 1842, over that for 1841, is caused by three additional receiving vessels at Portland, New Bedford, and New Orleans.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

--379--

______________

C No. 5.

RECRUITING STATIONS.

Estimate for the pay of officers attached to recruiting stations for the year 1842, being part of the first item of the general estimate for that year.

  Portland. New Bedford. Boston. New York. Philadelphia. Baltimore. Norfolk. New Orleans. Inland stations. Total.  
Commanders 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 12 $25,200
Lieutenants 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 20 30,000
Surgeons 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 12 21,000
Midshipmen 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 8 24 8,400
Estimate for 1842 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 20 68 84,600
Estimate for 1841 0 0 6 6 6 6 6 0 00 30 37,750
Increase for 1843 6 6           6 20 38 46,850

Note.—The increase in the foregoing estimate for 1842, over that for 1841, is caused by the establishment of seven additional recruiting stations.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

_____________

D No. 5.

Estimate of the pay of officers and others at navy yards and stations for the year 1842.

No. PORTSMOUTH, N. H. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Master 1,000  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Sailmaker 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 941 75  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $14,251 75

--380--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. PORTSMOUTH, N. H.—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
  Ordinary.    
1 Lieutenant $1,500  
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
6 Seamen, at $144 each 864  
12 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,440  
      $4,032
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,400  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Foreman and inspector of timber 700  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk to the master builder 400  
1 Porter 300  
      7,650
  Total   25,983,75
  BOSTON    
  Naval.    
1 Captain 3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
2 Professors, at $1,200 each 2,400  
4 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,400  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Sailmaker 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360 23,017 75

--381--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. BOSTON—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
  Ordinary.    
3 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each $4,500  
1 Master 1,000  
6 Midshipmen, at $350 each 2,100  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
4 Carpenters' mates, (3 as caulkers,) at $228 each 912  
2 Boatswains' mates, at $228 each 456  
14 Seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,320  
      $ 6,804
  Hospital.    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Steward 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 Cook 144  
  *When number of sick shall require them.   3,636
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Measurer and inspector of timber 1,050  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 650  
1 Keeper of magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      10 380
  Total   53,837 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are to be required to attend to the marines also.

--382--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. NEW YORK. Pay. Aggregate;
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
2 Professors, at $1,200 each 2,400  
4 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,400  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Sailmaker 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $23,017 75
  Ordinary.    
3 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 4,500  
1 Master 1,000  
6 Midshipmen, at $350 each 2,100  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
4 Carpenters' mates, (3 as caulkers,) at $228 each 912  
2 Boatswains' mates, at $228 each 456  
14 Seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 Ordinary seamen, at 120 each 4,320  
      16,804
  Hospital.    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Steward 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 Cook 144  
  *When number of sick shall require them.   3,636
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Measurer and inspector of timber 1,050  

--383--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. NEW YORK—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 Clerk to the yard $900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 630  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      $10,380
  Total   53,837 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines.

No. PHILADELPHIA. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Master 1,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
      $14,907 75
  Ordinary.    
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Boatswain's mate 228  
4 Seamen, at $144 each 576  
12 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,440  
      3,744
  Naval Asylum and Hospital.    
1 Captain 3,500  
1 Master 1,000  
1 Secretary 900  

--384--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. PHILADELPHIA—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 Surgeon* $1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon * 950  
1 Steward* 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 Cook* 144  
  *To attend to the hospital, also, if required.   $9,036
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,250  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk to the naval constructor 400  
1 Porter 300  
      7,700
  Total   35,387 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the receiving vessel and the marines.

No. WASHINGTON. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
2 Masters, one in charge of ordnance, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner, as laboratory officer 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
1 Steward to hospital 216  
      $16,483 75

--385--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. WASHINGTON—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
  Ordinary.    
1 Boatswain's mate $228  
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
6 Seamen, at $144 each 864  
14 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,680  
      $3,000
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor, (to be employed as the Secretary may direct) 2,300  
1 Master builder 1,250  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 900  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk to the master builder 450  
1 Master camboose maker and plumber 1,250  
1 Chain cable and anchor maker 1,250  
1 Keeper of the magazine 480  
1 Porter 300  
      13, 180
  Total   32,663 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also required to attend to the hospital when necessary.

No. NORFOLK. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants 3,000  
2 Masters, at $1,000 each 2,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
2 Assistant surgeons, at $950 each 1,900  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
2 Professors, at $1,200 each 2,400  
4 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,400  
1 Boatswain 500  

--386--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. NORFOLK—Continued. Pay. Aggregate.
1 Gunner $500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Sailmaker 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
1 Steward, assistant to purser 360  
      $23,017 75
  Ordinary.    
3 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 4,500  
1 Master 1,000  
6 Midshipmen, at $350 each 2,100  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
4 Carpenters' mates, (3 as caulkers,) at $228 each. 912  
2 Boatswains' mates, at $228 each 456  
14 Seamen, at $144 each 2,016  
36 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 4,320  
      16,804
  Hospital.    
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Steward 360  
2 Nurses at $120 each* 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 Cook 144  
  *When number of sick shall require them.   5,136
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Naval constructor 2,300  
1 Inspector and measurer of timber 1,050  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 900  
1 Clerk (2d) to the storekeeper 450  
1 Clerk to naval constructor 650  
1 Keeper of magazine 480  
1 Porter 300 10,380
  Total   55,337 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to be required to attend to the marines.

--387--

D No. 5—Continued.

No. PENSACOLA. Pay. Aggregate.
  Naval.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
1 Master 1,000  
1 Surgeon 1,800  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Chaplain 1,200  
3 Midshipmen, at $350 each 1,050  
1 Boatswain 500  
1 Gunner 500  
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Sailmaker 500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 1,141 75  
1 Steward 216  
      $17,957 75
  Ordinary.    
1 Carpenter 500  
1 Carpenter's mate 228  
1 Boatswain's mate 228  
10 Seamen, at $144 each 1,440  
10 Ordinary seamen, at $120 each 1,200  
      3,596 00
  Hospital.    
1 Surgeon 1,750  
1 Assistant surgeon 950  
1 Steward 360  
2 Nurses, at $120 each* 240  
2 Washers, at $96 each* 192  
1 Cook 144  
  *When number of sick shall require them.   3,636 00
  Civil.    
1 Storekeeper 1,700  
1 Clerk to the yard 900  
1 Clerk to the commandant 900  
1 Clerk (second) to the commandant 750  
1 Clerk to the storekeeper 750  
1 Clerk (second) to the storekeeper 450  
1 Porter 300  
      5,750 00
  Total   $30,939 75

Note.—The surgeon and assistant surgeon of the yard are also to attend to the marines and the receiving vessel, if one should be stationed near the yard, and to such persons in the yard as the commander may direct.

--388--

D No. 5-Continued.

No. STATIONS. Pay.  
  Baltimore.    
1 Captain $3,500  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Surgeon 1,500  
1 Purser, including all allowances 862 50  
1 Clerk 500  
      $7,862 50
  Charleston.    
1 Captain 3,500  
1 Lieutenant 1,500  
1 Surgeon 1,500  
1 Purser and storekeeper, including all allowances 1, 189 75  
      7,689 75
  Sackett's Harbor.    
1 Master 1,000  
      1,000 00
  For duty at Washington, or on general duty—ordnance.    
1 Captain 3,500  
1 Commander 2,100  
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
4 Passed midshipmen, at $750 each 3,000  
      11,600 00
  Chart and instrument depot.    
2 Lieutenants, at $1,500 each 3,000  
4 Passed midshipmen 3,000  
1 Chief naval constructor   6,000 00
    3,000  
1 Civil engineer 4,000  
1 Principal steam engineer 2,500  
      9,500 00
  Foreign stations.    
1 Storekeeper at Mahon 1,500  
1 Storekeeper at Rio de Janeiro 1,500  
      3,000 00

--389--

D No. 5—Continued.

RECAPITULATION.

  Naval.
1st head, 4th item.
Ordinary.
1st head, 5th item.
Hospital.
1st head, 6th item.
Civil.
2d head.
Aggregate.
Portsmouth, N. H. $14,251 75 $4,032   $7,650 $25,938 75
Boston 23,017 75 16,804 $3,636 10,380 58,837 75
New York 23,017 75 16,804 3,636 10,380 53,837 75
Philadelphia 14,907 75 3,744 9,036 7,700 35,387 75
Washington 16,483 75 3,000   13, 180 32,663 75
Norfolk 23,017 75 16,804 5,136 10,380 55,337 75
Pensacola 17,057 75 3,596 3,636 5,750 30,939 75
Baltimore 7,362 50     500 7,862 50
Charleston 7,689 75       7,689 75
Sackett's Harbor 1,000 00       1,000 00
Ordnance 11,600 00       11,600 00
Chart and instrument depot 6,000 00       6,000 00
Naval constructor       3,000 3,000 00
Civil engineer       4,000 4,000 00
Principal steam engineer       2,500 2,500 00
Storekeepers       3,000 3,000 00
Estimated for 1842 166,306 50 64,784 25,080 78,420 334,590 50
Estimated for 1841 157,312 50 64,784 25,080 75,170 322,346 50
Increase for 1842 8,994 00     3,250 12,244 00

Note.—The difference in the foregoing estimates is occasioned by additional officers being attached to the ordnance service and to the chart and instrument depot, the salary of the naval constructor at Washington, and a small addition to the pay of the storekeepers' clerks at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Norfolk.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

--390--

____________

E No. 5.

WAITING ORDERS.

Estimate of the pay required for the commissioned and warrant officers waiting orders for 1842, being the seventh item of the first head of the general estimate for that year.

31 captains $77,500 00
47 commanders 84,600 00
58 lieutenants 69,600 00
16 surgeons 25,600 00
6 chaplains 4,800 00
72 midshipmen 21,600 00
  283,700 00
Add for 39 midshipmen, who, after examination, may be entitled to be arranged as passed midshipmen, in addition to their pay as midshipmen 11,700 00
Estimated for 1842 295,400 00
Estimated for 1841 261,856 25
  $33,543 75

Note.—This difference is occasioned by the change in the number and rank of officers waiting orders.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

____________

F No. 5.

PROVISIONS.

Estimate of the amount required for provisions for the year 1842, explanatory of the third item of the general estimate for that year.

9,867 persons in vessels in commission, exclusive of marines.  
999 marines, embarked in vessels in commission.  
1,382 persons attached to recruiting vessels, and enlisted persons at shore stations.  
12,248 persons, at one ration per day, will make 4,470,520 rations, which, at 20 cents each, are equal to $894,104 00
  Estimating the balance under this head that may remain in the Treasury on the 1st January, 1842, as available for that year, there may be deducted from the above the sum of $174,104, which may not be required 174,104 00
    720,000 00

--391--

Note.—From the amount now in the Treasury for provisions, the above sum, with the probable balance which will be on hand on the 1st January, 1842, will, it is believed, be sufficient for the demands under this head for the ensuing year.

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

______________

G No. 5.

IMPROVEMENTS OF NAVY YARDS.

Estimate of the proposed improvements and repairs to be made in the navy yards during the year 1842, explanatory of the sixth head of the general estimate.

At Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

For completing wharf No. 3 $28,000
For taking up fallen materials of wharf No. 1 5,000
For continuing wall west side of launching-slip No. 2, and for a portable bridge across end of the same 4,775
For completing knee-dock site 22 1,150
For repairs of all kinds, including navy-yard bridge 8,500
  $47,425

At Charlestown, Massachusetts.

For extending smithery $9,500
For pier wharf, angle 59 22,000
For dredging at entrance of dock 2,500
For steam engine to ropewalk 8,000
For rigging loft, cordage store, &c. 35,000
For addition to floating gate of dry dock 4,500
For repairs of all kinds 4,500
  $86,000

At Brooklyn, New York.

For foundation of granite sheds for guns $3,500
For re-slating roof of sail loft and coppering roof of yard offices 4,900
For dredging out docks and channels, &c. 5,000
For a pitch house, setting boilers, &c. 1,700
For a guard house for marine guards, police officers, watchmen, &c. 4,500
For building for fire engines and cistern 5,000
For continuing construction of dry dock 150,000
For repairs of all kinds 9,000
  $183,600

--392--

At Philadelphia.

For two houses for officers on plan of yard $15,500
For repairs of all kinds 1,600
  $17,100

At Washington.

For renewing wharf, end of ship-house $7,500
For browstage at north end of saw mill, new shears, &c. 1,800
For addition to officers' quarters 2,300
For barracks for ordinary and watchmen 1,500
For a new iron foundry and extending iron store 6,700
For shops for machinists and paint shop 4,500
For a new saw mill 6,000
For new machinery in chain-cable shop, planing machine, &c. 7,000
For repairs of all kinds in yard and naval magazine 6,500
  $43,700

At Norfolk, Virginia.

For quay walls, launching slip, and timber docks $40,000
For building store-house No. 16, to be used as timber shed 36,000
For dredging machine and culvert 7,000
For repairs of all kinds 9,800

At Pensacola.

For building offices $16,300
For guard-house and gateway west side of yard 7,500
For completing timber shed No. 1 5,000
For repairs of all kinds 5,000
 

$33,800

RECAPITULATION.

For navy yard Portsmouth, New Hampshire $47,425
For navy yard Charlestown, Massachusetts 86,000
For navy yard Brooklyn, New York 183,600
For navy yard Philadelphia 17,100
For navy yard Washington 43,700
For navy yard Gosport, Virginia 92,800
For navy yard Pensacola 33,800
  $564,425

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

--393--

_____________

No. 5. HOSPITALS.

An estimate of the sums that will be required during the year 1842 for the repairs and improvements of the hospitals at the several navy yards, viz:

For hospital at Charlestown, Massachusetts $3,960
For hospital at Brooklyn, New York 20,000
For naval asylum at Philadelphia 1,300
For hospital at Norfolk, Virginia 13,750
For hospital at Pensacola 28,000
Total required for hospitals $67,010

Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 30, 1841.

____________

No. 6.

Original estimate of the expenses of the quartermaster's department of the United States marine corps for the year 1842.

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Washington, October 7, 1841.

Sir:

The estimates for the marine corps for the year 1842 accompany this letter.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

ARCHIBALD HENDERSON,
Colonel Commandant.

Com. Lewis Warrington,
President Board of Navy Commissioners.

____________ 

Headquarters Marine Corps,
Quartermaster's Office, Washington, October 7, 1841.

Sir:

The triplicate estimates for the support of the quartermaster's department of the marine corps for the year 1842, which are herewith submitted, vary from the estimates of the last year in the addition of $500 to the appropriation for military stores, the increase being for the purchase and repair of instruments for the band.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,
Quartermaster Marine Corps.

Col. Archibald Henderson,
Commandant Marine Corps, Headquarters.

--394--

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Paymaster's Office, October 7, 1841.

Sir:

Herewith you will receive triplicate estimates for the pay department of the marine corps for the year 1842.

I am, very respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

GEO. W. WALKER,
Paymaster Marine Corps.

Col. Archibald Henderson,
Commandant U. S. Marine Corps, Headquarters.

Estimate for the quartermaster's department of the United States Marine corps for the year 1842.

There will be required for the support of the quartermaster's department of the marine corps during the year 1842, in addition to the balances remaining on hand on the 1st of January, 1842, the sum of three hundred and eighteen thousand nine hundred and eleven dollars and sixty-one cents.

For provisions for the non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, serving on shore $45,054 99
For clothing 43,662 50
For fuel 16,274 12
For the purchase of a site, and to commence the erection of barracks at Charlestown, Massachusetts 50,000 00
For ditto at Brooklyn, New York 50,000 00
For ditto at Gosport, Virginia 50,000 00
To commence the erection of barracks at Pensacola 25,000 00
For keeping barracks in repair, and for rent of temporary barracks at New York 6,000 00
For transportation of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and expenses of recruiting 8,000 00
For medicines, hospital supplies, surgical instruments, and pay of matron and hospital stewards 4,140 00
For military stores, pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, accoutrements, ordnance stores, flags, drums, fifes, and other instruments for the band 2,800 00
For contingencies, viz: freight, ferriage, toll, wharfage, and cartage, per diem allowance for attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, compensation to judges advocate, house rent where no public quarters are assigned, per diem allowance to enlisted men on constant labor, expenses of burying deceased marines, printing, stationery, forage, postage on public letters, expenses in pursuit of deserters, candles and oil, straw, barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, carpenters' tools, and for the keeping of a horse for the messenger 17,980 00
  318,911 61

--395--

ESTIMATE FOR 1842—Continued.

FUEL.—For whom required. Number. Fuel for each. Total fuel. Amount.
Cords. Feet. Inches. Cords. Feet. Inches.
Dolls. Cts.
Colonel commandant 1 36 4   36 4    
Lieutenant colonel, south of latitude 39 1 26     26      
Majors, do. do. 39 1 26     26      
Majors, north do. 39 3 29     87      
Captains, do. do. 43 1 24 4 8 24 4 8  
Captains, do. do. 39 2 23 6   47 4    
Captains, south do, 39 3 21 2   63 6    
Staff, do. do. 39 3 26     78      
Staff, north do. 39 1 29     29      
Lieutenants, do. do. 43 2 19 1 4 38 2 8  
Lieutenant, do. do. 39 12 18 4   222      
Lieutenants, south do. 14 16 4   231      
Non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, servants, and washerwomen, north of latitude 40 239 1 5   388 3    
Do. south of latitude 40 370 1 4   555      
Clerk to paymaster 1 2 2 8 2 2 8  
Hospital matron 1 1 4   1 4    
Commanding officer's office at Portsmouth, New Hampshire 1 8 5 4 8 5 4  
Guard room at do. 1 25     25      
Hospital at do. 1 19 1 4 19 1 4  
Mess room at do. 1 4 1 4 4 1 4  
Offices of the commanding officer and assistant quartermaster at Charlestown, Now York, and Philadelphia 4 8     32      
Guard rooms at do, 3 24     72      
Hospitals at do. 3 18 4   55 4    
Mess rooms at do. 3 4     12      
Offices of the commandant and staff and commanding officers at headquarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola 7 7     49      
Guard rooms at headquarters, navy yard Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola 4 21     84      
Hospital at headquarters 1 33     33      
Hospitals at Norfolk and Pensacola 2 16 4   33      
Mess rooms for officers at headquarters, Norfolk, and Pensacola 3 3 4   10 4    
Armory at Washington 1 30     30      
Cords         2,324 7    
Which, at $7 per cord, is               16,274 18

--396--

ESTIMATE FOR 1842—Continued.

PROVISIONS.—For whom required. Enlisted men. Washerwomen. Matron. Servants. Clerks Total. Rations per day at 19 cents. Rations per day at 20 cents. Aggregate amount.
Dolls. Cts.
For non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen 517 34 1     552 1   38,281 20
For clerks and officers' servants       68 5 73   1 5,329 00
For two months' rations for each soldier as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably, to the act of 2d March, 1835 125         125 1   1,444 79
                  45,054 99

 

CLOTHING.—For whom required. Enlisted men. Servants. Clerks Total. Amount.
Dolls. Cts.
For non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, at $33 per annum 1,156     1,156 38,148 00
For officers' servants, at $33 per annum   68   68 2,244 00
For paymaster's clerk, at $33 per annum       1 33 09
For 300 watch coats, at $8 50 each         2,650 00
For two months clothing for each soldier as premium for re-enlisting, agreeably to the act of 2d March, 1835 125     125 687 50
          43,662 50

Respectfully submitted.

AUG. A. NICHOLSON,
Quartermaster Marine Corps.

--397--

Detailed estimates of pay and subsistence of officers and pay of non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, of the marine corps of the United States for the year 1842.

RANK AND GRADE. No. PAY. SUBSISTENCE. Aggregate.
Pay per month. Extra pay per month. No. servants at $8 per month. No. servants at $7 per month. Total. No. rations per day at 20 cents. No. extra or double rations at 20 cts. p. day. Total.
Colonel commandants 1 75     2 $1,068 6 6 $876 $1,944
Lieutenant colonels 1 60     2 888 5 5 730 1,618
Majors 4 50     2 3,072 4 4 2,336 5,408
Adjutant and inspectors 1 60   2   912 4 4 584 1,496
Paymasters I 60   2   912 4 4 584 1,496
Quartermasters 1 60   2   912 4 4 584 1,496
Assistant quartermasters 1 50   1   696 4 4 584 1,280
Captains commanding posts and at sea 3 50     1 2,088 4 4 1,752 3,840
Captains on recruiting service 2 40     1 1,928 4 4 1,168 2,296
Captains 5 40     1 2,820 4   1,460 4,280
First lieutenants commanding guards or detachments at sea 5 40     1 2,820 4 4 2,920 5,740
First lieutenants 16 30     1 7,104 4   4,964 12,068
Second lieutenants 20 25     1 7,680 4   5,840 13,520
Hospital stewards 1 18       216 1   73 289
Sergeant majors 1 17       204       204
Quartermaster sergeants 1 17 $20     444       444
Drum and fife majors 2 16       384       384
Orderly sergeants employed as clerks to col. com't, adj't and insp'r, and q'rmas. 3 16 20     1,296       1,596
Sergeants 50 13       7,800       7,800
Corporals 80 0       8,640       8,640
Drummers and fifers 60 8       5,760       5,760
Privates 1,000 7       84,000       84,000
Clerk to paymasters 1         *650       650
Amount required for payment of bounty for re-enlistment 125         1,750       1,750
Additional rations to officers for every five years' service             144     10,498
Orderly sergeants and sergeant of guards at sea 27 16       5, 184       5, 184
                    183,381

*This sum of $650 covers, and is in lieu of pay, clothing, rations, fuel, and quarters, for the year 1842.

Respectfully submitted,

GEO. W. WALKER, Paymaster Marine Corps.

--398--

The Commissioners of the Navy have to remark, in laying before you the estimates for the marine corps, the necessity, in their opinion, for barracks at the four principal navy yards or ports for the portion of marines which it may be necessary to retain in the vicinity of each, or supplying detachments to the ships preparing for sea, and those returned from sea service, &c. They believe the establishment of them as above mentioned will add much to the efficiency and comfort of the corps, and be a measure of sound economy.

The sum proposed appears to them to be sufficient for the purchase of sites and for the expenditures upon materials for the ensuing year, which, it is presumed, will be effecting as much as can be done within the period for which the appropriation is to be made. The amount asked for (viz: $175,000) is the same that was asked for last year, but reduced by the direction of your predecessor, Mr. Secretary Paulding, to $100,000.

--399--

____________

No. 7.

List of vessels in commission of each squadron, their commanders and stations, on the 1st October, 1841.

Class. Name. Commanders of vessels. Commanders of squadrons. Stations.
Frigate Brandywine Captain D. Geisinger Com. Charles W. Morgan Mediterranean.
Sloop Fairfield Commander J. Tattnall Do. do. Mediterranean.
Sloop Preble Commander Ralph Voorhees Do. do. Mediterranean.
Frigate United States Captain James Armstrong Com. Thomas Ap C. Jones Pacific.
Sloop St. Louis Commander French Forrest Do. do. Pacific.
Sloop Cyane Commander C. K. Stribling Do. do. Pacific.
Sloop Yorktown Captain John H. Aulick Do. do. Pacific.
Sloop Dale Commander Charles Gauntt Do. do. Pacific.
Schooner Shark Commander Thomas A. Dornin Do. do. Pacific.
Ship of the line Delaware Captain C. S. McCauley Com. Charles Morris Coast of Brazil.
Frigate Potomac Captain George W. Storer Do. do. Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Marion Commander W. J. Belt Do. do. Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Decatur Commander H. W. Ogden Do. do. Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Concord Commander W. Boerum Do. do. Coast of Brazil.
Schooner Enterprise Commander L. M. Goldsborough Do. do. Coast of Brazil.
Frigate Constellation Commodore Lawrence Kearney Com. Lawrence Kearney East Indies.
Sloop Boston. Commander John C. Long Do. do. East Indies.
Frigate Macedonian Commodore Jesse Wilkinson Com. Jesse Wilkinson West Indies.
Sloop Levant Commander A. Fitzhugh Do. do. West Indies.
Sloop Warren Commander C. L. Williamson Do. do. West Indies.
Sloop Vincennes Lieutenant Charles Wilkes Lieutenant Cha's Wilkes Exploring Expedition.
Sloop Peacock Lieutenant William L. Hudson Do. do. Exploring Expedition.
Brig Porpoise Lieutenant C. Ringgold Do. do. Exploring Expedition.
Brig Dolphin Lieutenant W. W. McKean   On special service

--400--

No. 7—Continued.

Class. Name. Commanders of vessels. Commanders of squadrons. Stations.
Steamship Fulton Captain John T. Newton Atlantic coast.
Schooner Grampus Commander John S. Paine At Boston, refitting for sea.
Schooner Flirt* Lieutenant J. T. McLaughlin Lieut. J. T. McLaughlin Coast of Florida.
Schooner Wave* Lieutenant William Lewis Herndon Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Schooner Otsego* Acting Lieutenant James S. Biddle Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Schooner Phoenix* Acting Lieutenant C. R. P. Rodgers Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Schooner Jefferson Lieutenant John Rodgers Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Schooner Van Buren Lieutenant John B. Marchand Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Schooner Madison Acting Lieut. William S. Drayton Do. do. Coast of Florida.
Ship of the line Columbus Captain Joseph Smith Receiving vessel, Boston.
Ship of the line North Carolina Captain F. H. Gregory Receiving vessel, New York.
Ship of the line Pennsylvania Captain C. W. Skinner Receiving vessel, Norfolk.
Brig Pioneer Commander W. C. Nicholson Receiving vessel, Baltimore.
Schooner Experiment Commander F. Engle Receiving vessel, Philadelphia.

* Transferred from War Department.

† Transferred from Treasury Department.

--401--

___________

No. 8.

A statement of the names of the vessels in ordinary or under repair at the several navy yards.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

The frigate Congress has just been built, is equipping, and can soon be got ready for sea service.

At Charlestown, Mass.

The ship of the line Columbus is in good order, and is used as a receiving ship.

The ship of the line Ohio has lately returned from sea, and is now repairing for service, and can be got ready in a short time.

The frigate Columbia has been repaired, and is now ready for service, (home squadron.)

The sloop of war John Adams has been repaired, and is now ready for service, (home squadron.)

The sloop of war Erie has been repaired and fitted as a storeship, and is nearly ready for service.

The schooner Grampus has been repaired, and is ready for service, (home squadron.)

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

The ship of the line North Carolina is in good order, and is used as a receiving ship.

The ships of the line Washington and Franklin both require very extensive repairs. A survey has recently been ordered upon them, to ascertain the probable expense of preparing them for service, either as seventy-fours or razees.

The frigate Hudson is considered unfit for sea service, and a survey has been ordered on her. This is a white-oak ship, and was purchased in 1826.

The Ontario sloop of war has been ordered to be repaired as a receiving ship, to be employed at the South.

The razee Independence is nearly ready for sea service, (home squadron.)

The Falmouth sloop of war is nearly ready for sea service, (home squadron.)

The brig Boxer has been repaired, and is ready for sea service, (home squadron.)

The steamer Missouri has been built, is equipping, and can be got ready in a short time.

At Philadelphia.

The steamer Mississippi has been built, is equipping, and can be got ready in a short time.

The schooner Experiment is fitted for and used as a receiving vessel; is not considered fit for general service.

--402-- 

At Baltimore.

The brig Pioneer is in good order, and used for a receiving vessel.

At Norfolk, Va.

The Pennsylvania ship of the line is in good order, and used for a receiving vessel. She requires the completion of her magazines and storerooms, and some sails.

The frigate United States has been repaired, and is ready for sea.

The frigate Java is unfit for service. Timber is collecting for her, and she is to be rebuilt.

The sloop, Vandalia has been repaired, and is ready for sea.

The sloop Lexington has been repaired and fitted as a storeship, and is nearly ready for service.

The steamers Poinsett and Engineer, small vessels, transferred from the War Department, are considered as unfit for cruising vessels, and capable of rendering very little service at any time.

The brig Consort is repairing, to be used as a receiving vessel at Portland, Maine.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

____________

No. 9.

A statement of the names of the vessels on the stocks at the several navy yards.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

The "Alabama" 74 and the "Santee" 44.

At Charlestown, Mass.

The ships of the line "Virginia" and "Vermont," and the frigate "Cumberland." Orders have been given to prepare the last ship for launching.

At Brooklyn, N. Y.

The frigates "Sabine" and "Savannah." The "Savannah" has been ordered to be prepared for launching, and the "Sabine" will be.

At Philadelphia.

The frigate "Raritan." Orders have been given to launch and complete this ship.

At Norfolk, Va.

The ship of the line "New York" and frigate "St. Lawrence." The "St. Lawrence" has been ordered to be prepared for launching.

RECAPITULATION.

Four ships of the line and six frigates.

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

--403--

____________

No. 10.

Statement of the amounts expended during the preceding fiscal year, (from October 1, 1840 to September 30, 1841,) for wages of mechanics and laborers employed in building, repairing, or equipping vessels of the navy, or in receiving and securing stores and materials for these purposes;" and, also, the number of days' work which were performed during the same time, were as follows, viz;

Navy yards. Number of days' labor. Cost of labor. Average price of labor per diem.
Portsmouth, N. H. 23,149 $33,103 94 $1 43
Charlestown, Mass. 70,678 122,082 68 1 72 7/10
New York 73,272 124,574 00 1 70
Philadelphia 38,787 64,608 66 1 66 5/10
Washington, D. C. 45,176 61,678 94 1 36 5/10
Norfolk, Va. 101,874 169,800 40 1 66 6/10
  352,936 575,848 62 1 63

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

___________

No. 11.

Statement showing the cost or estimated value of stores on hand at the several navy yards on the 1st October, 1840; of articles received and expended during the year; and of stores on hand 1st October, 1841, under the appropriation for "increase, repairs, armament, and equipment of the navy, and wear and tear of vessels in commission."

Navy yards. Value on hand
Oct. 1, 1840.
Receipts. Expenditures. Value on hand
Oct. 1, 1841.
Portsmouth $609,054 $157,091 $125,495 $640,650
Boston 1,993,292 477,763 378,493 2,092,562
New York 1,698,777 172,931 229,084 1,642,624
Philadelphia 438,595 100,327 70,411 468,511
Washington 527,525 242,448 257, 185 512,788
Norfolk 1,504,388 476,587 335,935 1,645,040
Pensacola 110,989 6,803 11,308 106,484
Total 6,882,620 1,633,950 1,407,911 7,108,659

Navy Commissioners' Office, November 30, 1841.

--404--

___________

No. 12.

List of deaths in the navy, as ascertained at the Department, since the 1st December, 1840.

Name and Rank. Date. Place.
Captains.    
Alexander Claxton 7th Mar., 1841 Pacific ocean.
Thomas H. Stevens 21st Jan., 1841 Washington.
Commander.    
Ebenezer Ridgeway 31st Oct., 1841 Concord, N. H.
Lieutenants.    
Joseph Stallings 25th Ap., 1841 Fredericktown, Md.
Gurden C. Ashton 11th Oct., 1840 At sea.
William B. Lyne 30th Ap., 1841 Drowned at Norfolk.
Algernon S. Worth 3d Feb., 1841 At sea.
Surgeons.    
Mordecai Morgan 22d July, 1841 Pensacola.
John R. Chandler 28th July, 1841 Norfolk.
Samuel W. Ruff   New Orleans.
Assistant surgeons.    
Buckner T. Magill   At sea.
Edward McKinley   Florida.
Passed midshipmen.    
Joseph A. Underwood 24th July, 1840 Killed at Fijee islands.
James Anderson 28th Dec., 1840 Penny Grove, Penn.
D. Ross Crawford 26th July, 1841 Drowned in Delaware river.
Albert S. Whittier 24th Jan., 1841 Coast of Africa.
Midshipman.    
Wilkes Henry 24th July, 1840 Killed at Fijee islands.
Boatswain.    
David Eaton 22d Feb., 1840 Washington.
Gunner.    
Charles Wade 27th Feb., 1841 New York.

--405--

No. 12-Continued.

Name and rank. Date. Place.
Marine corps.    
Lt. Col. R. D. Wainwright 5th Oct., 1841 Washington.
1st Lieut. F. N. Armistead 14th Ap., 1841 Norfolk.
Navy agent.    
George Johnson February, 1841 Lost in Gulf of Mexico, on his way to Pensacola.

____________

No. 13.

List of dismissions from the navy since the 1st December, 1840.

Name and rank. Date of dismission.
Lieutenant.  
John C. Sharp 28th December, 1840.
Passed midshipmen.  
Richard M. Harvey 20th July, 1841.
William M. E. Adams 8th July, 1841.
J. F. Marrast 15th October, 1841.
Midshipmen.  
Charles S. Cooper 1st March, 1841.
G. D. Lemoine 1st March, 1841.
Navy agents.  
John Thomas 27th August, 1841.
John Laighton 29th April, 1841.
Leonard Jarvis 20th September, 1841.
John R. Livingston, junior 18th March, 1841.
Naval storekeepers.  
Enoch Barnes 19th April, 1841.
Seth J. Thomas 19th April, 1841.
Thomas R. Hunter 6th January, 1841.

--406--

____________

No. 14.

List of resignations in the navy since the 1st December, 1840

Name and rank. Date of acceptance.
Lieutenants.  
William H. Kennon 16th December, 1840.
John W. Mooers 22d September, 1841.
Passed midshipmen.  
Richard H. Lowndes 18th June, 1841.
Thomas W. Cumming 23d February, 1841.
Edward S. Hutter 22d September, 1841.
Samuel Pearce 9th June, 1841.
Benjamin R. Nichols 5th May, 1841.
Midshipmen.  
John V. Hixon 4th February, 1841.
William Hewitt 26th December, 1840.
John K. Mills 7th July, 1841.
Dallas R. Wood 26th October, 1841.
Professor of mathematics.  
J. H. Belcher 10th April, 1841.
Boatswains.  
Charles Matthews 22d May, 1841.
John Young 2d July, 1841.
Gunner.  
John D. Anderson 10th April, 1840.
Carpenters.  
Thomas Johnson 12th October, 1841.
Joel Bliss 26th May, 1841.
Sailmaker.  
George Parker 12th May, 1841.
Navy agent.  
Michael W. Ash. 19th January, 1841.

--407--

____________

No. 15.

Pension Office, November 20, 1841.

Sir:

I have the honor to transmit, herewith, for the purpose of laying before Congress, in conformity with the 3d section of the act of the 10th of July, 1838, entitled "An act for the regulation of the navy and privateer pension and navy hospital funds," three lists, containing the names of persons who have been wounded or otherwise disabled in the naval service, and who have been pensioned for such injuries or disabilities, and the names of widows whose husbands have died in the naval service, and of orphans whose fathers have died in the same service, with the dates and amount of their respective pensions, and the dates of the acts of Congress under which they have been granted.

It will be perceived, from these lists, that there are now on the invalid navy pension rolls 491; and that the annual amount to pay those pensions is $33,998 64. There are 363 widows on the pension, lists, and $67,749 96 will be required to pay them in 1842; and 105 orphans, whose pensions amount to $12,154 annually. All these will probably be paid-up to the 1st of July, 1842, because the law of August 16, 1841, entitled "An act to provide for the payment of navy pensions," continues all pensions allowed to widows and orphans under the act of the 3d of March, 1837, up to the end of the next session of Congress; and there is but little probability that the next session will terminate before July, as the long sessions for nearly ten years past have closed in that month. The aggregate sum to pay these pensioners for six months, amounts to $56,951; and this sum will be required to pay them on the 1st of July, 1842. There is now in the Treasury, of the appropriation made in August last, $61,468 30 and this sum will be exhausted by the payment due in January. There are now pending a number of claims, one of which only will amount to about $12,000. The whole number of claims now in the office, which will probably be allowed, will be nearly $14,000; and, during the succeeding year, it is probable that claims to as great an amount may be admitted, which will increase the expenditure at least $28,000. This sum, added to $56,951, which will be wanted on the 1st of July, 1842, to pay those who are now on the rolls, will make an appropriation of $84,951 necessary. The amount necessary to meet the payments due in January, 1843, will depend upon future legislation on the subject.

The only stocks which now remain of the navy pension fund are 700 shares of the Bank of Washington, the nominal value of which is $14,000, and stock of the Union Bank of Georgetown, the nominal value of which is $9,600. The latter institution is now closing its concerns; and, as soon as collections can be made, the directors will pay from the dividends of its capital stock the amount due to the navy pension fund. The stock of the Bank of Washington cannot now be sold to advantage, and the amount of interest which it yields is so inconsiderable that I have not introduced it into the present report as available. Perhaps it may produce $700 during the ensuing year.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. L. EDWARDS,
Commissioner of Pensions.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

--408--

____________

A No. 15.

Alphabetical list of invalid navy pensioners, complete to the 20th of November, 1841.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Samuel Abbot Seaman March 1, 1815 $5 00 April 23, 1800.
Zephaniah Allen Marine March 1, 1801 3 00 do
George Adams Quartergunner Dec. 31, 1836 5 62 1/2 do
George Alexander Ordinary seaman July 19, 1814 8 00 do
William Adams Seaman July 25, 1838 3 00 do
Joseph Ashley Ordinary seaman Dec. 18, 1835 2 50 do
James Allcorn Sailingmaster Jan. 1, 1815 20 00 do
Robert Andrews Quartergunner August 1, 1829 4 50 do
Thomas Austin, Yeoman Dec. 7, 1838 7 50 do
John Adams Seaman Feb. 17, 1836 6 00 do
Alexander Adams Seaman Oct. 6, 1812 3 00 do
John Agnew Seaman August 1, 1825 5 00 do
Nathan Burr Quartergunner Dec. 13, 1814 4 50 do
Samuel Bryant Seaman March 5, 1830 3 00 do
John Brown Seaman July 1, 1829 6 00 do
Peter Barnard Ordinary seaman Dec. 1, 1814 4 00 do
John Brannan Seaman June 28, 1815 5 00 do
John Beatty Marino June 1, 1830 4 00 do
Luke Brown Seaman July 5, 1834 3 00 do
John Bevins Quartergunner Feb. 24, 1837 7 50 do
Isaac Bassett Ordinary seaman May 15, 1814 5 00 do
John Bostrom Quartermaster May 30, 1834 3 00 do
Frederick Boyer Sergeant marine corps Sept. 5, 1834 2 25 do
Thomas Barry Gunner August 10, 1809 5 00 do
James Bird Seaman Nov. 7, 1828 6 00 do
John Burnham Master's mate Dec. 10, 1813 9 00 do
John Butler Seaman Nov. 22, 1815 5 00 do
John Berry Master-at-arms March 18, 1835 4 50 do
John Brown, 4th Seaman August 31, 1825 3 00 do
Edward Berry Seaman July 4, 1837 4 50 do
Lloyd J. Bryan Passed midshipman Jan. 22, 1837 83 1/3 do
James Bantam Ordinary seaman July 5, 1833 4 00 do
James Bell Seaman August 23, 1823 6 00 do
Godfrey Bowman Seaman Sept. 10, 1813 6 00 do
Jonathan Bulkley Midshipman June 17, 1834 9 00 do
Edward Barker Marine May 18, 1836 3 50 do
James Barron Captain June 22, 1807 25 00 do
John Baxter Seaman Feb. 28, 1810 6 00 do
Peter Borge Captain's steward May 19, 1834 6 00 do
John Brumley Seaman Sept. 1, 1826 6 00 do
William Barker Marine July 1, 1802 6 00 do
William Baggs Marine March 1, 1814 3 00 do
George Boyle Seaman Nov. 21, 1837 4 00 do
John Brace Quartergunner Nov. 1, 1826 9 00 do
William Bain Quartergunner Oct. 22, 1883 3 50 do
David C. Bunnell Seaman April 27, 1813 3 00 do
Thomas Bowden Quartermaster Dec. 7, 1837 4 00 do
Henry S. Baker Seaman Dec. 11, 1838 4 50 do
Robert Berry Seaman June 22, 1829 6 00 do
Joseph Barrett Quartergunner April 17, 1813 9 00 do
John Bennett Seaman Dec. 14, 1814 6 00 do
James Blake Ordinary seaman July 23, 1822 5 00 do
Alfred Batts Ordinary seaman Oct. 24, 1833 5 00 do
George Bennett Ordinary seaman Sept. 16, 1839 2 80 do

--409--

A No. 15-Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Lemuel Bryant Ordinary seaman August 1, 1814 $8 00 April 23, 1800.
Samuel Bosworth Seaman July 3, 1823 6 00 do
James Barker Quartermaster April 20, 1836 8 00 do
Junius J. Boyle Midshipman Nov. 22, 1823 4 75 do
Thomas Bartlett Seaman Nov. 24, 1834 6 00 do
William B. Brown Gunner July 4, 1835 2 50 do
Edmund Brett Marine June 12, 1815 3 00 do
Robert Butler Quartergunner April 30, 1835 3 75 do
Robert Blair Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 6 00 de
Samuel Butler Quartergunner August 29, 1815 8 00 do
Thomas Buchanan Marine June 4, 1829 3 00 do
Thomas I. Clarke Carpenter's mate April 27, 1839 2 37 1/2 do
Horace Carter Landsman Feb. 26, 1837 2 00 do
John Clark Boatswain's mate Jan. 15, 1838 7 12 1/2 do
Leonard Chase Ordinary seaman August 1, 1828 5 00 do
John Clements Seaman Dec. 29, 1812 6 00 do
Michael Collins Seaman April 22, 1834 4 50 do
Abraham Caswell Ordinary seaman Sept. 30, 1838 2 50 do
David Connor Lieutenant May 23, 1815 16 66 2/3 do
Daniel H. Cole Marine Dec. 27, 1833 3 00 do
John H. Chauncey Midshipman Sept. 30, 1817 4 75 do
William Cook Cabin cook June 30, 1836 4 50 do
James Cole Seaman May 1, 1823 5 00 do
Horatio N. Crabb Lieutenant m. corps Jan. 1, 1831 7 50 do
John Conklin Seaman Dec. 31, 1837 3 00 do
David Christie Marine Jan. 1, 1841 4 00 do
Enos R. Childs Midshipman April 2, 1823 9 50 do
Nathaniel Covill Quartergunner Jan. 1, 1832 9 00 do
Nathaniel Chapman Quartergunner June 10, 1815 9 00 do
George Cornell Carpenter's mate Sept. 10, 1813 9 00 do
John C. Champlin Seaman May 21, 1831 6 00 do
John Clark Seaman May 31, 1825 3 00 do
Thomas R. Clarke Ordinary seaman Feb. 18, 1823 2 50 do
John Cole Ordinary seaman Feb. 6, 1832 5 00 do
John Clough Sailingmaster June 4, 1829 15 00 do
Edward Cardevan Seaman Feb. 28, 1836 3 00 do
Francis Covenhoven Ordinary seaman June 22, 1807 3 75 do
Stephen Champlin Lieutenant Sept. 3, 1814 10 00 do
R. B. Cunningham Lieutenant March 25, 1840 12 50 do
R. C. Cogdell Passed midshipman Feb. 24, 1839 6 25 March 3, 1837.
Robert Cathcart Seaman Sept. 20, 1816 6 00 April 23, 1800.
John Collins Seaman Feb. 9, 1813 6 00 do
George Coomes Seaman July 1, 1825 8 00 do
William Cantrill Marine April 8, 1830 2 00 do
Edward Carr Seaman May 13, 1835 6 00 do
Robert Carson Ordinary seaman June 26, 1821 5 00 do
William Dunbar Seaman May 31, 1840 4 50 do
Richard Dunn Seaman Jan. 1, 1829 6 00 do
James Dixon Seaman Nov. 11, 1835 3 00 do
David Denvers Marine Oct. 22, 1835 3 00 do
Marmaduke Dove Sailingmaster April 20, 1838 5 00 do
Stillman Dodge Ordinary seaman May 1, 1831 3 33 1/3 do
John Downes Master commandant Nov. 28, 1813 10 00 do
John A. Dickason Carpenter August 19, 1835 3 331 do
Timothy Donegan Ordinary seaman April 27, 1837 2 50 do
William Dunn Gunner Oct. 8, 1836 10 00 do
Joseph Dalrymple Seaman Feb. 34, 1814 4 50 do
Owen Deddolph Gunner June 25, 1814 5 00 do

--410--

A No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Matthias Douglass Seaman April 23, 1814 $10 00 April 23, 1800.
James Dunham Gunner July 4, 1828 5 00 do
John Daniels Quartermaster Sept. 7, 1816 9 00 do
John Dunn Marine July 1, 1818 3 00 do
John Davidson Lieutenant March 1, 1801 20 00 do
Samuel Daykin Marine Oct. 22, 1834 3 00 do
John Diragen Seaman Dec. 22, 1815 5 00 do
James Darley Ordinary seaman March 1, 1838 5 00 do
George Edwards Boy May 21, 1837 4 00 do
Francis H. Ellison Sailingmaster Dec. 27, 1830 15 00 do
Thomas Edwards Quartermaster Jan. 1, 1823 9 00 do
Standish F. Edwards Seaman May 11, 1837 3 00 do
Francis Elliott Marine April 20, 1838 8 60 do
Ebenezer Evans Seaman March 2, 1813 6 00 do
Jesse Elam Marine August 1, 1828 6 00 do
William Evans Marine May 1, 1827 3 00 do
Abner Enos Master's mate June 4, 1830 6 00 do
Gardner Edmonds Ordinary seaman June 4, 1814 5 00 do
D. S. Edwards Surgeon's mate June 28, 1822 7 50 do
James Eddo Captain forecastle Jan. 16, 1835 1 75 do
Alvin Edson Lieutenant m. corps Feb. 6, 1832 7 50 do
Thomas English Ordinary seaman May 14, 1832 5 00 do
Nicholas T. Farrell Marine May 10, 1830 3 00 do
William Farrell Seaman June 4, 1829 6 00 do
Alfred Fisher Seaman May 15, 1835 5 00 do
Warren Fogg Marine June 1, 1813 87 1/2 do
Jack Flood Seaman July 7, 1837 6 00 do
James Ferguson Sailingmaster Feb, 19, 1827 10 00 do
Andrew W. Fleming Seaman Dec. 20, 1839 4 50 do
Robert Forsaith Marine May 18, 1799 3 00 do
William Flagg Lieutenant Oct. 31, 1800 18 75 do
John Fallerhee Landsman August 1, 1827 4 00 do
George Fitzgerald Seaman [Oct]. 11, 1838 2 00 do
Michael Fitzpatrick Master-at-arms June 4, 1829 9 00 do
Moses French Seaman April 14, 1834 6 00 do
Peter Foley Marine June 27, 1837 5 50 do
William Fitzgerald Seaman Dec. 31, 1836 6 00 do
William M. Goodshall Seaman July 15, 1825 6 00 do
Cheater Goodell Ordinary seaman Dec. 12, 1834 3 00 do
Charles Gordon Ordinary seaman May 11, 1835 5 00 do
James Good Seaman Jan. 1, 1829 12 00 do
Anthony Gerome Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 6 00 do
William Gregory Marine May 28, 1830 4 00 do
Samuel H. Green Quartermaster Jan. 1, 1819 9 00 do
John Geyer Seaman April 6, 1815 6 00 April 2, 1816.
Daniel Gardner Ordinary seaman March 28, 1814 2 50 April 23, 1800.
Anthony Gale Lieut. Colonel m. c. Jan. 5, 1835 25 00 do
John Grant Seaman May 20, 1813 6 00 do
William Gunnison Ordinary seaman Nov. 24, 1833 5 00 do
James Glass Sergeant marine corps Oct. 24, 1836 3 25 do
James Grant Seaman April 9, 1829 8 00 do
Patrick Gilligan Marine June 4, 1829 3 50 do
John Granso Captain maintop March 30, 1838 3 50 do
John Grant Ordinary seaman July 1, 1831 4 00 do
Peter Green Seaman April 3, 1827 5 00 do
William Gillen Seaman Jan. 1, 1832 6 00 do
Jerry Gardiner Ordinary seaman Jan. 14, 1818 9 00 do
Richard Gilbody Ordinary seaman Jan. 14, 1826 4 00 do

--411--

A No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
John Hodgkins Corporal's mate July 1, 1814 $7 00 April 28, 1800.
Benjamin Harrod Seaman Oct 28, 1039 3 00 do
James Hatch Quartergunner July 1, 1814 12 00 do
William Herringbrook Seaman Feb. 18, 1814 6 00 do
John Hogan Seaman March 4, 1830 3 00 do
John J. Hardy Seaman June 25, 1813 6 00 do
John Harvis Quartergunner August 1, 1827 4 50 do
John Hussey Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1832 5 00 do
Simon Hillman Ordinary seaman July 3, 1815 4 00 do
Horatio N. Harrison Passed midshipman July 15, 1838 6 50 do
James D. Hammond Seaman Deo. 29, 1812 6 00 do
Elijah L. Harris Marine Sept. 25, 1833 3 00 do
John Hamilton Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
John Hoxse Seaman August 15, 1800 8 50 do
Samuel F. Holbrook Carpenter Sept. 30, 1820 5 00 do
Isaac Harding Seaman May 9, 1834 5 00 do
Garret Hendricks Seaman August 9, 1834 6 00 do
Uriah Hanscomb Ordinary seaman Oct. 16, 1799 6 00 do
Isaac T. Heartte Acting sailingmaster April 1, 1817 20 00 do
Samuel Hambleton Purser Sept. 10, 1813 20 00 do
John Hamilton Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
John Hall Quartermaster Oct. 20, 1830 4 50 do
Boswell Hale Ordinary seaman Dec. 25, 1819 5 00 do
Thomas Huntley Seaman August 31, 1837 3 00 do
Ephraim Hathaway Landsman June 15, 1838 4 00 do
J. L. C. Hardy Midshipman July 31, 1821 4 75 do
Alexander Hamilton Boatswain's mate May 31, 1838 7 12 1/2 do
Henry Hervey Seaman March 8, 1834 4 00 do
William Hamilton Seaman July 1, 1829 6 00 do
Joshua Howell Ordinary seaman June 30, 1836 5 00 do
William L. Hudson Sailingmaster July 6, 1817 15 00 do
Elias Hughes Ordinary seaman August 28, 1837 5 00 do
Robert Hazlett Musician marine corps Dec 12, 1836 2 00 do
Henry Hampton Ordinary seaman June 14, 1840 1 66 2/3 do
Michael Johnson Seaman Jan. 31, 1812 3 00 do
David Jenkins Seaman August 1, 1828 6 08 do
Richworth Jordan Seaman March 15, 1836 6 00 do
Gilbert Jones Ordinary seaman June 30, 1815 2 50 do
James Jackson Seaman March 4, 1816 5 00 do
Thomas Ap C. Jones Lieutenant Dec 14, 1814 25 00 do
William Jones Boy August 24, 1814 2 25 do
Thomas Irwin Private Jan. 31, 1837 1 75 March 3, 1837.
Obadiah Johnson Ordinary seaman April 1, 1819 5 00 April 23, 1800.
Lewis Jones Seaman Oct. 27, 1835 6 00 do
John Joyce Ordinary seaman August 30, 1839 3 75 do
Ichabod Jackson Seaman Jan. 25, 1837 4.50 do
John Johnson Seaman March 28, 1814 6 00 do
Joseph Jackson Cook Oct. 29, 1839 4 50 do
Joseph Jennette Captain mizentop June 13, 1838 2 33 1/3 do
Thomas Jackson, 2d Quartermaster June 1, 1813 9 00 do
Sylvester Jameson Seaman August 1, 1828 6 00 do
Edward Ingram Boatswain April 1, 1831 5 00 do
James Jeffers Ordinary seaman Dec. 7, 1805 6 00 do
Henry Jackson Captain foretop Sept. 20, 1836 3 75 do
Henry Irwin Marine Feb. 20, 1837 1 75 do
Nicholas Kline Sergeant marine corps Jan, 1, 1832 5 00 do
William C. Keene Master-at-arms Sept. 10, 1813 9 00 do
William Kinnear Marine April 3, 1834 3 00 do

--412--

A No. 15—Continued

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Daniel Kleiss Ordinary seaman May 6, 1829 $5 00 April 23, 1809.
Andrew Key Boatswain's mate July 9, 1839 19 00 do
James Kelly Marino August 24, 1814 4 50 do
John Kiggan Ordinary seaman April 30, 1838 2 50 do
Henry Keeling Gunner August 30, 1834 5 00 do
John Kennedy Quartergunner July 1, 1825 4 50 do
George Kensinger Master-at-arms May 22, 1819 9 00 do
Thomas Kelly Seaman April 25, 1815 4 00 do
Joseph Kelly Seaman Oct. 31, 1835 4 50 do
John Keegan Quartermaster March 27, 1830 6 00 do
John Loscomb Ordinary seaman Jan. 15, 1838 2 50 do
John Lang Seaman July 27, 1837 6 00 do
Edward Libbis Ordinary seaman June 11, 1836 1 66 2/3 do
John Lewis Boatswain's mate Jan. 1, 1832 9 00 do
John Lovely Seaman April 23, 1835 6 00 do
Henry P. Leslie Carpenter Feb. 18, 1840 5 00 March 3, 1837.
James Lloyd Murine April 5, 1834 2 00 April 23, 1800.
Isaac Langley Ordinary seaman Dec. 1, 1814 5 00 do
John Lloyd Marine June 8, 1819 3 00 do
John Lagrange Seaman Nov. 30, 1834 4 50 do
Robert Lewis Steward Sept. 5, 1830 6 75 do
Richard Lee Quartermaster July 1, 1820 6 00 do
Timothy Lane Cook March 25, 1816 8 00 do
Peter Lewis Ordinary seaman July 30, 1837 5 00 do
John Leonard Seaman July 1, 1829 9 00 do
John G. Lanman Quartergunner June 20, 1836 7 50 do
Edward Martin Seaman March 3, 1837 3 00 do
Jacob Marks Marine June 30, 1810 43 3/4 do
Richard Merchant Marine June 30, 1824 1 75 do
Charles Morris Lieutenant August 19, 1812 12 50 do
James Mount Sergeant June 7, 1837 3 25 do
James Moses Purser's steward April 23, 1816 9 00 do
James McDonald Corporal marine corps Dec. 31, 1814 2 25 do
Joseph Marks Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
Edward Myers Seaman May 27, 1827 3 00 do
Thomas Murdock Seaman June 30, 1836 6 00 do
William McKeever Ordinary seaman Oct. 14, 1835 2 50 do
John Munroe Seaman July 22, 1835 4 50 do
John Meiggs Seaman July 1, 1819 10 00 do
John McGarr Steward Nov. 11, 1832 4 50 do
G. T. McLaughlin Passed midshipman Feb. 8, 1837 9 37 1/2 do
M. F. Maury Lieutenant Oct. 18, 1839 12 50 do
Archibald Moffat Ordinary seaman June 1, 1832 5 00 do
Enoch M. Miley Quartergunner March 28, 1814 8 00 do
Peter McMahon Ordinary seaman Nov. 2, 1807 6 00 do
Samuel Meade Seaman Oct. 19, 1837 3 00 do
Andrew Mattison Seaman Sept. 10, 1813 5 00 do
Patrick Murphy Ordinary seaman Oct. 19, 1836 5 00 do
Giles Manchester Ordinary seaman May 1, 1827 5 00 do
James Merrill Ordinary seaman Oct. 23, 1819 5 00 do
Colton Murray Boatswain's mate August 1, 1831 9 00 do
John McMahon Ordinary seaman July 9, 1836 5 00 do
George Marshall Gunner March 31, 1825 2 50 do
William P. McArthur Midshipman Jan. 15, 1838 4 75 do
Matthias McGill Seaman May 28, 1814 8 00 do
Samuel Miller Captain marine corps April 24, 1814 10 00 do
John Marston, jr. Midshipman Dec. 31, 1814 4 75 do
William Mervine Midshipman Nov. 28, 1812 3 16 2/3 do

--413--

A No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
John Myrick Gunner August 7, 1837 $5 00 April 23, 1800.
John Metzer Seaman Feb. 26, 1839 3 00 do
John Moore Seaman Jan. 9, 1838 4 50 do
James McDonald Seaman Dec. 31, 1826 3 00 do
John Malprine Landsman Feb. 1, 1,839 3 00 do
Patrick McLaughlin Ordinary seaman Nov. 1, 1815 5 00 do
John Myers Seaman Nov. 1, 1828 6 00 do
Samuel McIsaacs Boy July 30, 1814 5 00 do
William Moran Seaman Dec. 5, 1815 6 00 do
Enos Marks Ordinary seaman Feb. 16, 1815 5 00 do
John H. McNeale Seaman June 1, 1832 3 00 do
John Mitchell Quartermaster June 11, 1832 8 00 do
Matthew McMurray Seaman Sept. 1, 1827 6 00 do
Thomas Miller Seaman Oct. 23, 1829 4 00 do
John Moore Seaman Dec. 4, 1817 [] 00 do
William Middleton Seaman Jan. 1, 1837 8 00 do
Henry J. Mercier Ordinary seaman May 20, 1837 1 25 do
James Nickerson Seaman Jan. 15, 1815 6 00 do
James Nagle Seaman June 30, 1834 5 00 do
John F. Noyer Marine July 1, 1826 5 00 do
John Nugent Seaman August 14, 1813 6 00 do
Francis B. Nichols Midshipman June 1, 1818 4 75 do
William Napier Corporal marine corps July 1, 1826 4 00 do
David Newbury Ordinary seaman April 15, 1836 2 50 do
William Newton Ordinary seaman Sept. 11, 1814 1 25 do
John Neilson Quartergunner Jan. 1, 1832 9 00 do
Asael Owens Seaman Jan. 22, 1838 8 00 do
Samuel Odiorne, jr. Seaman Dec. 24, 1825 6 00 do
Isaac Omans Seaman June 26, 1821 6 00 do
Charles T. Platt Lieutenant June 4, 1829 25 00 do
Stephen Phyfer Ordinary seaman April 4, 1825 7 00 do
David Porter Captain Jan. 24, 1825 40 00 do
Peter Pierson Seaman March 20, 1836 6 00 do
James Perry Ship's corporal Sept. 1, 1827 9 00 do
Thomas Paine Sailingmaster Feb. 7, 1834 20 00 do
William Perry Seaman April 9, 1825 6 00 do
Charles Pasture Seaman March 4, 1815 5 00 do
Neal Patterson Seaman July 1, 1820 8 00 do
Payne Perry Seaman April 6, 1815 6 00 April 2, 1816.
John Peterson Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 5 00 April 23, 1800.
John Percival Lieutenant Dec. 22, 1825 12 50 do
N. A. Prentiss Sailingmaster Nov. 30, 1814 10 00 do
Edward Power Ordinary seaman May 27, 1834 5 00 do
Henry Powell Seaman Feb. 10, 1840 3 00 do
Usher Parsons Surgeon Feb. 7, 1816 12 50 do
Thomas B. Parsons Seaman Sept. 1, 1808 6 00 do
Joseph Peck Seaman Oct. 19, 1836 2 50 do
Charles Perry Seaman Nov. 30, 1837 4 50 do
John Price Seaman May 11, 1835 6 00 do
John Piner Ordinary seaman Nov. 6, 1828 5 00 do
Daniel Peck Seaman July 1, 1829 6 00 do
David Quill Quartermaster Feb. 80, 1815 5 00 do
John Randall Marine Sept. 2, 1805 3 00 do
John Roberts Seaman June 1, 1813 3 00 do
John Robinson Master's mate Jan. 31, 1814 1 25 do
James Reid Ordinary seaman Jan. 14, 1838 5 00 do
Thomas Richie Seaman May 14, 1839 3 00 do
James Roberts Quartergunner April 14, 1832 1 87 1/2 do

--414--

A No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement of
pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Jasper Read Seaman March 28, 1814 $3 00 April 23, 1800.
John Rogers Captain's yeoman May 18, 1832 4 50 do
John Romeo Ordinary seaman April 6, 1838 5 00 do
John Revel Ordinary seaman August 20, 1833 2 50 do
Burnett Rogan Landsman June 6, 1838 2 00 do
James Rankin Seaman June 8, 1839 4 50 do
James Rodgers Sailingmaster July 27, 1815 15 00 do
James C. Reed Ordinary seaman March 5, 1837 2 50 do
Alonzo Rouley Ordinary seaman March 15, 1836 5 00 do
Edward Ross Boy January 1, 1827 3 00 do
Edward Rowland Ordinary seaman Sept. 11, 1814 5 00 do
Rosnante Rhodes Seaman Dec. 5, 1815 6 00 do
Samuel Riddle Seaman June 30, 1836 3 00 do
Thomas Riley Gunner June 23, 1837 7 50 do
B. S. Randolph Midshipman October 7, 1815 6 00 do
Daniel Riggs Ordinary seaman May 18, 1836 3 75 do
Samuel Rose Seaman May 24, 1836 4 50 do
Nathan Rolfe Seaman Dec. 14, 1813 6 00 do
John Rice Seaman July 19, 1830 6 00 do
William Robinson Marine June 15, 1817 6 00 do
John Riley Marine July 1, 1831 3 00 do
John Richards Quartergunner October 20, 1829 9 00 do
Benjamin Richardson Master's mate October 8, 1829 10 00 do
John Richmond Marine July, 31, 1816 1 75 do
Nathaniel Staples Seaman May 1, 1833 3 00 do
Patrick Scanton Ordinary seaman January 1, 1811 6 00 do
Benjamin Stevens Master's mate June 27, 1814 10 00 do
Stephen Simpson Marine Nov. 16, 1835 3 50 do
William Smith Ordinary seaman June 1, 1827 5 00 do
Eli Stewart Master's mate May 20, 1814 7 00 do
Harmon Sutton Seaman July 1, 1829 3 00 do
Thomas J. Still Marine January 1, 1832 3 00 do
Charles Sheeter Boatswain's mate Nov. 1, 1832 6 00 do
Thomas Smith Seaman April 5, 1839 2 00 do
Joseph Smith Boatswain Dec. 31, 1837 5 00 do
Alfred Smith Ordinary seaman Sept. 27, 1837 3 50 do
John Stevens Quartermaster May 21, 1831 4 50 do
Jeremiah Sullivan Seaman June 30, 1837 6 00 do
Thomas Smith Boatswain April 6, 1815 10 00 April 2, 1816.
Aaron Smith Ordinary seaman August 1, 1828 2 00 April 23, 1800.
Joseph Smith Lieutenant Sept. 11, 1814 18 75 do
John Smith, 5th Seaman May 5, 1827 00 do
William Stockdale Marine July 26, 1816 6 00 de
William Smart Ordinary seaman July, 1, 1829 5 00 do
John Smith Seaman August 31, 1834 3 00 do
James Smith Ordinary seaman Dec. 2, 1837 2 50 do
James Shanklin Ordinary seaman June 1, 1813 2 50 do
Robert Spedden Lieutenant Dec. 5, 1823 25 00 do
William Smith Sergeant marine corps January 7, 1841 6 50 March 3, 1837.
John Strain Seaman Feb. 28, 1837 4 50 April 23, 1800.
James Spiers Ordinary seaman May 5, 1837 3 75 do
John Smith Boatswain Dec. 31, 1887 5 00 do
John Scriver Seaman April 10, 1811 5 00 do
John Schrouder Seaman June 29, 1819 6 00 do
Horace B. Sawyer Midshipman June 3, 1813 4 75 do
Otis Sage Corporal marine corps Nov. 16, 1835 4 50 do
Samuel Spooner Ordinary seaman October 15, 1838 1 66 2/3 do
William Seymour Seaman Feb. 17, 1836 6 00 do

--415--

A No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Jonas A. Stone Seaman April 4, 1829 $9 00 April 23, 1800.
Alexander Smith Seaman July 26, 1836 3 00 do
Thomas Stallings Ordinary seaman Nov. 7, 1826 2 50 do
Leonard Stevens Sergeant marine corps January 27, 1837 3 25 do
Richard S. Suter Midshipman Dee. 16, 1814 9 50 do
Lewis Thomas Marine May 11, 1839 2 66 2/3 do
John Tarlton Ordinary seaman May 8, 1833 4 00 do
James Turnbull Ordinary seaman April 6, , 1815 5 00 April 2, 1819.
Owen Taylor Seaman August 19, 1812 6 00 April 23, 1800.
B. R. Tinslar Surgeon January 31, 1830 6 50 do
Thomas Tindley Seaman April 6, 1816 3 00 April 2, 1816.
John Taylor Quartermaster May 31, 1839 8 00 April 23, 1800.
Jacob Tonkins Marine May 31, 1840 3 50 do
Samuel Taylor Ordinary seaman Nov. 30, 1839 5 00 March 3, 1837.
George Tunstall Seaman April 14, 1836 3 00 April 23, 1800.
Isaac Thomas Marine October 30, 1826 6 00 do
William Thompson Ordinary seaman May 20, 1826 7 50 do
James Thompson Seaman June 30, 1836 6 00 do
Julius Terry Ordinary seaman August 31, 1812 5 00 do
James Tull Sergeant marine corps June 29, 1816 5 00 do
Henry Townsend Ordinary seaman Dec. 18, 1814 5 00 do
David Thomas Marine January 1, 1806 3 00 do
Philip Tulley Seaman January 10, 1816 6 00 do
Peter Tooley Marine January 27, 1837 3 50 do
George Turry Boatswain August 9, 1839 3 33 1/3 do
Benjamin Underwood Ordinary seaman April 24, 1815 5 00 do
George Upham Marine July 12, 1816 3 00 do
Gabriel Van Horn Marine Dec. 23, , 1837 3 50 do
William Venable Boatswain's mate May 2, 1834 4 75 do
John W. West Lieutenant Nov. 30, 1830 6 25 do
Job G. Williams Lieutenant m. corps June 30, 1828 7 50 do
William Whitney Seaman Nov. 1, 1818 8 00 do
John A. Webster Sailingmaster Sept. 13, 1814 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Peter Woodbury Quartermaster March 18, 1813 9 00 April 23, 1800.
Robert Woods Seaman Dec. 31, 1836 3 00 do
Charles W. White Ordinary seaman Feb. 17, 1837 5 00 do
Reuben Wright Carpenter's mate August 30, 1814 8 00 do
Caleb J. Wiggins Ordinary seaman May 23, 1814 3 00 do
Henry E. Williams Yeoman August 2, 1840 7 50 March 3, 1837.
John Williams Seaman July 1, 1818 6 00 April 23, 1800.
Joseph Ward Seaman July 1, 1818 6 00 do
William Williams Marine July 9, 1838 3 50 do
William S. Welsh Seaman May 1, 1827 6 00 do
James Wilson Quartermaster July 1, 1817 9 00 do
James B. Wright Quartermaster May 1, 1831 9 00 do
Charles Weeks Seaman Feb. 23, 1830 6 00 do
Thomas Williamson Surgeon Dec. 31, 1835 15 00 do
Francis Williams Landsman January 15, 1838 1 00 do
George, Wiley Seaman March 1, 1837 3 00 do
John Waters Seaman Sept. 30, 1838 3 00 do
James Woodhouse Seaman March 17, 1836 6 00 do
George Wilson Seaman March 23, 1838 6 00 do
John Williams Captain foretop Sept. 9, 1836 1 87 1/2 do
Jack Williams Seaman March 22, 1828 6 00 do
Daniel Watson Carpenter's mate May 10, 1838 4 75 do
Charles Wheeler Seaman October 3, 1836 3 00 do
Henry Ward Quartergunner May 27, 1838 9 00 do
Henry Walpole Seaman October 2, 1820 3 00 do

--416--

A No. 15-Continued.

Names of pensioners. Rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Henry Williams Ordinary seaman March 3, 1838 $5 00 do
Solomon White Seaman Feb. 29, 1812 4 00 do
Thomas Ward Captain foretop Jan. 14, 1835 7 50 do
William Ward Seaman August 1, 1832 6 00 do
William Welsh Ordinary seaman Jan. 1, 1822 2 50 do
Samuel E. Watson Major marine corps Feb. 4, 1837 18 75 do
John Wright, 2d Ordinary seaman May 1, 1822 5 00 do
William A. Weaver Midshipman June 1, 1813 9 50 do
James Williamson Armorer Sept. 1, 1831 6 00 do
John Wright Quartergunner Nov. 7, 1836 5 62 1/2 do
John Waters Ordinary seaman April 24, 1824 5 00 do
James Wines Seaman March 28, 1824 6 00 do
William Wicks Ordinary seaman August 4, 1813 4 00 do
Elias Wiley Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 2 50 do
William Wright Seaman August 31, 1832 3 00 do
Edward Watts Seaman Dec. 31, 1828 3 00 do
Thomas Welsh Quartergunner Feb. 26, 1820 12 00 do
Samuel Williams Quartermaster Sept. 1, 1827 6 00 do
William Wagner Quartergunner Dec. 3, 1819 9 00 do
John J. Young Lieutenant May 21, 1829 25 00 do

The number of invalid pensioners is 491; annual sum to pay them, $33,998 64.

_____________

B No. 15.

Alphabetical list of invalid pensioners, complete to the 20th of November, 1841.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Sally Annis Seaman April 20, 1815 $6 00 March 4, 1814.
Abigail Appleton Seaman January 4, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837
Mary P. Archer Seaman October 12, 1839 6 00 do
Emma Anderson Passed midshipman Dec. 29, 1840 12 50 do
Martha Ann Atwood Purser May 11, 1823 20 00 do
Louisa Auchmuty Lieutenant October 8, 1835 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Louisa Ashton Lieutenant October 11, 1840 25 00 March 3, 1837
Catharine L. Armistead Lieutenant m. corps April 14, 1841 15 00 do
Catharine Anderson Marina Feb. 19, 1818 3 50 do
Elizabeth Armitage Seaman March 7, 1810 6 00 do
Sarah Bernard Carpenter's mate Sept. 10, 1829 9 50 do
Eliza K. Boughan Lieutenant Nov. 6, 1832 25 00 June 30, 1834
Susan Barber Boy October 24, 1840 8 00 March 3, 1837
Emily Beale Purser April 4, 1835 20 00 June 30, 1834
Elizabeth Beeler Corporal marine corps Sept. 8, 1830 4 50 March 3, 1837
Lydia Brown Carpenter March 28, 1824 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Jane Bergamer Marion Sept. 12, 1839 3 50 March 3, 1837
Mary E. Broom Major marine corps Nov. 14, 1840 25 00 do
Mary Ann Boyd Surgeon March 26, 1839 30 00 do
Elizabeth Buck Musician marina corps Dec. 5, 1838 4 00 do
Elizabeth Bellingham Seaman August 9, 1837 6 00 do
Caroline M. Berry Lieutenant July 17, 1824 25 00 June 30, 1834

--417--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Act of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Maria Babbit Surgeon May 24, 1826 $25 00 June 30, 1834.
Polly Barry Marine Dec. 7, 1812 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Bishop Seaman Dec. 18, 1813 6 00 do
Martha Burrell Seaman Dec. 14, 1822 6 00 do
Elizabeth Bartlett Seaman April 26, 1813 6 00 do
Abigail Bailey Landsman Dec. 31, 1813 4 00 do
Nabby Burchstead Carpenter Dec. 11, 1833 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza Bradlee Sergeant marine corps April 12, 1838 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Julianna Burchmore Surgeon Sept. 10, 1829 27 50 June 30, 1834.
Letitia Blake Marine August 14, 1836 3 50 do
Elizabeth Beckford Landsman Nov. 30, 1839 4 00 do
Johanna S. Babbit Commander Sept. 9, 1840 30 00 March 3, 1837.
Muldah Bennett Sailingmaster August 18, 1840 20 00 do
Phoebe Butler Purser April 9, 1837 20 00 do
Susan Bainbridge Captain July 27, 1833 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine M. Beers Surgeon June 8, 1831 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Barnes Carpenter Nov. 2, 1819 10 00 do
Sarah Beggs Sailmaker Sept. 21, 1840 10 00 do
Sarah Berry Boatswain March 2, 1829 10 00 June 30, 1884.
Elizabeth H. Baldwin Captain's clerk April 12, 1816 12 50 March 3, 1817.
Elizabeth E. Chandler Surgeon July 28, 1841 30 00 March 3, 1837.
Susan Corlette Ordinary seaman July 5, 1840 5 00 do
Leah Carter Musician marine corps Sept. 23, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann D. Campbell Lieutenant June 3, 1836 25 00 do
Sarah Ann Cooke Surgeon Dec. 4, 1838 35 00 March 3, 1887.
Mary Crawford Passed midshipman July 26, 1841 12 50 do
Mary Cheever   April 12, 1814 8 33 1/3 April 12, 1814.
Abigail Cowell Lieutenant April 18, 1814 25 00 March 8, 1817.
Harriet Carter Lieutenant Sept. 6, 1823 25 00 do
Margaret Carmick Major marine corps Nov. 6, 1816 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Cowen Gunner Sept. 14, 1831 10 00 do
Rebecca G. Cooper Boatswain October 4, 1840 9 00 do
Caroline L. Covington Gunner Nov. 4, 1840 10 00 do
Ann Maria Clunet Sergeant Marine corps Dec. 1, 1825 6 50 June 20, 1813.
Eliza M. Cloud Assistant surgeon August 1, 1831 15 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Cernon Ordinary seaman Nov. 28, 1823 5 00 March 3, 1887.
Maria Christy Seaman Sept. 7, 1839 6 00 do
Isabella Cope Seaman Jan. 31, 1840 6 00 do
Eliza Cassin Purser August 19, 1821 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Maria J. Cuvilier Musician marine corps June 28, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Clementson Sailmaker July 9, 1833 10 00 March 3, 1887.
Eleanor Correia Gunner Dec. 31, 1823 10 00 do
Celia Cross Lieutenant Feb. 10, 1834 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Chauncey Captain Jan. 28, 1840 50 00 do
Frances F. Cook Lieutenant Feb. 7, 1834 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza W. Cocke Lieutenant March 7, 1823 25 00 June 20, 1818.
Ann V. Cocke Lieutenant May 31, 1835 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Fanny Cassin Lieutenant Nov. 30, 1826 25 00 do
Sarah Coulter Surgeon Oct. 12, 1840 25 00 March 3, 1887.
Mary Cassin Lieutenant Oct. 15, 1837 35 00 do
Elizabeth I. Caldwell Lieutenant August 9, 1831 25 00 June 30, 1884.
Susannah Crickett Seaman June 19, 1812 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Harriet Creighton Captain Oct. 13, 1838 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Chapman Ordinary seaman July 5, 1805 5 00 do
Eleanor Cox Marine April 10, 18837 3 50 do
Anna Cain Ship's corporal Oct. 25, 1834 7 00 do
Ann Conrad Landsman March 8, 1834 4 00 do
Ellen Coxe Passed midshipman June 30, 1822 12 50 do

--418--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Elizabeth Cash Seaman Jan. 12, 1837 $6 00 March 3, 1897.
Rodolphine Claxton Captain March 7, 1841 50 00 do
Elizabeth Ann Dent Captain July 31, 1823 50 00 do
Susan Decatur Captain March 22, 1820 50 00 do
Mary Ann Denham Sergeant marine corps April 7, 1841 8 00 do
Laura P. Daggett Gunner April 9, 1836 10 00 do
Sarah Drew Sailing master April 9, 1823 20 00 do
Susan Davis Quartergunner August 10, 1800 7 50 do
Ellen Dever Landsman April 23, 1823 4 00 do
Mary Frances Davis Sailmaker Jan. 26, 1839 10 00 do
Prudence Denham Ordinary seaman June 27, 1837 5 00 do
Peggy Dorney Steward Jan. 25, 1838 9 00 do
Eliza Doxey Sailingmaster May 20, 1828 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Ellen Dix Surgeon April 16, 1823 27 50 March 3, 1817.
Lamitia Dill Boatswain Dec. 19, 1831 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Virginia Duncan Passed midshipman August 3, 1836 12 50 March 3, 1837.
Arabella Dubois Seaman August 30, 1837 6 00 do
Sarah Davis Master's mate Jan. 6, 1820 10 00 do
Mary Davis Quartermaster Sept. 11, 1814 9 00 do
Jane Evans Captain June 2, 1824 50 00 June 30, 18.14.
Ann Edwards Lieutenant mar. corps Oct. 16, 1800 15 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Eldridge Seaman June 2, 1831 6 00 do
Phebe Eldridge Gunner Dec. 31, 1806 10 00 do
Hannah Everett Chaplain April 12, 1837 20 00 do
Ann R. Edwards Lieutenant Jan. 19, 1824 25 00 do
Susan Eaton Gunner Feb. 22, 1840 10 00 do
Harriet Ann Elbert Lieutenant Dec. 20, 1812 25 00 March 4, 1814.
Dorothy M. Evans Boatswain July 9, 1832 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Abigail Fernald Seaman Feb. 24, 1815 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Lucy Flagg Gunner April 20, 1816 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary Forrest Sergeant marine corps March 11, 1832 8 50 June 30, 1834.
Mary Ford Carpenter's mate April 20, 1815 9 00 March 4, 1814.
Rachel Felt Seaman July 14, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann Fletcher Marine Jan. 20, 1818 3 50 do
Elizabeth Ferguson Seaman July 24, 1814 6 00 do
Mary T. Forrest Lieutenant Oct. 1, 1825 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Fremody Ordinary seaman Jan. 20, 1836 5 00 do
Eliza M. Fortin Steward Jan. 28, 1833 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Susanna Flann Seaman Oct. 1, 1839 6 00 do
Jane Goslin Marine Dec. 28, 1831 3 50 do
Margaret F. Green Carpenter Nov. 11, 1834 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Gallon Seaman April 28, 1825 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Sophia Gardner Master commandant Sept. 1, 1815 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Eliza Grayson Captain marine corps June 30, 1823 20 00 do
Mary Glass Carpenter's mate Oct, 1, 1837 9 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Goldthwait Ordinary seaman August 25, 1813 5 00 do
Elizabeth C. Gray Boatswain Feb. 15, 1836 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Rebecca Gulliver Marine Jan. 31, 1822 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Joan Goodwin Seaman August 29, 1837 6 00 do
Ann B. Grimes Captain marine corps July 25, 1834 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary S. Gadsden Master commandant August 28, 1812 30 00 March 3, 1837.
Olive Grover Ordinary seaman February 2, 1836 5 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann T. Green Purser August 24, 1812 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann Gardner Gunner April 28, 1835 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Hannah L. Gamble Major marine corps Sept. 11, 1836 25 00 do
Mary Griffin Surgeon Nov. 1, 1814 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Dionysia Goodrum Lieutenant May 9, 1836 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ellen Nora Hanbury Sergeant marine corps January 4, 1825 8 00 do

--419--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Mary R. Hatch Pilot February 5, 1814 $20 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Mary Henley Captain October 7, 1828 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Theresa Hoffman Musician marine corps Sept. 19, 1837 4 00 do
Hannah Hazen Seaman March 28, 1814 6 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Mary Ann H. Holmes Armorer Sept. 8, 1833 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Hannah Hammond Marine Nov. 10, 1817 3 50 do
Phebe Hollis Marine May 13, 1811 3 50 do
Emma Horton Midshipman August 7, 1815 9 50 do
Ann J. Holmes Master-at-arms August 22, 1836 9 00 do
Rebecca Higgins Seaman Sept. 30, 1837 6 00 do
Sarah Ann Huntt Purser April 4, 1837 20 00 do
Diana Hardy Ordinary seaman Sept. 10, 1813 5 00 March 4, 1814.
Sarah Higgins Seaman Sept. 28, 1834 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Hanna Gunner January 17, 1837 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann R. Hall Sailmaker Sept. 18, 1826 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Ann Horsley Surgeon Sept. 8, 1834 27 50 March 3, 1837.
Margaret Holland Carpenter's mate August 10, 1800 9 50 do
Ellen Hunter Marine May 16, 1838 3 50 do
Eliza Halsey Purser January 2, 1838 20 00 do
Cornelia Hobbs Lieutenant April 3, 1836 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Hetty Henry Seaman May 25, 1834 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary S. Hunter Chaplain Febr'ry 24, 1823 20 00 do
Mary Ann Hartnett Carpenter Sept. 9, 1830 10 00 do
Phebe Hammersley Lieutenant October 1, 1823 25 00 do
Phebe W. Hoffman Captain Dec. 10, 1834 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Henrietta Hixon Master Sept. 8, 1840 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Mary E. Holbert Corporal marine corps June 30, 1834 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Susan Harraden Master commandant January 20, 1818 30 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Eliza Henley Captain May 23, 1835 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Hachleton Seaman Dec. 5, 1812 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Johnston Landsman Febr'ry 21, 1833 4 00 do
Elizabeth Jones Marine Sept. 1, 1827 3 00 June 30, 1834.
Maria T. Johnson Carpenter's mate January 30, 1814 9 50 Jan. 20, 1813.
Hannah Ingraham Seaman April 10, 1837 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Jones Seaman August 16, 1800 6 00 do
Catharine Johnson Gunner August 11, 1818 10 00 do
Mary Ann Jackson Ordinary seaman May 2, 1838 5 00 do
Theresa Jones Marine June 26, 1810 3 50 do
Mary Jameson Midshipman Nov. 11, 1828 9 50 do
Ellen Jenkins Seaman June 2, 1825 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Mary Jones Chaplain January 29, 1829 20 00 do
Susan J. Jackson Purser October 31, 1840 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Jones Cook April 20, 1815 9 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Catharine C. King Sergeant marine corps August 3, 1837 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Kitchen Seaman August 16, 1800 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza Kitts Sailingmaster Sept. 27, 1819 20 00 March 3, 1887.
Harriet J. Kissam Surgeon October 6, 1828 30 00 June 30, 1884.
Ann M. Kelly Gunner June 10, 1841 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Frances m. Lewis Master commandant Sept. 1, 1815 30 00 March 3, 1817.
Susannah Lippincott Ordinary seaman January 1, 1838 5 00 March 3, 1837.
Lydia Low Yeoman August 1, 1834 7 50 June 30, 1834.
Betsey Low Seaman Sept. 1, 1835 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Deborah Linsay Sailingmaster May 19, 1826 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Lagoner Seaman March 4, 1835 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Julia M. Lawrence Captain June 1, 1813 50 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Sarah Ann Lent Sailmaker's mate Sept. 11, 1824 9 50 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Leahy Marine Dec. 27, 1840 3 50 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth B. Lyne Lieutenant May 1, 1841 25 00 do

--420--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Mary D. McClure Quartergunner June 5, 1834 $7 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary McCawley Captain marine corps Febr'ry 22, 1839 20 00 do
Rachel Marshall Seaman Dec. 31, 1827 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Matthews Quartergunner Nov. 30, 1814 9 00 Jan. 20, 1818.
Hetty McDermott Quartergunner Sept. 30, 1837 7 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary Ann Marshall Gunner August 8, 1827 10 00 do
Celeste McGowen Lieutenant Febr'ry 19, 1826 25 00 do
Ann Mix Commander Febr'ry 8, 1839 30 00 do
Abigail Morgan Carpenter's mate March 12, 1813 9 50 do
Hester Meredith Ordinary seaman Febr'ry 17, 1838 5 00 do
Mary McNelly Gunner Nov. 29, 1834 10 00 June 30, 1834.
Phebe Montgomery Surgeon Jan. 3, 1828 25 00 do
Rebecca McGee Marine Jan. 26, 1830 3 00 do
Mary E. McPherson Master commandant April 28, 1834 30 00 do
Hester Murphy Corporal marine corps Dec. 26, 1831 4 50 March 3, 1837.
Mary G. Maury Lieutenant June 23, 1840 25 00 do
Elizabeth Myers Marine October 10, 1839 3 50 do
Catharine Mitchell Landsman Nov. 20, 1832 4 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth H. Marshall Corporal marine corps Dec. 11, 1822 4 50 March 3, 1837.
Ann G. McCullough Sailingmaster August 24, 1814 20 00 Jan. 20, 1818.
Jane Moulton Seaman April 20, 1815 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Caroline Monteath Lieutenant October 16, 1819 25 00 March 3, 1887.
Mary P. Morris Lieutenant Nov. 5, 1837 25 00 do
Martha McNelly Boatswain July 14, 1839 10 00 do
Honora McCarty Ordinary seaman May 25, 1839 5 00 do
Ann Martin Quartergunner April 20, 1815 9 00 Jan. 20, 1818.
Elizabeth Martin Boatswain Sept. 1, 1829 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Susan McCullough Lieutenant Dec. 31, 1827 25 00 do
Mary McCall Surgeon Sept. 15, 1831 25 00 do
Eliza Maury Lieutenant June 24, 1823 25 00 March 3, 1817.
Elizabeth McCann Purser's steward April 26, 1840 9 00 do
Elizabeth McMurtrie Purser March 23, 1836 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine McLaughlin First class boy Febr'ry 15, 1837 4 00 March 3, 1887.
Ann Nantz Sailingmaster Dec. 27, 1824 20 00 do
Laura C. Nicholson Captain Dec. 12, 1838 50 00 do
Sarah L. Noyes Ship's corporal October 9, 1835 7 00 do
Rhoda Newcomb Lieutenant Nov. 1, 1825 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Nagle Boatswain Nov, 19, 1834 9 50 do
Mary Neale Lieutenant Sept. 1, 1815 25 00 March 8, 1817.
Teresa Nichols Seaman June 30, 1838 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Ann Nelson Seaman Nov. 11, 1837 6 00 do
Eliza Netto Captain's steward Dec. 6, 1838 9 00 do
Charity Nicholson Carpenter Sept. 9, 1814 10 00 do
Margaret Navarro Sailmaker October 2, 1823 10 00 March 3, 1817.
Sarah H. Nichols Sailingmaster Sept. 12, 1822 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Rebecca Oellers Seaman March 21, 1839 6 00 do
Margaret Osborn Seaman August 16, 1834 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza A. Oliver Gunner March 30, 1884 10 00 do
Elizabeth O'Hare Carpenter's mate August 28, 1838 9 50 March 3, 1837.
Catherine Ann Pierce Carpenter's mate Sept. 10, 1829 9 50 do
Eliza L. Pierce Lieutenant August 7, 1822 25 00 March 8, 1817.
Frances Pottenger Lieutenant February 5, 1833 25 00 June 80, 1884.
Jane R. Palmer Passed assist't surgeon Nov. 6, 1886 17 50 March 8, 1837.
Maria Page Surgeon March 15, 1882 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Nancy Patch Seaman Oct. 29, 1812 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Frances W. Parker Carpenter August 26, 1830 10 00 March 3, 1887.
Nabby Pippen Coxswain April 20, 1815 9 00 do
Mary Proctor Steward July 1, 1837 9 00 do

--421--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Abigail Parrott Ordinary seaman March 3, 1832 $5 00 March 8, 1887.
Lydia G. Pinkham Lieutenant October 27, 1839 25 00 do
Eleanor H. Prentiss Lieutenant July 5, 1840 25 00 do
Elizabeth C. Perry Captain August 23, 1820 50 00 March 3, 1817.
Margaret Parcels Sailmaker August 20, 1819 10 00 do
Sarah T. Phillips Carpenter October 9, 1839 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Rachel Patten Ordinary seaman August 11, 1835 5 00 do
Mary Preble Captain August 25, 1807 50 00 do
Lucretia M. Perry Purser May 8, 1832 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Eliza Page Sailingmaster Sept. 16, 1826 20 00 do
Sarah Potts Sailingmaster May 8, 1839 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Georgiana A. Peaco Surgeon May 23, 1827 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Phillips Marine Oct. 22, 1834 3 50 do
Mary Ann Patterson Boatswain Dec. 13, 1836 10 00 March 3, 1887.
Eliza C. Porter Master commandant Sept. 2, 1831 30 00 June 30, 1834.
George Ann Patterson Captain August 25, 1839 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Henrietta M. Prather Marine Sept. 14, 1834 3 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine S. M. Ray Surgeon Sept. 7, 1835 35 00 do
Rebecca Rainey Ordinary seaman Nov. 11, 1804 5  00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Rumney Sailingmaster March 31, 1823 20 00 do
Ann I. Ross Lieutenant m. corps Dec. 11, 1836 15 00 do
Sally Russell Master's mate Oct. 17, 1803 10 00 do
Elizabeth J. Russell Lieutenant July 21, 1838 25 00 do
Mary Russell Sergeant m. corps July 7, 1829 6 50 June 30, 1834.
Martha Rose Seaman Sept. 10, 1813 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Catharine Rinker Sailingmaster July 10, 1823 20 00 do
Elizabeth Roberts Sergeant m. corps Feb. 14, 1838 8 00 March 3, 1837.
Sarah Ross Marine Dec. 18, 1840 3 50 do
Catharine C. Read Lieutenant Jan. 6, 1812 25 00 do
Ann M. Rodgers Captain May 21, 1832 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah Richardson Boatswain's mate Jan. 9, 1837 9 50 March 3, 1827.
Minerva Rodgers Captain August 1, 1838 50 00 do
Mary W. Rose Master commandant August 27, 1830 30 00 June 30, 1834.
Catharine Rossmusoin Pilot July 22, 1813 20 00 Jan. 20, 1818.
Nancy Riggs Seaman Dec. 27, 1814 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Phebe Reynolds Boatswain May 24, 1823 10 00 March 3, 1817.
Eliza Sitcher Drummer Feb. 28, 1841 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Stevens Captain Jan. 21, 1841 50 00 do
Hannah Stricker Sergeant m. corps Oct. 1, 1820 6 50 do
Eleanor Smart Seaman Oct. 15, 1814 6 00 March 4, 1814.
Louisa Ann Smith Lieutenant Nov. 30, 1836 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Patty Smith Boatswain June 17, 1815 10 00 do
Elizabeth L. Stallings Lieutenant April 26, 1841 25 00 do
Mary H. Stockton Lieutenant Nov. 20, 1836 35 00 do
Elizabeth Steinbogh Boatswain Nov. 20, 1840 10 00 do
Mary C. Spence Captain Sept. 26, 1826 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Mehitable Smith Lieutenant Sept. 10, 1829 25 00 do
Sarah Smith Steward Dec. 19, 1820 9 00 March 3, 1837.
Hannah Stone Seaman July 1, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1817.
Mary B. Shaw Captain Sept. 17, 1823 50 00 do
Harriet H. Sanders Lieutenant Dec. 7, 1816 25 00 Jan. 30, 1818.
Sally Sclosser Seaman Feb. 5, 1821 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Catharine Smith Marine March 18, 1837 3  50 do
Elizabeth A. Stark Corporal m. corps Dec. 10, 1839 4 50 do
Louisa Sherburne Lieutenant Nov. 20, 1830 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann E. Sardo Musician m. corps Dec. 20, 1835 4 00 do
Rachel Steel Sergeant m. corps Nov. 28, 1832 8 00 March 3, 1837.

--422--

B No. 15—Continued.

Names of pensioners. Husband's rank. Commencement
of pension.
Monthly
pension.
Acts of
Congress
under which
allowed.
Mary Stellwagen Sailingmaster Nov. 16, 1828 $20 00 Jan. 30, 1834.
Ann Stephenson Sailingmaster Aug. 27, 1813 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Margaret E. Shaw Purser Oct. 17, 1820 20 00 do
Jane Smith Midshipman March 21, 1831 9 50 June 30, 1834.
Mary Stevens Sailingmaster April 18, 1816 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Alice Smily Seaman Feb. 27, 1813 6 00 do
Elizabeth Simmons Marine Jan. 30, 1811 3 50 do
Ann Maria Stivers Landsman April 22, 1839 4 00 do
Rebecca S. Stinger Landsman July 15, 1839 4 00 do
Mary Stone Seaman April 20, 1840 6 00 do
Mary Stevenson Seaman Oct. 8, 1828 6 00 June 30, 1834.
Elizabeth Sevier Captain m. corps May 9, 1837 20 00 Jan. 20, 1813.
Mary Ann Springer Lieutenant May 25, 1820 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Frances A. Thomas Lieutenant Sept. 10, 1829 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann Tight Seaman March 24, 1834 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Trapnell Marine Sept. 10, 1813 3 50 March 4, 1814.
Ann Tilden Seaman April 20, 1815 6 00 March 3, 1837.
Eliza Toohey Sergeant m. corps Nov. 13, 1837 6 50 do
Hannah Thompson Seaman April 9, 1835 6 00 do
Lucy R. Temple Lieutenant June 23, 1830 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Ann Taggert Gunner Dec. 13, 1836 10 00 March 3, 1837.
Jane Trusty Cook July 24, 1839 9 00 do
Ann E. Tingey Captain Feb. 22, 1829 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Emily Tupper Captain m. corps Jan. 18, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth Trenchard Captain Nov. 3, 1824 50 00 June 30, 1834.
Emma C. B. Thompson Captain Sept. 2, 1832 50 00 do
Sarah J. Underwood Lieutenant July 24, 1840 25 00 March 3, 1837.
Hannah Ulrick Sailingmaster June 6, 1822 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Rachel Van Patten Ordinary seaman April 23, 1825 5 00 do
Lydia Van Horn Marine Oct. 10, 1814 3 00 March 4, 1814.
Anna Vanderfeen Ordinary seaman June 30, 1824 5 00 June 30, 1834.
Edna M. Wood Passed midshipman Oct. 9, 1836 12 50 do
Eleanor Wells Landsman August 10, 1800 4 00 March 3, 1837.
Abigail Warren Marine Sept. 12, 1812 3 50 do
Hannah Webb Seaman Jan. 1, 1813 6 00 March 4, 1814.
rah V. Waldo Master August 30, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Elizabeth White Master-at-arms May 18, 1815 9 00 do
Margaret C. Worth Lieutenant Feb, 3, 1841 25 00 do
Mary D. Wade Lieutenant Nov. 15, 1816 25 00 do
Catharine Walling Seaman Dec. 8, 1813 6 00 do
Mary S. Wilkinson Passed midshipman Nov. 14, 1639 12 50 do
Electa Webster Lieutenant August 25, 1825 25 00 June 30, 1834.
Marvel Wilcox Carpenter's mate August 8, 1813 9 50 March 3, 1817.
Susan C. Woolsey Captain May 15, 1838 50 00 March 3, 1837.
Ellen Woolsey Lieutenant Oct. 25, 1840 25 00 do
Catharine Wise Purser Nov. 20, 1824 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Sarah H. Willard Sergeant m. corps. May 30, 1837 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Charlotte Wares Sailingmaster Dec. 4, 1815 20 00 March 3, 1817.
Julia Weed Captain m. corps May 5, 1838 20 00 March 3, 1837.
Rebecca Winn Purser Feb. 8, 1836 20 00 June 30, 1834.
Drucilla Whetcroft Sergeant m. corps August 29, 1834 6 50 March 3, 1837.
Ann T. Yarnall Carpenter's mate April 30, 1837 9 50 do

The number of widow pensioners is 363; annual sum to pay them, $67,749 96.

--423--

___________

C No. 15.

Alphabetical list of minor children to whom pensions have been granted under the act of March 3, 1837.

Names of children. Father's rank. Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
Elizabeth Ardis Carpenter's mate $9 50 Sept. 8, 1831.
Ann Ardis
Emma Ardis
Franklin Armstrong Sergeant marine corps 7 50 Jan. 23, 1825.
Venerando Armstrong
Thomas W. Adams Sailmaker 10 00 Sept. 10, 1829.
Laura V. Anderson Captain marine corps 20 00 Jan. 1, 1837.
Ann E. Armstrong Carpenter 10 00 Nov. 27, 1839.
Thomas P. Armstrong
George W. Armstrong
Virginia Armstrong
Julia A Blakeslee Marine 3 60 July 31, 1827.
John Bell Cook 9 00 August 15, 1831.
James Bell
Mary Jane Bell
Maria Bell
Marcellus Bell
Elizabeth E. A. Berry Seaman 6 00 Oct. 9, 1840.
James R. Blade Ordinary seaman 5 00 Sept. 26, 1834.
Thomas J. P. Bliss Seaman 6 00 July 1, 1838.
William L. Booth Master commandant 30 00 Jan. 1, 1837.
Thomas A. Booth
George T. Bassett Surgeon 25 00 Aug. 20, 1830.
James Covenhoven Marine 3 50 Feb. 26, 1837.
Margaret T. Chamberlain Sailingmaster 20 00 Feb. 8, 1832.
Emeline Cousins Seaman 6 00 May 21, 1829.
Delia Cousins
Charles W. Conway Marine 3 50 July 14, 1833.
Edward T. Cunningham Gunner 10 00 July 1, 1837.
William M. Caldwell Lieutenant 25 00 June 5, 1827.
John G. Carr Lieutenant 25 00 April 15, 1840.
Elizabeth C. Enoch, formerly Elizabeth C. Davis Musician marine corps 4 00 Jan. 4, 1822.
Emma Demarest Sergeant marine corps 8 00 August 24, 1824.
Margaret P. Darragh Purser 20 00 Jan. 9, 1831.
Teresa Davis Carpenter 10 00 Jan. 11, 1829.
Eliza E. A. R. Denison Purser 20 00 March 15, 1822.
Mary Jane Fisher Corporal marine corps 4 50 May 18, 1829.
Elizabeth Ann Franks Sergeant marine corps 6 50 Oct. 27, 1840.
Henry N. Franks
Children of Timothy Griswold Ordinary seaman 5 00 July 1, 1838.
M. A. S. Grimke Lieutenant 25 00 Nov. 30, 1825.
Edward Garrison Seaman 6 00 April 2, 1825.
Adolphus Heerman Surgeon 35 00 April 20, 1837.
Theodore Heerman
Valentine M. Heerman
Charles F. Heerman
Clifford Heerman
Stephen D. Hibbert Gunner 10 00 July 9, 1832.
George J. Hall Seaman 6 00 Dec. 10, 1834.
Mary Ann Hunt Ordinary seaman 5 00 April 20, 1837.
John Henry Harrison Ordinary seaman 5 00 August 16, 1831.
Joseph B. Jones Sailingmaster 20 00 May 21, 18[24].

--424--

C No. 15—Continued.

Names of children. Father's rank. Monthly
pension.
Commencement
of pension.
Lucinda Jolly Captain of foretop $1 00 August 15, 1819.
Hannah Jolly
James Jolly
Jane Jolly
William Kidwell Private marine corps 3 50 July 1, 1837.
John Kidwell
J. B. O. H. Lightelle Private marine corps 3 50 Dec. 22, 1824.
Robert C. Ludlow Purser 20 00 Jan. 1, 1837.
James Livingston Ordinary seaman 5 00 June 4, 1829.
Caroline Lord Gunner 10 00 July 9, 1829.
Adeline K. Lowe Lieutenant 25 00 May 2, 1826.
Mary F. Linscott Gunner 10 00 May 25, 1827.
Caroline W. Linscott
William O. Martin Seaman 6 00 Oct. 10, 1838.
Margaret R. Munroe Boatswain 10 00 March 27, 1832.
Augustus R. Macdonough Captain 50 00 Jan. 1, 1837.
Thomas Macdonough
Charlotte R. Macdonough
Mary A. McCloud Boatswain 10 00 July 1, 1837.
Martha E. Mozart Master-at-arms 9 00 August 16, 1839.
Mary Ann McCoy Seaman 6 00 Oct. 13, 1836.
James B. McCauley Lieutenant 25 00 Feb. 20, 182[4].
Alexander Moran Quartergunner 7 50 Feb. 10, 1829.
John H. M. Madison Lieutenant 25 00 Jan. 1, 1838.
Maria C. Norris Master commandant 30 00 Jan. 1, 1838.
Shubrick Norris
James W. A. Nicholson Lieutenant 25 00 June 24, 1822.
Alexander Perry Lieutenant 25 00 July 1, 1837.
Mary R. Ritchie Lieutenant 25 00 June 26, 1831.
Mary R. Reany Purser's steward 9 00 Jan. 3, 1831.
Mary Roberts Musician marine corps 4 00 Oct. 1, 1835.
Margaret Roberts
Sarah Robinson Ordinary seaman 5 00 March 10, 1841.
Susan Robinson
Hannah T. Sanderson Lieutenant 25 00 August 23, 1831.
Gilberta F. Sinclair Captain 50 00 Jan. 1, 1837.
Alonzo P. Smith Lieutenant 25 00 Jan. 1, 1840.
Deborah Sullivan Seaman 6 00 July 7, 1840.
Florence Sullivan
Catharine M. Smith Master commandant 30 00  
Virginia A. Towner Gunner 10 00 Sept. 2, 1831.
Robert Towner
Margaret R. Timberlake Purser 20 00 April 2, 1828.
Eliza [] Trimble Sailmaker 10 00 July 1, 1837.
Edward Thinkham Seaman 6 00 Oct. 31, 1836.
John L. Thurston Sergeant marine corps 6 50 Sept. 11, 1840.
Children of Robert L. Thorn Surgeon 30 00 Oct. 12, 1838.
Emily Vandackenhausen Private marine corps 3 50 March 12, 1833.
John Woods Boatswain 10 00 Jan. 1, 1830.
T. G. Wescott Lieutenant 25 00  
Thomas A. Young Lieutenant 12 50 July 7, 1835.

The number of minor children pensioners is 105; annual sum to pay them, $12,154.

--425--

___________

D No. 15.

A statement shaving the receipts and expenditures on account of the navy pension fund, from the 1st of October, 1840, to the 30th of September, 1841, inclusively, and advances to agents during the same period.

  I. Balance in the Treasury, to the credit of the fund,    
  II. Amount received into the Treasury since 1st October, 1840, from whom, and on what account, viz:    
1840.      
Dec. 23 From Corcoran & Riggs, for sale of stocks $38,075 98  
1841.      
Jan. 5 From do do 10,000 00  
Feb. 25 From do do 3,217 79  
June From Secretary of the Navy, for stock of Union Bank, Georgetown 1,705 50  
August Appropriation by act of Congress, approved 16th August, 1841 139,666 06  
  Total amount of receipts;   192,665 33
1840. III. Expenditures from October 1, 1840, to September 30, 1841, inclusive, viz:    
Nov. 2 Paid W. R. Wesson, administrator of John G. Lauman, 31 75  
16 Paid Maria Harrison, for arrears of pension due her as
the child of John Garde, late S. M., lost in the Insurgente, 1800
5,040 00  
18 Paid Wm. Collings, for arrears of pension due him as child of J. Collings, lost in the same    
    1,361 67  
1841.      
March 8 Paid Robert W. Casey, executor of Joshua Howell, for pension due him 30 50  
April 15 Paid John L. Thurston, for pension due him as the child of L. Thurston, deceased 6 72  
Paid John H. McJ. Madison, (minor,) for pension to 1st September, 1840 200 00  
June 8 Paid David Christie, for arrears of pension under act 3d March, 1837 952 80  
Paid Franklin W. Desha, for pension due him as one of
the children of R. M. Desha, late major M. C. to
20th February, 1840, when he attained the age of 21
years .
   
Paid Margaret F. Denton, formerly Dosha, for pension to same date 300 00  
July 9 Paid Elizabeth Farrar, (widow,) for pension due her late husband 90 00  
Aug, 30 Paid Mary Boyd, for pension due her as the child of Jos.
Heiner, who was lost in the Insurgente in 1800
628 67  
Sept. 6 Paid Cornelius M. Roundy, for pension due him as the
child of B. Roundy, deceased, from 26th August,
1816, to 31st May, 1830
991 00  
28 Paid Lewis S. Thomas, for pension due him as the child
of G. Thomas, deceased, formerly purser, from 20th
September, 1829, to 29th March, 1841
2,766 00  
  Total amount of expenditures   12,549 11
  IV. Advances to agents to pay pensions, viz    
1840.      
Dec. 23 To. B. D. Heriot, navy pension agent, Charleston, S. C. 555 38  
  To J. Laighton, do Portsmouth, N.H. 975 51  
  To J. B. Perrault, do New Orleans 1,050 75  

--426--

D No. 15—Continued.

1840.      
Dec. 23 To Wm. C. Anderson, navy pen. agt. St. Louis, Mo. $192 00  
To Wm. B. Scott, do Washington, D. C. 2,000 00  
To L. Jarvis, do Boston, Mass. 4,000 00  
To George Loyall, do Norfolk, Va. 4,000 00  
To M. W. Ash, do Philadelphia 3,000 00  
To J. Thomas, do Baltimore 8,000 00  
To President Savings Institution, Louisville, Ky. 521 00  
To do Maine Bank, Portland, Me. 1,032 00  
To do Arcade Bank, Providence, R. I. 1,362 00  
To do Merch'ts & Man. B'k, Pittsburg, Penn. 156 00  
To do Farmers & Mech's' Bk. Hartford, Con't 1,195 00  
To do Farmers' Bank of Del. Newcastle, Del. 144 00  
To do Trenton Bank, Trenton, N. J. 586 00  
To do Mechanics' Bank, New York 10,000 00  
1841.      
Jan'ry 5 To J. Thomas, navy pension agent, Baltimore 5,000 00  
To Wm. B. Scott, do Washington 5,000 00  
Feb. 25 To do do do 3,200 00  
Aug. 17 To J. Thomas, do Baltimore 9,591 48  
To W. B. Scott, do Washington 6,810 16  
To Jacob Alricks, do Newcastle, Del. 144 00  
To L. Jarvis, do Boston 9,234 82  
To T. Upham, do Portsmouth, N. H. 1,030 00  
To B. D. Heriot, do Charleston, S. C. 1,656 00  
To George Loyall, do Norfolk, Va. 4,848 20  
To Thomas Hayes, do Philadelphia 8,944 17  
To J. B. Perrault, do New Orleans 1,432 50  
To President Savings Institution, Louisville, Ky. 541 00  
To do Arcade Bank, Providence, R. I. 1,380 00  
To do Maine Bank, Portland, Me. 3,191 46  
To do Farmers & Mech's' Bk. Hartford, Ct. 1,125 66  
To do Merch'ts & Man. Bk. Pittsburg, Pa. 120 00  
To do Trenton Bank, Trenton, N. J. 424 40  
20 To R. C. Wetmore, navy pension ag't, New York 17,286 97  
To President of Arcade Bunk, Providence, R. I. 281 66  
Sept. 11 To do do do 1,000 00  
  To Samuel McClellan, navy pen. ag't, Baltimore 1,300 00  
  Total amount of advances   $122,212 12

RECAPITULATION.

Balance in the Treasury, October 1, 1840 $7,248 19  
Amount received from that period to Sept. 30, 1841, inclusive 192,665 33  
    $199,913 52
Deduct expenditures to 30th September, 1841, inclusive 12,549 11  
Deduct advances to agents do do 122,212 12  
    134,761 23
Balance to the credit of the fund, October 1, 1841   65,152 29

Treasury Department,
Fourth Auditor's Office, November 22, 1841.

--427--

____________

No. 16.

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Washington, November 9, 1841.

Sir:

On the 11th of May last, a copy of a report dated October 7, 1839, was sent to the Department, accompanied by a letter from me. I would beg leave to refer you to those documents, as comprehending most of the material points to which it is deemed necessary to invite your attention. They are on file in the Department, and can, no doubt, readily be brought before you.

Since that report was prepared, the navy has been greatly enlarged, which renders it necessary to present other tables, to provide for that, increase. For that purpose, the two tables accompanying this have been prepared. No. 1 shows the number of men required for the ships of war now in commission, allowing one marine for each gun. No. 2 shows the number required by a regulation adopted on the recommendation of the Board of Navy Commissioners during the past year. The number of sentinels on board the vessels of war, the opinions of the naval officers on sea duty, and the experience and custom of the service heretofore, all unite in favor of one marine for a gun. I therefore recommend to the Department the adoption of the principle contained in table No. 1, for the guards of ships of war. In the British navy the military guards are even larger than those provided for in this table, a great increase of them having taken place since the last war between England and the United States. The experience of the greatest naval Power in the world should not be disregarded by us.

The number of privates required by that table for the ships in commission amount to 1,104. To provide one relief for this force, it is necessary to maintain on shore the same number of disciplined soldiers. Fifteen hundred and fifty, the number called for on shore by this table, furnishes this relief, and 446 over, in which are included recruits and all others unable to do duty from sickness or other causes. This table further shows the disposition of this force at the several naval stations, affording ample protection to the public property, and preventing any other expenditure for that purpose. The navy yards at all the seaports are now large, requiring a long line of sentinels to afford the necessary security to the property within them; the two Southern naval stations, more especially, require a large force for their security. A large number of arms is kept in each of them, which, by a sudden irruption of the class of people who are not citizens, might be seized and used for most disastrous purposes, unless a force competent for their safe keeping be maintained. The number proposed in this table would seem to be hardly sufficient for a service so important.

In presenting to the Department the propriety of providing for an increase of our naval armament in steamships, I should not fully do my duty if I did not ask for a number of men even larger than that contained in this able. I am therefore clearly of opinion that 3,000 privates are required, and that that number should now be provided for by law. Commodore Stewart and other naval officers think that 4,000 men are necessary. That this number could be usefully employed, I do not doubt; but, in asking for 3,000 men, I am led to believe that the public interests will be sufficiently provided for.

--428--

Before I close this letter, I would earnestly renew the request, made in my letter of the 11th May last, in relation to military regulations for the marine corps, for which provision is made in the act of Congress of the 30th June, 1834. A board of officers, of which Commodore Biddle was president, drew up those regulations. They were prepared on the board,) liberation, (an army and a marine officer being members of mature desent to the Navy Department, and never adopted. They did justice both to the navy and marine corps, and their sanction would have been satisfactory to the service generally. I beg leave now to ask your attention to them, with an assurance that their adoption is called for to restore the corps to its military independence, without which it will certainly be materially injured in its military efficiency.

Should the Department concur with the views presented in this report, the necessary estimates can be furnished by the staff at any time they may be called for.

I remain, with great respect, your most obedient servant,

ARCH. HENDERSON,
Col. Commandant.

Hon. A. P. Upshur,
Secretary of the Navy.

--429--

____________

(No. 1.)

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, required for the guards of vessels in commission on the 30th September, 1841, allowing one private to each gun as rated in the Navy Register, rating the steam frigate Fulton as a second class frigate, and the schooners Van Buren, Flirt, and Madison, as schooners of the largest class.

Vessels. No. of guns. Captains. 1st lieutenants 2d lieutenants Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
Pennsylvania 120 1 1 1 5 6 2 2 120 138
North Carolina 80 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 80 92
Delaware 80 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 80 92
Columbus 74 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 74 86
Frigate Potomac 44   1   3 3 1 1 44 53
Constitution 44   1   3 3 1 1 44 53
Brandywine 44   1   3 3 1 1 44 53
Constellation 36     1 3 3 1 1 36 45
Macedonian 36     1 3 3 1 1 36 45
Steam frigate Fulton       1 3 3 1 1 36 45
Sloop St. Louis 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Vincennes 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Warren 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Fairfield 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Boston 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Concord 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Cyane 20       2 2 1 1 20 20
Levant 20       2 2 1 1 20 26
Peacock 18       2 2 1 1 18 24
Decatur 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Marion 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Preble 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Yorktown 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Dale 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Brig Porpoise 10       1 2 1 1 10 15
Schooner Van Buren 10       1   1 1 10 15
Flirt 10       1 2 1 1 10 15
Madison 10       1 2 1 1 10 15
Total   4 7 7 64 72 29 29 892 1,104
 
  Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates.
Whole strength on shore 124 124 62 62 1,560
Whole strength afloat, including home squadron 82 92 37 37 1,104
  42 32 26 25 446

--430--

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, required at the present shore stations.

Stations. Brig. generals. Colonels. Lt. colonels. Majors. Captains. 1st lieuten-ants. 2d lieuten-ants. Non-commissioned staff. Ser-geants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
Headquarters &. navy yard, D. C.               4 24 24 12 12 300  
Philadelphia                 12 12 6 6 150  
New. York                 16 16 8 8 200  
Charlestown, Mass.                 16 16 8 8 200  
Portsmouth, N. H.                 8 8 4 4 100  
Gosport, Va.                 24 24 12 12 300  
Pensacola, W. F.                 24 24 12 12 300  
Total               4 124 124 62 62 1,550  

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, required for the home squadron, allowing one private to each gun.

Vessels. Brig. gen'ls. Colonels. Lt. colonels. Majors. Captains. 1st lieuten-ants. 2d lieuten-ants. Non-commissioned staff. Ser-geants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates Aggregate.
3 frigates                 6 6 2 2 88  
2 steamers                 6 6 2 2 64  
2 sloops                 4 4 2 2 40  
2 smaller vessels                 2 4 2 2 20  
Total                 18 20 8 8 212  

--431--

Whole number required for the stations, vessels in commission, and the home squadron, allowing one private to each gun.

  Brig. generals. Colonels. Lt colonels. Majors. Captains. 1st lieute-nants. 2d lieute-nants. Non-commissioned staff Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
Stations               4 124 124 62 62 1,550  
Vessls in commission.                 64 72 29 29 892  
Home squadron                 18 20 8 8 212  
Total               4 206 216 99 99 2,654  

 

  Non-com. staff. Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates.
Total 4 206 216 99 99 2,654
Present strength allowed by law 4 80 80 30 30 1,000
    126 136 69 69 1,654

* Non-commissioned staff—sergeant major, quartermaster sergeant, drum and fife majors. The corps, being cut up into small detachments, requires a greater number of first and second lieutenants than a regular military organization. For this table, (No. 1,) the following officers will be the required number, to wit: 1 brigadier general, 3 colonels, 3 lieutenant colonels, 3 majors, 26 captains, 53 first lieutenants, and 53 second lieutenants. Whole number of enlisted men required in table No. 1: Non-commissioned staff, 4; sergeants, 206; corporals, 216; drummers, 99; fifers, 99; privates, 2,654; aggregate, 3,278. The number of corporals afloat being greater than sergeants, accounts for the difference in this table.

Headquarters of the Marine Corps, Washington,
November, 1841.

--432--

______________

(No. 2.)

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, required for the guards of vessels in commission on the 30th September, 1841, agreeably to the increase directed to be estimated for by the Navy Department, under orders dated 15th October, 1839.

Vessels. Guns. Captains. 1st lieute-nants. 2d lieute-nants. Ser-geants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
Pennsylvania 120 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 54 66
North Carolina 80 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 54 66
Delaware 80 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 54 66
Columbus 74 1 1 1 3 4 1 1 54 66
Frigate Potomac 44   1   3 3 1 1 36 45
Constitution 44   1   3 3 1 1 36 45
Brandywine 44   1   3 3 1 1 36 45
Constellation 36     1 3 3 1 1 32 41
Macedonian 36     1 3 3 1 1 32 41
Steam frigate Fulton       1 3 3 1 1 32 41
Sloop St. Louis 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Peacock 18       2 2 1 1 18 24
Vincennes 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Warren 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Fairfield 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Boston 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Concord 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Cyane 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Levant 20       2 2 1 1 18 24
Decatur 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Marion 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Preble 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Yorktown 16       2 2   1 16 22
Dale 16       2 2 1 1 16 22
Brig Porpoise 10       2 2 1 1 16 22
Schooner Van Buren 10       2 2 1 1 16 22
Flirt to       2 2 1 1 16 22
Madison 10       2 2 1   16 22
Total   4 7 7 66 70 28 28 726 936
         

 

  Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates.
Whole strength on shore 124 124 62 62 1,550
Whole strength afloat, including home squadron 86 90 36 36 930
  38 34 26 26 620

--433--

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, required at the present shore stations.

Stations. Brig. gen'ls. Col-onels. Lt. colonels. Ma-jors. Cap-tains. 1st lieuten'ts. 2d lieuten'ts Non-commis-sioned staff. Ser-geants. Cor-porals. Drum-mers. Fifers. Pri-vates. Aggregate.
Headquarters and navy yard, D. C.               4 24 24 12 12 300  
Philadelphia.                 12 12 6 6 150  
New York.                 16 16 8 8 200  
Charlestown, Mass.                 16 16 8 8 200  
Portsmouth, N. H.                 8 8 4 4 100  
Gosport, Va.                 24 24 12 12 300  
Pensacola, W. F.                 24 24 12 12 300  
Total               4 124 124 62 62 1,550  

Number of officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates required for the home squadron.

Vessels. Brig. gen'ls. Col-onels. Lt. colonels. Ma-jors. Cap-tains. 1st lieuten'ts. 2d lieuten'ts Non-commis-sioned staff. Ser-geants. Cor-porals. Drum-mers. Fifers. Privates. Aggregate.
2 frigates                 6 6 2 2 72  
2 steamers                 6 6 2 2 64  
2 sloops                 4 4 2 2 36  
2 smaller vessels                 4 4 2 2 32  
Total                 20 20 8 8 204  

--434--

Whole number required for the stations, vessels in commission, and the home squadron, agreeably to the increase directed to be estimated for by the Navy Department, under orders dated 15th October, 1839.

  Brig. gen-erals. Col-onels. Lt. col-onels. Ma-jors. Cap-tains. 1st lieute-nants. 2d lieute-nants. Non-commissioned staff. Ser-geants. Cor-porals. Drummers. Fifers. Pri-vates. Aggregate.
Stations               4 124 124 62 62 1,550  
Vessels in commission                 66 70 28 28 726  
Home squadron                 20 20 8 8 204  
Total               4 210 214 98 98 2,480  

 

  Non-com. staff.* Sergeants. Corporals. Drummers. Fifers. Privates.
Total 4 210 214 98 98 2,480
Present strength allowed by law 4 80 80 30 30 1,000
    130 134 68 68 1,480

*Non-commissioned staff—sergeant major, quartermaster sergeant, drum and fife majors. The corps, being cut up into small detachments, requires a greater number of first and second lieutenants than a regular military organization. For this table, (No. 2,) the following officers will be the required number, to wit; one brigadier general, three colonels, three lieutenant colonels, three majors, twenty-four captains, fifty first lieutenants, and fifty second lieutenants.

Whole number of enlisted men required in table No. 2: Non-commissioned staff, 4; sergeants, 210; corporals, 214; drummers, 98; fifers, 98; privates, 2,480; aggregate, 3,104.

The number of corporals afloat being greater than sergeants, accounts for the difference in this table.

Headquarters of the Marine Corps,
Washington, November, 1841.

[END]

Published:Wed May 18 12:43:28 EDT 2016