Naval History and Heritage Command

The Navy Department Library

Related Content
Sources

United States. 1831. Annual report of the Secretary of the Navy. Washington: For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off.

Document Type
Topic
Wars & Conflicts
File Formats
Location of Archival Materials

Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy - 1831

-36-

22d Congress.]

No. 457.

[1st Session.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY, SHOWING THE CONDITION OF THE NAVY IN THE YEAR 1831.

COMMUNICATED, WITH THE PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE, DECEMBER 6, 1831.

Navy Department, December 3, 1831.

To the President of the United States:

Sir: The Secretary of the Navy respectfully submits a report of the transactions of this Department during the past year.

Under its general superintendence, the employment of the public vessels for the protection of our commerce, the erection of dry docks, the improvement of the navy yards, the purchase of timber and stores for future use, and the preservation of live oak, have been the most prominent objects of attention.

Many minor subjects connected with the interests of the service have received due care; and the results of the whole will be presented to your consideration with all practicable brevity.

The naval force in commission has consisted of five frigates, eleven sloops, and seven schooners; but, of these, four small schooners, purchased, and temporarily used in guarding our live oak, and in making surveys of the coast, can hardly be considered as a permanent portion of the establishment, while the relieving vessels necessary to keep up a complement in the different squadrons, have, in this and former years, by going out before others returned, added somewhat to the number and expense of those actually enumerated as in commission.

Our force abroad has been divided between the Mediterranean, the West Indies, Brazil, and the Pacific. From the first station, the Java, the Fairfield, and the Constellation have returned, the former taking the Cape de Verd islands and Liberia in her way homeward. An account of her cruise is annexed, as it may be interesting to those specially engaged in African colonization. (A.)

The Java, on a minute survey, was found to be very defective; and, having been built of inferior materials, expensive repairs on her are not deemed judicious. As she bears the name of one of our trophies during the late war, it is recommended that an appropriation be made for purchasing timber to rebuild her, and another, for a similar reason, to rebuild the Cyane. A frame has heretofore been obtained for the Macedonian; and an appropriation to finish one of these vessels, whose names are so intimately associated with our naval glory, could be expended with much advantage the two ensuing years. (B.)

Last August the Constellation was ordered home from the Mediterranean, after the close of the cruising season, as the usual term of absence would expire next spring, and a large saving of expense would be made by her winter-

-37-

ing in this country. She recently arrived, a few weeks earlier than anti- cipated, and in excellent condition, and, after the discharge of her crew, was immediately placed in ordinary.

The John Adams is the only vessel which has been added to that station.

The squadron there has been usefully employed in its ordinary duties. At this time a part of it, having lately been engaged in transporting our former consul at Algiers to his new situation as chargé to Constantinople, is supposed to be in the Archipelago, waiting the result of the chief object of that mission, and watching the consequences to our commerce of the late disturbances in Greece; another part is under orders to carry from Gibraltar our diplomatic agent to Naples; and a part of it, as recently directed, is presumed to be on a new cruising ground, extending into the Atlantic along the coast of Portugal and her neighboring dependencies. In consequence of this last increase of duty, and the novel state of our relations with the Ottoman Porte, as well as the agitated condition of other portions of Europe, it would seem expedient immediately to increase our naval force in that quarter of the world. To effect that object, and others hereafter mentioned, and at the same time to ensure in our navy a continuance of the requisite skill and experience in navigating ships of the line, a sum sufficient to put one in commission is included in the general estimate for the ensuing year. (C, Nos. 1 to 15.)

The squadron employed in the West Indies has discharged its accustomed service with fidelity and success, no piracies whatever having been there perpetrated on our commerce; the slight disturbances near Porto Cabello, Hayti, and Havana having been promptly looked after; and the health of the crews and officers in our public vessels having been, with a few lamented exceptions, uncommonly good. The only changes in this squadron have been the substitution of the Vincennes for the Peacock, and the Fairfield for the Natchez, on account of greater dispatch and economy in preparing the relief vessels.

The Brazilian station, notwithstanding the political commotions in its neighborhood, has presented little active employment for the squadron. The utmost security to our navigation in that quarter has existed, except a The Brazilian station, notwithstanding the political commotions in its recent, and, it is believed, unprecedented claim, which has been made to disturb our vessels engaged in seal catching at the Falkland Islands. To guard against the ill consequences of this claim to our commercial interests, prompt measures have been taken, so far as the subject comes within the purview of this Department. From that station the Hudson has returned home; and not having been built of live oak, she is in a condition rendering the expediency of repairing her very doubtful. The Vandalia is soon expected here; and both the Lexington and Warren, sent to relieve them, have probably, ere this, reached their destination. Our force in that region will soon be strengthened by one of the schooners now building, and whose small draught of water will render her employment on that coast highly beneficial. Preparations are making to send more vessels in that direction, should circumstances require and justify the measure; visiting, among other places on their way out, Para and the principal ports on the northern coast of Brazil, where the amount of our commerce, and the agitated condition of the country, make the presence of some of our public vessels judicious, and where none have shown themselves since the late war.

In the Pacific no occurrence of much interest has happened since the last annual report. The Falmouth has been ordered to join that squadron in-

-38-

stead of the St. Louis, and the Potomac in place of the Guerriere; and which last vessel, it is gratifying to announce, arrived two days since, safely, in Hampton Roads. Directions have been given to the new commander on that station to keep one of his vessels constantly employed in cruising among those islands in the Pacific to which our whalemen and merchantmen resort for either supplies or trade. Unfortunately for the credit of our bills of exchange in that quarter, the Department early in the year felt compelled to refuse payment of some of the drafts by its former agents; and an attempt was made to improve the forms of transacting business there, and to lessen the expenses of providing for the squadron, by sending out a purser to make purchases, and to take charge of the stores and provisions for the whole. Sufficient time has not yet elapsed to test fully the success of this experiment, though the arrangement has required and recently received some modifications to promote its efficiency.

In consequence of a most wanton outrage upon the American ship Friendship, on the northwest coast of Sumatra, the Potomac was ordered to proceed to the Pacific by the way of the Cape of Good Hope; and from the caution used in her instructions, and from the energy of her commander, favorable hopes are entertained of procuring some indemnity for that barbarous and piratical injury. She has also been ordered, after leaving Sumatra, to touch at Macao, and communicate with Canton. The great value of our commerce in India and China, exceeding five millions annually, and its constant exposure, with many valuable lives, to insult and rapine, furnish a strong appeal to the government for the protection of a naval force. Should appropriations be made for the ensuing year, in conformity to the estimates, it will enable the Department not only to strengthen the squadron in the Mediterranean, and extend its cruising ground with success, as before suggested, but to guard more efficiently our navigation on the coasts of South America, and provide a sufficient force to visit occasionally the Indian and Chinese seas. Another beneficial change can also be accomplished, by thus having it in our power to keep one vessel-of-war fit for active service at the shortest notice, within our own waters, ready to be dispatched to any weak or endangered point of our relations in any quarter of the world; and when not so wanted, to be employed on the home station for purposes of protection to commerce, or of discipline to the navy, as the interests of the country may appear to require.

A list of the different vessels now in commission, with their several stations and commanders, is subjoined. (D.) It is due to those having special charge of the ministerial duties of this Department, to add, that the strictest attention appears to have been paid to the prompt and thorough repairs of all our force destined to foreign stations; and that, in point of strength and perfect equipment for useful service, the vessels of the United States in commission were probably never in superior condition.

The construction of the two dry docks has advanced with great rapidity during the past year. Both are now nearly completed, except the removal of the coffer dams, and the finishing of some of the gates and steam machinery. They present to the eye specimens of stone masonry seldom rivaled in beauty and solidity. The expenditures on each have been about $500,000; and by the 4th of next July, it is hoped that some of the public vessels requiring repairs may be safely docked in these useful, economical, and splendid conveniences for our naval establishment.

For greater detail on this subject, and on the purchase of materials under the act of Congress for the gradual improvement of the navy, reference can be had to the report annexed, (E.)

-39-

A personal inspection, during the past season, not only of the dry docks, but of all the navy yards except that near Pensacola, has caused, to the head of this Department, high gratification at the prosperous condition of most of them. The building of storehouses and sheds for the reception of materials, collected formerly for the gradual increase, and now collecting under the appropriation for the gradual improvement of the navy, seems conducted with a great regard to durability and convenience.

Experiments have been recently commenced, with a view to settle beyond further controversy the best mode and places in this country for depositing, seasoning and preserving the different kinds of timber in most general use here in naval architecture. Whatever differences of opinion may once have existed in Europe, or may now prevail in America, on this subject, it is believed we possess the means of removing them so far as regards our own service.

The buildings for accommodation to the officers of yards, reported in the surveys and plans of A. D. 1828, are in progress where most needed, and, in connexion with the storehouses, sheds, wharves, walls and ship ways, require, annually, such appropriations as can be expended without a neglect of more urgent duties. An increased estimate, to advance all these improvements, is presented for the ensuing year. (C, No. 9.)

The discontinuance of some, and the establishment of other navy yards, have been subjects of previous communications from this Department. But no sufficient reasons can be discovered by me to warrant the former measure at this time; and the latter measure should, in my opinion, depend much, though not entirely, on the future increase of our naval power.

Among other contemplated improvements in those plans were rope walks at some of our present yards. All observation and experience in the navy show that in nothing does it suffer more at this time than from bad cordage. The impositions in the quality of the hemp, in the manufacture, and in the tar, are numerous, are difficult of detection, productive of injurious delays when detected, and, when not detected, exceedingly hazardous to the safety of both crews and vessels. Indeed, the reasons seem more powerful in favor of making our own cordage, than of building our own vessels, or manufacturing our own blocks and anchors. An estimate is presented for the erection of two rope walks at appropriate sites. (F.)

The vessels in ordinary have been, at most of the yards, covered, so as to shelter them effectually from sunshine and storms, and to render their security from decay much greater than heretofore. It is a gratifying circumstance that most of these vessels, as well as all those upon the stocks, are in a condition highly creditable to the persons who planned and executed the present mode of preserving them; and that, by proper care in future, until put in commission, no probability whatever exists of much further decay in the important portions of their expensive works, or of any decay in those portions composed of the invaluable material of live oak. (G and H.)

The three new schooners, authorized to be built under the act of Congress of February 3, 1831, were commenced, one at the yard in this city, one at New York, and one at Charlestown. They are all nearly finished, and the first named on a plan seldom before attempted. If successful, it may prove a source of much economy and utility in the construction of vessels of the lower classes. She has been called the Experiment, and the others the Enterprise and Boxer.

-40-

The whole purchases of timber and stores, under the act for the gradual increase of the navy, and which remain in deposite at the yards, are over a million and a half in value.

The amount of purchases, under the act for the gradual improvement of the navy, in deposite, is nearly half a million.

The amount of property on hand for repairs, is almost a million.

The ordnance, provisions, &c., amount to upwards of a million and a half more.

The paper annexed (I) will present any further detail desirable on this subject. By this, it will likewise be seen that the property belonging to the navy has rapidly increased, and is increasing. Some new regulations in probably be introduced into the rules for the service now undergoing a revision. The object will be to ensure ample security to the Government, strict care of its interests, and the greatest precautions against waste from accident or neglect.

The real estate, as well as the personal property, belonging to the navy establishment, is very valuable, including navy yards, hospital grounds, sites for magazines, and their respective buildings. The titles to some of these, and to parts of others, are in dispute; and the evidences of the titles to some are not collected and preserved together. It would be very conducive to the security of this estate, and render the transaction of business concerning it more expeditious and satisfactory, if the examination of the titles, and the various controversies about the estate, and if the collection and preservation of all the documentary evidence of those titles, were devolved upon one of the law officers of the government.

The act of Congress of March 27th, A. D. 1804, makes the commander of the yard at Washington the navy agent for this Department. In the changes since adopted respecting navy agents, no separate and permanent one has been appointed at this yard; but the duties have been performed by the commander without giving any security by bonds, and without the usual check of an approval of his purchases by another officer. The duties of agent to the Department were never specially imposed on him in practice, till the past summer. This last change has been made in compliance with both the letter and spirit of the last act of Congress, and has contributed to public convenience, by the saving of time and labor to the officers of the government, and to those having business to transact with it. It is recommended, for the obvious reasons before suggested, that the duties of navy agent to the yard and to this Department be hereafter separated from those of the commander of the yard; and that the usual responsibility, and a just compensation, be annexed to the former office. (C, No. 7.) Indeed, the whole system of compensation to navy agents, whether permanent or temporary, has for many years depended so much upon large and arbitrary allowances, very questionable in some particulars in point of principle, that further legislation on the entire subject seems highly proper. A new arrangement in respect to the drafts by our agents on two foreign stations, and in respect to the payment of the drafts drawn on all of our foreign stations, when payable in London, has lately been concluded on terms much more advantageous to the government.

As a part of the plan for the gradual improvement of the navy, the attention of this Department has, for some years, been turned to the rearing of live oak, and to its preservation, when found growing on the public lands. About a

-41-

quarter of a century ago it was estimated that the full growth of between four and five hundred acres of timber trees was annually requisite to keep the British navy in its condition at that time; and such is the rise in value, as well as scarcity, of good building materials in the progress of high agricultural cultivation, that the royal forests of England, preserved for public purposes, have sometimes been considered one great foundation of her naval greatness.

The plantation of trees, commenced a few years since in Florida, was not deemed a proper subject of further attention by my immediate predecessor, more, however, it is presumed, from doubts about the legality and necessity of that particular measure, than about the utility of careful attention to either the growth or safety of our live oak generally. No expense in respect to the plantation has yet been authorized by me, except such as seemed indispensable to secure the benefits of previous expenditures. A more extended plan of agents and vessels for the discovery and preservation of such live oak as is now growing on the public lands, was devised last winter, dividing the seaboard from the St. Mary's to the Sabine into seven districts, with an agent in each, and stationing three small vessels at proper distances on the coast, to aid in the same object, and in the survey of the bays, navigable creeks, and rivers of that region. This plan had advanced so far in May, that it could not be at once discontinued without much loss. The measures necessary for a fair test of its merits have therefore been completed; its benefits, if answering original expectations, will soon be developed, and, whether failing or successful, the trial, it is hoped, will lay the foundation for full information as to the quantity and location of this kind of timber, will assist the government in the reservation of those public lands where it abounds, and enable the Department hereafter to recommend a substitute less expensive and equally efficacious. In the paper annexed (J) is a minute detail of the proceedings on this subject.

Intimately connected with the interests of the service are the purchase and use of iron tanks in all our vessels in commission; they are now prepared only for ships of the line and frigates built out of the fund for the gradual increase of the navy. The convenience derived from them in ballasting, the increased capacity they leave for stores, the greater security to health in the quality of the water, all conspire to render a specific appropriation for this object very desirable, and in the end economical. (K.)

The building of steam batteries is another subject of much interest. While such astonishing improvements are making in the application of steam, it would be improvident to overlook its probable importance hereafter in maritime warfare, or fail to keep pace with other naval nations in any new means of attack or defence. The experiment made here soon after the successful introduction of this power, in the building of a steam frigate, was, perhaps, equal to the state of skill in the use of the power at that period. As that frigate, however, has been destroyed by accident, and as the machinery since obtained for other steam vessels-of-war is not the best now extant for such purposes, it is recommended that an appropriation be made, to enable the Department to exchange it, or to purchase new and more appropriate machinery, and to erect, soon as may be, two steam batteries of twelve heavy guns each, on the most modern and approved models. (L.)

The improvement of the navy depends so much on the character of its officers and seamen, as well as on its vessels, docks, yards, and building materials,

-42-

that your attention is invited to some circumstances calculated to exercise in that respect a favorable influence. It would hardly be useful or decorous to dwell on former recommendations from this Department in respect to many important changes, chiefly as regards rank and pay, a limited peace establishment, a naval academy, further discriminations in favor of sea service, additional provision for hospitals, the abolition of such a large and vexatious system of discretionary allowances, a division of the duties of the Naval Board, a change in the powers of pursers, and in the mode of making purchases for the medical department. Most of these recommendations have my decided approbation. In addition to them, the state of the service imperatively requires the adoption of a few alterations connected with the instruction on shipboard of young officers, and with the welfare of some, who are highly useful in their stations, though acting in subordinate capacities. Thus, it is believed that greater benefits of education to the youthful midshipman, while at sea, could be obtained by a more liberal compensation to schoolmasters, and sedulous attention to the purchase and preservation of nautical books and instruments; that the important class of sailingmasters, as they are not in the line of promotion, will soon become extinct without emoluments more nearly equal to what can be commanded by them in the merchant service; that the carpenters and sailmakers are paid much less than those not in commission; and that the wages of gunners and boatswains are entirely insufficient. It happens that the moral and religious benefits anticipated from the employment of chaplains, in our vessels abroad, though earnestly desired, cannot be fully obtained by the Department, in the present condition of that class of officers. This misfortune occurs, in part, from the bodily infirmities of a majority of them; but so far as it springs from the smallness of their number, and the inadequacy of their compensation, it is hoped that Congress will furnish a remedy.

It gives me much pleasure to observe that the occurrence of courts martial is becoming less frequent; that your resolution to protect the oppressed, whether seamen or officers, and at the same time to carry sentences into full and final effect against those clearly convicted, and that the salutary alterations in punishments recommended during the past year, are beginning to produce a beneficial influence.

Notwithstanding the high wages and great demand for seamen in merchant vessels, the naval service continues popular. No difficulty has been experienced in obtaining crews seasonably; indeed, the recruiting rendezvous were closed some months ago, and in the meantime, till more men were wanted, they made repeated applications for the rendezvous to be reopened. Much care has been exerted to promote the welfare of our seamen. Whenever their terms of service expire abroad, they have, for some years, if not consenting to re-enlist, been sent home at the public expense. But the latter course is attended by inconvenience and cost, arising mostly from short differences in the periods of service in a large crew, and for which the most effectual remedy would be found in Congress authorizing men to be enlisted not only for three years, but, if sailing to a foreign station within the first year, then to extend three years from the time of sailing. Two orders are annexed, (M, 1 and 2,) which have been issued during the past season, chiefly with a view to ameliorate the condition of this class of men. Besides these, other attentions, of late years, to comfort in their dress, to greater dryness and warmth in their apartments at sea, to new securities against disease, and

-43-

better accommodations while sick, appear to have excited increased and permanent attachment on their part to that service in which they have helped to cover their country with such durable glory.

Many useful changes in the naval code, as to the punishment of offences, have before been urged; and, in addition to them, the power to order courts in yards and vessels within the limits of the United States, in the same way as on board public vessels at sea, would be a great convenience.

The discontinuance of the marine corps, or its transfer entirely to either the army or navy, has been the subject of former recommendations from this Department. In the present fluctuating condition, without any imputation on the character of the officers of the corps, frequent difficulties in relation to pay, allowances, trials, and orders, are necessarily happening; and part of which proceeded to such an extent as to require a special resolution of Congress in 1830, and a particular provision in the appropriation bill of 1831. But by placing this establishment, as in former years has been proposed, wholly under navy discipline and laws, most of these difficulties might, in my opinion, be obviated, all the present benefits of it to the service retained, its increase in numbers rendered unnecessary, its old associations preserved, and much greater economy, harmony, and energy infused into its operations, without derogating at all from the respectability and usefulness of the corps. Should the system recommended in the document annexed, (C, No. 12) be fully adopted, the saving is estimated at over $40,000 annually. But in that event, the officers not needed should, in justice, be transferred to the army, and the saving to the government would then fall short of that amount. In its hospital and staff departments alone, a change of less extent as to officers would save to the public more than $10,000 annually; and a portion of the expensive call for new barracks, presented in the estimates of the present year, would be rendered unnecessary. The appropriation, at the last session, for those at Philadelphia, was so expressed that the officers of the Treasury did not feel authorized to allow the expenditure.

The condition of the navy pension and navy hospital funds, they being under the charge of other officers in connection with the Secretary of the Navy, will be made the subject of a distinct report by the commissioners, with a view to great, and, in my opinion, very salutary changes in their future management. The state of the privateer pension fund the past year is disclosed in the annexed report. (N.)

The large supply of lead in the hands of the government, as rents from the public mines, being three or four millions of pounds beyond what has been used by the War Department, and the great quantity needed in the navy being annually, for ten years past, about fifty thousand pounds, induce me to recommend that from those rents a quantity equal to our naval wants be yearly set apart, and placed at the disposal of this Department.

The deaths, dismissions, and resignations, the past year, are detailed in the list annexed. (O, No. 1 to 3.)

The general estimates for the ensuing year are presented in the document before referred to, and marked (O, No. 1 to 15). In these an attempt has been made, in conformity to what is believed to be the true spirit of our institutions and the repeated wishes of Congress, to enable the legislative authorities to render the appropriations more specific, and to place the enumerated contingent fund in a condition to meet more nearly and promptly those demands upon it, so indispensable to the efficient operations of the navy. Although the whole expenses of the last year may not equal the whole

-44-

appropriations and balances on hand for the naval service, yet the enumerated contingent, as in former years, has proved insufficient. The remedy, hereafter suggested to supply all past deficiencies, is considered preferable to any former practice of resorting to other specific appropriations.

In the mode of keeping accounts with persons responsible to this Department, so great latitude was, at one time, indulged in the transfer of appropriations from one object to another, that the disbursing officers stand charged with large and almost incredible sums under some heads, and credited with almost equal sums under other heads; but which balances cannot be legally settled without the authority of Congress. As this difficulty has generally originated more from carelessness than dishonesty, and, though censurable in principle, has probably caused no essential injury to the public, it seems judicious to allow, under the usual guards against imposition and loss, the privilege of an adjustment to the persons interested. No other course is perceived which will enable the accounting officers connected with this Department ever to close these transactions on their books, and to introduce, with full effect, an accurate and improved system. These unsettled balances now exceed seven millions of dollars. Again, by carrying the balances not expended from the contingent appropriations to the surplus fund, instead of reserving them, as in the case of pay, provisions, &c., to meet future claims, (and in the necessities of the service abroad, these claims cannot always be early received and adjusted,) the demands on those contingent appropriations in some former years have not only exceeded their amount, but cannot now be discharged from any surplus of other years. Nor should the deficiency be taken, as done at some prior period, from different heads of appropriation, without an express legal provision: nor can it be taken from any existing appropriation for arrearages, as none has been made the last few years. To settle these just demands, it will therefore be necessary to appropriate to the object the balances of all former years carried to the surplus fund, or to make a new appropriation of about $80,000. This latter course is the more definite, and seems due to all the claimants, and especially to the meritorious officers of the navy. To obviate this difficulty in future, it will only be necessary that the appropriations for contingencies should assume the form of those for pay and subsistence, without any increase of their whole amount; that these appropriations in other respects should correspond with the estimates for the present year, by throwing some of the enumerated items upon other and specific heads, and thus lessening the gross nominal sum for contingencies over $100,000; and that due vigilance be exercised in the Department to confine the demands on these appropriations within the limits of the sums provided. There will probably be, on the 1st of January next, an unexpended balance from all the appropriations of last year to the navy of nearly twenty times this $80,000; but it may all be required when the whole accounts for the year are closed; and if not, as before remarked, it would seem, on any correct principles of legal construction and of administering specific appropriations, not to be applicable to these old arrearages, or to different heads from those particularized, without the special authority of Congress. (P.)

If the system of making surveys of our coast by naval officers at great exposure and toil continues to meet public approbation, a specific appropriation to reward the extra services in that employment the last year, as well as any in future, to the amount of $2,000 annually, will be necessary.

It would conduce much to the convenience of officers in the navy, without incurring any great risk to the public, if this Department were empowered to

-45-

advance the allowance for travel and transportation when orders are given for duty within the United States—the authority to do it now being confined to the case of orders for service abroad.

Under an appropriation made at the last session, the naval monument has been removed from the navy yard, in this city, to a site west of the capitol. The expense has not exceeded the estimate, although, in addition to the repairs, about two hundred dollars' worth of labor, not included in the estimate, will be required fully to compensate the contractor, if he proceeds to renew the inscriptions, besides giving uniformity of color to the statues. But this, as the appropriation is exhausted, must depend solely on the liberality of Congress. (Q.)

The general appropriation for the suppression of the slave trade has had but small demands upon it, in addition to the special charges imposed by Congress in favor of Armstrong and of Livingston's heirs. For information in relation to the expenditures the past year, and to the property of the United States in Africa, acquired by former expenditures on this subject, a document is annexed. (R, 1 and 2.)  This property may require some new legislation concerning its sale or preservation. Though an agent is still maintained at Liberia, the report from the commander of the Java, before named, contains all the intelligence received from the establishment at that place during the year, except a letter announcing the loss by piracy of a vessel in the employ of the colonists. From the nature of the transaction it may be questionable whether any hostile designs are meditated against the commerce of the United States by those who committed that outrage. But measures were immediately taken to obtain full information on the subject; and the earliest opportunity will be embraced to have that region of country again visited by one of our public vessels.

With a view to a more uniform and satisfactory administration of both the naval and civil branches of this Department, the rules and regulations, published in A. D. 1818, have been carefully revised and enlarged as to naval duties; and the different orders, circulars, and decisions, now in force in relation to the transaction of business between this Department and the officers of the navy, with other useful rules of a civil character in relation to the service, have been collected; in some cases amended, and in all condensed. The whole of these will soon be submitted for your approbation, and, if receiving it, will be afterwards laid before Congress. Their distribution and strict enforcement hereafter will, it is hoped, contribute to system in business, harmony in the service, and economy in the public disbursements. This last kind of economy, and not a diminution of the gross amount of naval expenditures, is all which probably may be expected under the gradual increase of our navy, the great improvements going forward in our docks and yards, the wider range and exposure of our navigation, and the present flourishing resources of the country, so well adapted to make due preparation in peace for the exigencies of future wars.

In this enviable state of the confederation, the estimates for the navy have been in some degree conformed to what is supposed to be the wishes of the people in respect to so important an establishment; and without any augmentation of officers not before sanctioned, and without the recommendation of any doubtful novelties in our expenditures, everything has been attempted which promises to insure, with frugality, promptitude and vigor, the promotion of the great ends of naval protection and defence. With much respect,

LEVI WOODBURY.

documents communicated to congress by the president at the opening of the first session of the twenty-second congress, accompanying the report of the secretary of the navy.

____________________________________________________________

[End of SECNAV Report]

Accompanying documents below

____________________________________________________________

-225-

DOCUMENTS

COMMUNICATED TO CONGRESS BY THE PRESIDENT AT THE OPENING OF THE

FIRST SESSION OF THE TWENTY-SECOND CONGRESS,

ACCOMPANYING THE

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY.

______________

SCHEDULE of documents accompanying the Secretary of the Navy’s report to the President of the United States, dated 3d Dec 1831.

A. Copy of a letter from Captain E. P. Kennedy, in relation to his visit to Liberia.

B. Submitted estimate for the frigates Macedonian, Java, and corvette Cyane.

C. No. 1 to 15. General estimates for the service of the year 1832.

D. List of vessels in commission, their commanders, and stations.

E. Statement of progress made in the execution of the law for "gradual improvement of the navy,” including dry docks.

F. Submitted estimate of the expense of two rope walks.

G. Statement of vessels on the stocks, their condition, and the time and expense necessary to prepare them for launching.

H. Statement respecting the vessels in ordinary.

I. Statement showing the amount of stores, provisions, &c., on hand at the respective yards.

J. Abstract of instructions to live oak agents, the limits of the districts, and the vessels employed.

K. Submitted estimate for tanks to frigates and sloops-of-war in commission.

L. Submitted estimate for two steam batteries.

M. 1 and 2. Circulars respecting the commutation of the spirit part of the navy ration, assistance to vessels in distress, and punishments in the service.

N. Report respecting the privateer pension fund.

O. No. 1, to 3. List of deaths, dismissions, and resignations.

P. Submitted estimate of arrearages.

Q. Report on removal of the naval monument.

R. No. 1 and 2. Account of expenditures of last year for suppression of the slave trade; and List of United States property in Liberia.

-29-

______________________________________

-226 -

 A.

Copy of a letter from Captain E. P. Kennedy, in relation to his visit to Liberia.

 United States’  Frigate Java,

Hampton roads, 11th May, 1831

 SIR: I have the honor to report my arrival here from Mahon, via the cape de Verds, Mesurado, and the West Indies. I left Mahon on the 8th January, arrived at Porto Praya on the 2d February, watered ship and sailed the 9th, and arrived at Mesurado the 18th same month. I am happy to inform you that I found the colony at Monrovia in a flourishing and happy state. I have no doubt but it will be the foundation of a great empire. I furnished the governor such articles as he required, with the exception of gun carriages, theirs being in a state of decay. I think iron carriages would suit them better than wood, the dry worm being very destructive there. The small schooner they have as a guard vessel, I think badly fitted, and too small. A fast schooner of 80 or 90 tons, mounting one long nine-pounder on a pivot, and two twelve or eighteen-pound carronades, with thirty men, would, I think, be sufficient to guard the coast against the piratical slave vessels. One of our man-of-war schooners would give great protection by cruising between the northern boundary of the colony and Gape Palma.

I left Mesurado on the 24th February, passed and looked into the islands of St. Croix and St. Johns, and arrived at St. Thomas the 26th March, where I watered ship, and sailed from thence the 11th April, run down the north side of Porto Rico, sent a boat into St. Johns, and communicated with the consul; proceeded from thence to Cape Francois, where I should have anchored, but was prevented by the weather, and not being able to procure a pilot; from thence I sailed through the windward passage, looked into cape Nicholas Mole, and run down the south side of Cuba, showing our colors in passing the different ports, and arrived at the Havana the 2d May. We have lost but two men, one from fever contracted in Africa, and the other with consumption. The officers and crew have been, and still are, very healthy.Shortly

ly before we left Mahon. all the sick of the squadron were sent on board the Java, I think amounting to sixty-eight old cases of rheumatism, &c. The sick list is now reduced to twenty-four.

I received on board the Java, at Porto Praya, five mutineers, at the request of the consul, to be delivered to the marshal, at Norfolk, with a protest and other documents, proofs of the guilt of the prisoners. Will you please to direct what is to be done with Silas Cooper, a quartermaster, ordered home as a witness?

                   I have the honor to remain,

                                      With high respect, &c

                                                        EDMD. P. KENNEDY

The Hon. John  Branch,

      Secretary of the Navy, Washington

-227-

________________________________

B.

Submitted estimate for the frigates Macedonian, Java, and corvette Cyane.

To rebuild or repair and equip the frigate Macedonian, a live oak frame having already been provided for her, there will be required the sum of

$207,984 00         

To provide live oak frames to rebuild or repair the frigate Java and corvette Cyane, there will be required the sum of.

50,500 00

 

$258,484 00

_________________________________

C.

General Estimate-There will be required for the navy during the year 1832, to the unexpended balances that may remain on hand on the 1st January, 1832, the sum of three millions one hundred and forty-seven thousand three hundred and eighty-three dollars and twenty cents.

1st. For pay and subsistence of officers of the navy, and pay of seamen    -     -     -     -     -   

$1,409,927 64

2d. For pay of superintendents, naval constructors, and all the civil establishment at the several yards

58,530 00

3d. For the purchase, freight, and the transportation of provisions and stores  -   -     -  

478,241 25

4th. For pay and allowances to navy agents, and for clerk hire, office rent, fuel, and stationery -    -

59,000 00

5th. For repairs of vessels in ordinary, and the repairs and wear and tear of vessels in commission, including furniture for vessels in commission  -   -

536,682 00

6th. For medicines and surgical instruments, hospital stores, and other expenses on account of the sick                                           -

25 000 00

7th. For improvement and the necessary repairs of navy yards and furniture for officers' houses      -

403,338 56

8th. For ordnance and ordnance, stores, and repairs of magazines and powder houses   -        -        -

15,000 00

9th. For books, maps, charts, chronometers, and other mathematical and nautical instruments, models, drawings, and for the preservation of the same, and for rating and preserving all the chronometers required for the   -       -       -       -       -

16,663 75

10th For freight and transportation of materials, other than provisions and stores, from one yard to another, and for the removal of timber and materials from one part of the yard to another; for wharfage, dockage, storage, and rent; traveling expenses of officers, and transportation of seamen; house rent, chamber money, and fuel and candles to officers other than those attached to navy yards and stations, and for officers in sick quarters where there is no hospital; for funeral expenses; for premiums and incidental expenses of recruiting; for apprehending deserters; for compensation to judge advocates; for per diem allowance to persons attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers engaged in extra service beyond the limits of their stations; for printing and stationery; for purchase and repair of steam and fire engines and for machinery; for purchase and maintenance of oxen and horses, and for carts, timber, wheels, and workmen's tools of every

 

-228-

ESTIMATE C.- Continued

description; for postage of letters on public service; for pilotage and towing ships-of-war; for taxes on Navy yards and public property; for assistance rendered to vessels in distress: for incidental labor at Navy yards, not applicable to any other appropriation; for coal and other fuel for forges, foundries, and steam engines; for candles, oil, and fuel for vessels in commission and in ordinary, and for no other object or purposes whatever -         -         -         -           -

 

 

 

 

$140,000 00

11th. For contingent expenses for objects not hereinbefore enumerated     -     -     -     -    -

5,000 00

For arrearages due from contingent funds of former years

80,000 00

Should the Macedonian be rebuilt or repaired, and live oak frames be procured for the frigate Java and corvette Cyane, there will be required:

 

For the Macedonian                       &207,984 00

 

For the Java and Cyane                    50,500 00

50,500 00

                 Making                   _________

258,484 00

Which will increase the above estimate to the sum of

$3,485,867

        20

-229-

C.- No.1

EXPLANATORY ESTIMATE of the pay and subsistence of all persons in the navy, attached to vessels in commission, for the year 1832, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Ship of the line.

Fri- gates 1st class.

Fri-gates 2d class.

Sloops, 1st class.

Schoo-ners.

Total numb-er of each   

Total amount for  each grade.

1

3

1

11

7

 

Captains

2

3

1

 -

6

$14,500 00

Masterscommandant

     - 

      -       

              - 

11

       -

 

 

11

12,938 75

Lieutenants commandant

-

-

7

8,233 75

Lieutenants

10

18

5

44

21

98

94,570 00

Masters

2

3

1

11

17

11,262 50

Pursers

1

3

1

11

7

23

15,237 50

Surgeons of the fleet

1

3

4

8,045 00

Surgeons

 -

1

11

12

14,518 08

Assistant surgeons

4

6

2

11

7

30

24,540 00

Chaplains

1

3

1

5

3,312 50

Midshipmen

34

72

20

132

28

286

65,208 00

Boatswains

1

3

1

11

16

5,300 00

Gunners

1

3

1

11

7

23

7,618 75

Carpenters

1

3

1

11

16

5,300 00

Sailmakers

1

3

1

11

16

5,300 00

Secretaries

1

3

-

 -

4

4,000 00

Schoolmasters

1

3

1

11

16

6,260 00

Clerks

1

3

1

11

7

23

6,900 00

Boatswains' mates

6

9

3

22

14

54

12,312 00

Gunners' mates

3

6

2

11

22

5,016 00

Carpenters' mates

3

6

2

11

7

29

6,412 00

Sailmakers' mates

2

3

1

11

7

24

5,472 00

Quartermasters

12

27

9

55

21

124

26,784 00

Quartergunners

20

36

10

66

28

160

34,560 00

Yeomen

3

9

3

33

7

55

11,880 00

Captains' stewards

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

Captains' cooks

1

3

1

11

16

3,456 00

Coopers

1

3

1

11

16

3,456 00

Armorers

1

3

1

11

 -

16

3,456 00

Armorers' mates

2

3

1

7

13

2,340 00

Masters-at-arms

1

3

1

11

16

3,456 00

Ships' corporals

4

6

2

12

1,016 00

Cooks

1

3

1

11

7

23

4,968 00

Masters of the band

1

3

1

5

1,080 00

Musicians, 1st class

6

12

3

21

3,024 00

Musicians, 2d class

5

9

2

16

1,920 00

Seamen

300

450

120

660

98

1,628

234,432 00

Ordinary seamen

240

360

100

330

49

1,079

129,480 00

Landsmen

100

150

30

220

21

521

50,016 00

Boys

46

81

21

132

35

315

22,680 00

 

821

1,320

354

1,914

392

4,801

$886,228 83

Seventy-five passed midshipmen, in addition to allowance as midshipmen.

$12,243 75

 

Sixty-four midshipmen, who may be arranged as passed midshipmen, after examination, at $6 per month and one ration per day

10,448 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22,691 75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$908,920. 58

-230 -

C, No. 2.

EXPLANATORY EXHIBIT of the Officers &c awaiting orders and on furlough, for the year 1832, being part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Captains.

Masters commandant.

Lieutenants.

Midshipmen.

Pursers.

Surgeons.

Assistant Surgeons.

Masters.

Boatswains.

Carpenters.

Sailmakers.

Amount.

Awaiting orders

18

11

97

86

8

9

7

3

9

$195,723 81

On furlough

-

-

10

12

 -

 -

 -

8,766 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$204,490 31

C—No. 3.

EXPLANATORY ESTIMATE of the number, pay, &c., of officers, &c., required for five receiving vessels, for the year 1832, as part of the first item, of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia

Baltimore

Norfolk

Total

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

4

$4,705 00

Lieutenants

3

3

2

2

3

13

12,545 00

Masters

1

1

1

3

1,987 50

Pursers

1

1

 -

1

3

1,987 50

Assistant surgeons

1

1

 -

1

3

2,081 25

Midshipmen

3

3

2

2

3

13

2,964 00

Boatswains' mates

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,140 00

Carpenters' mates

1

1

1

1

4

912 00

Stewards

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Cooks

1

1

1

1

1

5

1,080 00

Able seamen

2

2

2

2

2

10

1,440 00

Ordinary seamen

6

6

4

2

6

24

2,880 00

Boys

4

4

2

2

4

16

1,152 00

Total

26

26

17

13

26

108

$35,954 25

-231-

C--No. 4.

EXPLANATORY ESTIMATE of the pay &c.of the officers attached to recruiting stations and ordnance service, for the year 1832, forming part of the first item of the general estimate.

 

Boston.

New York.

Philadelphia

Baltimore

Norfolk

Total

Amount.

Masters commandant

1

1

1

1

1

5

$10,053.75

Lieutenants

2

2

2

2

2

10

9,650 00

Midshipmen

2

2

2

2

2

10

3,192 50

Surgeons

1

1

1

1

1

5

5,425 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$28,321. 25

 

ORDNANCE SERVICE.

One captain

$1,930 00

One lieutenant

965 00

 

$2,895 00

 

DEPOT FOR INSTRUMENTS, CHARTS, &c.&c.

One captain

$965 00

One midshipman passed

482 50

 

$1,447 50

-232-

C.- No. 5.

ESTIMATE of the pay and rations, and all other allowances to officers and others at  Navy Yards and Hospitals, for the year 1832, explanatory of the second part of the first item of the general estimate.

PORTSMOUTH.

 

 

YARD

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

100

16

65

30

3

$3,466. 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

300

40

20

2

2,010 .75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

20

20

1

1,292 .25

Lieutenant Do.

1

50

4

 -

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

1,612 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

1,141 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 -

1

981 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

 

 -

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

12

9

1

651 75

Gunner

1

20

2

12

9

1

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$15, 180 75

ORDINARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 -

 -

 -

 -

$965 00

Carpenter

1

20

2

 -

 -

 -

 -

422 50

Carpenter's Mate

1

19

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

319 25

Able seamen

4

12

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

1,267 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,915 25

CIVIL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 -

*200

 -

 -

 -

 -

$1,400 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

350 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

500 00

Clerk to yard

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

600 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

300 00

Master builder and inspector of timber

1

 -

 -

 -

 -

 -

1,500 00

Porter

1

25

 -

 -

 -

 -

300 00

 TOTAL

 CIVIL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,950 00

GRAND TOTAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$24,046 00

Notes.—House rent is estimated for naval officers in cases only where no house is furnished by the government.

Pay and rations of Surgeons and their Assistants are averaged under the law of 24th May, 1828.

*Directed February, 1830, by Secretary of War.

-233-

C, No. 5.  ESTIMATE of pay and rations—Continued.

BOSTON.

 

YARD 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 15

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

40

20

2

 

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

12

 

 

754 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,412 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

$145

16

14

1

 

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

1

 

1,091 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

1

 

981 75

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

1

 

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

12

9

1

 

 

651 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 Total

Amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$17,687. 00

ORDINARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

100

8

 

45

25

1

 

$2,312 25

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

2,895 .00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 .50

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 .50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 .50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

1

 

651 75

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mate  Do.as Caulkers..

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 .50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 .50

 Total

Amount

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$19,241 .75

HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

CIVIL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

550 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to commandant

1

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Inspector and measurer of timber.

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Civil   Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,300 00

Grand Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$49,13     1.25

30

-235-

C,No.5. ESTIMATE—Continued

PHILADELPHIA

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 COL1

 2   

 3

 4

 5

 6

 7

 8

Captain

1

$100

16

$600

65

30

3

 

$4,066 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,732 35

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

1

 

307 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$15,483. 00

C, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Lieutenant

1

$50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Able seamen

4

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,267 50

$4,258 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

60

4

$200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

35

3

145

16

14

 

1

1,102 00

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$4,029 75

Civil.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,200 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

350 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to builder

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,000 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

700 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$6,200 00

GRAND TOTAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$29,921. 25

-236-

C,No.5

WASHINGTON.

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 .75

Master commandant

1

75

6

 

40

20

2

 

1,982 .00

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 .25

Lieutenant Do.

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 .00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 .75

Master in charge of ordnance..

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 .50

Chaplain

1

40

2

$200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner, as laboratory officer...

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner, keeper of magazine

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

 Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$14,076.25

Ordinary.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

$965 00

Master

1

 40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Boatswain's mates

2

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

638 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Able seamen

6

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,411 50

Ordinary seamen

8

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,690 00

 Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$5,686 75

Hospital.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

70

4

200

20

20

 

1

$1,732 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

1

 

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

Washers

1

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

187 25

Cook

1

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

211 25

 Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,600 00

C, No. 5.—Estimate of pay and rations—Continued.

 

 

CIVIL 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

500 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Clerk to commandant

1

$40

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,300 00

Inspector and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Master chain cable and anchor maker

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Machinist and engineer

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Assistant master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,000 00

Master plumber and camboose maker

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,200 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$12,700 00

Grand Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$36,063 .00

-237-

C. NO.5.  ESTIMATE--Continued

NORFOLK

Yard.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

$300

40

20

2

 

2,010 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,492 25

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

965 00

Master

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

40

4

145

16

14

 

1

1,253 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Teacher of mathematics

1

40

2

90

12

9

 

1

981 75

Midshipmen

4

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,277 00

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

301 25

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$18,88 7.50

ORDINARY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Captain

1

100

8

 

45

25

1

 

$2,312 25

Lieutenants

3

50

4

 

 

 

 

 

2,895 00

Master

1

40

2

 

 

 

 

 

662 50

Midshipmen

6

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

1,915 50

Carpenter

1

20

2

 

12

9

 

1

651 75

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Carpenter's mates, as caulkers.

3

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

957 75

Boatswain's mate

1

19

1

 

 

 

 

 

319 25

Boatswain

1

20

2

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Seaman

14

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

3,293 50

Ordinary seamen

26

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

5,492 50

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$19,24 1. 75

CIVIL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

550 00

Clerk to yard

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750 00

Clerk to commandant

1

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Clerk to master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

420 00

Master builder

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 2,300 00

Inspect-or and measurer of timber

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1,050 00

Keeper of magazine

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

480 00

Porter

1

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

300 00

Total 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$8,930.

HOSPITAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Surgeon

1

$60

4

$200

20

20

1

 

$1,612 25

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

 

 

 

 

 

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

 

 

 

 

 

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

 

 

 

 

 

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

 

 

 

 

 

235 25

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$3,902 50

Grand Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$50,961. 75

-238-

C, No.  5  ESTIMATE—Continued

PENSACOLA

YARD.

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

$100

16

 

65

30

3

 

$3,466 75

Master commandant

1

60

5

 

40

20

2

 

1,710 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

 

20

20

1

 

1,292 25

Lieutenant Do.

1

50

4

         

965 00

Master

1

40

2

 

20

12

1

 

941 75

Surgeon

1

50

2

 

20

20

1

 

1,109 75

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

$145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Purser

1

40

2

200

20

12

1

 

1,141 75

Chaplain

1

40

2

200

12

9

 

1

1,091 75

Midshipmen

3

19

1

         

957 75

Boatswain

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Gunner

1

20

2

90

12

9

 

1

741 75

Steward

1

18

1

         

307 25

Total

               

$15,419. 00

ORDINARY.

                 

Carpenter

1

20

2

         

$422 50

Carpenter's mate

1

19

1

         

319 25

Seamen

4

12

1

         

941 00

Ordinary seamen

6

10

1

         

1,267 50

Total

               

$2,950 25

HOSPITAL

                 

Surgeon

1

50

2

200

20

20

1

 

$1,309 75

Assistant surgeon

1

30

2

145

16

14

 

1

950 75

Steward

1

18

1

         

307 25

Nurses

2

10

1

         

422 50

Washers

2

8

1

         

374 50

Cook

1

12

1

         

235 25

Total

               

$3,600 00

CIVIL

                 

Storekeeper

1

             

$1,700 00

Clerk to storekeeper

1

             

350 00

Clerk to yard

1

             

900 00

Clerk to commandant

1

             

600 00

Clerk to master builder

1

25

           

300 00

Master builder

1

             

2,000 00

Porter

1

25

           

300 00

Total

               

$6,150 00

GRAND TOTAL

               

$28,119 25

-239-

C, No. 5.  ESTIMATE--Continued

BALTIMORE.

Captain

1

$100

8

$300

65

30

3

 

$3,036 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

       

1,165 00

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

       

862 50

Grand Total

               

$6,676 50

 

CHARLESTON, S. C.

 

Number.

Pay per month.

Rations per day.

House rent per annum.

Candles per annum.

Cords of wood per annum.

Servants at $8.

Servants at $6.

Pay, rations and allowances per annum.

Captain

1

$100

8

$300

65

30

3

 

$3,036 75

Lieutenant

1

50

4

200

 

 

 

 

1,165 00

Surgeon

1

60

4

200

20

20

1

 

1,612 25

Purser

1

40

2

200

 

 

 

 

862 50

Grand Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

$6,676 50

SACKETT’S HARBOR.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Master

1

$40

2

$200

20

12

1

 

$1,141 .75

 

RECAPITULATION.

 

FIRST ITEM.

FIRST  ITEM.

FIRST ITEM

SECOND ITEM.

Aggregate.

 

Naval.  

Ordinary.

Hospital.

Civil.

 

Portsmouth

15180.75

3,915 25

 

4,950

24,046 00

Boston

17,687

19,241 75

$3,902 50

8,300

49,131 25

New York

19247 50  

19,241 75

3,902 50

8,300

50,691 75

Philadelphia

15,433

4,258 50

4,029 75

6,200 00

29,921 25

Washington

14076 25

5,686 75

3,600 00

12,700

36,063 00

Norfolk

18887 50

19,241 75

3,902 50

8,930

50,961 75

Pensacola

15,419

2,950 25

3,600 00

6,150

28,119 25

Baltimore

6,676 50

-

6,676 50

Charleston

6,676 50

-

6,676 50

Sackett's Harbor

1,141 75

    -

1,141 75

Naval constructor

-

-

3,000 00

3,000 00

 

130425.75 

74,535 75

22,937 25

58,530

286,428 75

-240-

 C, No. 6.

Explanatory estimate for provisions required for the navy for the year 1832.

For vessels in commission

4,588

For marines on board

571

For receiving vessels

82

 

5,241 persons,

At one ration per day, equal to 1,912,965 rations, which, including freight and transportation, and an amount necessary for the supply of fresh provisions, and. to cover all contingencies, at 25 cents each, will make the sum estimated in the third item of the general estimate, viz: $478,241.25.

In the above amount of $478,241.25, is included the sum of $49,066 for freight and transportation.

C, No. 7.

Explanatory of the fourth item in the general estimate for 1832.

For the pay and allowances for office rent, fuel, candles, stationery, books, clerk hire, &c., &c., &c., for 15 navy agents, including the foreign agents

$55,400 00

For the pay, allowances, &c., &c., &c., for navy agent at Washington

3,600 00

 

$59,000 00

----

C, No. 8.

Data upon which the estimate for repairs, &c. of vessels in the year 1832 is founded.

VESSELS TO BE REPAIRED.

 

 

Delaware

 $103,982

 

Constitution

 98,000

 

Constellation

 40,000

 

St. Louis

 30,000

 

Vandalia

 30,000

 

 

 

 $301,982

For the preservation of the following vessels,if not repaired.

 

 

Independence

 $1,500

 

Columbus

 1,500

 

Ohio

 1,500

 

Franklin

 1,500

 

Washington

 1,500

 

North Carolina

 1,500

 

Java

 1,000

 

Guerriere

 1,000

 

Hudson

 1,000

 

Congress

 1,000

 

Constellation

 1,000

 

Cyane

 500

 

St. Louis

 1,800

 

 

 

 16,300

 

 

 $318,282

For the wear and tear of the following vessels during the year:

 

 

Delaware

 $25,000

 

Potomac

 13,000

 

United States

 13,000

 

Brandywine

 15,000

 

Constitution

 10,000

 

John Adams

 10,000

 

Ontario

 10,000

 

Lexington

 10,000

 

Fairfield

 10,000

 

Boston

 10,000

 

Erie

 10,000

 

Peacock

 10,000

 

Natchez

 10,000

 

Falmouth

 10,000

 

Warren

 10,000

 

Vincennes

 10,000

 

Concord

 10,000

 

Dolphin

 2,500

 

Porpoise

 2,500

 

Grampus

 2,500

 

Shark

 2,500

 

Enterprise

 2,000

 

Boxer

 2,000

 

Experiment

 2,000

 

Fox and Sea Gull

 400

 

Furniture for vessels in commission

 6,000

 

 

 

 218,400

 

 

 $536,682

-242 -

C, No. 9.

Estimate for repairs and improvements of navy yards for the year 1832, explanatory of the fifth item of the general estimate.

PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz:

 

 

Store, of brick,

$12,435

 

Saw shed, of do.

2,580 94

 

Officers' quarters, of brick,

15,000

 

Lock piers in timber dock for securing timber,

2,500

 

Completing timber shed No. 6, and for leveling in front of officers' quarters.

1,700 

 

Enlarging and repairing west wharf, completing east wharf and spar dock, shingling and repairing spar house and rigging loft, painting ship houses Nos. 1 and 2, repairing and painting commandant's house, back buildings, and fences, repairing" lodge, and leveling round the same,

6918 26

 

 

 

 $41,134 20

 

BOSTON

Towards the following improvements and repairs,viz.

Permanent quay wall from wharf 60 and ship house H, as marked on the plan of the yard, including piling and preparing foundation,

 $50,000

 

Permanent quay wall between ship houses H and I, and filling up behind it to level of the yard

 14,002.50       

 

Brick culvert from yard wall to edge of proposed canal, between 24 and 28, on the plan of the yard, excluding excavation, &c. &.,

 1,000

 

Extending plan for securing timber under water, and to floor a passage from dry dock to ship house,

 5,000

 

Warrant officers' houses, with necessary outhouses and fences,

 10,000

 

Leveling yard and removing earth,

 3,000

 

To keep all the buildings, wharves, roads, enclosures, and covering of ships in ordinary, in good repair during the year,

 2,000

 

 

Total 

$85002 50

 

NEW YORK.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz.

 

 

Brick timber shed, with stone foundation,

$20,000

 

Extension of wharf from flood gates of timber pond 930 feet,

7,365 00

 

 

22,000

 

Magazine,

10,000

 

Bridge wharf, continuation 290 feet,

1,850

 

Muster office,

625

 

Belfry on one of the ship houses,

250

 

Wharf on the flat, 300 feet,

2,376

 

Stone wall on the northwest boundary of the yard,

2,300

 

Filling in and leveling yard,

1,500

 

Repairing roof of ship house No. 1, painting commandant's house, painting and repairing brick stores, blacksmith shop, timber sheds, and repairs to gun wharf,

4,473

 

 

 

72739 00

-243-

PHILADELPHIA.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz.

 

 

Steam box house, with pitch and varnish kettles complete,

$1,200

 

Leveling the yard, and filling up,

600

 

Paving timber shed No. 5,

1,355

 

Tinning north side of ship house No. 2,

2,000

 

New capping wall round the yard,

2,950

 

Painting ship houses 1 and 2, and adding broader ledges to the windows,

1,450

 

Repairing wharf round frigate house and slip,

733 75

 

Painting doors and windows of timber sheds, repairing blacksmith shop, workshops, offices, and store rooms,

400

 

 

 

10688 75

 

WASHINGTON.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz.

 

 

Enlarging wharf on south side of yard, filling up, &c,

$20,000

 

Finishing north and south sides,and piling west end of timber dock,

10,000

 

Finishing camboose shop,

2,000

 

Improvements in steam engine, block factory,anchor factory, repairs of engine house, graduating yard, repairs of mud machine, and all other improvements therein,

10,000

 

 

 

42,000

 

NORFOLK.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz.

 

 

Facing wharves,

$25,000

 

Mast house, and mould loft,

24,000

 

Cooperage, and storehouse for tanks, staves,&c,

19,941 99

 

House, with iron doors and windows, for iron store, armorer's, coppersmith's, tinner's,and other small workshops,

18,981 12

 

Boat house No. 29, to complete it

5,000

 

Launching ways for a frigate

15,000

 

Filling up and leveling yard

5,000

 

Repairs of all works of every description within the yard

8,000

 

 

 

120923.11

 

PENSACOLA.

Towards the following improvements and repairs, viz.

 

 

Wood fence around the yard,

 $2,500

 

Storehouse

18,851 70

 

Timber shed

 5,000

 

Repairs during the year

 2,500

 

 

 

25,851 70

For furniture of officers' houses in navy yards

 5,000

 

 

 

$403339.26

-244-

C, No. 10.

Estimate of pay for officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates, and subsistence of officers of the marine corps, for the year 1832.

PAY.

1 Lieutenant Colonel Commandant,$75 per month

$900

 

4 Lieutenant Colonels by brevet,     60   do.

2,880

 

 1 Paymaster,                        $60  do.

720

 

 1 Quartermaster,                     60  do.

720

 

 4 Captains,                          60  do.

1,920

 

23 First Lieutenants,                 30  do.      

8,280

 

16 Second Lieutenants,                25  do.             

4,800

 

 1 Surgeon,                           60  do.

720

 

 1 Sergeant Major,                    10  do.     

120

 

  1 Quartermaster's Sergeant,         10  do. 

120

 

  1 Drum Major,                        9  do.

108

 

  1 Fife Major,                        9  do.  

108

 

 71 Sergeants,                         9  do.

7,668

 

 73 Corporals,                         8  do.   

7,008

 

 20 Drummers,                          7  do. 

1,680

 

 20 Fifers,                            7  do.

1,680

 

750 Privates,                          6  do.              

54,000

 

Extra pay to Adjutant and Inspector   30  do.

360 00

 

Pay for five clerks, viz, one for the Lt. Col.Commandant, one for the Paymaster, one for the Adjutant and Inspector, and two for the Quartermaster, at $20 per month each

1,200

 

 

 

$94,992

SUBSISTENCE.

 1 Lt.Col.Commandant 12 rat’s per day is 4,380      rat.’a’ $20 [cents]

  $876

 

 4 Lt.Cols by brevet(com’dg)10 do.14,600 do.20

2,920

 

 1 Paymaster,                4 do. 1,460 do.20

292

 

 1 Quartermaster             4 do. 1,460 do.20 

292

 

 2 Captains,(comd’g)         6 do. 4,380 do.20

876

 

 2 Ditto,                    3 do. 2,190 do.20

438

 

23 First Lieutenants,        4 do.33,580 do.20

6,716

 

16 Second Lieutenants,       3 do.17,520 do.20

3,504

 

 1 Surgeon,                  4 do. 1,460 do.25

365 00

 

 1 Adjutant and Inspector,   4 do. 1,460 do.20

292 00

 

 

 

16,571 00

 

 

$111,563

HEAD QUARTERS MARINE CORPS,

PAYMASTER’S OFICE, October  4,1831.

C.R.BROOM,P.M.M.C.

-245-

C, No. 11.

Estimate for expenditures in the Quartermaster's Department of the United States Marine Corps,for the year 1832.

SUBSISTENCE.

For 461 non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, serving on shore, at one ration per day each,153,665 rations, at 12 cents per ration, is

  18430 80

CLOTHING.  

For 938 non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates at $30 each, is

28140

 

For one hundred watchcoats, at $6.25 each

625 

28,765   

 

 

 

FUEL.

For the officers, non-commissioned officers, musicians, privates, and washerwomen, and for the public offices, hospital, and armory

 

9098 00

CONTINGENCIES.

For travelling expenses of officers and transportation of men, freight of stores from one station to another, toll, ferriage, wharfage, and cartage, expenses of recruiting, per diem allowance for attending courts-martial and courts of inquiry, and for officers on extra duty, compensation to judge advocates, house rent and chamber money where there are no public quarters assigned incidental labor in the Quartermaster's Department, expenses of burying deceased persons belonging to the marine corps, printing and stationery, postage on public letters, forage, expenses in pursuing deserters, candles and oil for guards at the different stations, keeping in repair the barracks at the different stations, straw for the men, barrack furniture, spades, axes, shovels, picks and carpenter tools

 

 

 

14000 00 

-246-

MEDICINES.

For medicines, hospital stores, and surgical instruments, for the officers and marines serving on shore

       2,369 71 

MILITARY STORES. 

For the pay of armorers, keeping arms in repair, armorers' tools, musical instruments, drums, fifes, flags, and ordnance stores

 

     2,000.00 

BARRACKS.

For building new barracks at New York and Norfolk

60,000

 

For building officers' quarters and repairing barracks at Philadelphia

 9,000

 

For repairs of barracks at head-quarters, Charlestown, and Portsmouth, N. H.

 5,000

 

 

 

  74,000

 

 

$148672.54  

Respectfully submitted.

HEAD QUARTERS MARINE CORPS,

QUARTERMASTER’s OFFICE, Washington, 28th Sept, 1831.

C, No. 12.

ESTIMATES FOR MARINE CORPS AS PROPOSED TO BE CHANGED.

Copy of a letter from the Secretary of the Navy to the Board of Navy Commissioners, dated Navy Department, October 6,1831.

 “I submit for your inspection copies of the estimates from the Pay and Quartermasters of the marine corps for the year 1832, and take the opportunity to inquire what amount of expense would be saved, annually, if the marine corps was incorporated with the navy, and subject always to navy discipline and laws.      ”With your reply be pleased to return the estimates.”

 Extract from a letter addressed by the Secretary of the Navy to the Board of Navy Commissioners, dated 10 th October,1831.

 “In making the estimates concerning the difference of expense caused by incorporating the marine corps more fully into the navy, you may consider that, in such an event, the hospital establishment for that corps will not be separate; that forage, &c., will become unnecessary; and that three separate commands or stations on shore will probably prove sufficient for their accommodation and the wants of the service.”

 __________

NAVY COMMISSIONERS' OFFICE 

25 th October, 1831       

Sir: The accompanying paper A, based upon the principles laid down in your letters of the 6th and 10th instant, is respectfully submitted, in the hope that it contains the information which you have been pleased to call for. If the marine corps were fully incorporated into the navy, and subjected always to its discipline and laws, without being charged with any functions other than such as have a direct relation to the navy, then the existing law organizing it as a distinct corps, liable to do duty either on shore or on board ship, would require such modifications as would adapt it, exclusively, to such service. Its duties on shore would be confined to navy yards, and would there be performed under the superintending direction of the senior officer in command; of

-247-

whose command it would form a constituent part, precisely as do detachments on board ships form part of the crew of such ships, and there act as may be required of them by the commanders of such ships. Such an organization would preclude the necessity of investing any individual with the general command of the corps; and the staff essential to it, when viewed strictly as a military body, would become unnecessary, since all its functions would be performed by officers having similar duties to perform at this time in relation to the navy. Its clothing might be procured as is the clothing of seamen and ordinary seamen; its rations might be provided and distributed as is the ration of other branches of the ship's crew; its arms might be procured as are now the arms of the navy generally. It would be paid as are now seamen and others, by pursers. For its drill and preparation for service, the officers of the respective detachments would be as competent as are now the officers of ships to their appropriate commands. Such considerations have guided the Commissioners in preparing the information now submitted.

     With very great respect, I am, sir, your obedient servant,

                                        JOHN ROGERS                                                       

Hon. Levi Woodbury, Secretary of the Navy.

A.

ESTIMATE of the expense of marines for the ships intended to be kept in commission during the year 1832, and for three navy yards, viz. Norfolk, New York, and Boston; based upon the principles suggested in the communications of the Secretary of the Navy to the Commissioners of the Navy, 6th and 10th instant.

The vessels to be in commission consist of 1 ship of the line, three frigates of the 1st class, one frigate of the 2nd class, eleven sloops of war of the 1st  class, and seven schooners. These ships and vessels, with the three navy yards, would require the following marines, viz.

 

Captains.

1st Lieut's.

2nd Lieut's.

Sergeants.

Corporals.

Drummers.

Fifers.

Privates.

One ship of the line

1

1

1

4

4

2

2

55

Three frigates of the 1st class

-

3

3

9

9

3

3

120

One frigate of the 2d class

-

1

1

2

2

1

1

30 

Eleven sloops of the 1st class

-

-

11

11

22

11

11

176 

Seven schooners

-

-

-

7

14

56 

Navy yard at Boston

1

2

2

4

4

2

2

80

Navy yard at New York

1

2

2

4

4

2

2

80

Navy yard at Norfolk

1

2

2

4

4

2

2

80

Recruiting service and casualties

4

4

8

3

3

 

 

 

 

8

15

30

48

66

30

30

677

Aggregate,

904.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

-248-

Pay of the above, viz.

8 Captains                       at $40

$3,840 00

 

15 Fifteen 1st lieutenants  at $30

5,400 00

 

30 2d lieutenants             at $25

9,000 00

 

48 Sergeants                   at $9

5,184 00

 

66 Corporals                    at $8

6,336 00

 

60 Drummers and Fifers    at $7

5,040 00

 

677 Privates                     at $6

48,744 00

 

 

 

$83,544 00

Subsistence commission officers..

4 Captains   at 6 rations per day

8,760

 

4 Captains,       at 3 rations per day

4,380

 

15 1st Lieutenants  at 4   “     “    “

21,900

 

30 2d  Lieutenants  at 3   “     “    “

32,850

 

 Subsistence for

67,890 rations, at 25 cents

$16,972 50

282 non-commission officers, musicians, and privates, at 1 ration each per day, makes 102,930 rations at 16 cents

 

 

$16,468 80

             Clothing for

851 non-commission officers, musicians          and privates, at $30

$25,530 00

 

100 watch coats, at $6.25

625 00

 

 

 

$26,155 00

             Fuel, allowing

20 cords for each Captain at a navy  yard    

12 cords for each Lieutenant.       

100 cords for each of the 3 navy     yards, viz.

 

 

3 Captains, at twenty cords each

60

 

12 Lieutenants, at twelve cords each

144

 

3 yards, at one hundred cords each

300

 

                   -504 cords, at $6

$3,024 00

 

Candles for

3 Captains, at $20 per annum

$60 00

 

12 Lieutenants, at $12 per annum

144 00

 

 

 

204 00

 

 

$3,228 00

-249-

Contingencies.

Under this head, the estimate for the corps, as now constituted and employed, is $14,000. If it were fully incorporated into the navy, and employed as stated in the scale, this item would be considerably reduced in amount, probably to one-half, but say -- $9,000.

MEDICINES, ETC.

The estimate for the corps, as it now is, under this head, ($2,369 71) would admit of a small reduction, say to

$2,000 00

MILITARY STORES.

The estimate, as the corps now is, might probably not be more than sufficient

$2,000 00

BARRACKS.

The estimate would be confined to the navy yards at Boston, New York, and Norfolk; hence the amount in the estimate for the corps, as it now is, would be considerably reduced; but, as this is not an annual expense, it would be needless to institute any comparison.

 

Recapitulation and comparison of the amount of this estimate with the one prepared for the corps as now constituted.

 

This estimate.

The estimate for the corps as it now is.

Pay

$83,544 00

$95,160 00

Subsistence of commission officers

16,972 50

16,571 00

Subsistence of non-commission officers, &c

16,468 80

18,439 80

Clothing

26,155 00

28,765 00

Fuel and candles

3,228 00

9,098 00

Contingencies

9,000 00

14,000 00

Medicines, &c

2,000 00

2,369 71

Military stores

2,000 00

2,000 00

 

$159,368 30

$186,403 51

Difference in favor of this estimate

$27,035 21

-250-

This estimate provides for certain commission and non-commission officers which are not embraced in the estimate for the corps as it now is; and it excludes certain commission and non-commission officers and privates which are embraced in that estimate. The difference in the annual expense, as to the pay, &c., between those provided for and those excluded, is:

      Excluded,viz.

 

 

 

1 Lieut.Colonel Commandant,    at $75

$900 00

 

 

4 Lieut Colonels by brevet,       at 60

2,880 00

 

 

1 Paymaster,                          at 60

720 00

 

 

1 Quartermaster,                    at 60

           32

720 00

 

 

 8 1st Lieutenants,         at 30

2,880 00

 

 

 1 Surgeon,                 at 60

720 00

 

 

 1 Sergeant Major,          at 10

120 00

 

 

 1 Quartermaster Sergeant,  at 10

120 00

 

 

 1 Drum Major,              at  9

108 00

 

 

 1 Fife Major               at  9

108 00

 

 

23 Sergeants,               at  9

2,484 00

 

 

 4 Corporals,               at  8

384 00

 

 

73 Privates,                at  6

5,256 00

 

 

 

 

$17,400 00

 

To which add extra pay to the Adjutant and Inspector, and pay of 5 clerks

 

1,500 00

 

 

 

$18,960

Subsistence of the above, as estimated by the corps,

 

 

1 Lieut.Colonel Commandant 12 rat’s per day

$876 00

 

4 Lieut.Cols. by brevet,  10 “      “   “

2,920 00

 

1 Paymaster & 1 Quartermaster, each 4 rations per day

584 00

 

8 1st Lieutenants,          4 rat’s per day

2,336 00

 

1 Surgeon, 4 rations per day, at 25 cents

365 00

 

1 Sergeant Major, 1 Quartermaster Sergeant, 1 Drum Major, 1 Fife Major,23 Sergeants,   4 Corporals, and 73 Privates, each 1 ration per day, 37,960 rations, at 12 cents

4,555 20

 

 

 

11,636 20

 

 

$30,596 20

Clothing of the non-commission officers and privates excluded.104 in all, at $30 each

 

3,120

$33716 20

 

 

 

The pay, &c. of the additional officers, &c., provided for in this estimate, are:

 

Pay.

Subsistence.

Total.

 

 4 Captains

$1,920

$876 00

$2,796 00

 

14 2nd Lieutenants

4,200

3,066 00

7,266 00

 

 9  Drummers,9Fifers

1,512

788 40

2,300 40

 

 

 

 

$12,362 40

 

Clothing

 

 

 

 

18 Drummers and Fifers, at $30.00,

540 00

 

 

 

$12,902 40

 

 

$20,813 80

-251-

Thus, while this estimate excludes officers and others to an amount equal to $33,716.20; which is embraced in the estimate for the corps as it now is, it includes $12,902.40 not embraced in that estimate. It is due to the subject, however, here to remark that, of those thus included, the 14 2nd lieutenants, 9 drummers and 9 fifers, are considered as absolutely necessary, whether any change in the organization of the corps takes place or not; unless we consider the 8 1st lieutenants excluded as supplying the place of 8 of the 14 2d lieutenants included: in which case, the estimate for the corps as it now is will be deficient in the number required in the service during the ensuing year, 6 2nd lieutenants,9 drummers, and 9 fifers, whose annual pay, subsistence, and clothing would, according to the estimate for the corps as it now is, amount to $5,954.40.       It will further be perceived, that this estimate allows to all the commission officers an increase of 5 cents in the ration, and computes the ration of the non-commission officers, musicians and privates at 16 cents; which is one-third more than the price fixed in the estimate for the corps as now constituted; these items increase this estimate $7,511.70.

If the amount of this increase were deducted from this estimate, and the annual expense of the 6 second lieutenants and 18 musicians, before referred to were added to the estimate for the corps as it now is, then the aggregate difference in the amount of the two estimates, instead of being $27,035.31, would be $40,501.31 in favor of this estimate.

This increase in the price of rations arises as a consequence upon the full incorporation of the corps into the navy:the officers would be considered as officers of the navy commanding detachments belonging exclusively to the service, and should have similar allowances to those made to other officers of the navy; any distinction in such allowances would appear invidious and unjust.

In the event of the marine corps being attached exclusively to the navy, the appropriations, now made distinct, might all be merged in the general appropriations for the navy.

______

C, No. 13.

ESTIMATE of the sums required for the support of the Office  Secretary of the Navy for the year 1832.

Secretary of the Navy

$6,000 00

Six clerks, per act of 20th April, 1818

$8,200

 

One clerk, per act of 26th May, 1824

1,000

 

One clerk, per act of 2d March, 1827

1,000

 

 

10,200

Messenger and assistant messenger

1,050

Contingent expenses

3,000

 

$20,250

-252-

C, No.14.

ESTIMATE of the sums required for the support of the office of the Commissioners of the Navy, for the year 1832.

For salaries of the Commissioners of the Navy,

$10,500

             of their secretary

2,000

             of clerks and draughtsman, per acts of 20th April, 1818, 26th May, 1824, and 2d March, 1827

7,750

For messenger

700

For contingent expenses

1,800

 

$22,750

C, No. 15.

ESTIMATE of the expenses for the navy building, for the year 1832, viz.

For superintendent,

$250

For two watchmen, at $300 each,

600

For extra, for Sunday watching, at 52 days,

52

Contingent expenses of said building, including fuel, repairs of building, engines, and improvement, of ground,&c.

3,350

SOUTHEY PARKER, Sup’t.

-253-

________________________________

D.

LIST of vessels in commission, their commanders, and stations.

CLASS AND NAME.          COMMANDERS.               WHERE EMPLOYED.

Frigate Brandywine

Com. James Biddle

In the Mediterranean.

Sloop Concord

M.Com’t M. C. Perry

  Do         do

DO    Boston

  Do  G. W. Storer

  Do         do

DO John Adams

  Do  P. F. Voorhees

  Do         do

DO   Ontario

  Do  W. L. Gordon.

  Do         do

DO   Fairfield

Com. Jesse D. Elliott

In the West Indies.

DO   Erie

M.Com’t J. H. Clack

  Do         do

DO   Vincennes

  Do  E. R. Shubrick

  Do         do

Schooner Porpoise

Lieut. Jas. Armstrong

  Do         do

Schooner Shark

 Do Wm. Boerum

  Do         do

 Do Grampus

 Do Josiah Tatnall

  Do         do

Sloop Vandalia

M.Com’t Bev. Kennon

Coast of Brazil.*

 Do   Warren

  Do    Benj. Cooper

  Do        do

 Do  Lexington

  Do    Silas Duncan

  Do        do

Schooner Enterprise

Lieut.  S.W. Downing

To be employed on do.

Frigate Guerriere

Com. C.C.B. Thompson

In the Pacific. †

Frigate Potomac

Do.John Downes

  Do       do

Sloop St.Louis

M.Com’t J. D. Sloat

  Do       do*

 Do   Falmouth

  Do   F.H. Gregory

  Do       do

Schooner Dolphin

Lieut. Jno. C. Long

  Do       do

EMPLOYED IN THE PROTECTION OF LIVE OAK.

Schooner Spark

Lieut. W. P. Piercy

Atlantic, coast of Florida.

  Do     Ariel

 Do  Eben.Farrand

Gulf of Mexico, E. of Perdido river.

  Do     Sylph

 Do H.E.V.  Robinson

Gulf of Mexico, between Perdido & Sabine rivers.

*Ordered home  +Arrived Dec. 1, 1831

-254-

________________________________

E.

Statement showing the progress which has been made in executing the law for the gradual improvement of the Navy, passed 3d March, 1827, including the condition of the Dry Docks.

The progress of the work on the dock at Boston during the past year has been satisfactory, and has not been interrupted by the effect of tides or accidents which impeded the operations during the winter of 1830.

It was necessary to open a communication from the dock to the great wells, by a tunnel at such a depth as to allow the water to flow from the dock chamber to the great pumps; it was concluded best to form this passage in the usual way of tunneling, without opening the ground from the top; and it was begun in this manner; but the flowing sands, saturated with copious springs at this depth, occasioned so much difficulty, and embarrassed the workmen to such a degree, that it was indispensable to open an excavation from the surface. This, of course, increased the expense, and caused delay last winter; the work, however, was successfully and well accomplished during the summer.

There has been expended for the year ending 31st October, on this dock—

for materials,

$64,572 01

    Labor,

59,664 04

Making,

$124,236 05

Which, added to the amount paid for labor and materials upon the different branches of expenditure from its commencement in June, 1827, to 31st October, 1831—

for materials,

$236,647 23 ½

    labor,

269,692 91 ½

Making the total expenditure of

$506,340 15

In the item of labor is included all the work and services of every kind performed on the dock, or on business connected with it, except the salary of the engineer.

 From the great difficulty in procuring timber of the required form and size for the turning gates, the engineer was compelled to resort to a mode of procuring the gate ribs or rails out of planks, not having been able to procure the solid timber: large, straight timber was sawed into planks 18 inches wide and seven thick; they were steamed, and bent over a mould formed to the required curve. Three planks, bent successively one over the other, and well bolted with copper bolts, formed a rib 21 inches thick, and 18 deep. After cooling and being bolted, they were taken from the mould, and it was found that they preserved their curvature remarkably well: thus rails were obtained, made of what was known to be sound timber, which might not be the case if solid timber were used, though at more expense. There are only two or three of the top and bottom rails to prepare, for which good solid timber is expected from Norfolk.              The masonry of the dock may be considered as completed; the beautiful line of coping, three feet wide and fifteen inches thick, is all laid ere this. The top of the rubble wall behind the coping remains uncovered; it is proposed to cover this with a course of hammered stones level with the coping, which seems to be indispensable to protect the backing rubble work from the effects of frost.

-255-

The great wells for the pumps are completed, and ready to receive the pumps, the placing of which, and the erection of the great steam engine, will be begun as soon as the engine house is covered, and with the windows in; the stone cornice is all laid, the roof frame partly on, and in two or three weeks the building will be slated. 

The jettee walls are to extend from the wing walls of the dock towards the sea, as far as they can be carried with safety to the coffee dam; they will be parallel with, and fifty feet from, the axis of the dock on each side, and from the top of which a flight of stone stairs will descend to about low water mark.  These jettee walls are intended as a defence against the washing in of mud or other obstructions to the dock entrance. It was not considered prudent to commence these walls this fall, because the excavation requisite for a good foundation would endanger the coffer dam: it was thought best to leave it till the spring, when the works will be in a situation not to suffer so much, should any accident occur.

The turning gates have been commenced, and will be framed during the winter; and preparations are made for completing and hanging them in the spring.

The drain to discharge the water from the great pumps is about half done, and the sewer on one side of the dock is commenced; these will be prosecuted as fast as the weather and the new filling up of earth will permit. All the earth banking round the dock is brought up as high as required to receive the gravel and paving, which is to extend thirty feet wide round the dock, and this will be begun as early next spring as the season will allow. The dock may be used as soon as the turning gates are finished and in their place. The amount yet to be expended to complete the dock will probably be about $75,000, of which about $14,000 will be paid under existing contracts.

It would seem almost impossible, from past experience to designate the time when the work will be completed; the able engineer, however, to whom its construction has been confided, has no doubt that a ship may be docked for repairs the ensuing summer.

Nearly all the stones required for the masonry of the dock at Norfolk are on hand, the recent supplies having been very great. An increased number of hammerers are also expected from the north, so that it is hoped that the masonry of the dock can be put into a nearly finished state in the course of the winter, should the season be favorable for such work. The sinking of the great wells, and constructing the tunnel, about 165 feet long, from the dock to the wells, were attended with great difficulty. The upper part of the excavation to 12 or 15 feet depth, was in a loose quicksand, full of springs, and notwithstanding a strong curbing was used, and great caution exercised, large quantities of this almost fluid mass run in under the curbing, and repeatedly filled in at night what had been dug out during the day; the consequence of this was, that round the curbing on the outside a hollow space was created, increasing the labor of digging, and embarrassing all the operations in and about the wells. After working to within a few feet of the necessary depths, the great spring which underlies this whole district at a depth of 50 to 70 feet, broke up, and increased the difficulties. To furnish a drain for the water to the great pumps for draining the dock, the driving the tunnel was hastened, and, a passage being thus effected, the water was discharged, so as to render the completion of this part of the work comparatively easy.

-256-

Much unexpected trouble attended the bricking the tunnel: it was, however, successfully, though slowly, prosecuted, and is now completed. This part of the work appears to be well and substantially executed, and does credit to the workmen employed upon it. 

Notwithstanding all the embarrassments which have been encountered, it will be seen that a vast quantity of business has been effected, and that all the heavy, difficult, and troublesome parts have been accomplished, such as the great wells, the tunnel, the foundation and first story of the engine house; and that the wing and jettee walls at the entrance of the dock are nearly done also. All the round oak pieces for the turning gates, except two or three pieces, have been procured; the ribs have been dressed, and piled up ready for framing, which will be commenced as soon as the masonry is so far advanced as that the gates can be placed when finished.

The amount expended during the year is,

for materials

$112,143 73

    labor

104,394 28

 

$216,538 01

Which added to the sums disbursed on this work since its commencement in December,1827, up to October, 1831, will make the sum of

587,252 07

of which were expended

for materials,

$284,709 70

    labor,

302,542 37

 

$587,252 07

There is yet due, under existing contracts, $79,229.31, which, with $100,000 additional for labor and materials, making $119,229.31, will complete the dock, which there can be no doubt will be effected during the year 1832. Notwithstanding the unfavorable circumstances which have attended the operations at this dock, the progress during the year has been satisfactory.  Under this law contracts were made for live oak frames, and promiscuous timber required for five ships of the line, five frigates, and five sloops-of-war, which it was contemplated to build at the following yards:

 

Seventy-four.

Forty-four.

Sloop.

At Portsmouth,

0

1

1

   Boston,

2

1

1

   New York,

1

0

0

   Philadelphia,

0

1

1

   Washington,

0

1

1

   Norfolk,

2

1

1

Under which contracts there have been delivered

 

 

 

At Portsmouth, cubic feet

 

2,282

5,675

   Boston,         do.

77,618

41,439

9,153

   New York,       do.

 

13,759

 

   Philadelphia,   do.

 

42,925

9,136

   Washington,     do.

 

23,664

14,828

   Norfolk,        do.

77,151

23,803

9,607

 

154,769

153,872

48,999

357,640 cubic feet, for which the sum of $498,021 43 have been paid.

-257-

________________________________

F.

Submitted estimate of the expense of two rope walks.

Constructed of the best materials, and in the most approved manner, two rope walks will cost, each, $70,000.00

$140,000

________________________________

G.

Statement showing the number of vessels now on the stocks, their state of preservation, the yards where building, and the time and expense necessary to prepare them for launching.

PORTSMOUTH N. H.

There are two ships on the stocks at this yard, viz.

Alabama, ship of the line.— This ship is in a good state of preservation, and can be prepared for launching at the probable expense, exclusive of joiner’s work, of $38,320.60, and in ninety days' time.

Santee, frigate of the first class.— This ship is also in a good state of preservation, and can be prepared for launching for $29,341.42, in seventy days' time.

BOSTON.

There are three ships on the stocks at this yard, under houses and in a perfect state of preservation,viz.

Vermont, Virginia, ships of the line, and Cumberland, frigate of the first class.—The time necessary to prepare these ships for launching, with all the force that can be advantageously employed, and the probable expense, will be: for the Vermont, $70,360.66, in ninety days; Virginia, $79,726.46, in ninety days; Cumberland, $74,780.73, in ninety days.

NEW YORK.

Two frigates are on the stocks at this yard, viz.

Sabine, frigate of the first class.— This ship is under cover in ship house No. 1, and is in a fine state of preservation, and could be finished and launched in sixty days, at an estimated expense of $46,357.00.

Savannah, frigate of the first class.— This ship is also under cover in ship house No. 2, and is generally sound and in a good state of preservation, and could be finished and launched in four months, at an expense of $46,435.00.

PHILADELPHIA.

Two ships are on the stocks at this yard, viz.

Pennsylvania, line of battle ship.— This ship is in a good state of preservation; the timbers, plank, beams, knees,&c.&c. are sound; it will cost to prepare her for launching, which will require six months to do, $33,754.

Raritan, frigate of the first class.— This ship is also in a good state of preservation, and can be prepared for launching in about three months, and will cost $15,500.

-258-

WASHINGTON.

There is on the stocks at this yard only one ship, viz:

Columbia, frigate of the first class.—This ship is in a good state of preservation, and can be got ready for launching in two months, at an expense of $42,576 49

NORFOLK.

There are two ships on the stocks at this yard, viz.

New York, ship of the line.— This ship is under a good substantial house, on a foundation of wood, which is sound and good. The ceiling plank, from floor heads to keelson, and fillings, have been removed within the year, and keel and keelson salted. It will require to complete this ship, exclusive of materials on hand, $37,775.10, which can be done in about three months.

St. Lawrence, frigate of the first class.— This ship is also under a house; she rests on a stone foundation under the keel and bilge: her blocking is decayed, and also the foundation under shores; the foundation under the north side of the ship, under the wall shores, has settled about four inches; this is, however, now undergoing repairs, and will be completed the ensuing spring. It will cost to complete this ship, exclusive of materials on hand, $32,590.53; which could be effected in ninety days. The keel and keelson of this ship have also been salted during the present year.

________________________________

H.

Statement showing the number, names, state, and condition of the vessels of war belonging to the United States, now in ordinary; the station at which each is placed; with the cost of repairing and equipping, exclusive of articles belonging to the several vessels; and the materials which have been provided for repairs.

BOSTON.

Columbus, ship of the line.— The hull of this ship, sound and in good order, will require to have part of two streaks of wales put on, rudder to finish, masts to be wedged, anchors and stocks to be made, to be caulked throughout, and to be new coppered. Cost of material and labor, $108,673.52.

Independence, ship of the line.— The frame and bottom plank of this ship supposed to be sound; the plank, outboard from lower edge of wales to rail, the ceiling, all the decks, magazine, platforms, plank on stern cutwater, &c. are defective, and will require to be new; she will require to be thoroughly caulked and new coppered. Cost of material and labor, $163,955.23.

Constitution, frigate of the first class.— The frame of this ship, bottom plank, gun deck, ceiling between decks, and spar deck, knees and beams, are sound; the outboard plank from light water mark to rail ceiling in hold, orlop and berth decks, magazine platforms, plank on spar deck, &c.&c. are deficient, and require to be new;the head, knight-heads,and stem require repairs; the ship requires caulking throughout, and to be new coppered. Cost of materials and labor required, $97,998.10.

-259-

Peacock,sloop of war.— This vessel has had her spars and rigging altered and repaired; her hull is considered sound and has been caulked, her sails are nearly all made or repaired, her masts rigged, and yards across, her hold thoroughly cleansed and whitewashed, water filled, salt provisions and wood stowed; some of her sea stores (not perishable) are provided; she requires her other articles of provisions and sea stores, some running rigging yet to be furnished, and some of her sails to be finished, and hull painted; she could be made ready for sea in ten days.

The ships are covered with tight roofs and side hurdles, with their guns and ballast on board, and due attention is paid to ventilating, pumping, cleaning,&c.&c.

NEW YORK.

Ohio, ship of the line.—This ship was launched in May, 1820, but has never been masted or fitted for sea; her outside plank, from water line to rail, is believed to be decayed, and will require to be replaced, as will also a part of the ceiling, clamps, and waist, on the upper and lower gun decks; her frame, upper and lower gun decks, beams and knees, are sound and in good condition; all her bulkheads have been removed to admit a free circulation of air; a tight roof was placed over this ship last winter; she has on board about 700 tons iron ballast; there have been no materials procured for the repairs and equipment of this ship except guns, shot, anchors, two chain cables, a set of iron tanks, ballast, and canvas for sails. Cost, $171,072.69.   

Washington, ship of the line.— This ship was built and launched in 1814, and has made but one cruise, and has been in ordinary since August,1818; that part of her frame which is live oak is sound; her beams, knees, deck frames, and two-thirds of her decks are sound and good, as well as her bottom plank below the water lines; this ship is without a covering and is deficient in the decayed state of her upper works; all her bulk-heads, state rooms, have been taken down; she is well ventilated, and is daily visited by an officer; she has on board 250 tons of ballast, but no materials have been provided for her repair and equipment. Cost, $186,034.94.

Franklin, ship of the line.— This ship was built and launched in 1815, and has made two cruises, one in the Mediterranean and one to the Pacific; she is in about the same condition as the Washington and would require the same repairs; she is at present used as a receiving ship, is well ventilated, and well taken care off[sic]; she is also without a covering and does not require one while she is used as a receiving ship; no materials have been provided for the repair and equipment of this ship. Cost, $192,185.16.

Hudson, frigate of the first class.— This ship was purchased by the Government in 1826; her frame is of white oak; she is built of green materials, has made one cruise on the coast of Brazil; her upper works are partially decayed; although her state is not positively known, she is believed to be pretty generally sound below her gun deck, and would make a good receiving vessel, although not considered worth repairing.

United States, frigate of the first class.— This ship was built and launched in 1797, and has been much employed at sea; she is now undergoing a thorough repair, and will be, when finished, as good as a new ship; sufficient materials are on hand to complete her repairs, and for a part of her outfits.

PHILADELPHIA.

The Cyane is the only vessel in ordinary at this yard; she requires to be rebuilt, which will cost $71,103.61.

-260-

NORFOLK.

Delaware, ship of the line.—In this ship some of the beams, deck plank, clamps, waterways, and sperketting on all the decks, are defective in spots; defects are also discovered in the ceiling, &c. Before the condition of the bottom can be ascertained, the ship must be hove down or docked; the ship is under cover; it would require sixty days to effect her repairs, which will cost $103,892.

North Carolina, ship of the line.— A few beams in this ship, on the spar and orlop decks, are decayed, and on all the decks the clamps, waterways, and sperkettings are partially decayed; outside the ship the wales and channelways are generally decayed; she will require new main and mizzen channels; it will require four months to complete her repairs, which, exclusive of stores, will amount to $149,083. This ship is also under cover.  Congress, frigate of the second class.— This ship will require a thorough repair, which will take nearly one year to complete, at an expense of $148,247.

The Java and Macedonian, frigates, require to be rebuilt; the frame of the latter has already been procured; it will, however, require, to rebuild and equip her, the sum of $207,984.

The frigate Constellation arrived since this report was commenced; her state and condition are such that she could be sent to sea in three weeks; her hull requires little more than caulking to be done to it, and her stores are nearly all complete; only some additional sails and rigging are required to fit her for a cruise of two years.

-261-

________________________________

I.

Statement showing the amount on hand, at the several navy yards of articles belonging to the several appropriations for the navy, 1st November 1831.

 

Portsmouth.

Boston

New York.

Philadelphia.

Washington.

Norfolk.

Gradual increase

195,869 73

321,045 63

450,808 98

190,281 17

250,217 14

177,114 36.5

Gradual improvement

10,699 06

192,997 14

21,406 92

61,536 03

49,281 12

144,871 51 ¼

Repairs

25,063 23

292,478 70

317,628 81

26,457 78

81,427 24

255,736 84

Ordnance

108,334 39

262,188 19 ¾

636,274 45

163,734 01

138,127 57

173,887 38

Ten sloops

11,006 31

23,723 52

18,797 76

21,728 05

7,533 53

 

Provisions

 

8,853 75

14,181 41

 

1,216 42

23,711 25

Pay, (slops)

 

901 35

5,596 81

 

 

 

 

$350,972 72

1,102, 188 28 ¾

1,464,695 14

463,737 04

527,803 02

775,331 34 ¾

RECAPITULATION.

Amount on hand at Portsmouth

350,972 72

                  Boston

1,102,188 28 ¾

                  New York

1,464,695 14

                Philadelphia

463,737 04

                  Washington

527,803 02

                  Norfolk

775,331 34 ¾

                  Dollars,

4,684,737 55 ½

-262-

________________________________

J.

ABSTRACT of instructions to the agents appointed to superintend the preservation of the live oak belonging to the United States.

The agents are required, in the first place, to procure from the Surveyor General of the Land Office copies of the surveys of the lands within their respective districts, and within twenty miles of the sea coast, or fifteen of the sounds, bays, or creeks of salt water, on which live oak is known to be produced; to obtain from the Register of the Land Office lists of the lands already sold, and which are not to be further noticed, unless so abounding with navy timber as to make it desirable it should belong to the United States; in this case, the fact is to be reported to the Navy Department.

In cases where copies of the surveys cannot be furnished by the Surveyor General, the agents are authorized to employ a person to make the necessary copies, to examine the lands belonging to the United States, and, if bodies of valuable navy timber are discovered on any part of them, to report the same to the Register, that he may withhold the lands from sale until the President of the United States can be informed of the fact, and reserve them, if he deems it expedient, for the use of the United States’ navy; to note minutely the soil of such tracts, their locality, with respect to the towns, bays, rivers, or creeks within their vicinity, and the facilities or difficulties of making roads, or boating the timber to landings from whence it may be taken to market; if such tracts belong to individuals, to note the same, &c., and to report, in detail, to the Department, at least once in three months, and to the Register monthly, a list of all such tracts, &c.

The agents are further required to advertise their appointments in their respective districts, and to publish the provisions of the acts of Congress under which they perform their duties; to keep a steady watch on the sections of United States’ lands known to contain timber suitable for the navy; to report violations of these acts to the United States District Attorney, and, generally, in all cases of doubt or difficulty arising under their appointments, to appeal to that officer for instructions; to accompany the United States’ surveyors, while they are employed in the agent's district, and to refer to their field notes, &c.for such information as they may afford on the subjects under examination; to report also the form and dimensions of the timber obtainable from the live oak trees, according to diagrams with which the agents have been furnished; to communicate to the commanders of vessels appointed to aid in the preservation of the live oak, information as to the titles of lands, necessary to enable them to determine upon the propriety of arresting or permitting the removal of navy timber, &c., and on all such matters as may facilitate the discharge of the duties confided to such commanders.

The commanders of these vessels are instructed to guard diligently the portion of sea coast assigned to each, respectively, against depredations on the navy timber; to examine the bays, rivers and creeks, for the discovery of such timber; to aid the land agents in exploring such watercourses, bays,&c. as may not be readily accessible without the use of boats, and generally to co-operate with them, as far as may be practicable under their instructions, in the discharge of the duties allotted to them.

-263-

The commanders are also required to visit the live oak districts frequently, and especially during the cutting season; if timber is about to be taken from lands which there is good reason to believe belong to the United States, to refer the subject, in the first instance, to the land agents, and finally, if necessary, to the United States district attorney. In the mean time they are authorized to forbid the removal of such timber; the agents are directed to note also the localities of any live oak lands they may discover, their proximity to landings from whence the timber may be transported to distant markets; to determine, as accurately as circumstances will permit, the geographical position of the principal capes, entrances into bays, rivers, &c.; to ascertain the depth of the water on the bars, or entrances thereof, distances to which they may be navigable, &c., and to communicate the information thus obtained to the Department only.

The following is a list of the land agents, and vessels and commanders thereof, appointed and employed in the preservation of the live oak,&c.

District the 1st extends from the mouth of the St. Mary's river, Georgia, to Cape Sable, or the southern extremity of the Peninsula of Florida. Thompson Mason, agent.

District the 2d extends from Cape Sable to the mouth of the Suwanee river. Samuel Reed, agent.

District the 3d extends from the mouth of the Suwanee to range line between the 5th and 6th ranges east from Tallahassee. Eli B. Whitaker, agent.

District the 4th extends from range line between the 5th and 6th ranges east of Tallahassee to the Appalachicola river. John E. Frost, agent.

District the 5th extends from the Appalachicola river to the range line dividing the 29th and 30th ranges west of Tallahassee; this line passes near Deer Point, four miles east of Pensacola. John Clark, agent.

District the sixth extends from the western line last mentioned to the mouth of the Mississippi river. John Jerrison, agent.

District 7th extends from the mouth of the Mississippi to the mouth of the Sabine river. George Blair, agent.

The vessels employed are, first, schooner Spark, Lieut. Wm.P. Pierey, commander: the coast assigned to his protection extends from the St. Mary's to Cape Sable.

2dly. Schooner Ariel, Lieut. Ebenezer Farrand, commander; cruising ground extends from Cape Sable to the Perdido river.

3dly. Schooner Sylph, Lieut. H. E. V. Robinson, commander; this district extends from the Perdido river to the Sabine.

________________________________

K.

Submitted estimate of the cost of iron tanks for the frigates and sloops of war in commission, viz. 3 frigates of the 1st class, 1 frigate of the 2d class, and 11 sloops of war.

For a frigate of the 1st class to hold about 39,500 gallons of water; for a frigate of the 2d class to hold about 34,000 gallons of water, and for a sloop of war to hold about 14,000 gallons of water:

3 frigates, at 39,500,

118,500 galls.

1 frigate,

34,000    “

11 sloops, at 14,000

154,000   “

306,500 galls., at 43 cts.

$131,795.00.

-264-

________________________________

L.

Submitted estimate of the cost of a steam battery calculated to mount 12 42-pounder, cannons.

MATERIALS.

Wood

$14,407

 

Copper

10,558

 

Iron

2,062

 

Lead

460

 

Oakum

600

 

Hardware for joiners

500

 

Augers

70

 

Pumps

100

 

Naval stores

100

 

 

 

$28,857

Magazine and light room

500

 

Painter's bill

700

 

Boats, two

200

 

 

 

1,400

 

Labor of every description

$16,976

Contingencies

3,000

 

$50,227

CANNON.

Twelve 42-pounders, at $472.50

5,670

 

$55,897

Hence, two steam batteries are estimated to cost

$111,794

________________________________

M.

Circulars respecting the commutation of the spirit part of the navy ration, assistance to vessels in distress, and punishments in the service.

M, No. 1.

General order to officers as to rations.

Navy Department, 15th June, 1831

All persons in the naval service, entitled to rations, who shall voluntarily relinquish the use of that part of them composed of spirits, shall be paid therefor at the rate of six cents per ration, it being the estimated value of that part, as approved by this Department, September 17, 1817. The payments made in pursuance of this regulation are to be charged to the appropriation for "provisions."

LEVI WOODBURY

                 

-265-

M, No. 2.-Circular

NAVY DEPARTMENT, 26th September,1831.

To all Captains and Masters Commandant, Navy United States:

Sir: In consequence of recent occurrences in the service, your attention is invited to two subjects, where the law now regulates the rights and power of all concerned, but where there is still vested in officers a discretion, in the exercise of which it may be desirable to them to know distinctly the wishes of the President and of this Department.

One of these subjects, and our wishes upon it are, that when any portion of the navy furnishes relief to American vessels, whether wrecked or otherwise in distress, to yield which relief promptly ought to be, and long has been, one great object of its gallant exertions, no compensation of any kind should either be asked or received.

The other subject, and our wishes upon it are, that till Congress deem it proper to alter the existing laws concerning punishments in the navy, and whenever the laws allow a discretion in the choice of punishments, the first resort, in the case of offences by seamen, is recommended to be always had to pecuniary fines, badges of disgrace, and other mild corrections, rather than to the humiliating practice of whipping; and that never on the same day, by punishing, under an officer's own authority, two offences at once, should the stripes, limited by law, be exceeded in number, or be inflicted otherwise than in the presence and under the sanction of the commanding officer of the vessel or station.

And that, in the case of offences by officers, which it is hoped their well known high sense of duty and honor will prevent from becoming frequent, a system more remedial should be adopted, by sentencing to a reduction of rank and pay, or to suspension from promotion, rather than to suspension from active service; as persons, unfortunately guilty of any misbehavior, need most the constant discipline of active service, and, when suspended therefrom, are left without employment, under greater temptations and opportunities for injurious indulgences.

LEVI WOODBURY

To all Captains and Masters Commandant Navy U. States.

________________________________

N.

Report respecting the Privateer Pension Fund.

The privateer pension fund consists of stock of the corporation of Washington, purchased 25th of May, 1830, bearing interest of 5 per cent. per annum from 1st April preceding

$1,961 81

Stock of the State of Maryland, purchased 10th of August, 1830, bearing interest of 5 per cent. per annum from 1st of April, 1831

37,500 00

And from 1st July, 1831

8,500 00

The dividends on this stock  -      -      -       -

47961 81

constitute the only means of payment of pensions chargeable upon the fund.

The amount of payments during this year cannot be ascertained until the agents shall have made their returns.

34

-266-

The pensions to widows and orphans, by the limitation of the laws granting them, have expired.

Eighty-six persons have been authorized to receive pensions during the continuance of their disability, under the acts of Congress of the 13th of February and 2d of August, 1813.

Of the number entitled, but forty-two have applied for payment within two years; and, in making remittances to the agents, it is believed to be necessary to provide for the latter only, as the rest may be presumed to be dead, or to have relinquished their claims.

Of the number now in receipt of pensions,

17 are paid in Massachusetts, 17;

2              Pennsylvania.                                     

6              Maryland.                                       

10            New York.                                           

2              New Hampshire.                                  

1              Rhode Island.                                      

4              Maine, 4

____________________________

Total 42

2 receive $20 per month: six, $3 per month; one, $15 per month; two, $12 per month; one, $10 per month; one, $9 per month; three, $8 per month; thirteen, $6 per month; four, $5 per month; six, $4 per month; one, $3 per month; two, $2 per month.

To meet these payments, will require semi-annually the sum of $1,616. The half-yearly dividends on stock amount to $1,199.04; consequently, should these pensioners continue to claim, a sale of part of the stock will be necessary.

There was in the Treasury to the credit of the fund on the 1st January, 1831, the sum of

$285 69

Dividends on stock to 1st January, 1832, will be

1,790 40

 

$2,076 09

Remitted to agents the sum of

$805 37

Which, with the balances in their hands, was estimated as sufficient to pay claims during the first half year of 1831, including salary of secretary to October 1st, 1831.

 

Salary of secretary to January 1st,1832

62 59

Semi-annual payment to 42 pensioners, 1st January, 1832, to be remitted in December next

1,616 00

 

$2,483 87

Will leave a balance against the fund, on the 1st of January 1832, of

$407 78

 

 

         NAVY DEPARTMENT, 13th October, 1831.

                                          THO. L. RAGSDALE

                                                 Sec’y P.P. Fund

-267-

________________________________

O.

LISTS of Deaths, Dismissisons,and Resignations.

O, 1.

LIST OF DEATHS in the Navy of the United States, since the 1st of December, 1830.

 Name and rank.           Date.                      Cause.                            Place.

CAPTAINS.

Arthur Sinclair

7 Feb. 1831

-              -        -       -

Norfolk.

MASTERS COM’DANT.

Samuel W. Adams

1 Jan. 1831

    -        -      - 

Brooklyn, N. Y.

John Porter

2 Sept.  “

Protracted illness

Watertown, Mass.

LIEUTENANTS.

John K. Carter

1 Feb. 1831

Lunacy

Lunatic asylum, N. Y.

Joseph R.Blake

11 May,  “

Consumption

Washington, D. C.

Benj.Talllmadge, jr

20 June, “

Brain fever

Gibraltar.

John T. Ritchie

26 Jun,  “

Protracted illness

Georgetown, D. C.

Francis Sanderson

23 Aug,  “

-                              -       

Baltimore.

Paul H. Hayne

14 Sept.  “

Yellow fever

Pensacola hospital.

Chas. H. Caldwell

9 Aug.  1831

 _           _          _

At sea.

SURGEONS.

A. B. Beers

 8 June,1831

 

Fairfield, Conn.

Rob’t P. Macomber

16 Jun,  “

Inflammation of the bowels.

Port Mahon.

Wm. C. McCall

15 Sept. “

 

Near Trenton, N. J.

ASSIST’ SURGEONS.

Caleb W. Cloud

15 July  “

Yellow fever

W.Indies,on board Vincennes.

PURSERS.

Joseph Watson

16 Feb.1831

 

Portsmouth, N.H.

Alex’r P.Darragh 9 Jan. 1831

 

Gibraltar.

-268-

O, 1--Continued

MIDSHIPMEN.

Wm C. Allen

1831

 

Philadelphia.

Ferdinand Smith

               “

 

Do

Edw’d Hopkinson

31 Jan.    “

Fall from mizen top

Monte Video.

Thos.O. L. Elwyn

1  Aug.    “

Consumption

BrandywineSp’gs

Chas. K. Ruffin

27 July    “

Black vomit

Pensacola hospital.

John C. Wynan

31 Jan.    “

Consumption

Norfolk, Va.

BOATSWAIN.

Levi Talbot

13 July. 1831

 

Norfolk.

GUNNERS.

WS.Cowan

(acting)

14 Sept. 1831

Consumption

N.York hospital.

-269-

O, No. 2.

LIST OF DISMISSIONS from the  Navy of the United States, since the 1st of December,1830.

MASTER COMMANDANT.

Name and rank.

Date of dismission.

James Ramage

23d September,1831.

LIEUTENANTS.

Thomas S. Hammersley

16th  July, 1831

MIDSHIPMEN.

Zebulon P. Wardell

10th December,1830.

Timothy B. Field

           Do                    do              

Francis G. Beatty

           Do                    do

William R. O'Sullivan

           Do                    do

Amedens B. Marrast

           Do                    do

Charles Sperry

 21st    April,               do

Horatio N. Cady

 8th      June,                do

William B. Everett

           Do                    do

Israel S. Griffin

            Do                    do

William F. Grymes

            Do                    do

Robert Jones

            Do                    do                

David M. Stokes

            Do                    do

William J. Jenkins

 26th October,  do

Robert W. Alden

 14th November, do

John A. Turley

 29th November, do

BOATSWAINS.

Henry Vanderford

 10th February,1831

MARINE OFFICERS.

First Lieutenant C. F. Spering

 23d September,1831

Second Lieutenant Thomas Burke

   3d   October,              do

-270-

O, No. 3.

LIST OF RESIGNATIONS in the navy of the United States, since the 1st of December,1830

LIEUTENANTS.

Name and rank.

Date of resignation.

John Swartwout

 15th June,1831.

SURGEONS.

Samuel B. Malone

  20th September, 1831.

ASSISTANT SURGEONS.

John H. Imlay

 5th September, 1831.

PASSED MIDSHIPMEN.

John R. Bryan

   5th   September, 1831

MIDSHIPMEN.

Thomas M. Petway

  2d  December, 1830.

Augustus Marrast

  14th December, 1830.

J. B. Glentworth

  21st Janusry,   1831.

William H. Browne

  4th  April,          do

R. H. L. Paterson

  12th   do             do

Henry Mifflin

  22d   do             do

James W. Southard

  29th   do             do

Albert McDaniel

  9th  May,            do

Milo H. Smith

  3d  June,             do

Robert P. Mayrant

 11th July,  do

Timothy B. Field

   18th    July,         do

John L. Taylor

 3d August,  do

Henry F. Toulmin

  15th  August,        do

George M. Thompson

  12th  Sept.            do

Alonzo P. Buck

  26th  Sept.            do

John W. Willis

  7th  October,         do

William A. Patterson

  19th  October,       do

Adam J. Leslie

  31st  October,       do

Daniel Cameron

  16th  Nov.             do

Joseph B. Eckford

  16th  Nov.             do

GUNNERS.

Jacob Carpenter (acting)

 16th August, 1831.

Thomas Stanley (acting)

   16th   November,  1831.

37

CARPENTERS.

Philip P. Goumpert (acting)

26th  April, 1831.

MARINE OFFICERS.

2d Lieut. Farnifold Green

29th  June,  1831.

2d Lieut. Thomas Lee

30th Sept.    1831.

-271-

________________________________

P.

Submitted estimate for arrearages.

For arrearages of former years, arising from insufficient appropriations for the contingent expenses of the navy

 

$80,000

________________________________

Q.

Report on the removal of the Naval Monument.

NAVY COMMISSIONERS’ OFFICE, 24th Nov.1831

Sir. The amount appropriated for removing and reconstructing the naval monument, was $2100.   -

Of this sum the disbursements to the present time amount to

$1,502 50

There will be due to contractors on the completion of the work

564 96

And for extra work

32 54

 

$2,100 00

The inscriptions upon the monument being very faint, it has been proposed to improve them; and for this purpose, should it be approved, there will be required an additional appropriation of one hundred and thirty dollars.

With very great respect,  I   am, sir, your most obedient servant,

 JNO RODGERS

Honorable LEVI WOODBURY,

Secretary of the Navy.

________________________________

R.

R, No. 1.

SUPPRESSION of the Slave Trade,under the Act of 3d of March,1819

 Da.                       1831.

Dr.

Jan 1. To balance in the Treasury this day

$9,979 99

-272-

Jan. 26. To am’t refunded by G. Harrison, navy agent

150 00

March 2. To amount appropriated per act of this date

10,000 00

                                         Amount, -

$20,129 99

1831.

CR.

March 12. By payment to F. W. Armstrong, former marshal of Alabama, for support of fifteen Africans, per special act of the 25th February,1831

$1,551 14

March 12. By ditto to Livingston's estate, for ditto, per same act,

2, 184 33

      15  By bill of exchange of Joseph Mechlin,  

             agent,

500 00

      15  By         do.        do.        do.

500 00

      15  By         do.        do.        do.

2,526 83

      15  By         do.        do.        do.

400 00

      29  By         do.        do.        do.

375 00

May   16  By Thos. Finley, marshal of Md., for  

             expenses of two Africans

18 00

Oct’r 24  By bill of exchange of Jos.Mechlin,agn’t

750 00

      25  By         do.        do.    do.

764 26

      29  By         do.        do.    do.

71 05

Nov’r  3  By         do.        do.    do.

662 52

      21  By balance to the credit of the fund this day

9,826 86

Amount

$20,129 99

Nov. 21. To balance due the fund per the other side

9,826 86

-273-

R. No. 2.

SCHEDULE of the United States property attached to the agency for liberated Africans, and not of a convertible nature.

No. 1. Agency house.—This is a frame building, two stories high, surrounded with a double piazza; it is 64 feet long, 40 feet wide, height of stories 11 and 9 feet; the materials for its construction were brought from the United States in 1823; it was valued by Mr. Ashmun at -                                            $7500.00

No. 2. Storehouse, a small building attached to the agency house; it is two stories high, the lower of mason work; it was formerly valued at $500.00, but, from its ruinous condition, its value at present may be estimated at -

 

 

200 00

No. 3. Servants' house, &c.—Erected adjacent to the agency house; it is constructed of African materials, one story and a half high, well finished, and may be valued at -

 

  800

No. 4. Warehouse, is a two story frame building, erected in 1826, and valued by Mr. Ashmun at -

1,800

No. 5. Magazine. A stone building, rough-cast on the outside; it is vaulted, and covered with a shingle roof, and lined inside with timber; valued at -

 

200 00

No. 6. Fortification on Crown hill, for the protection of the eastern side of the town; foundation merely laid; its form is hexagonal, and intended to mount four guns; foundation, together with the materials collected, estimated by Mr. Ashmun at -

 

 

175 00

No. 7. Central fort, formerly Fort Stockton, is of a triangular form, with three pentagonal towers, and can mount from 6 to 9 guns; it has been nearly completed by the Colonization Society. Mr. Ashmun estimated the work done by the United States at -

 

 

950 00

No. 8. Fort Norris battery, erected near the summit of Cape Mesurado, and intended for the protection of the harbor; it is constructed of heavy mason work, and mounts four long twelve-pounders; was built in 1827. Mr. Ashmun valued it, exclusive of the armament, at -

 

 

800 00

No. 9. Buildings for the reception of liberated Africans, consisting of, 1st, a central building, part of which is two stories high; the whole is 60 feet long, and consists of 8 apartments; 2d, two ranges of buildings, one story high, each 72 feet long, and 42 feet wide. These were built in 1821, and valued at -

 

 

  2,800

These buildings were located on the Stockton river, about four or five miles from the Cape; the situation was low, and overflowed every rainy season; owing to this they were rapidly decaying, and were also, from their remote situation, subject to the depredations ofthe natives. To prevent their total destruction, they have been removed to the Cape, where one of them has been put up, and the materials of the others are under shelter.

 

35

-274-

No. 10. Two houses at Thompsontown, each 36 feet long, and one and a half stories high, built in 1825 of African materials, and valued by Mr. Ashmun at -

 

750 00

No. 11. One schooner, coppered to the bends, and completely rigged, finished in 1829, and may be valued at -

 

 2,000

There was another schooner, but she was wrecked in May, 1829, and so much injured as to be unworthy of repair.

 

No. 12. One four-oared boat, with sails, awning, &c., complete, -

60 00

No. 13. Nine pieces of ordnance, viz. 3 long twelves, 4 long sixes, and 2 nine-pounder carronades. Mr. Ashmun reported 21 pieces, but, on examination, the late agent, Dr. Randall, ascertained that several pieces were included in that report, that did not properly belong to the United States, but were presented to the colony by different individuals, or were obtained by the colonists from wrecks. The carriages of all these are unfit for service; but, according to Mr. Ashmun's valuation, may be estimated at -

 

 

 

 

 

  860

 

$18,895 00

______________

Inventory of articles belonging to the United States agency for recaptured Africans, now in the public store at Cape Mesurado.

1 Quadrant, 2 Speaking trumpets, 14 Minute glasses, 1 Tenon saw, 1 Broad axe, 1 Shark hook, 2 Harpoons, 2 Caulking mallets, 3 Pod augers, 1 Cooper's adze, 6 Assorted screw augers, 12 Assorted gimlets, 13 Stock locks, 25 Plane irons, double and single, 13 Brace bits, 1 Large cold chisel, 12 ½ Pairs round and hollow planes, 1 Hand bellows, 1 Tea kettle, 1 Pair tinner's shears, 

1 Quires of log paper, 1  Two-handed hammer, 6 Whitewash brushes, 2 Caulking irons, 1 Large salt pan, 1 Chain cable, 4    Deck lights, 1 Draw knife, 2 Narrow axes, 3 Log reels, 30 Damaged muskets and 7 Damaged pistols (in the hands of the colonists), 15 Muskets and two rifles and ten pistols (all in good order), 20 Round shot for eighteen-pounders, 100 Round shot for 12-pounders, 112 Round shot for 9-pounders, 80 Round shot for 6-pounders, 9 Double-headed shot, 5 Stands canister shot for eighteen-pounders, 35 Stands canister shot for 12-pounders, 12 Stands canister shot for nine-pounders, 124 Grape shot.

[END]

Published:Wed May 18 12:25:59 EDT 2016