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Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy, Showing the Condition of the Navy in the Year 1832

Communicated, With the President's Message to Congress, December 4, 1832

22d Congress.]

No. 486.

[2d Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN 1832.

COMMUNICATED WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE OF DECEMBER 4, 1832.

Navy Department,

December 3, 1832.

To the President of the United States:

Sir:

It is a source of much gratification to be able to lay before you an exposition of the transactions of this Department the past year, evincing great prosperity.

New evidences have been furnished of the importance of our navy in sustaining the American character abroad, and in extending and protecting some of our most valuable interests.

Besides the ordinary aid given to commerce by the presence of a respectable force on each of our foreign stations, the cruising grounds of some of our squadrons have been enlarged; convoy, and relief in distress, have been occasionally afforded; threatened aggressions have, in some cases, been deterred, and, in others, the commission of actual injuries has been seasonably investigated and stopped.

In the performance of these duties, frequently very delicate and difficult, our officers have, in general, displayed commendable prudence, and always their accustomed promptitude, zeal, and bravery.

Connected with the Mediterranean station, the only collision that has arisen between any part of our squadron and other powers took place at Madeira, between the Constellation and the blockading vessels of Donna Maria. The commander of the Constellation, under instructions to show entire impartiality towards the contending claimants to the throne of Portugal, and at the same time to respect, in all places, the actual government, found, on his arrival at that island, the force employed in its blockade apparently insufficient for the due investment of the place, and partial in its indulgences towards the flags of other nations. Under these impressions as to the facts, and under his general orders for the efficient protection of our commerce, he came to a conclusion, very fortunate for those interested in the trade to Madeira, that while such a state of things continued he was justified in extending assistance to our merchantmen to enter the port of their destination with their perishable cargoes.

The addition to the Mediterranean squadron of the frigates Constellation and United States, and the return of the Ontario, are the only material changes in it since my last annual report. The Delaware has been prepared for sea with a view to that station, but it was deemed expedient not to dispatch her, unless some emergency occurred, until she could undergo a thorough examination in one of our dry docks. The Brandywine, Boston, and Concord, being expected home the present winter, their places will probably, in a few months, be supplied by the Delaware.

The chastisement inflicted by the frigate Potomac on the piratical Malays, in February last, is the sole occurrence of importance among our vessels that compose the squadron in the Pacific. The orders given to her commander required him to ascertain, by careful inquiries, that the information received here before his sailing, concerning the plunder and massacre committed on board the ship Friendship, was not exaggerated. He was further directed to satisfy himself that those outrages were not provoked by any misconduct on the part of the Americans; and that the offenders were, as represented and believed to be true, a race of a character so lawless and savage as not to come within the scope of regular diplomatic intercourse. He was also instructed, if practicable, first to demand and obtain indemnity for the injury committed, and the punishment of those most conspicuous in these barbarous atrocities. It has been gratifying to learn, by accounts from that quarter of the world, subsequent to the visit of the Potomac to Sumatra, that the result of that visit has been to silence all exultation and menaces of further violence from those sea robbers; to draw from them acknowledgments of past errors, and promises of future forbearance from like offences, and to insure, as yet, a scrupulous fulfillment of those promises. But to guard against their perfidy, orders were given that the Potomac should be followed by a detachment from the Brazilian squadron, part of which detachment has since sailed, and has instructions to touch not only at Sumatra, but such places in India, China, and on the eastern coast of Africa, as may be conducive to the security and prosperity of our important commercial interests in those regions.

The stop put to the seizure of our vessels at the Falkland Islands, in January last, was effected by a ship of the Brazilian squadron, under general instructions from this Department to take all proper measures for the effectual security of our commerce and fisheries. Special orders on that subject had been previously prepared and forwarded by this Department, but they had not arrived at the time of the

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prompt and successful interference by the Lexington. Our commerce and fisheries have not been molested in that quarter since that occurrence. The Boxer, another vessel of the same squadron, after visiting Liberia, in Africa, has, at a critical moment, extended our naval protection to the neighborhood of Para and Maranham. The schooner Enterprise, in the late disturbances at Montevideo, was also placed in a position of much delicacy, and succeeded in furnishing very opportune assistance, not only to our own merchants, but to the constituted authorities of the country. Nothing else of interest, connected with the Brazilian station, has occurred since my last annual report. But the unsettled condition of South America, and the security of our commerce in India, have led to an increase of our force on that station, by the addition of the Peacock, Boxer, and Enterprise.

The West India squadron has been employed in an active and useful manner, and particularly so while on the coast of Mexico. During the commotions in that country, the past season, this squadron yielded very efficient protection to our own citizens, and was, on some occasions, fortunately enabled to proffer security to the residents from other nations. The recent seizure of the Montezuma, a vessel belonging to Santa Anna, was made by the Grampus without any special instructions from this Department; but, on the facts reported to her commander, the seizure was deemed by him both necessary and proper in the execution of his general orders to shield our flag, our citizens, and their property, from unlawful aggressions. A part of this squadron has recently been detached to visit the Western Islands, the Cape de Verds, and, if necessary, the coast of Africa, in pursuit of a piratical vessel which, in September last, robbed the American merchant brig Mexican of a large amount of property near the Azores. This measure, aided by instructions to the commanders of vessels on their return from the Mediterranean, and to those now in the West Indies, as well as to our consuls at Madeira, Lisbon, and Gibraltar, to use all practicable vigilance in the detection and punishment of the authors of this wanton outrage, will, it is hoped, terminate successfully; and, in any event, will tend to prevent any other attempts of a like character, from the increased impracticability of escape with impunity. The only changes in the vessels of this squadron have been the withdrawal of the Fairfield, Vincennes, and Erie, for repairs, and the substitution of the St. Louis and Vandalia.

For reasons suggested in the last annual report, it has been my endeavor to keep one of our vessels, in commission, remaining constantly on some portion of our own coast. The schooner Experiment, after sundry trials of her qualities, which proved in a great degree satisfactory, and after a visit, during the past season, to most of our home stations, is still retained on our Atlantic sea-board, ready to be dispatched to such quarter of the world as any new incident may show to be most expedient.

Of the three small vessels heretofore employed in the protection of our live oak, there seems now to be little doubt but one unfortunately foundered in a severe gale during the previous year. The other two, under a belief that their further employment would not be so beneficial as to justify the expenses they occasion, have been recalled. One ceased to be in commission in May last, and was ordered to be sold, and the same disposition will be made of the other on her arrival at Norfolk.

A list of all our vessels now in commission, with their stations and commanders, is annexed (A.) The vessels not in commission have all been recently examined by the Navy Board; and most of those in ordinary, as well as all on the stocks, have been found to be in a good state of preservation. For their condition in detail, reference may be had to the documents annexed (M and N.) The acts of Congress, relative to the rebuilding of the Macedonian, and the purchase of timber to rebuild, at some future period, the Java and Cyane, have both been executed as far as practicable. The rebuilding of the former has already been commenced, and contracts have been made for timber for the others.

The collection of live oak frames, and of other timber suitable for other parts of vessels, under the act for the gradual improvement of the navy, is in progress, as rapidly as the supply of live oak timber from private lands, and the erection of sheds at the different yards, to preserve our materials of that character, render judicious.

On the subject of vessels, the Department has nothing more of much importance to remark, except the repetition of its earnest desire, expressed in the last annual report, for an appropriation to build a few steam batteries. In addition to the consideration then urged in favor of early attention to this subject, may properly be suggested the circumstances, that much time will be required, not only to procure their peculiar equipments, but to introduce the system of discipline, somewhat novel, which may be necessary for their crews; to enable our officers to acquire the new and necessary science suitable for the supervision and management of steam batteries, and to train a distinct class of persons in the service to become their engineers. It is moreover ascertained that these batteries can be so constructed as to prove highly useful, during peace, at the principal navy yards, in towing public vessels towards their destination, at the time of their departure and return, under all winds and tides, and in the frequent and indispensable transportation of men, stores and provisions.

The property on hand at the several yards, consisting chiefly of timber, iron, copper and arms, continues to increase in amount. The whole now exceed in value the sum of five millions five hundred and seventy-nine thousand nine hundred and seventeen dollars. (B.) Independent of what is provided for repairs of vessels, we have on hand the frames for four ships of the line, seven frigates, four sloops and three steam batteries; nine hundred tons of iron, four hundred and fifty-eight tons of copper, ninety-three tons of lead; two thousand two hundred and thirty-two cannon and carronades; three thousand five hundred and four muskets; about thrice as many pistols and cutlasses; two hundred and twenty-eight thousand nine hundred and eight round and double-headed cannon balls, besides grape and cannister; thirty-five thousand six hundred pounds of powder; one hundred and ninety-eight thousand three hundred and eighty-two pounds of sulphur, and about double that quantity of nitre. For further particulars under this head, reference may be had to the annexed report (C.) Increased attention has been bestowed on the due arrangement and preservation of all these materials; and new securities, for their proper use and the accountability for them, will probably be introduced into the revised naval regulations now preparing.

Without much previous attention to the extent and quality of these materials, it will never be in our power, in any future emergency, to develop suddenly, and employ efficiently, the great naval capacities of this country for annoyance of an enemy and for protection to our commerce, as well as for maritime defence.

The act of Congress for the gradual improvement of the navy will expire next March; and this occasion is seized to recommend the continuance of its appropriations for the purchase of these materials, as well as for other valuable purposes, at least six years longer. If these materials are gradually collected, and well preserved, in such quantities as to enable us, in addition to the force usually in commission,

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forthwith, in any crisis, to put our vessels that may be in ordinary and on the stocks into a condition for active and efficient service, and to build and equip suitably such other vessels as our great commercial marine will assist us fully to man, we shall then exercise that true foresight, and that sound and sagacious economy in respect to this branch of the public service, which all experience of our own and other nations recommends, and which the present flourishing state of our country justifies. Without any increase of the number of seamen actually serving in the navy during peace, every sailor on our two thousand miles of seaboard, on our noble rivers and vast lakes, can then be considered as in a course of training to man the numerous vessels-of-war, which our interests, our rights and our honor may at any future period require us to arm; and our countless steam vessels, on the navigable waters connected with some of our frontiers, could then, in any emergency, be at once supplied with the proper munitions of war, and be so far equipped as floating batteries, that they will furnish new and powerful aid, not only in the rapid transportation of men and stores, but in repressing hostile depredations near our shores, and in repelling an invading foe.

Though nominally, as to vessels in commission, only the fifth or sixth naval power in the world, and not expending over one-eighth of the annual amount paid by some nations to maintain a naval establishment, yet, if we look to the true elements of naval power, to our ships in ordinary and on the stocks, to our materials for building and equipment collected and collecting, to our large commercial marine, whether of merchant vessels or steamboats, to our flourishing fisheries, our extended sea-coast and excellent harbors, to our large number of navigable rivers and inland seas, and, at the same time, to our position in regard to other nations, with few neighbors bordering on us by land, and an ocean rolling between us and most of the governments with whom we are likely to have collision, it must be manifest that our greatest exposure and danger are on the water, and that our means of attack and defence there, if duly husbanded and developed, will probably always prove equal to sustain us with credit in any hostilities into which the convulsions of the world may hereafter plunge our peaceful confederacy.

The buildings at the different yards, contemplated by the estimates of last year, have been commenced; and such sums as are wanted to complete them, and to begin others necessary for the accommodation of the officers, the construction and repairs of vessels, and for the safety of the public property, are included in the estimates for the ensuing year.

The appropriation, at the last session, for the survey of Narraganset Bay, received immediate attention. The survey has been completed, and the chart is now preparing. When finished, it will be submitted, for the purpose of being laid before Congress.

The liberal appropriations made at the last session, in aid of the navy hospital fund, have been partly expended; and, when the buildings are finished and furnished, they will conduce greatly to the health and comfort of their meritorious inmates, and reflect much credit on the humanity and benevolence of the country. Measures have been adopted to obtain, if practicable, the release of jurisdiction from the States over the several hospital sites, with a view to prevent the burden and annoyance of taxes, and the obstructions to due discipline in the establishments.

The navy hospital, navy pension, and privateer pension funds, since being placed exclusively under the charge of this Department, have all received careful attention; and the present prosperous condition, especially of the two first, will be made the subject of a separate report, to be submitted to Congress in. a few days. The payment of nine thousand dollars on the third of March, 1829, for the site of the Navy hospital at Norfolk, having been made out of the appropriation for pay and subsistence, instead of the navy hospital fund, and on a deed of conveyance deemed exceptionable in its form, the special interposition of Congress to arrange the subject was held to be proper by my predecessor; and, on that account, the subject still remains unadjusted on the books of the Fourth Auditor.

The entire completion of the dry docks has been prevented by an accident to the coffer dam of one of them, the prevalence of the cholera in the neighborhood of the other, and the extraordinary severity of the weather during the last winter. But it is believed that the solidity and durability of the works, generally, will be increased by the delay; and that, during the ensuing season, we shall be enabled, with safety and. great advantage, to use both the dry docks in the examination and repair of our public vessels. The report annexed will furnish the details on this subject, as well as the other proceedings under the act for the gradual improvement of the navy. (D.) A civil engineer will be needed in the future superintendence of these docks; and he could otherwise be very useful in preparing plans and estimates for the erection of the various buildings and other public works at the different yards. Any increase in our expense by the services of such an officer will be avoided, as the estimates of this year omit two of the number of naval constructors, whose labors at this time are not required. It will be seen by the general estimates for the naval service, the ensuing year, which are annexed, (E,) that no other essential change is contemplated as to officers, except a small reduction in the number of captains and midshipmen, and a small increase in that of masters commandant. The number of lieutenants is only apparently lessened, as it had been during the year no larger than the present estimates contemplate, while the actual number of midshipmen has been the same as in the estimate of former years. The estimates extend this year to the purchase of suitable libraries for the officers in schooners, as well as in larger vessels; and include schoolmasters for all the sloops. Until Congress may think proper to make provision for educating the younger officers, other than the present course of instruction on board the largest vessels and at two of the yards, with an occasional extension of it to another, earnest and additional efforts should, in my opinion, be made to convert every vessel as large as a sloop into a school, efficient as possible, in bestowing on the midshipmen that elementary science and literature, as well as that discipline, necessary to qualify them for the honorable discharge of the higher and more responsible duties of the service. If in such a floating academy, confined to the deck of a ship-of-war, they may fail to acquire in so great perfection some of the appropriate graces of their rank, it is a consolation to reflect that, by furnishing them with improved means, what they may acquire in theoretic information will be increased in quantity and excellence, will be sooner tested by experiment, and thus become more strongly incorporated with the memory and judgment; while much less will intervene to tempt them from that rigid discipline, and that ardent devotion to the ocean, its scenes, its dangers, and glories, which should be inseparable from their arduous and adventurous profession.

The estimates for improvements at the different yards, and for repairs of vessels, are somewhat smaller than those of the previous year. But while retrenching, wherever practicable, all unnecessary expenditure, it has been my constant endeavor to avoid weakening the efficiency of the whole naval establishment, either through an inconsiderate impression that it is, as in some older countries, already

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arrived at maturity, or overgrown and unwieldy, or that, from some other cause, it is not entitled to share in the gradual progress and improvements which the advancing spirit of the age, and the increasing power of a great and growing people, seem to require from all our useful public establishments.

As respects the pecuniary concerns of the navy, generally, it gives me sincere satisfaction to state that, during the year, not a single dollar is known to the Department to have been misappropriated, or lost by misconduct on the part of any of our agents or other officers.

By the changes made under the new arrangement for drawing bills of exchange abroad, either on England or this country, as most advantageous, and by the exercise of more care in our agents concerning the forms of business and the communication of seasonable advices, all our payments abroad have been effected without delay or sacrifices. No bills of exchange have been protested; the credit of our drafts has become good on every station, and on the two where most depressed heretofore, they have advanced considerably above par. (F.)

By means of the seasonable appropriation at the last session of Congress, for the arrearages which had been some years accruing, and by extreme caution since in relation to charges on the enumerated contingent fund, we have as yet been enabled to pay promptly all the demands under that head. No transfer has been made to aid it, in any case, under the temporary act of the last session.

Should Congress place the enumerated contingent fund on the footing heretofore and now recommended, and which new charges upon it in the present estimates render still more urgent, and which the experience of the last ten years, as shown by repeated bills for arrearages, and by irregular transfers from other appropriations to aid it, proves to be indispensable to meet the usual demands upon it in the ordinary contingencies of the service, there is but little doubt that the present desirable state of our moneyed accounts will long continue.

There is now on hand unexpended, of previous naval appropriations, about a million and a half of dollars; but probably most of this sum will be requisite to adjust outstanding claims, and complete the specific objects for which some of the appropriations were made.

On one subject connected with our pecuniary matters, and which has heretofore excited some sensibility both in and out of Congress, from other considerations as well as economy, it affords me gratification to add that our public vessels have returned so seasonably, during the year, that no expense whatever has been incurred in the transportation, from foreign countries, of seamen whose terms of service had been allowed to expire abroad.

In respect to the preservation of live oak, the Department, as before suggested, has not deemed it proper to employ any longer the small vessels engaged in that service. In two of the seven districts, the general examinations having been completed, it has been considered not advisable to retain the agents in them at a large expenditure, merely for the preservation of the timber. It is expected that the examinations of three of the remaining districts will be finished during the present winter, and of the other two in the course of the ensuing year. The general results from these examinations, and my opinion in detail on the plan most eligible to be pursued hereafter on this interesting subject, will soon be presented to Congress in a special report, prepared in conformity to a request contained in a resolution of the House of Representatives passed at the last session.

Our seamen have, in general, evinced a strong and increasing attachment to the service. Great care has, with success, been taken to prevent their time of enlistment from expiring abroad. No occasion has arisen to open the rendezvous at home for some months. Whenever opened during the year, an ample supply of men has been readily obtained. The habits of our seamen are improving in respect to temperance. In most of our ships they have generally enjoyed excellent health; and the visitations among them of that alarming scourge, the Asiatic cholera, have been neither frequent nor severe. Corporeal punishment has become less common and less necessary. The present ration of provision issued for their sustenance cannot lawfully be changed by the Department alone, but could be altered by Congress so as to increase its variety, its nutriment, and healthful qualities. The ingredients recommended in a special report from this Department, at the last session, would be no more expensive than those now composing the ration, and much more acceptable to most seamen.

Efforts have been made to apportion an equal share of the emoluments and hardships of the service to all officers of similar rank and date. Opportunities to test the fitness of all, in subordinate stations, have been, and will continue to be, furnished, as fast as the wants of the naval establishment may permit. It is essential to its prosperity that those officers found entirely unfit for duty should be placed on half pay, or retire altogether from the service, as their unfitness may have arisen either from wounds and infirmities which happened in the discharge of duty, or from censurable causes.

Strict discipline among the officers has generally been attempted, tempered, it is hoped, with all reasonable indulgences. Such discipline has been found not only beneficial to the officers themselves, and the high reputation of the service, but a most efficient instrument in the control and reformation of the seamen, who seldom complain of a system of government extended with firmness and impartiality to their superiors.

The annexed order (G) has been issued during the year, with a view to furnish increased incentives to vigilance in discipline on board our vessels in commission, and as an additional means of obtaining more accurate information on the peculiar merits of officers in command, whose modesty will generally allow only the report of their good works, through the inspection of others, to recommend them.

No appropriation was made the last session of Congress for the suppression of the slave trade; but the Department has been able to meet all the demands growing out of that subject by the balances on hand from former years, as may be seen in the annexed statement, (H.) In consequence of a supposed piracy on the coast of Africa, the Boxer visited Liberia in April last. The report of her commander is annexed, (I.) As Congress did not, at their last session, make any provision in regard to the public property there, the Department has deemed it expedient to sell such of it as was perishable and decaying, and to direct a careful examination, by our agent resident in that country, and an expression of his opinion as to the future disposition of the residue. It may be proper to have, this year, at least a moiety of the last appropriation of ten thousand dollars made, so as to enable the government to meet any contingent calls which may happen in the further suppression of this inhuman trade.

The rules and regulations for the administration of the civil branch of this Department, mentioned in the last annual report, have been collected, arranged and printed. From their subsequent distribution among the naval and civil officers connected with the service, all the benefit anticipated to the relief of the Department and the officers, from much unnecessary correspondence and many unpleasant decisions,

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have been fully realized. The code of regulations for the naval branch, is undergoing revision and enlargement, under a resolution passed by Congress at its last session, and will be submitted for approbation when completed, (K.)

A list of the deaths, dismissions, and resignations, the past year, is annexed, (L.)

The condition of the marine corps, as to its organization and size, as well as the allowances to its officers, and the ruinous state of some of its barracks, have heretofore attracted the attention of this Department and of Congress. But, except the small appropriation to rebuild the barracks at Philadelphia, and. which is now in course of expenditure, legislation has not been completed, though very desirable, on the subjects so interesting to the corps, and so intimately connected, in my opinion, with its future services and usefulness.

To avoid unnecessary repetition, and what might perhaps be deemed indecorous importunity, several other subjects, intimately connected with the welfare of our naval establishment, are left to the decision of the proper authorities, on the suggestions and considerations heretofore submitted by this Department. Full confidence is cherished that they will receive all that attention which the acknowledged importance of many of them deserves, and that nothing exists in the present state of the establishment, or of the country, which should prevent the continuance of all that liberality towards the navy which it has so often experienced, as well as merited, both from the government and the public. Yours, respectfully,

LEVI WOODBURY.

Schedule of documents accompanying the report of the Secretary of the Navy, made December 3, 1832.

A. List of vessels in commission, stations, and commanders.

B. Whole amount of stores on hand.

C. Letters from the Navy Board as to property on hand.

D. Report of Navy Board as to gradual improvement, and dry docks.

E. General estimates.

F. Rate of bills of exchange on two foreign stations.

G. General order as to surveys of vessels on return from a cruise.

H. African slave trade expenditures.

I. Report of the schooner Boxer's cruise to Liberia.

K. Expenses of board for revision of naval code.

L. List of deaths, dismissions, and resignations.

M. Condition of vessels in ordinary.

N. Condition of vessels on stocks.

A.

List of vessels in commission, their commanders, and stations. Class. Name. Commanders. Where employed.

Frigate United States Captain John B. Nicholson In the Mediterranean.
Frigate Brandywine Captain James Renshaw do
Frigate Constellation Captain George C. Reed do
Sloop Concord Master Commandant Matt. C. Perry do
Sloop Boston Master Commandant Geo. W. Storer do
Sloop John Adams Master Commandant Phil. F. Voorhees do
Sloop Vandalia Master Commandant George Budd In the West Indies
Sloop St. Louis Master Commandant John T. Newton do
Schooner Porpoise Lieutenant James M. Mcintosh do
Schooner Grampus Lieutenant Joseph Smoot do
Schooner Shark Lieutenant William Boerum do
Sloop Warren Master Commandant Benjamin Cooper Coast of Brazil.
Sloop Peacock Master Commandant David Geisinger do
Sloop Lexington Master Commandant Isaac McKeever do
Schooner Enterprise Lieutenant Samuel W. Downing do
Schooner Boxer Lieutenant Benjamin Page, jr do
Frigate Potomac Commodore John Downes In the Pacific.
Sloop Falmouth Master Commandant Francis H. Gregory do
Schooner Dolphin Lieutenant John C. Long do

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B.

Amount of stores on hand at the several navy yards, on October 1, 1832, viz:

Portsmouth, N. H. $348,979 49
Boston 1,122,617 79
New York 1,494,143 08
Philadelphia 471,646 81
Washington 907,273 37
Norfolk 1,057,987 83
Pensacola 167,269 55
  $5,579,917 92

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C.

Navy Commissioners' Office,

November 28, 1832.

Sir:

The Commissioners, in compliance with your directions of the 21st of August last, have now the honor to submit the following papers, viz:

1. Statement showing the number and distribution of the vessels of the navy, the number of live oak frames on hand, and frames contracted for.

2. Statement showing the quantity of timber on hand, purchased under the appropriation for repairs and for other purposes.

3. Statement showing the number of tons of iron, lead, and copper, and the number of anchors and chain cables on hand, belonging to the appropriation for repairs, and to any other appropriation.

4. Statement showing the number of serviceable cannon, carronades, and cannon ball, the quantity of powder, and materials for powder, with the number and description of small arms, on board vessels in commission, and in depot at the several navy yards.

All which is respectfully submitted.

I have the honor to be, sir, with great respect, your obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Hon. Levi Woodbury,

Secretary of the Navy.

____________

C, No. 1.

Statement showing the number and distribution of the vessels of the United States navy, the number of live oak frames on hand, and frames contracted for but not fully delivered.

  Ships of the line. Frigates. Sloops-of-war. Schooners. Steam vessels.
In commission   3 11 7  
In ordinary 7 6 6    
On the stocks 5 7      
Frames on hand 4 7 4   3
Frames contracted for   3 3    

___________

C, No. 2.

Statement showing the quantity of timber on hand, purchased under the appropriation for repairs and for other purposes, besides the frames, and the timber properly belonging to them, returned in paper A.

  Live oak. White oak plank, stocks and knees. Yellow pine. White pine. Various knees.
  Cubic feet. Cubic feet. Superficial feet. No. of knees. Cubic feet. Superficial feet. Super. feet. Cubic feet.
For repairs 54,672 234,316 1,014,096 3,381 311,122 456,732 9,114 25,177
For other purposes not connected with frames, in paper A 20,448 105,400 383,811 4,389 109,923 331,736 2,579 22,863
Total 75,120 339,716 1,427,907 7,770 421,045 788,468 11,693 48,040

___________

C, No. 3.

Statement showing the number of tons of iron, copper, lead, anchors and chain cables on hand, belonging to the appropriation for repairs, and for any other appropriation.

        Anchors. Chain cables.
  Iron. Copper. Lead. No. in use. No. not in use. No. in use. No. not in use.
  Tons. Tons. Tons.        
Under appropriation for repairs 468 194 21 71 244 46 23
For all other appropriations 900 458 93 91 1 4  
  1,548 652 114 71 335 47 27

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C, No. 4.

Statement showing the number of serviceable cannon and carronades, the number of cannon ball, the quantity of powder, and the materials for powder, with the number and description of small arms, on board vessels in commission, and in depot at the navy yards.

    Cannon ball. Materials for powder. Small arms.
  Cannon and carronades. Round and double head. Grape and cannister. Loose grape and cannister. Powder. Sulphur. Nitro. Muskets. Pistols. Cutlasses.
  No. No. No. Tons. Pounds. Pounds. Pounds.      
On board vessels in commission 467 28,655 2,290 114,325 1,063 980 1,672      
In depot at the navy yards 2,232 228,908 23,324 540 35,600 198,382 396,994 3,504 5,703 5,248
  2,699 257,563 32,614 540 149,925 198,382 396,994 4,567 6,683 6,920

Note.—Many of the cannon, though serviceable, are of such different forms and dimensions that they could not be used as armament for vessels.

D.

Statement showing the progress which has been made in executing the law for the gradual improvement of the navy, passed 3d March, 1827, including a statement of the present condition of the dry docks building at the Navy yards at Boston and Norfolk.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

A contract was made for the delivery, at this yard, of the frame and promiscuous live oak timber for a frigate and a sloop-of-war; the contractor failed, after delivering about 7,957 cubic feet of moulded and promiscuous timber, which cost, including labor in receiving and storing away, the sum of $8,717.61, leaving about 23,000 cubic feet to be provided for to complete the frames.

976 white oak knees have also been purchased at a cost of $4,187.06.

Contracts are also about being made for 6,000 cubic feet of oak, and 6,000 cubic feet of pine plank stocks, to be delivered during the year 1833.

BOSTON.

At this yard, frames and promiscuous live oak timber have been received for two ships of the line, two frigates, and one sloop-of-war, which, including the live oak beams for 74 and frigates, make 135,051 cubic feet, delivered at a cost of $179,101.93; 35,000 feet of pine, 24,295 feet of oak plank stocks, with 10,338 feet of mast and spar timber, and 957 white oak knees, have also been received at this yard, at a cost of $44,528.13, including labor in receiving and stowing away. Contracts are about being made for the delivery of 30,000 feet of oak, and 20,000 cubic feet of pine plank stocks, during the year 1833.

A shed for the preservation of timber has been completed, under this law, at a cost of $17,738.49.

A dry dock has also been constructed, and during the past year the works upon it have been brought nearly to a close. The turning gates are in their places, and have been proved with a height of twenty-four feet, and the result at a trial of their strength and adjustment is reported by the engineer as very satisfactory. The steam engine, pumps, and machinery, connected with them, are all in place, and have been in satisfactory use since the 10th June last.

The early setting in of cold weather in November, 1831, and the steady cold weather during the winter and unfavorable weather in the spring, delayed the progress of the work in an unusual degree, but during the latter part of the year the weather was very favorable and the work progressed rapidly.

In building the northeastern jettee wall, a breach took place in the coffer dam. This is the only important accident which has occurred at this dock; it occasioned a delay of five or six weeks, and an additional expense of about $7,000.

The engineer has reported that a ship might possibly be admitted, if much required, by the first of next month.

The expense during the year ending 31st October, was—  
For materials $60,651 32
For labor 46,675 48
  $107,326 80
Which, added to the amounts previously expended—  
For materials $236,747 23 2/3
For labor 269,592 91 1/3
  506,340 15
Making the total expenditure $613,666 95

The works remaining yet to be done are the building of the floating gate, further adjustment of the turning gates, fixing keel blocks in the dock, completing the wharves between the coffer dam and wing walls, and removing the coffer dam.

--165--

It is estimated that to complete the dock and its dependencies there will be required the sum of $38,816.

NEW YORK.

Contracts were made for the delivery, at this yard, of live oak frames and promiscuous timber for a 74 and a frigate. The contractor for the 74's frame having entirely failed, the frigate's frame alone has been delivered, containing 20,886 cubic feet, at a cost of $24,445.48.

Contracts have also been made for 40,000 cubic feet of oak and 70,000 cubic feet of pine plank stocks, of which 29,792 feet of oak and 7,763 feet of pine have been received, which, with 419 white oak knees purchased, amount to the sum of $15,308.49.

Contracts are about to be made for 25,000 feet of oak and 15,000 feet of pine, to be delivered in the ensuing year.

PHILADELPHIA.

Contracts were also made for the delivery, at this yard, of frames of two frigates and one sloop-of-war, which have been received, making 54,680 cubic feet, and. cost the sum of $62,426.49.

There has also been delivered 68,582 cubic feet of oak, which cost, including thirty-four white oak knees, $2,537.09.

Other contracts are now making for 10,000 feet of oak and 10,000 feet of pine, to be delivered during the year 1833.

WASHINGTON.

At this yard the live oak frames for one frigate and for one sloop-of-war have been received, containing 38,830 cubic feet, at a cost of $48,118.77.

One hundred and nineteen white oak knees have been purchased at a cost of $500.90, and contracts have been made for 10,000 cubic feet of white oak and for 10,000 cubic feet of pine plank stocks, to be delivered at this yard.

NORFOLK.

The frames for two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop-of-war, making 110,491 cubic feet, have been received and stowed away at this yard, amounting in cost to $139,799.10.

Two sheds for the preservation of this timber have also been constructed at this yard, which cost the sum of $66,116.19. Another building is nearly completed, which has cost $27,489.42 thus far; a further sum of $5,000 will finish it.

Contracts have been made for 70,000 feet of oak and for 50,000 feet of pine plank stocks, and for the masts and spars of two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop-of-war, of which there have been received 23,151 feet of oak and 11,110 feet of pine plank stocks, 5,273 cubic feet of mast and spar timber, and 2,042 white oak knees, amounting to the sum of $23,069.77.

Contracts are also about to be made for 20,000 cubic feet of white oak and for 20,000 cubic feet of pine plank stocks, and for the mast and spar timber for one ship of the line.

A dry dock has been constructed, and during the past year great exertions have been made to hasten the completion of it; all the important branches of the work have been accomplished, and expenses paid. In the course of the coming winter all the important work will be completed, except the floating gate and the removal of the coffer dam.

An unusual suspension of the masonry was caused last year by the cold weather, which set in so uncommonly early and endured so long. Last summer, the great panic produced by the malignant cholera, which was very prevalent, especially at this place, induced upwards of a hundred workmen to quit the dock for several weeks, and prevented others from coming to supply their places.

This embarrassment caused great delay in the work—much languor and uneasiness in those who remained. Notwithstanding these discouraging circumstances, the great operations are mostly accomplished, and considering the nature of the interruptions it is hoped that the progress has been satisfactory.

The great wells, steam engine house, steam engine, and the great pumps, are complete, and the latter are in full and satisfactory operation. The drain from the pumps is finished, and all the masonry and jettee walls are done.

The masonry of the dock, and two-thirds of the coping, is laid, and the whole banked up to the level of the bottom of the coping. The turning gates are nearly completed, and one of them is in its place. Most of the graduation of the ground round the dock is formed, and prepared for building sewers, and to receive the paving.

There has been expended during the past year, ending November 1, 1832—  
For materials $138,515 92
For labor 102,352 66
  $240,868 58
Which added to the previous expenditure of—  
For materials $284,709 70
For labor 302,642 37
  587,352 07
Makes the sum expended on this dock, from its commencement in December, 1827, to November, 1, 1832 $828,220 07

The work yet remaining to be done is the completion of the coping; the making of the sewer round the dock; paving round the dock and between the dock and engine house, the stones for which are mostly delivered; graduating and forming the ground round the dock, now mostly accomplished; finishing the turning gates and the floating gate—the former will soon be done, and the latter with as little delay as possible; the removal of the coffer dam, and clearing out the entrances. These are all the important branches now to be completed.

The cost of finishing this dock will probably be about $50,000; and although the engineer regrets to state that the work cannot, as heretofore stated, be done in December, he has no doubt it may be completed during the winter.

--167--

From the foregoing statement, it is seen that there are live oak frames now in deposite at the following yards, viz.

At Boston, frames for two ships of the line, two frigates, and one sloop.

At New York, frame for one frigate.

At Philadelphia. frames for two frigates.

At Washington, frames for one frigate, and one sloop of war.

At Norfolk, frames for two ships of the line, one frigate, and one sloop of war; which includes three frigate frames, originally contracted for under gradual increase, and subsequently ordered by the department to be changed to gradual improvement: one frame at each of the yards of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia.

E - General Estimate.

There will be required for the navy during the year 1833, in addition to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st day of January, 1833, the sum of three millions one hundred and seventy-six thousand seven hundred and sity-six dollars and eighty-seven cents.

1st. For pay and subsistence of officers of the navy and pay of seamen - $1,478,824 64
2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the several yards - 57,330
3d. For the purchase of provisions, - 460-000
4th. For the repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission, - 506,750
5th. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick, - 35,000
6th. For improvements and necessary repairs of navy yards, - 228,862 23
7th. For ordnance and ordnance stores, - 10,000
8th. For defraying and expenses that may accrue for the following purposes, viz. for freight and transportation of materials and stores of every description; for wharfage and dockage, storage and rent, travelling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers, other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters where there is no hospital, and for funeral expenses; for commissions, clerk hire, and office rent, stationary and fuel to navy agents; for premiums, and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters, for compensation to judge advocates, for per diem allowances for persons attending courts martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers engaged in extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationary of every description, and for books, maps, charts, and mathematical and nautical instruments, chronometers, models and drawings; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber, wheels, and workmen's tools of every description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships of war; for cabin furniture of vessels in commission, and for furniture of officers' houses at navy yards; for taxes on navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress; for incidental labor at navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries, and steam engines, for candles, oil and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary; for repairs and building of magazines and powder houses; for preparing moulds for ships to be built, and for no other object or purpose whatsoever, - 295,000
9th. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated, - 5,000
$3,176,766 87

E, No. 1.

Estimate of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1833, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

Rank and grade. Ships of the line. Frigates, 1st class. Frigates, 2d class. Sloops, 1st class. Schooners. Total number of each. Total amount of each grade.
  1 3 1 11 7    
Captains 2 3 1     6 $14,500 00
Masters commandant 11         11 12,938 75
Lieutenants commanding         7 7 8,233 75
Lieutenants 10 18 5 44 21 98 94,570 00
Masters 2 3 1 11   17 11,262 50
Pursers 1 3 1 11 7 23 15,237 50
Surgeons of the fleet 1 3       4 8,045 00
Surgeons     1 11   12 14,518 08
Assistant surgeons 4 6 2 11 7 30 24,540 00
Chaplains 1 3 1     5 3,312 50
Midshipmen 34 72 20 132 28 286 65,208 00
Boatswains 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Gunners 1 3 1 11 7 23 7,618 75
Carpenters 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Sailmakers 1 3 1 11   16 5,300 00
Secretaries 1 3       4 4,000 00
Schoolmasters 1 3 1 11   16 6,260 00
Clerks 1 3 1 11 7 23 6,900 00
Boatswains' mates 6 9 3 22 14 54 12,312 00
Gunners' mates 3 6 2 11   22 5,016 00
Carpenters' mates 3 6 2 11 7 29 6,412 00
Sailmakers' mates 2 3 1 11 7 24 5,472 00
Quartermasters 12 27 9 55 21 124 23,808 00
Quartergunners 20 36 10 66 28 160 28,800 00
Yeomen 3 9 3 33 7 55 9,900 00
First captains of tops and forecastle 8 24 8 88   128 23,040 00
Second captains of tops and forecastle 6 18 6 66   96 16,128 00
Captains' stewards 1 3 1 11 7 23 4,968 00
Captains' cooks 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Coopers 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Armorers 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Armorers' mates 2 3 1   7 13 2,340 00
Masters-at-arms 1 3 1 11   16 3,456 00
Ships' corporals 4 6 2     12 2,016 00
Cooks 1 3 1 11 7 23 4,968 00
Masters of the band 1 3 1     5 1,080 00
Musicians, 1st class 6 12 3     21 3,024 00
Musicians, 2d class 5 9 2     16 1,920 00
Seamen 300 450 120 98 98 1,628 234,432 00
Ordinary seamen 240 360 100 330 49 1,079 129,480 00
Landsmen 100 150 30 220 21 521 50,016 00
Boys 46 81 21 132 35 315 22,680 00
Ninety-five passed midshipmen             37,168 75
Eighty-four midshipmen, who may be arranged as passed midshipmen, in addition to allowance as midshipmen             13,713 00
  835 1,362 368 2,068 392 5,025 $965,562 58

E, No. 2.

Exhibit of the officers, &c., awaiting orders and on furlough, for the year 1833, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Captain. Master commandant. Lieutenants. Passed midshipmen. Midshipmen. Pursers. Surgeons. Assistant surgeons. Chaplains. Masters. Sailmakers. Amount.
Awaiting orders 19 13 94 10 1 7 9 6     4 $197,039 56
On furlough   1 11 2 1 1     1 3   8,194 00
                        $205,233 56

--168--

___________

E, No. 3.

Estimate of the number, pay, &c., of officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1833, being  part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Boston. New York Philadelphia Norfolk Baltimore. Total. Amount.
Masters commandant 1 1 1 1   4 $4,705 00
Lieutenants 3 3 2 3 2 13 12,545 00
Masters 1 1   1   3 1,987 50
Pursers 1 1   1   3 1,987 50
Assistant surgeons 1 1   1   3 2,081 25
Midshipmen 3 3 2 3 2 13 2,964 00
Boatswains' mates 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,140 00
Carpenters' mates 1 1 1 1   4 912 00
Stewards 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,080 00
Cooks 1 1 1 1 1 5 1,080 00
Able seamen 2 2 2 2 2 10 1,440 00
Ordinary seamen 6 6 4 6 2 24 2,880 00
Boys 10 10 2 10 2 34 2,448 00
  32 32 17 32 13 126 $37,250 25

E, No. 4.

Estimate of the pay, &c., of the officers attached to recruiting stations, ordnance service, and depot for instruments, charts, &c.,& c., for the year 1833, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

  Boston. New York Philadelphia Norfolk Baltimore. Total. Amount.
Masters commandant 1 1 1 1 1 5 $10,053 75
Lieutenants 2 2 2 2 2 10 9,650 00
Midshipmen 2 2 2 2 2 10 3,192 50
Surgeons 1 1 1 1 1 5 5,425 00
              $28,321 25

 

ORDNANCE SERVICE.
One captain $1,930 00
One lieutenant 965 00
  $2,895 00
DEPOT FOR INSTRUMENTS, CHARTS, ETC., ETC.
One lieutenant $965 00
One midshipman, passed 482 50
  $1,447 50

--169--

E, No. 5.

Estimate of the pay, rations, and all other allowances of officers and [h . s], at the navy yards and stations, for the year 1833.

PORTSMOUTH.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Midshipmen 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 12 9     1 651 75
Gunner 1 20 2 12 9     1 651 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 12 9     1 651 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 12 9     1 651 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $14,537 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenant 1 50 4           $965 00
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Able seamen 4 12 1           941 00
Ordinary seamen 10 10 1           2,112 50
                  $4,337 75
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1     *200         $1,400 00
Master builder and inspector of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to yard 1               600 00
Clerk to commandant 1               500 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Clerk to master builder 1               300 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $4,350 00
Whole amount                 $23,225 25
BOSTON.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 65 6   40 20 2   1,710 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4           965 00
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4   20 20 1   1,412 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 $145 16 14   1 950 75
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 75
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,277 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75

Notes.—House rent is estimated for officers, and is to be allowed only in cases where no house is furnished by the government.

Pay and rations of surgeons and their assistants are averaged, under the law of 20th May, 1828.

*Directed February, 1830, by Secretary of the Navy.

--170--

E, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Gunner 1 $20 2   12 9   1 $651 75
Carpenter 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2   12 9   1 651 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 75
                  $20,291 50
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,915 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers.. 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain's mate 2 19 1           638 50
Able seamen 14 12 1           2,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $18,554 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 $200 20 20 1   $1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses 2 10 1           422 50
Washers 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,902 50
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber. 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to commandant 1 40             480 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               550 00
Clerk to master builder 1               420 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $8,300 00
Whole amount                 $51,048 50
NEW YORK.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4           965 00
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9 1 1 1,091 75
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 75
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,277 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 25
                  $21,431 50

--171--

E, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 $50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,950 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers. 3 19 1             957 75
Boatswain's mates 2 19 1           638 50
Able seamen 14 1 1           3,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $19,589 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 $200 20 20 1   $1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14 1   950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses 2 10 1           422 50
Washers 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,902 50
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               990 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to commandant 1 40             480 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               550 00
Clerk to builder 1               420 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $8,300 00
Whole amount                 $53,224 50
PHILADELPHIA.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16 $600 65 30 3   $4,066 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 25
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Surgeon 1 70 4 200 20 20 1   1,732 25
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $15,209 75
                   
Ordinary.                 $965 00
Lieutenant 1 50 4           319 25
Boatswain's mate 1 19 1           941 00
Able seamen 4 12 1           2,535 00
Ordinary seamen 12 10 1            
                  $4,750 25
Hospital. 1               $1,612 25
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,102 00
Assistant surgeon 1 35 3 145 16 14   1 307 25
Steward 1 18 1           422 50
Nurses 2 10 1           422 50
Washers 2 8 1           211 25
Cook 1 10 1           211 25
                  $4,029 75

--172--

E, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,250 00
Master builder 1               2,000 00
Clerk to yard 1               600 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               150 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Clerk to builder 1 $25             300 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $6,450 00
Whole amount                 $30,439 75
WASHINGTON.
Yard.                  
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 75 6   40 20 2   1,982 00
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   61 75
Master in charge of ordnance. 1 40 2           662 50
Chaplain 1 40 2 $200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 9 1   141 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner, as laboratory officer 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner, keeper of magazine 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $13,873 00
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenant 1 50 4           $965 00
Boatswain's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Able seamen 6 12 1           1,411 50
Ordinary seamen 14 10 1           2,957 50
                  $5,972 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 70 4   20 20 1   $1,532 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurse 1 10 1           211 25
Washer 1 8 1           187 25
Cook 1 10 1           211 25
                  $3,400 00
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Assistant master builder 1               1,100 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to commandant 1 40             480 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               500 00
Clerk to assistant master builder 1               420 00
Master plumber and camboose maker 1               1,200 00
Master chain cable and anchor maker 1               1,000 00
Machinist and engineer 1               1,000 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $10,150 00
Whole amount                 $33,395 50

--173--

E, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

NORFOLK.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5 $300 40 20 2   2,010 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200 20 20 1   1,492 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4           965 00
Master 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Master 1 40 2 20 12 1     941 75
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 40 4 145 16 14   1 1,253 25
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Teacher of mathematics 1 40 2 90 12 9   1 981 75
Teacher of languages 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 4 19 1           1,277 00
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Steward, assistant to purser 1 30 1           451 25
                  $21,764 00
Ordinary.                  
Lieutenants 3 50 4           $2,895 00
Master 1 40 2           662 50
Midshipmen 6 19 1           1,915 50
Boatswain 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter 1 20 2           422 50
Gunner 1 20 2           422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Carpenter's mates, as caulkers. 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain's mates 2 19 1           638 50
Able seamen 14 12 1           3,293 50
Ordinary seamen 36 10 1           7,605 00
                  $19,554 50
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Master builder 1               2,300 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Inspector and measurer of timber 1               1,050 00
Clerk to commandant 1               750 00
Clerk to commandant 1 40             480 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               550 00
Clerk to master builder 1               420 00
Keeper of magazine 1               480 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $8,930 00
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   $1,612 25
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses 2 10 1           422 50
Washers 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,902 50
Whole amount                 $54,151 00

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E, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

PENSACOLA.
  Number. Pay per month. Rations per day. House rent per annum. Candles per annum. Cords of wood per annum. Servants at $8. Servants at $6. Pay, rations and allowances per annum.
Captain 1 $100 16   65 30 3   $3,466 75
Master commandant 1 60 5   40 20 2   1,710 00
Lieutenant 1 50 4   20 20 1   1,292 25
Lieutenant 1 50 4           965 00
Master 1 40 2   20 12 1   941 75
Surgeon 1 50 2   20 20 1   1,109 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 $145 16 14   1 950 75
Purser 1 40 2 200 20 12 1   1,141 75
Chaplain 1 40 2 200 12 9   1 1,091 75
Midshipmen 3 19 1           957 75
Boatswain 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Gunner 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Carpenter 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Sailmaker 1 20 2 90 12 9   1 741 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
                  $16,901 75
Ordinary.                  
Carpenter 1 20 2           $422 50
Carpenter's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Boatswain's mate 1 19 1           319 25
Able seamen 4 12 1           941 00
Ordinary seamen 10 10 1           2,212 50
                  $4,114 50
Hospital.                  
Surgeon 1 50 2 200 20 20 1   $1,309 75
Assistant surgeon 1 30 2 145 16 14   1 950 75
Steward 1 18 1           307 25
Nurses 2 10 1           422 50
Washers 2 8 1           374 50
Cook 1 12 1           235 25
                  $3,600 00
Civil.                  
Storekeeper 1               $1,700 00
Clerk to storekeeper 1               350 00
Clerk to yard 1               900 00
Clerk to commandant 1               600 00
Porter 1 25             300 00
                  $3,850 00
Whole amount                 $28,466 25
BALTIMORE.
Captain 1 $100 8 $300 65 30 3   $3,036 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200         1,165 00
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Purser 1 40 2 200         862 50
Whole amount                 $6,676 50
CHARLESTON, S. C.
Captain 1 $100 8 $300 65 30 3   $3,036 75
Lieutenant 1 50 4 200         1,165 00
Surgeon 1 60 4 200 20 20 1   1,612 25
Purser 1 40 2 200         862 50
Whole amount                 $6,676 50
SACKETT'S HARBOR.
Master 1 $40 2 $200 20 12 1   $1,141 75

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RECAPITULATION.

  1st item.
Naval.
1st item.
Ordinary.
1st item.
Hospital.
2d item.
Civil
Aggregate.
Portsmouth $14,537 50   $4,337 75 $4,350 00 $23,225 25
Boston 20,291 50 18,554 50 $3,902 50 8,300 00 51,048 50
New York 21,431 50 19,554 50 3,902 50 8,300 00 53,224 50
Philadelphia 15,209 75 4,750 25 4,029 25 6,450 00 30,439 75
Washington 13,873 00  5,972 50 3,400 00 8,930 00 33,395 50
Norfolk 21,764 00 19,554 50 3,902 50 8,930 00 54,151 00
Pensacola 16,901 75  4,114 50  3,600 00 3,850 00 28,466 25
Baltimore 6,676 50       6,676 50
Charleston 6,676 50       6,676 50
Sackett's Harbor 1,141 75       1,141 75
Naval constructor       3,000 00 3,000 00
Civil engineer       4,000 00 4,000 00
  $138,503 75 $76,873 50 $22,737 25 $57,330 00 $295,444 50

E, No. 6.

Estimates for repairs and improvements of navy yards, for the year 1833.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.
Towards the erection of officers' quarters on site No. 2 $15,000 00  
For new roofs to wings of ship house No. 2, repairing foundation, &c., &c 1,452 00  
For laying new platform under the frigate Santee, in ship house No. 2 910 00  
For laying new platform at west end of brick store, making new crane, and underpinning the old mast and spar house 1,162 00  
For leveling yard 3,000 00  
    $21,524 00
BOSTON.
Towards the erection of a quay wall, and stone fence thereon $16,954 74  
Towards building foundation under ship house 3, and ship; clearing away old wharf, filling in, &c., &c 27,807 95  
Towards quay walls from ship houses 1 and 39 9,419 74  
Towards the erection of a steam box shed, a pitch house, and oil and varnish house 4,526 86  
For completing warrant officers' houses in block No. 7, authorized in 1832,    
and towards building the other two houses 9,000 00  
For painting and repairing, &c., brick stores, officers' houses, ship houses, and mast shears, and for painting porter's and gunner's house, blacksmith's shop and tank shed; for repairing wharves, and for painting and repairing mast, boat and timber sheds 5,825 26  
    73,534 55
NEW YORK.
For completing works already commenced $14,250 00  
Towards facing dock in timber pond 5,600 00  
Towards filling in and leveling the yards, and for masting shears 11,500 00  
To repairs to yard buildings 3,500 00  
    34,850 00
PHILADELPHIA.
Towards building a steam box house $1,200 00  
For filling up door ways in timber shed No. 5; for filling up and leveling yard, &c.; wharfing from mast and boat house to the shore, and across the head of timber pen, and for repairing offices and store rooms, workshops, &c., &c 2,075 00  
    3,275 00
WASHINGTON.
For filling in wharf, north side of timber dock $8,500 00  
For repairs to officers' quarters, work shops, &c 7,500 00  
    16,000 00
NORFOLK.
For the completion of master commandant and surgeon's houses (2 and 3) $12,178 77  
Towards building a permanent bridge across the creek, dividing the yard 10,500 00  
Towards the erection of a timber dock 25,000 00  
Towards the foundation of stone under the ship of the line New York 17,301 71  
For facing wharves 25,000 00  
For completing mast house No. 28, and for gutters to Nos. 28, 32, 33, 34, 35, 10 and 11 12,398 75  
For graduating yard 4,000 00  
For completing wall around the yard 7,500 00  
For repairing all works in the yard of every kind, including the foundation of    
the frigate St. Lawrence 12,650 00  
    126,529 23

--176--

PENSACOLA.
Towards completing dwelling-houses already commenced $18,000 00  
Towards completing storehouse 2,200 00  
Towards completing wharf 13,500 00  
Towards completing timber shed 12,700 00  
Towards completing blacksmith's shop 5,250 00  
Repairs of all kinds 1,500 00  
    $53,150 00
Total amount of estimate $328,862 78

E, No. 7.

Estimate of pay for officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, and subsistence of officers of the marine corps, for the year 1833.

PAY.
One lieutenant colonel commandant, at $75 per month $900 00  
Five lieutenant colonels by brevet, (com.) at $60 per month 3,600 00  
One paymaster, at $60 per month 720 00  
One quartermaster, at $60 per month 720 00  
Three captains, at $40 per month 1,440 00  
Twenty-three first lieutenants, at $30 per month 8,280 00  
Sixteen second lieutenants, at $25 per month 4,800 00  
One surgeon, at $60 per month 720 00  
One hospital steward, at $18 per month 216 00  
One sergeant major, at $10 per month 120 00  
One quartermaster sergeant, at $10 per month 120 00  
One drum major, at $9 per month 108 00  
One fife major at $9 per month 108 00  
Seventy-one sergeants, at $9 per month 3,668 00  
Seventy-three corporals, at $8 per month 7,008 00  
Twenty-one drummers, at $7 per month 1,764 00  
Twenty-one fifers, at $7 per month 1,764 00  
Seven hundred and fifty privates, at $6 per month 54,000 00  
Extra pay to the adjutant and inspector, at $30 per month 360 00  
Pay for five clerks, viz: one for the lieutenant colonel commandant, one for the paymaster, one for the adjutant and inspector, and two for the quartermaster, at $20 per month each 1,200 00  
    $95,616 00
SUBSISTENCE.
One lieutenant colonel commandant, 12 rations per day, 4,380 rations, 20 cts. $876 00  
Five lieutenant colonels by brevet (com.), 10 rations per day, 18,250 rations, 20 cts 3,650 00  
One paymaster, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, 20 cts 292 00  
One quartermaster, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, 20 cts 292 00  
One adjutant and inspector, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, 20 cts 292 00  
Three captains (commanding), 6 rations per day, 6,570 rations, 20 cts 1,314 00  
Twenty-three first lieutenants, 4 rations per day, 33,580 rations, 20 cts 6,716 00  
Sixteen second lieutenants, 3 rations per day, 17,510 rations, 20 cts 3,504 00  
One surgeon, 4 rations per day, 1,460 rations, 25 cts 365 00  
One hospital steward, one ration per day, 365 rations, 25 cts 73 00  
    17,374 00
    $112,990 00

C. R. BROOM,

P. M. M. C.

Head-Quarters Marine Corps,

Paymaster's Office, October 15, 1832.

E, No. 8.

Estimate for expenditures in the quartermaster's department of the United States marine corps, for the year 1833.

SUBSISTENCE.
For 421 non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates and washerwomen, serving on shore, at one ration per day each, 153,665 rations, at 12 cents per ration, is $18,439 80  
CLOTHING.
For 938 non-commissioned officers, musicians and privates, at $30 each, is $28,140 00  
For 100 watch coats, at $6.25 each, is 625 00  
    28,765 00

--177--

FUEL.
For the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates and washerwomen, and for the public offices, hospitals and armory $9,090 80  
BARRACKS.
For repairs of barracks at the different stations, and for erecting an hospital at head-quarters 8,000 00    
transportation and recruiting.    
For the transportation of officers and men, and for expenses of recruiting 5,000 00  
MEDICINES.
For medicines, hospital stores and surgical instruments, for the officers and marines serving on shore 2,369 71  
MILITARY STORES.
For the pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, armorers' tools, musical instruments, drums, fifes, flags and ordnance stores 2,000 00  
CONTINGENCIES.
For freight of stores, toll, ferriage, wharfage and cartage; per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers on extra duty; compensation to judge advocates; house rent and chamber money, where there are no public quarters assigned; incidental labor in the quartermaster's department; per diem allowance for a messenger to the public offices; expenses of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps; printing and stationery; forage; postage on public letters; expenses in pursuing deserters, candles and oil for the guards at the different stations, straw for the men, barrack furniture, bed sacks, spades, axes, shovels, picks, and carpenters' tools 14,000 00  
    $87,672 51

Respectfully submitted.

E. J. WEED,
Quartermaster Marine Corps.

Head-Quarters Marine Corps,
Quartermaster's Office, Washington, November 15, 1832.

____________

E, No. 9.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Secretary of the Navy, for the year 1833.

Secretary of the Navy $6,000 00  
Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818 $8,200 00  
One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824 1,000 00  
One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827 1,000 00  
    10,200 00
Messenger and assistant messenger 1,050 00  
Contingent expenses 3,000 00  
    $20,250 00
One clerk, employed under authority of the act for the regulation of the navy and privateer pension and navy hospital funds, passed 10th July, 1832 $1,600 00  
Salary of clerk from 16th July, when appointed, to 31st December, 1832 736 22  
    2,336 22
    $22,586 22

___________

E, No. 10.

Estimate of the sums required for the support of the office of the Commissioners of the Navy, for the year 1833.

For salaries of the Commissioners $10,500 00  
For salary of their secretary 2,000 00  
For salaries of clerks and draftsmen, per acts of 20th April, 1823, 26th May, 1824, and 2d March, 1827 7,750 00  
For salary of messenger 700 00  
For contingent expenses 1,800 00  
    $22,750 00

--178--

E, No. 11.

Estimate of the expenses for the navy building, for the year 1833.

For superintendent $250 00  
For two watchmen, at $300 each 600 00  
Extra for Sunday watching, at 50 cents each 52 00  
For contingent expenses of said building, including fuel, labor, oil, repairs, engines, and improvement of the grounds 3,350 00  
    $4,252 00

__________

F, No. 1.

Extract from a letter addressed to the Secretary of the Navy by Philo White, purser, &c., dated— Valparaiso, Chili, April 6, 1832.

Sir:

I have the honor to advise you that I have drawn two bills on the Department, under this date: No. 40, in favor of Richard Alsop, Esq., for five thousand dollars; No. 41, in favor of H. J. Leaman, for one hundred and twenty-seven dollars, which I have sold at five per cent. premium, realizing for the two bills $5,383.35, gold currency of Chili.

___________

F, No. 2.

United States Ship Warren, Buenos Ayres, July 17, 1832.

Sir:

I have drawn on Messrs. Baring, Brothers & Co., London, the following bills for the disbursements of this squadron:

One dated July 11, for £3500, out, pay, &c. One dated July 12, for £500, out, repairs. One dated July 13, for £500, out, provisions.

I have drawn, in anticipation of the wants of the squadron, exchange being much more favorable here than at Rio. The advantage to the United States in drawing for £2,000 sterling, after allowing ten per cent. to replace the funds in England, is $1,497.

I have the honor to be, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

BENJ. COOPER.

To the Hon. Levi Woodbury,

Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C.

____________

G.

General order.

To the commanders of navy yards:

When any vessel-of-war, belonging to the United States, shall return from a cruise to the yard under your command, unless the captain of the vessel is your superior in rank, in which case the Department will make a special order, you will, soon as practicable, and before her crew are detached or discharged, unite with you the two officers highest in rank at your station, and with them make an examination of the general condition of the vessel and her equipments, leaving a critical survey in respect to the necessary repairs to be afterwards executed in the usual manner.

You will also inspect closely the situation of the vessel as to internal regulations and arrangements, discipline, health, and accommodations of her officers and men, and any other particulars deemed useful to the service.

In the discharge of this duty, all the officers of the vessel inspected are required to give every facility and aid in their power.

The result of your inquiries you will forthwith communicate to the Department, expressing an opinion on any matters therein, when you may consider it important to the prosperity of the navy.

Navy Department, October 8, 1832.

____________

H.

Suppression of the slave trade, under the act of March 3, 1819.

Dr.
1832.  
Jan. 1. To balance in the Treasury this day $8,573 36
Nov. 19. To balance in the Treasury this day $6,913 91

--179--

Cr.
1832.    
Feb. 14. By bill of exchange of Jos. Mechlin, agent, for his salary $750 00  
Mar. 17. By salary of J. W. Anderson, late assistant agent, deceased 159 45  
Sept. 3. By bill of exchange of Jos. Mechlin, agent, for salary 750 00  
Nov. 19. By balance in the Treasury this day 6,913 91  
    $8,573 36

I.

REPORT OF LIEUTENANT B. PAGE, COMMANDING UNITED STATES SCHOONER BOXER.

Extract of a letter from Lieutenant Commandant Benjamin Page, jr., of the United States schooner Boxer, to the Secretary of the Navy, dated,— Off Cape Mesurado, April 9, 1832.

I have the honor to inform you, by the brig Bethia, of our safe arrival at this place on the 5th instant.

After getting soundings, we stood in for Cape Mount; about that point we could see nothing of any vessel of suspicious appearance, or answering the description we had of Rayman's brigantine, which vessel you informed me took and destroyed the colony schooner, commanded by Captain Thompson, of whom, I learn since my arrival, no satisfactory information has been obtained. It is, however, reported, and the report is believed, that he has been taken to Cuba, where the brigantine is said to belong, merely to keep him out of the way as long as possible, as he is represented as a vigilant officer, and well known and dreaded along the coast by such as Rayman, who has, it is believed, taken his departure, as the French and English cruisers (seven in number) are very vigilant.

As you directed, I have furnished the colony with what we could spare of the articles we had on board, which they stood in need of. For your liberal instructions to me on this head, the governor requests me to tender you, in the name of the colony, his grateful acknowledgments. We have received from them all that attention and kindness for which they have been given credit by preceding visitors. They have lately been called to act in the field against a combination of the Dey and Gurrah Kings. It seems that some of the slaves of these kings, when about to be sold to the Spaniards at the Gallinas, ran away, and took shelter among the recaptured Africans who are settled about two miles from Caldwell, on the Stockton river, and that a son of King Brumley was sent down to demand them at Monrovia, but the governor could not treat with him with any safety, as, from his general character, his statements could not be depended upon. He was however told that, if the King himself would visit the colony, he would find no obstacle to a fair adjustment. On the return of the young man, King Brumley suddenly died, and his successor commenced aggressions without delay, by seizing our colonists, depriving them of their property, and even liberty, and cruelly wounding some of the recaptured Africans, at the same time making hostile movements toward the upper colonies, Caldwell and Millsburg. Upon remonstrance being made at their proceedings, they tore up the letters, and declared that if the colonists did not meet them in the field in three days, they would destroy the upper settlements, viz: Caldwell, about N. N. E., distant nine miles, and Millsburg, N. E. by E., distant about twenty-four miles from Monrovia.

In this serious state of things, part of the forces of the colony were marched to Brumley's town. It was found that the natives had left that place, and had assembled at a fortified town about ten miles further inland. Towards this place the colonists marched, armed with muskets and a field piece. On their arrival they had a battle, which resulted in the capture of the town. One colonist was killed, James Thompson, and three wounded, one severely and two slightly. It is said fifteen of the natives were killed, and a number wounded. After their flight, they sent messengers to sue for peace. On receiving assurance that they would be treated with on equitable terms, the Kings came down, and have entered into a treaty highly advantageous to the colonists. Thus peace and tranquillity have been entirely restored: trade is again resuming its usual course. Another deputation has arrived since we have been here, proposing a junction, in addition to the kingdoms of the Numba and Quah, countries already in connection with the colony; and Boatswain, the most powerful and intelligent of the kings of this section of Western Africa, still remains, as he ever has been, their firm and efficient friend, having declared that if the Dey Kings ever trespassed again, he himself would attend to the task of putting them in order. A trading caravan from his country is now here, besides the Quah deputation. There are six vessels laying in the harbor, and arrangements are making to establish another settlement at Cape Mount, so that everything looks encouraging. Between that cape and this place, all along the sea shore, many inoffensive old men, women, and weakly persons, belonging to the different inland kingdoms, are living in thick settlements, and are engaged in making salt, which is carried inland about one hundred and twenty miles by them, and exchanged for ivory and other produce, which brings them, at the colony, at the rate of one dollar for every gallon of salt. I mention this in order to point out an error which has been fallen into by some, in supposing that salt is a good article of commerce here: this is not the case, as foreign salt has been offered and rejected at forty cents per bushel. The Liverpool traders sometimes take it in as ballast, and carry it down to leeward, to the river Cameroons, but no other than native salt is encouraged by the interior natives hereabouts, as they are jealous of encroachments upon this means of livelihood for their old and weakly. This subject is somewhat connected with the commerce of this country, concerning the condition and prospects of which you have directed me to report particularly. It is not as extensive as that of the coast at large, as all vessels passing by do not anchor, but still it is in a flourishing state. I have conversed with the most intelligent, and have taken some time to look round for myself. When I say that it is in a thriving, I do not wish to be understood to mean that it is now, or can ever be, in such a state, independent of an industrious and persevering yeomanry. There appears to be several kinds of soil in the vicinity; to the southwest of the town, close by, there is a large tract of excellent coffee land, the wild produce of which has been esteemed for its flavor as highly as that of the Java coffee: cultivation will somewhat improve it, and a single individual is now setting out a plan-

--180--

tation of twenty thousand coffee trees, which is expected to he completed by May. Another quality of soil is that of Bushrod Island, which, I understand, is very similar in its location and formation to those lands on the coast of Georgia where Sea Island cotton is raised; and another, to the northward and eastward of the island, is a large and rich tract of soil suitable for raising sugar cane, rice, indigo, Indian corn, and tobacco. These locations are close around the settlement, and this, I am informed, is the general quality of the soil of all this section of the western coast, a little removed from the sea.

When it is taken into consideration that such valuable articles of trade as have been enumerated can be cultivated at an expense of about five bars, or one dollar and fifty cents, (five cents per day,) and sufficient rice for the daily subsistence of each native employed; that these natives do not work like slaves, but are a strong, laborious people, who might be brought out of their habit of giving up labor after the farming season is over, and employing their time in singing and dancing; and that these articles are in demand in our country and in Europe, there can be but one inference drawn, and that is, that, in proportion as an industrious farming interest is established, who are disposed for agriculture and its peaceful pursuits, the commerce of the colony will flourish, and keep pace with their exertions. There are several enterprising merchants here, but, at present, they can do all, and even more than the business of the colony, as they attend to some commission business for houses both in Europe and the United States. It is not, however, a favorable spot for small storekeepers and wandering pedlers, who, I am told, generally become stripped of what little they may have got; and, in wandering about in the interior for small traffic, disgust the natives by their immoralities, and thus create difficulties and disturbances, which sometimes have resulted in their imprisonment, and a demand of ransom money. It is now pretty well understood here that, in general, such persons only live and thrive as are willing to settle down on a farm, there to enjoy the fruit of their labors, and to dispose of the surplus to those very few traders which are necessary for the present state of things; and that all those who, deceived by the Utopian notions which have been put abroad by some, expect success by any other means than those of industry, perseverance, and sobriety, certainly sink, and, unless assisted by charity until they can get into the performance of their proper work, would finally starve. As a little specimen of what might be done by the farmer, it might be quoted that a colonist, at the upper settlement, Caldwell, at the junction of the St. Paul's and Stockton rivers, of the name of Jonathan James, from the eastern shore of Maryland, has raised, spun, and wove cotton enough to clothe a considerable family.

With regard to imports, &c., I suppose the following to be pretty nearly correct:

From and to America, France and England.

Amount of exports the last year $120,000
Amount of imports the last year, from April, 1831, to April, 1832 80,000

The number of colonists is now about twenty-seven hundred, amongst whom there are four or five merchants of note.

That you may see how much one house has done of the business above stated, I enclose a statement which I have procured from the house whose name it bears.

I have inquired as to the state of health of the colony: the report has been favorable, and I am credibly informed that Doctor Todson, the resident physician at Caldwell, loses hardly in the proportion of four out of every hundred of those who are taken with the country fever, through which ordeal all have, sooner or later, to pass.

I have visited both the day and sabbath schools, and was pleased with the appearance of things; several of the children did themselves much credit. With all the advantages that have been enumerated, it would be natural to expect to hear of the general contentment of the inhabitants, and, so far as my personal observation has gone, I have indeed found this to be the case. There have been some exceptions, but they are found amongst characters who would be dissatisfied in any situation. Here, as elsewhere, the contentment of the inhabitants may be measured by their morality, industry, and sobriety.

As there does not appear to be any necessity for our remaining longer at the cape, and as we have taken a look off Cape Mount, we shall, as soon as we have filled up our water, pass down the coast, probably as far as Cape Palmas, and then stretch over to the westward, with the southeast trades, towards the north coast of Brazil, according to your orders. It is therefore my intention, in pursuing the further execution of your orders, to proceed down the coast towards Cape Palmas, by which course I hope to be able to effect the double purpose of making my passage as short as possible, and, also, for the time, of defending our traders on this track from any piratical vessels that may possibly be hovering about.

Statement of C. M. Warring and T. Taylor.

Amount of sales $80,000 00
Shipments.
3,000 tons camwood $18,000 00
11,000 gallons palm oil, at 25 cents per gallon 2,750 00
1,700 gallons palm oil 1,850 00
Cash and gold dust 4,000 00
Bills 14,000 00
Ivory 32,200 00
  71,800 00
These exports, with the exception of bills and cash, sold at an advance in the United States of about twenty per cent.  
On hand, 1st January.
300 tons camwood $1,800 00
1,000 gallons palm oil 500 00
600 lbs. of ivory 1,700 00
4,600 00  
Good debts 3,800 00
Bad debts 3,000 00
Merchandise, the produce of foreign countries, on hand 1st January 11,400 00
  4,000 00

--181--

List of articles suitable to bring to this market.

Virginia leaf tobacco, flour, beef, pork, lard, butter, hams, tea, sugar, sperm. candles; salt fish, viz: mackerel, shad, and herring; soap (common brown), rum, West India molasses, a little sugar-house molasses; pound beads, viz: blue, white, and black, small sized; cheap black hats; common decanters, viz: quart, pint, and half pint; hollow-ware, crockery; hardware, such as cast iron pots, copper or brass rods about as thick as the finger, for ornaments, brass kettles, muskets, common single powder flints, padlocks, knives and forks, steel-yards, nails (different sizes), iron bars, paints, paint oil, blue serampores, strong shoes, assorted cordage for merchant ships, oars, and some (a very few pretty large sized) spruce spars, large-bowl Ohio pipes, fine calicoes for the colony, and domestic blue and white for the natives, (both should be yard wide,) some fine scarlet cloth for the Maningo men; American lumber, viz: weather boarding, flooring, joist, rafters, and frame pieces, cypress shingles. The lumber will bring from thirty to thirty-five dollars per thousand feet, and shingles six dollars per thousand. Each vessel might bring out as ballast a few tons of sea-coal, and a few barrels of slaked lime. Snuff is a good article at Cape Mount, and to windward generally, but not here; and pipe coral beads are a good article to leeward.

K.

Commissioners upon rules, &c.

At the Navy Commissioners' Office,
November 24, 1832.

Sir:

To enable the commissioners appointed under the act of 19th May, 1832, to execute the duties assigned to them, an appropriation will be necessary.

The sum that may be required cannot be ascertained with any precision; but the Commissioners suppose it may be $15,000, and would respectfully submit that sum as their estimate upon the subject.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir,
Your very obedient servant,

CHAS. STEWART.

Hon. L. Woodbury,
Secretary of the Navy.

_____________

L, No. 1.

List of deaths in the navy of the United States, as ascertained since the 1st of December, 1831. Name and rank. Date. Cause. Place.

CAPTAINS.
George W. Rodgers May 21, 1832 Inflamma'n of bowels. Buenos Ayres.
Charles C. B. Thompson September 2, 1832   Hot Springs, Va.
James T. Leonard November 9, 1832   New York.
LIEUTENANTS.
Alexander Eskridge March 17, 1832. Dropsy Norfolk.
Elias C. Taylor April 20, 1832 At sea, off Perna.  
Russell Baldwin April 25, 1832. Rupture blood vessel. Hall county, Georgia.
John H. Lee June 30, 1832   Norfolk.
James G. Boughan November 6, 1832   Fredericksburgh, Va.
* H. E. V. Robinson August 16, 1831    
SURGEON.
James Page March 15, 1832   Baltimore.
ASSISTANT SURGEON.
William Tyler January 14, 1832   Mediterranean.
PURSERS.
Nathaniel H. Perry May 8, 1832   New York.
Alexander H. Coleman March, 1832   Kentucky.
PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.
* William C. Selden August 16, 1831    
MIDSHIPMEN.
William G. Elliott Summer of 1831   Little Rock, A. T.
Dudley G. Woolbridge January 21, 1832   New York.
Peter L. Gansevoort March 7, 1832 Drowned Near New York.
Daniel Carter March 25, 1832 Disease of heart Baltimore.
George T. Crump April 12, 1832 At sea.  
George M. Fowler May 2, 1832 Drowned Pensacola Bay.
* John A. Coyle August 16, 1831    
* Lloyd P. Somers August 16, 1831    
Daniel Hunt     Ohio.

* Lost in schooner Sylph, off the Balize, coast of Louisiana.

--182--

List of deaths in the navy—Continued.

Name and rank. Date. Cause. Place.
BOATSWAINS.
Eli Dill December 19, 1831   New York.
Richard A. Munroe March 27, 1832   New York.
James Evans July 9, 1832 Dropsy. Mediterranean.
GUNNERS.
George Jackson November, 1831   Pensacola.
Samuel Hebberd July 9, 1832   Norfolk.
MARINE OFFICER.
Marshall Love July 28, 1832    

____________

L, No. 2,

List of dismissions from the navy of the United States, since the 1st December, 1831.

LIEUTENANTS.
Name. Date of dismission.
E. D. Whitlock May 23, 1832.
T. McKean Buchanan October 20, 1832.
ASSISTANT SURGEON.
Gideon White, jr January 12, 1832.
PASSED MIDSHIPMAN.
Edward Boyd December 5, 1831.
MIDSHIPMEN.
Erastus Huntington February 3, 1832.
Cincinnatus Pryor May 16, 1832.
Richard W. Meade May 16, 1832.
S. A. Washington May 17, 1832.
Lewis Ogden June 1, 1832.
George W. Gay November 28, 1832.
BOATSWAIN.
John Heywood (acting) April 18, 1832.
MARINE OFFICERS.  
Captain Joseph L. Kuhn April 7, 1832.
Second Lieutenant James W. Shaumburgh October 20, 1832.

____________

L, No. 3.

List of resignations in the navy of the United States, since the 1st of December, 1831.

PURSERS.
Name. Date of resignation.
Thomas I. Chew March 12, 1832.
William M. Sands March 24, 1832.
PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.
Charles S. Renshaw February 11, 1832.
Henry Tooley September 24, 1832.
William C. Homes October 18, 1832.
MIDSHIPMEN.
George W. Taylor December 19, 1831.
William Stearns, jr February 11, 1832.
William M. A. Moore March 8, 1832.
Gabriel A. O'Brien March 8, 1832.
Charles Henderson March 12, 1832.
William A. Howard April 12, 1832.
Edward H. Hubbard May 8, 1832.
Mark Hale May 29, 1832.
Richard S. Coxe June 13, 1832.
Osman Claiborne June 21. 1832.
Stephen D. McCutchon June 25, 1832.
John A. Underwood July 2, 1832.
Edgar Irving August 31, 1832.
Stephen D. Elliott September 12, 1832.
James H. Popelston September 19, 1832.
N B. Waters July 31, 1832.
John Buchanan October 19, 1832.
John S. Stoddard November 24, 1832.

--183--

SAILMAKERS.
Name. Date of resignation.
William D. Hills July 27, 1832.
Charles C. Cowpland August 22, 1832.
MARINE OFFICER.
Second Lieutenant Theodore Bainbridge January 18, 1832.

__________

M.

Statement showing the number, names, state, and condition of the vessels-of-war now in ordinary at the Navy Yards, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Norfolk and Portsmouth.

BOSTON.

There are four vessels in ordinary at this yard, viz: Columbus and Independence, ships of the line; Constitution, frigate; and Erie, sloop-of-war. The three first have light covering over them.

Columbus.—This ship is sound, and in good order in her hull; will require to have part of two strakes of wales put on, rudder to finish, and masts to wedge, and will require some new spars; anchors and stocks to be made; to be thoroughly caulked and new coppered.

Independence.—The frame and bottom plank of this ship are supposed to be sound; the plank outboard, from lower wale to rail, the ceiling, all the decks, magazine, platforms, plank on the stern, cutwater and head, are defective, and will require to be new. She will require to be thoroughly caulked and new coppered.

Constitution.—The frame, bottom plank, ceiling between decks, spar deck, knees and beams, are sound; the outboard plank from light water mark to rail, ceiling in the hold, orlop and berth decks, magazine platforms, plank on spar deck, bulwark, plank on stern galleries, channels, and capstan, are defective, and will require to be new, and the ship new coppered.

Erie.—The frame of this ship, bottom plank, and part of the ceiling, are sound; the outboard plank from lower wale to rail, the gun and berth deck platforms, and thick strakes in the hold, are defective, and will require to be new. She will require new fore and mainmasts, and some spars, and to be caulked throughout.

NEW YORK.

The vessels in ordinary at this yard are four, viz.: Ohio, Washington, and Franklin, 74's, and Hudson, frigate of the first class.

Ohio, ship of the line.—This ship was launched in May, 1820, but has never been masted or fitted for sea; her outside plank, from the rail to the water line, is believed to be decayed, and will require to be replaced, as will also a part of the ceiling, clamps, and waist, on the upper and lower gun decks; beams and knees are sound and in good condition; spar deck plank will require to be replaced; all bulkheads have been removed to admit free circulation; she is now protected from the weather by a tight covering. No materials have been procured for the repairs and equipment of this ship, except tanks, guns, sails and shot.

Washington, ship of the line.—This ship was built and launched in 1814, and has made but one cruise. That part of her frame which is live oak is sound; her beams, knees, deck frames, and two-thirds of her gun decks, are sound and good, as well as her bottom plank, below water; her upper works are in a decayed state; a tight covering over her is now in progress, to prevent the action of the weather on her. She requires extensive repairs, for which no materials are provided.

Franklin.—This ship was built and launched in 1815, and has made two cruises, and is in about the same condition as the Washington, and would require the same repairs; she is at present used as a receiving ship; is well ventilated and taken care of. No materials are provided for her repairs.

Hudson, frigate.—This ship is built of common oak, and is known to be partially decayed in her upper works. It cannot, however, be known, until she is opened, to what extent she is decayed, to warrant saying how far she requires repairing. The spar deck has been caulked the past season, to keep the frame as dry as practicable. No materials have been provided for her repairs.

PHILADELPHIA.

Cyane.—This is the only ship in ordinary at this yard; contracts are about being made for the live oak frame, of which she is about to be rebuilt.

NORFOLK.

The ships in ordinary at this yard are, the North Carolina and Delaware, line of battle ships; Java, Guerriere, frigates of the first class, and Congress, frigate of the second class; and Natchez, Fairfield and Ontario, sloops-of-war.

North Carolina.—This ship will require repairs in her upper works, and must be docked; she leaks badly; her copper is no doubt off, and the worms have eaten through. She will require to be new caulked and coppered, at a cost of $35,211, exclusive of docking.

Java.—This ship is decayed generally, her frame being of white oak and mahogany, or baywood. She is to be rebuilt, and contracts are now making for a new frame of live oak. She is at present, however, used as a receiving ship, which purpose she answers well.

Guerriere.—This ship is decayed in her upper works, and third and fourth futtocks; her frame is of the same materials as the Java, and she is about being covered in.

Congress.—This ship is decayed in her hull generally; her frame is of live oak; about one-third of her timbers are decayed; the rest, from repeated repairs, much cut with auger holes. She is very much hagged, otherwise much defective, and requires to be rebuilt or extensively repaired.

Delaware.—This ship has been repaired the present year, having been ordered to be fitted out, and now only requires to have the state of her copper ascertained.

Natchez, has undergone a thorough repair.

Fairfield and Ontario, are sound and good, and only require their bottoms to be examined.

--184--

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

There is but one vessel at this yard, the Vincennes, sloop-of-war, of the first class; is generally in good order, but requires slight repairs in her quarter galleries, and some new plank in her gun deck. She requires caulking, and it is now in progress.

____________

N.

Statement showing the number of vessels now on the stocks, their state of preservation, the yards where building, and the time and expense necessary to prepare them for launching.

PORTSMOUTH.

There are two ships on the stocks at this yard, the Alabama and Santee, both in a good state of preservation.

Alabama, ship of the line, is under cover in ship house No. 1; she can be prepared for launching in ninety days, at the cost of $38,320.60.

Santee, frigate of the first class; she is under cover in house No. 2; can be prepared for launching in seventy days, at the cost of $29,341.

BOSTON.

There are three ships at this yard on the stocks, in a perfect state of preservation, under houses.

Vermont and Virginia, ships of the line, can be prepared for launching in ninety days; the first at an expense of $70,360.60; the second at an expense of $79,726.46.

Cumberland, frigate of the first class, can be prepared for launching in ninety days, at an expense of $74,790.56.

NEW YORK.

In the ship house No. 1 is the frigate Sabine, in a fine state of preservation, and could be launched in sixty working days, at the expense of $46,357.

In the ship house No. 2 is the frigate Savannah, generally in a good state of preservation, but, from having been exposed to the weather previous to the house being built, and from having been caulked, some parts are injured, to wit: the wales were decayed and were taken off, the strings and part of the waist and ceiling are also decayed. She is now protected from further decay by a tight covering. She could be launched in one hundred and twenty working days, at a cost of $46,435.

PHILADELPHIA.

There are two vessels on the stocks at this yard; the Pennsylvania, line of battle ship, and the Raritan, frigate of the first class.

Pennsylvania.—The timber, plank, beams, knees, &c.,& c., of this ship, as far as can be judged of from examination, are as healthy as when the work was put together, except the ceiling in the hold, which, though apparently sound, does not appear to possess the strength of the white oak in other parts of this ship. It will require six months, at an expense of $33,754.

Raritan, is in a similar good state of preservation with the Pennsylvania, and can be prepared for launching in three months, at an expense of $15,500.

WASHINGTON.

There is but one ship on the stocks at this yard, the Columbia; frigate of the first class; she is in a good state of preservation, and can be got ready for launching in two months, at an expense of $42,576.49.

NORFOLK.

There are two ships on the stocks at this yard: the New York, line of battle ship, and the St. Lawrence, frigate of the first class.

New York.—This ship rests upon a wooden foundation, which will require to be replaced with stone, if she should stand any time; she is under cover of a wooden house, that rests on a stone foundation, and is in good repair; it will require ninety days to finish her for launching, at an expense of $37,775.

St. Lawrence.—This ship rests upon a good substantial stone foundation, which has been put under her the present year. She is under cover of a wooden house, on a brick foundation. She can be made ready for launching in ninety days, at an expense of $32,590.

[END]

Published:Wed May 18 12:27:49 EDT 2016