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Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy - 1821

--712--

16th Congress.]

No. 196.

[2d Session.

CONDITION OF THE NAVY AND ITS EXPENSES.

COMMUNICATED TO THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, JANUARY 25, 1821.

Navy Department, January 25, 1821.

Sir:

I have the honor to report upon the subjects contained in your letter of the 8th instant, for the information of the Committee of Ways and Means, the accompanying documents, being a letter from the Commissioners of the Navy, and statements numbered 1 to 4, inclusively, which contain, with my letter of the 11th December last, to the honorable Philip P. Barbour, to which reference is made, the whole information required. I have the honor to be, with the highest respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

SMITH THOMPSON.

The Honorable Samuel Smith,

Chairman Committee Ways and Means, House of Representatives.

--713--

 

Navy Commissioners' /Office, January 20, 1821.

Sir: 

The Commissioners of the Navy have had the honor of receiving the letter of the honorable Mr. Smith, Chairman of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the 8th instant, addressed to you, and which you were pleased to refer to them; and they now proceed to submit their report upon the various points on which information has been required.

They beg leave, to premise, that their information, with respect to the employment of our public ships and vessels is derived from your communication of the 11th ultimo, to the honorable Mr. Barbour, Chairman of the Naval Committee, of the House of Representatives.

The 1st inquiry is, "What is the present force in the Mediterranean, and its annual expenditures?"

The present force in the Mediterranean appears to be the Columbus, the Peacock, and the Spark, and the annual expenditure may be estimated at $285,000.

Query 2d. "What would be the annual expenditure of one 44, one 36, and a sloop of war?"

The annual expenditure of one 44, one 36, and a sloop of war, may be estimated at $256,000.

Query 3d. "What is the annual expenditure of the force employed on the African coast? What is the force, and what would be the annual expense of three of the new schooners?"

The present force cruising on the coast of Africa appears to be, the Cyane, the John Adams, and the Hornet, and the annual expenditure may be estimated at $165,700.

The annual expenditure of three of the new schooners would be about $70,500.

Query 4. "What is the annual expense of the ship employed in the Indian seas?"

The annual expense of the Congress, now employed in the Indian seas, may be estimated at $110,000.

Query 5. "What is the annual expense of the ships employed in the Pacific, allowing for both being under expense when relieving?"

To gain two years service of a ship in the Pacific ocean, and the constant presence of a ship in that ocean, we should estimate the expense to be equal to two years and nine months service of the ship, in order to allow for the expense of relieving, at the expiration of the term of service of the crew. Two years and nine months expense of such a ship as the Constellation, on so distant a station, may be estimated at $300,000.—Hence "the annual expense of the ships employed in the Pacific, allowing for both being under expense when relieving," may be estimated at $150,000.

Query 6. "What is the annual expense of the vessels employed in the West Indies and on our coast, to protect against piracies? and what will it be if all the small vessels, except three for Africa, be employed?"

It appears that the Enterprise, the Nonesuch, the Lynx, and gunboats Nos. 158 and 168, are "now employed in the West Indies and on our coast, to protect against piracies, &c." the annual expense of which maybe estimated at $105,000.

As to what the expense would be "if all the small vessels, except three for Africa, be employed," the Commissioners find no little difficulty in forming an estimate, not distinctly understanding the scope of the inquiry— whether it contemplated no exception but the “three for Africa," particularly mentioned. Whether the object was to withdraw from the coast of Africa the vessels now on that station, and include them in the estimate of the expense of the vessels employed, or whether leaving all the smaller vessels now in service, on the service now respectively assigned to them, the object was to add to the vessels now in the West Indies and on our coast, all the smaller vessels belonging to the navy, and not now in actual service, the Commissioners are not able to infer from the terms used in propounding the query. If, however, they can be informed precisely of the object of the inquiry, and the vessels intended to be included in the estimate, they will, with great pleasure, afford every information in their power.

The Commissioners, in reply to the 7th query, beg leave to submit the papers herewith marked No. 1, 2, 3, and 4.

No. 1 exhibits a view of the naval stations in the United States, the navy officers, seamen, and ordinary seamen, attached to each station, and an estimate of the annual expense of each station, exclusively of the mechanics and laborers.

No. 2 shows the number of mechanics and laborers employed at the different navy yards and stations and the total amount of the expenditures, on account of mechanics and laborers, for one month, distinguishing the amount expended for the gradual increase of the navy, and for other objects, such as repairs of vessels building schooners, &c.

The paper No. 3, shows the vessels at the different stations in the United States.

No. 4, gives a general view of the property belonging to the navy, at the several and respective stations. This paper would have been prepared more in detail, but the Commissioners presumed that it was not required by the honorable chairman, and it probably could not have been prepared in less than three or four weeks, so as to give a view of each and every article at each and every station.

Of these stations, Norfolk, Washington, Philadelphia, New York, Boston and Portsmouth, are building yards. New Orleans, and Charleston, S. C. are stations for the rendezvous of our small vessels cruising in those waters. At Sackett's Harbor and at Erie, we have, it will be seen, a considerable amount of public property, which could not be removed to any of the Atlantic stations, without incurring very great expense, and probably injury. The public property at White Hall might be removed to New York, and that station might be dispensed with. The Newport station might also be dispensed with. Baltimore should, in our opinion, be retained as a recruiting station, as that city furnishes its full proportion of the best seamen in our country.

The 8th query of the honorable chairman calls for the following information, viz: "Are any of the vessels of war so far decayed that they are unworthy of repairs? If so, name them." And in reply, the Commissioners beg leave to observe, that, in their opinion, the following vessels are unworthy of repair, viz:

The Confiance, The Madison,
Detroit, Niagara,
Eagle, Oneida,
General Pike, Queen Charlotte,
Ghent, Ranger,
Jefferson, Raven,
Jones, Superior,
Lawrence, Saratoga,
Linnet, Sylph,
Mohawk, Ticonderoga,

And 15 barges and 6 galleys, all on the lakes: that the schooners Fox and Spitfire, gunboats No. 72, 76, 95, and three barges, on Atlantic stations, are also considered as undeserving of repair; and the frigate, the Java, at Boston, is probably unworthy of repair.

The vessels in ordinary, at stations oh the Atlantic board, and incurring expense for their preservation, are,

SHIPS OF THE LINE

The Washington, The North Carolina,
Franklin, Independence,
Ohio, Delaware.

FRIGATES.

The United States, The Java,
Guerriere, Fulton Steam Battery.

--714--

Exclusively of supernumerary officers, the number estimated to be attached to each ship of the line is,

1 master, 1 sailmaker,
1 boatswain, 10 able seamen,
1 gunner, 4 ordinary seamen,
1 carpenter, 6 boys.
Estimated annual expense, $6,432 50.
To each 44 gun frigate:  
1 master, 1 sailmaker,
1 boatswain, 6 able seamen,
1 gunner, 4 ordinary seamen,
1 carpenter, 3 boys.
Estimated annual expense, $5,002 75.
To the steam battery:  
Same officers as to frigate, 4 ordinary seamen,
5 able seamen, 2 boys.
Estimated annual expense, $4,604 25.

All the vessels on Lakes Erie, Ontario, and Champlain, with the exception of two of the smallest class, which are employed in the revenue service, are in a state of ordinary. The expense of preserving them is shown by the paper No. 1, which exhibits the expense annually of the respective stations.

The Alert, the Asp, the Vesuvius, and the Louisiana, are employed as receiving ships.

With respect to that part of the ninth query, which calls for "a detailed view of the ships in actual service," the Commissioners have not presumed to answer it, from a conviction that you possess more precise information upon the subject than they can afford.

The tenth query is in the following words, viz: "The retained ration is now fixed at twenty-five cents each; is there any act for that sum, or is it a regulation? Would the present appropriation of money, and consequent cost of the items of the ration, justify a reduction?"

The law declares what the component parts of the navy ration shall be; but it is understood that the price of the ration is a regulation of the Department. The navy ration can probably be procured for less than twenty-five cents. By the contracts lately made, the first cost will not exceed sixteen cents. At this time provisions are known to be unusually low, and owing to this circumstance, and the competition produced among the bidders for public contracts, by advertising for all articles required, the ration is procured at a price less considerably than at any period since the establishment of our navy. It should, however, be observed, that the component parts of the ration are all of a perishable nature; and that on board of our ships they are unavoidably exposed to the vicissitudes of every climate; hence, with every care that can be taken of them, they are, in a greater or less degree, liable to damage before they can be used. These considerations render it expedient to prepare the estimates, as to the cost of the ration, so as to make a liberal allowance for the damages to which they are liable. Although, therefore, the first cost of the ration will not exceed sixteen cents, the ultimate cost is estimated at twenty-five cents.

The estimates for 1821 contemplate a provision of one million five hundred and twenty-six thousand four hundred and thirty rations, deliverable in kind, for actual consumption; and three hundred and seventy-six thousand four hundred and ninety-seven rations which are not drawn. The former is one ration per day, for every person in the service. The latter are rations which the officers are entitled to, but which, not being provided for them, are not drawn in kind, but paid for in money.

With respect to the rations which are drawn in kind, it may be observed, that, if they should not, including all the losses which may be sustained, cost the price named in the estimate, no more than their actual cost will be drawn from the treasury, the balance will remain unapplied, and subject to such disposition as the Legislature may please to decide.

With respect to the rations which are not drawn in kind, the price has at various times been regulated by the Department. Prior to the year 1801, the price was twenty-eight cents, in 1801, it was fixed at twenty cents, in 1814, thirteen years' experience having satisfied the Government that twenty cents was less than a fair average price, it was raised to twenty-five cents, and has never since been changed. This price may be more than the present cost of the ration, but next year it may be less. At the time the officers were receiving twenty-eight cents the ration, that price was known to be less, frequently, than the actual cost. The officers might, at that period, have drawn their rations and sold them to a profit; and after the price was reduced to twenty cents, although an apparent change in the market seemed to favor the reduction, yet it was fully ascertained that the price of the ration, on an average, was considerably higher; and upon this ground it was fixed at twenty-five cents as a fair average price. The officers now consider, and indeed have always considered, their undrawn rations as a part of their pay, and have made their calculations accordingly.

That there should be a fixed price for undrawn rations is essential, not only as respects the officers, but equally, if not more, essential, as respects the public accounts. Was the price to be regulated by the fluctuation of the markets, the officers would be kept in a state of constant uncertainty as to the regulation of their expenses, and great embarrassments would arise in the settlement of their accounts at the treasury. Hence it has been found expedient to give to these rations a fixed value; and the Commissioners presume that twenty-five cents is not more than a fair average price for them.

The officers, in furnishing their own tables, are unavoidably subject to pay the market prices demanded for the articles they require. These markets may be as various as the ports they may proceed to in the various parts of the world. It is also the custom to provide fresh meat for the crew whenever a vessel goes into port; and, on such occasions, we are subject to pay the market price demanded for such fresh provisions. This custom could not be dispensed with, the health of the crews requires its observance. These are contingencies which should always be considered, in estimating the cost of the navy ration.

The principle of permitting officers to commute their rations into money is universally practised in every service with which the Commissioners are acquainted; it enables the officers, from time to time, to provide their own stores. If this custom were prohibited, and the whole number of rations, to which the officers are by law entitled, were to be provided and delivered in kind to them, the capacity of the ships to receive provisions and stores, for the crew generally, would be proportionately diminished. Under the present regulation the stores of the officers occupy but an inconsiderable space, change it and you necessarily have to lessen the quantity which would otherwise be provided for the crew. By a change, these inconveniences would arise, without being attended with any conceivable benefit.

"Are not the improvements of navy yards complete? Can any thing be spared from that item?"

The improvements of navy yards are not complete. It would require a much larger sum than is estimated for this year to make them as complete as is desired, with regard to both economy and convenience. The present appropriation is not more than sufficient to keep the yards with their buildings, enclosures, building ships, launching ways, building stages, machinery, boats, lighters, mooring chains, mooring anchors, &c. in repair; and to pay officers whose services are indispensable for the preservation of the public stores.

In answer to the inquiry relative to the amount estimated for repairs; and "whether any thing can be spared from that item," the Commissioners beg leave to observe that the estimate for repairs embraces not only the repairs required to the hulls of our ships, but every object of equipment, cordage, sails, anchors, ship chandlery, &c. and it also embraces the wear and tear of the ships in-service. Hence it will be acknowledged that there are insuperable difficulties to forming any precise estimate, with respect to the cost of repairs, the amount depending measureably upon wind and weather. If, however, it should be determined to break-up the Java, and not to rebuild her, the Commissioners think it highly probable, judging from past experience, that the estimate for repairs might he reduced one hundred thousand dollars, without injury to the public service.

I have the honor to be, with great respect, sir, your most obedient servant,

JOHN RODGERS.

Honorable Smith Thompson, Secretary of the Navy.

--715--

No. 1.

Exhibit showing the Naval Stations in the United States, the officers and men attached to each, and annual expense of each, exclusively of Mechanics and Laborers.

OFFICER AND MEN ATTACHED TO THE RESPECTIVE STATIONS
Stations. Cap
tains.
Masters
Comm
andant.
Lieut
enants.
Surg
eons.
Surg
eons'
Mates.
Pursers. Sailing-
masters.
Capt
ains'
Clerks.
Boats
wains.
Gun
ners.
Carp
enters.
Stew
ards.
Arm
orers.
Able
Seamen.
Ord
inary Seamen.
Ann
ual
expense.
Norfolk, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 15 $14,013 50
Wash
ington,
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 15 14,013 50
Phila
delphia,
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 - 10,844 75
New York, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1. 1 1 1 1 1 6 15 14,013 50
Boston, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 20 16,010 75
Ports mouth, 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 15 14,013 50
Whitehall, 1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 9,313 25
Sackett's
harbor,
1 - 2 1 1 1 4 1 1 1 1 1 1 10 10 15,343 25
Erie, - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 - 5 7,829 50
Charles
ton, S. C.
1 - 1 1 1 1 1 1 - - - 1 - 6 - 8,093 75
Baltimore, 1 - 1 - - I 1 - - - - - - 2 2 5,551 75
Newport, 1 - 1 - - 1 1 - - - - - - - - 4,658 75
New Orleans, - 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 12,112 25

No. 2.

Exhibit of the number of Mechanics and Laborers employed at the different Navy Yards and Stations in the United States, during the month of October, 1820.

 

  Washington Gosport. Philadelphia New York Boston. Portsmouth. Erie, Penn. Whitehall New Orleans. Aggregate
Carpenters, 51 55 58 75 104 36 1 - 5 385
Carpenter's laborers, 29 24 - - - 2 1 - - 56
C. cable and camboose smith, 34 - - - - - - - - 34
Blacksmiths, 36 33 32 31 27 13 - - - 172
Anchor smiths, 20 - - - - - - - - 20
Mast makers, 6 14 9 - - - - - - 29
Gun carriage makers, 12 6 - - - - - - - 18
Sawyers, 6 8 4 9 13 8 - - - 48
Caulkers, 11 58 - 37 17 8 - - - 131
Plumbers, 29 3 - 2 - - - - - 34
Joiners, 22 19 15 39 14 8 - - 1 118
Boat builders, 9 9 - 3 - - - - - 21
Block makers, 21 8 - 7 - - - - - 36
Coopers, 3 9 - 2 - - - - - 14
Painters, 6 8 6 3 4 - - - - 27
Mould loft, 2 - - - - - - - - 2
Mechanists, - 6 - - - - - - - - 6
Ordnance crew, 5 - - - - - - - - 5
Gunners, 7 3 - - - - - - - 10
Sailmakers, 4 - - 10 3 - - - - 17
Riggers, 7 7 - 18 - - - - - 32
Steam engines, 4 - - - - - - - - 4
Saw mill, 8 - - - - - - - - 8
Laborers, 39 85 36 69 47 8 1 3 - 288
Assistants in navy store, 3 - - - - - - - - 3
Armorers, - 3 - 4 2 - 1 - 1 11
Receivers, - 15 - - - - - - - 15
Carvers, - 4 - - - - - - - 4
Tinners, - 1 - - - - - - - 1
Watchmen, - 7 - - - - - - - 7
Wheelwrights, - 1 - - - - - - - 1
Assistant inspectors, - 3 - - - - - - - 3
House Carpenters, - - 6 - - - - - - 6
Dock builders, - - - 8 - - - - - 8
Clerks, - - - 2 - - - - - 2
Porters, - - - 1 - - - - 1 2
Masons, - - - - - 2 - - - 2
  380 383 166 320 231 85 4 3 8 1,580

--716--

No. 3.

Exhibit showing the vessels at the respective stations in the United States.

At Portsmouth, N. H.

At Charleston, S. C.

One ship of the line, building.

Gun-vessels Nos. 10, 158, 168.

Porpoise, schooner, building.

 
 

At New Orleans.

At Boston.

Tchifonte, block ship.

Independence, ship of the line.

Lynx, schooner.

Java, frigate.

Nonesuch, schooner.

Ship of the line, building.

Louisiana, receiving ship.

Constitution, frigate.

Sheer-hulk.

Alligator, schooner.

Bull-dog, felucca.

Gunboat 95.

Thorn, prize tender.

 

One launch.

 

At Whitehall, L. C.

At New York.

Confiance, ship.

Washington, ship of the line.

Saratoga, do.

Franklin, do.

Eagle, brig.

Ohio, do.

Linnet, do.

Ontario, sloop.

Ticonderoga, schooner.

Erie, do.

Burrows, galley.

Ship, building, (frigate.)

Boxer, do.

Fulton, steam ship.

Centipede, do.

Ketch Vesuvius.

Allen, do.

Gunboat.

Viper, do.

 

Nettle, do.

   

At Philadelphia.

At Sackett's Harbor.

North Carolina, ship of the line.

Orleans.

Frigate, building.

Chippewa.

New schooner, building.

Superior.

 

Mohawk.

At Baltimore.

Pike.

Asp, schooner, receiving vessel.

Madison.

 

Jefferson, brig.

 

Jones, do.

At Washington.

Sylph, do.

Frigate, building.

Oneida, do.

Two new schooners, building.

Lady of the Lake.

Gunboat 67.

Fourteen gunboats.

   
 

At Erie, Penn.

At Norfolk.

Niagara.

United States, frigate.

Lawrence.

Delaware ship of the line.

Queen Charlotte.

Alert, receiving ship.

Detroit.

 

Porcupine.

Gunboats 72 and 76.

Ghent.

No. 4.

General abstract of naval stores in the building yards and naval stations in the United States, under the charge of naval storekeepers.

AT GOSPORT, VA.

10 anchors.

Powder.

Copper.

314 bbls. proof cannon powder.

148,252 lbs.

141 bbls. under proof.

2,960 lbs. of copper sheathing nails.

18 bbls. damaged.

1,048 1/2 lbs. of copper rods, for bolts.

21 bbls. priming proof.

657 lbs. of copper spikes.

11 bbls. under do.

746 lbs. of copper sheathing.

6 bbls. powder dust.

   

Cordage.

 

Cables, 2 1/2.

Powder materials, and Iron.

1,886 lbs. shroud laid cordage.

490,864 lbs. of iron.

11,817 lbs. running rigging.

1,469 lbs. of sulphur.

519 lbs. ratline.

 

433 lbs. white rope.

 

1,510 lbs. cable laid cordage.

Provisions.

Ordnance.

1,686 lbs. of bread.

138 iron cannon.

481 1/2 bbls. of beef.

39 carronades.

39 1/2 gallons of molasses.

2 mortars.

400 barrels of pork.

2 howitzers.

205 gallons of rum.

2 eprouvettes.

42 pounds of rice.

9,450 round shot.

142 1/2 pounds 0f tea.

1,100 double round shot.

13 3/4 gallons of vinegar.

238 stands of canister shot.

364 1/4 gallons of whiskey.

4,212 stands of grape shot.

401 3/4 lbs. tallow candles.

8 9/10 tons of double shot.

134 lbs. tobacco.

1 shot former.

 

5,642 leaden balls.

 

--717--

AT GOSPORT, VA.

Slop clothing.

434 cutlasses.
8 blankets. 220 boarding axes.
175 pairs of socks. 285 pikes.
256 shirts. 1,500 flints.
998 yards of Russia sheeting.  
2 pairs of duck trowsers.

Sundries.

  And a variety of other articles,
such as augers, pump-tacks, whipping twine,
pitch, tin, tacks, turpentine, tar, varnish, tea canisters,
buck shot, copper measures, cylinders,
cartridge-boxes, rocket-staffs, fire buckets, &c.

Small arms.

39 pistols.
322 muskets.
349 bayonets.

 

AT BOSTON.

42 anchors.

Small arms.

Canvass and duck.

24 boarding axes, and one rifle.
642 1/2 bolts.  

Cordage.

Provisions.

2,309 lbs. shroud laid cordage. 492 barrels of beef and 339 barrels of pork.
6,344 lbs. running rigging.  
3,541 lbs. worm lines.  
100 lbs. white rope.

Timber.

632 lbs. spun yarn.  
728 lbs. bolt rope.

White Oak.

2,268 lbs. patent running rigging. 29,454 superficial feet plank.
3,276 lbs. oakum. 19,936 cubic feet of promiscuous white oak.
  24,481 do. gun carriage stuff.

Copper.

1,692 knees.
13,597 sheets of copper. Live Oak.
42,980 lbs. of rods, for spikes. 50,372 cubic feet.
176,479 lbs. of rods, for bolts. 10,183 do. promiscuous.
1,753 lbs. of composition sheaves. 83 knees.
1,754 lbs. of composition cogs.  
 

Yellow Pine.

Ordnance.

66,331 cubic feet.
126 iron cannon. 10,367 superficial feet plank.
42 carronades. 102 masts and spars.
2 howitzers. 10,240 cubic feet of do.
15 gunades. 54 carriages for cannon No.
2,986 round shot 117 brackets and trucks for carronades.
1,250 double-headed shot. 1,761 blocks, various sizes.
1,236 stands of canister shot.  
32 tons and 10 cwt. of canister shot.

White Pine.

127.47 stools, for grape shot. 4,485 cubic feet.
273 stands of grape shot. 6,788 superficial feet of plank.
125 tons and 9 cwt. of loose grape shot.  
861 tons of shells.

Elm.

Lead.

221 cubic feet
1,400 lbs. of old lead.  
 

Hacmetac.

Iron.

213 knees.
Tons. cwt. qrs. lbs.  
328 11 1 14 kentledge.

Locust.

5 11 2 7 iron knees. 94 cubic feet promiscuous.
123 13 2 8 iron, assorted. 10,314 treenails.
175 3/4 lbs. of brads.  
522 lbs. of iron spikes.  
649 lbs. nails.

Sundries.

289 screws, in number. 114 cartouch boxes.
  52 passing boxes.

Powder.

112 powder horns.
  81,493 musket and pistol flints.
269 barrels of cannon powder. 2,243 flannel cylinders.
5 barrels priming powder. 8 pouch barrels.
  35 locks.

Powder materials.

8 but-hinges.
  41 escutcheons.
38,418 lbs. of crude nitre. 1 camboose.
3,307 lbs. of sulphur. 4 stoves.
  1 furnace.

Slop clothing.

176 ensigns and signals.
9 mattresses. 129 lanterns.
56 jackets. 561 water casks.
25 pairs of cloth trowsers. 2,173 pounds musket balls.
9 linen frocks. 2 barrels of white varnish.
25 duck trowsers. 1 do. black do.
19 duck frocks. 9 1/2 do. turpentine.
16 flannel shirts. 8 do. pitch.
3 woollen vests. 19 hammocks, &c.
152 hats. 400 patent augers.

--718--

AT PORTSMOUTH, N. H.

14 anchors.

Small Arms.

  180 muskets.

Canvass and Duck.

142 pistols.
14 1/2 yards. 96 cutlasses.
  70 boarding spikes.

Copper.

Timber.

257 3/4 pounds of rivet rings.

Live Oak.

185 pounds of cut copper nails. 43,847 1/2 cubic feet, cut to moulds.
3,791 1/2 pounds sheathing nails. 10,199 do. promiscuous refuse.
4,529 3/4 pounds rods, for bolts. 69 knees.
161 pounds spikes. 10 keel pieces.
488 pounds sheathing copper. 16 keelsons.
108,471 3/4 pounds of copper.  
7,601 sheets of sheathing copper.

White Oak.

452 pounds of copper rudder chains. 19,345 6/12 cubic feet of promiscuous.
  98,572 do. plank.

Cordage.

946 knees.
640 pounds of bolt rope. 20,125 cubic feet of refuse plank.
273 fathoms of cables. 1,407 9/12 do. refuse gun carriage stuff.
  6,314 superficial feet do. do.

Ordnance.

2,185 4/12 cubic feet dimension timber.
38 iron cannon.  
10 carronades.

Yellow Pine.

262 eighteen pound grape stools. 25,418 4/12 cubic feet promiscuous.
119 grape stool bottoms. 2,861 do. wharf timber.
5,845 round shot. 25,589 2/12 plank, stocks, and ledges.
28 double shot. 89 beams, 6,701 6/12 cubic feet.
419 stands of canister shot. 1,981 8/12 cubic feet of refuse.
706 do. grape shot. 464 do. Norway pine timber.
31 quires cartridge paper. White Pine.
  8,385 treenails.

Powder.

329 hacmetac knees.
374 barrels cannon powder. 82 ash sweeps.
16 barrels priming. 20 masts and spars.
56 pounds powder. 181 spruce spars.
40 pounds priming. 17,000 locust treenails.
63 pounds damaged.

Sundries.

Powder materials. 60 battle lanterns.
  69 worms and ladles.
None. 191 sponges and rammers.

Lead.

300 glass lights.
3 cwt. 24 lbs. 431 yards bunting.
23,804 lead balls. 31 augers.
  35 hinges.

Iron.

382 hooks and thimbles.
Tons. cwt. qrs. lbs. 63 locks.
103 1 2 22 4 tons, 9 cwt. 3 qrs. 25 lbs. assorted nails.
18 6 3 20 pig iron. 2,466 pounds of oakum.
1 17 0 3 old iron. 23,733 pump tacks.
886 3/4 pounds of iron spikes. 724 iron screws.
  167 pounds black lead.

Provisions.

41 gallons of varnish, and a variety
of other articles, such as sheep skins,
match rope, shackles, powder measures,
glue, &c. &c. &c.
2 barrels of pork.
 

 

AT PHILADELPHIA.

28 anchors. 1 eprouvette bed and ball.
  3,548 round shot.

Canvass and Duck.

304 shells.
210 bolts and 135 yards. 122 canister shot.
  11 tons, 13 cwt. 1 qr. 19 lbs. loose grape shot.

Copper.

255 pounds do. do.
2,942 sheets of sheathing copper.  
9,154 pounds of sheathing do.

Powder and materials.

66 do. composition bolts,  
21,720 1/2 do. sheathing nails. 179 1/2 barrels of cannon powder.
172 do. copper wrought nails. 124 barrels damaged powder.
312 do. copper rings. 558 musket cartridges.
10 do. copper burrs. 175,993 pounds of refined nitre.
1,430,172 do. copper rods, for bolts. 19,537 do. do. sulphur.
32,172 do. copper spikes.  
 

Lead.

Cordage.

98 pounds.
1 cable.

Iron.

  Tons. cwt. qrs. lbs.

Ordnance.

226 0 3 17 of iron, assorted.
364 iron cannon. 23 9 1 7 chain cable iron.
344 carronades. 21,009 pounds of leager iron.

--719--

AT PHILADELPHIA.

Small Arms.

White Pine.

744 muskets. 27 round logs.
198 pistols. 36,929 feet plank.
1,485 cutlasses. 41,498 locust treenails.
188 boarding axes. 2,671 headings.
195 boarding pikes. 70 casks.
4 blunderbusses.  
74 repeating swivels.  
 

Slop Clothing.

Timber.

269 uniform coats.
3,537 pieces of live oak timber. 667 overalls.
181 live oak knees. 681 trowsers.
415 pieces live oak fillings. 700 jackets.
3,942 feet square timber, white oak. 220 gaiters.
20,512 feet of white oak scantling. 1,448 linen shirts.
1 white oak cheek. 25 watch coats.
10 white oak keel and keelson pieces. 414 pairs of shoes.
386 white oak knees. 458 pairs of socks.
1,790 feet white oak, for mast work. 61 sergeants' coats.
5,965 feet white oak gun carriage stuff. 152 blankets.
3,045 feet white oak timber. 54 duck frocks.
3,942 feet white oak square timber. 6 pairs of stockings.
5 pieces white oak square timber. 40 hats.
731 feet white oak round logs. 5 pairs drawers.
58,198 feet plank and thick stuff. 475 flannel shirts.
  80 cotton shirts.
  8 Osnaburg shirts.

Yellow Pine.

46 vests.
89 beams. 385 Guernsey frocks.
303 knees. 12 Nankeen jackets.
4,500 feet square logs. 6 pairs boots.
47,076 feet square logs. 2 suits of clothes, for patterns.
53 round logs.

Sundries.

432,515 feet plank. 63 patent lights.
2,121 feet timber. 38 do. do.
31 pieces square yellow pine timber. 2,294 flannel cylinders.
  195 cartridge boxes, &c. &c. &c.

 

AT NEW YORK.

21 anchors.

Iron.

Canvass and Bucks.

374 tons, 16 cwt 1 qr. 28lbs. of assorted iron.
3,906 bolts.  
2,041 1/4 yards of hammock stuff.

Timber.

Copper.

53,326 feet of live oak.
8,033 pounds of sheathing nails. 3,413 inches of ash.
184,407 pounds copper for various purposes. 38 superficial feet of ash plank.
  7,537 superficial feet of pine timber.

Cordage.

105 oak knees.
  14,134 cubic feet of white oak timber.
6,272 pounds shroud laid. 3,652 feet of mahogany.
126,756 pounds running rigging. 13,170 feet of gun carriage stuff.
  4,316 1/2 inches of masts and spars.

Ordnance.

195 feet of locust timber.
302 iron cannon. 13,712 locust treenails.
2 mortars. 145,067 feet of oak plank.
13 grenades. 65,265 superficial feet of pine boards.
34 tons, 4 cwt 1 qr. 3lbs. round shot, 24,282 superficial feet of pine plank.
15,275 pounds round shot. 49 superficial feet of cedar boards.
2,170 doubleheaded shot  
22,953 canister shot.

Provisions.

1,046 canister shot.  
30 tons, 7 cwt. 2qrs. of canister shot. 85 3/4 barrels of beef.
13 tons, 16 cwt. 3qrs. 5lbs. stools. 588 pounds of flour.
2,273 stands of grape shot. 16,720 pounds of bread.
9 tons, 3 cwt. 2qrs. 6lbs. loose grape shot. 390 pounds of cheese.
7,192 pounds loose grape shot. 15 pounds of butter.
  186 gallons of rice.

Powder and materials.

40 pounds of raisins.
  111 gallons of vinegar.
523 barrels of cannon powder. 35 gallons of molasses.
9 barrels of priming powder. 10 1/2 bushels of peas.
41 half barrels of priming powder. 20 1/2 barrels of pork.
369 quarter casks. 161 gallons of beans.
539 cylinders full of powder. 17 pounds of soap.
61,095 pounds of sulphur. 40 pounds of suet.
  316 pounds of sugar.

Lead.

39 pounds of tea.
  35 pounds of tobacco.
47 tons, 15 cwt. 8lbs. of pig.  

--720--

NEW YORK.
Small Arms. 1,244 gunboat pintles.
155 battle axes. 108 caps.
28 blunderbusses. 172 elevating screws, and a great variety of similar articles.
1,635 cutlasses.  
880 muskets.

Slops.

744 pistols. 219 black handkerchiefs.

Sundries.

109 blankets.
8 tons, 3 cwt. 3qrs. 26lbs. of scupper and lead pipes. 117 blue cloth trowsers.
10 cwt. of oakum. 34 blue cloth jackets.
34 brushes, assorted. 148 pairs of shoes.
29 belaying pins. 121 pea jackets.
9 boom irons. 134 wool hats.
2 braces and bitts. 24 mattresses.
1,272 musket balls. 288 flannel shirts.
76 bags. 180 flannel drawers.
2,277 hooks and thimbles. 127 pairs of stockings.
406 trucks, 12 duck frocks.
8,122 bolts assorted. 47 bannians.
  87 red vests.
  4 pairs of worsted stockings.

 

AT WASHINGTON.

27 anchors. 364 white oak knees.

Canvass and Duck.

913 hacmetac knees.
166 bolts. 29,650 locust treenails.

Copper.

117,750 feet white pine boards.
22,367 sheets of sheathing copper. 6,674 feet of cypress plank.
2,605 pounds of sheathing copper. 145,496 feet of yellow pine plank.
550 pounds of pig. 615,135 feet of white oak plank.
81,202 pounds of copper bolts. 9,544 feet of white curled maple boards.
2,444 pounds of old rudder braces. 427 feet of spruce spars.
190 pounds of rings. 268 poles of spruce spars.
14,391 pounds of spikes. 15,923 pine sheathing boards.
8,491 pounds of sheathing nails. 1,008 oak rafters.
  1,763 oak boat boards.

Cordage.

153 feet of oak.
1 cable. 300 feet of pine boat boards.
1 hawser. 5,372 feet of yellow pine plank.
36 pounds of ratline. 630 feet of ash plank.
412 pounds of shroud laid cordage. 25 feet of walnut plank.
36 pounds of white line. 140 feet of deal.
69 pounds of worm lines. 3,756 staves.
206 pounds of white rope and lines. 2,071 headings.
6 pounds of house line.

Sundries.

7 pounds of twine. 1,256 yards of bunting.
  2 joiner's braces.

Ordnance.

128 1/4 gallons of linseed oil.
127 iron cannon. 2,415 pounds of Spanish whiting.
33 carronades. 7 gallons of spirits of turpentine.
7 brass carronades. 65 gallons of black varnish.
2 gunades. 42 barrels of pitch.
18,410 round shot. 153 barrels of tar.
9,589 doubleheaded shot. 28 barrels of turpentine.
2,775 grape shot. 7 tons 13 cwt. of oakum.
584 stools. 2 grindstones.
  6,201 pounds of block tin.

Lead.

1,752 pounds of zinc.
14 tons, 18 cwt. 3 qrs. 19 lbs. of lead. 24 escutcheons.
  15 brass headed screws.
Iron. 250 files, assorted.
25 tons, 13 cwt 26 lbs. of kentledge. 150 feet of glass lights.
238 tons, 9 cwt. 2 qrs. 26 lbs. iron, assorted. 19,158 pounds of junk.
12 cwt. 2 qrs. 5 lbs. of nails. 268 gallons of oil.
24,000 pump tacks. 70 kegs of white lead in oil.
  29 kegs of yellow ochre.

Timber.

2 kegs of ground verdigris.
39,523 cubic feet of promiscuous live oak. 40 1/8 gallons of spirits of turpentine.
21,636 do. moulded do. 799 pounds of steel.
1,657 knees, live oak. 48 quires of paper.
54,854 cubic feet of white oak.

Provisions.

35,801 do. pine. 185 pounds of bread.
459 do. locust. 8 gallons of peas.
2,588 do. cedar. 16 barrels of beef.
35 do. poplar. 12 barrels of pork.
131 do. hickory. 50 pounds of cheese.
3,140 do. ash. 276 1/4 gallons of whiskey.
392 do. elm. 544 1/4 pounds of tallow candles.
16 do. mulberry.

Slops.

915 do. cherry. 24 mattresses.
14,975 do. cypress. 44 blankets.

--721--

AT ERIE.

5 anchors.

Lead.

Canvass and duck.

5 tons 4 cwt. 6 lbs.
17 1/2 yards.

Iron.

  1 ton 8 cwt. 12 lbs. of iron assorted.

Copper.

8 tons 3 qrs. 16 lbs. of kentledge.
38 pounds sheathing nails.  
 

Small arms.

Cordage.

147 muskets.
1 cable. 14 pistols.
1,149 pounds bolt rope. 161 cutlasses.
764 pounds purchase falls. 104 battle axes.
1,057 pounds rigging. 75 pikes.
4 1/2 inch rope, 50 1/2 pounds. 1 blunderbuss.
  3 rifles.

Ordnance.

Sundries.

60 iron cannon. 2,636 flannel cylinders.
63 carronades. 218 paper cylinders.
7 howitzers. 39 field carriages,15 caps for elevating screws.
724 round shot.
794 double shot. 276 dead eyes.
1,058 canister shot. 40 iron fore locks.
596 stands of grape. 4,941 flints.
12,048 pounds of loose grape shot. 121 1/8 gun tackles.
431 shells. 448 hooks assorted.
31 hand grenades. 5,471 pounds of lignum vitae.
1,260 loose canister shot. 10 leager heads.
209 quires cannon cartridge paper. 2 barrels of tar.
15,020 quires musket cartridge paper. 39 copper ladles.
3 reams do do. 23 linchpins.
  45 monkey tails.

Powder and materials.

4 mortars and pestles.
  66 gunner's mallets.
6,444 pounds cannon powder. 55 ports.
787 pounds priming. 699 stands for grape shots.
25 port fires. 91 rammers and sponges.
85 false fires. 96 stanchions.
249 pounds of sulphur. 2,604 gun wads. 405 Blocks

 

AT WHITEHALL.

13 anchors. 150 pounds 8 oz, tea.

Canvass.

12 bushels potatoes.
6 bolts of canvass. 1,394 pounds rice.
  4 gallons vinegar.

Copper.

101 gallons whiskey.
150 pounds spikes. 11 pounds candles.
1,430 pounds old copper.  
1,380 pounds copper in casks.

Small arms.

Cordage.

687 musket bayonets.
40 cables. 70 bayonets for pistols.
1,200 pounds of running rigging. 464 cutlasses.
  108 boarding axes.

Ordnance.

473 boarding pikes.
133 iron cannon. 328 leaden balls.
76 carronades.  
14,243 round shot.

Sundries.

130 double shot. 26 augers.
818 canister shot. 86 aprons for guns.
1,059 stands of grape. 36 boring fitts.
64 shells. 8 boats.
9,000 quires of cartridge paper. 1 1/2 pieces bunting.
48 swivels. 300 blocks.

Powder.

4 axes.
23,809 pounds of cannon. 6 lanterns,
  9 saws.
351 1/2 pounds of priming. 7 cambooses.
  12 chairs.

Lead.

2 coffee mills.
150 pounds. 2 dark lanterns.
  624 flannel cylinders.

Iron.

2 ensigns.
5 tons 3 cwt. 22 lbs. iron assorted. 50 fire buckets.
120 tons 1 cwt. 3 qrs. 6 lbs. Pig iron ore ballast. 145 hand spikes.
  400 hooks and thimbles.

Provisions

90 yards flannel for cylinders.
1,028 pounds 8 oz. of beef. 6 hammers.
892 pounds pork. 6 cases surgeon's amputating instruments.
564 pounds flour. 6 kettles.
6 pounds cheese. 28 lint stocks.
194 pounds 12 oz. sugar.

3 1/2 pounds tar, and a few other similar articles.

--722--

AT NEW ORLEANS.

Anchors.

Provisions.

22 kedge anchors. 56 barrels of beef.
  94 barrels of pork.

Copper.

983 1/4 pounds of candles.
2,089 copper sheets.

Small Arms.

  98 battle axes.

Ordnance.

250 bayonets.
64 iron cannon. 22 blunderbusses.
29 carronades. 157 cutlasses.
2 mortars. 581 muskets.
5 howitzers. 45 pikes.
2 brass cannon. 111 pistols.
34,059 round shot 1 do. signal.
244 shells. 138 musket barrels.
1,182 double shot 57 do. do. bad.
43 canister shot. 37 pistol barrels.
13,720 pounds of loose shot.  
1,162 stands of grape shot.

Sundries.

15,198 quires of cartridge paper. 14 boxes of hand grenades.
  497 grape stools.

Powder.

63 crowbars.
  1,572 bolts.
316 1/2 barrels of cannon powder. 225 truck bands.
34 half barrels of do. do. 30 augers.
18 1/4 quarter casks of priming powder. 3 anvils.

Lead.

4 awnings.
  896 bushes assorted.
13,850 pounds of pig lead. 124 locks.
  1,114 hooks assorted.

Iron.

3,188 lbs. mast iron assorted.
Tons. cwt. qrs. lbs. 1,200 do. do. broken,
11 19 2 15 scrap iron that can be wrought And a few other articles,
such as ladles, pins for blocks,
punches, lead pencils, quills, rulers,
and scales and weights.
6 16 0 14 " " can't be wrought.
97 2 3 20 ballast iron.

AT SACKETT'S HARBUR.

63 anchors.

Small Arms.

  6 battle axes.

Canvass and Duck.

804 pikes.
17 bolts of American. 149 cutlasses.
2 1/2 do. Raven's, and 11 1/2 yards. 31 muskets.
  80 pistols.

Copper.

 
1,209 pounds of sheathing nails.

Timber.

4 do. rods for bolts. 48 masts and spars.

Cordage.

 
16 cables.

Sundries.

4,165 pounds of running rigging. 941 augers, assorted.
2,221 fathoms of cordage. 35 aprons.

Ordnance.

5 carpenter's adzes.
  2 blacksmith's axes.
119 iron cannon. 28 anvils.
193 carronades. 2 awnings.
8 howitzers. 1,063 yards bunting.
1 gunade. 62 salt boxes,
41,697 round shot. 8 filling boxes.
756 double shot. 12 pump do.
2,395 canister shot. 29 tube do.
8,236 stands of grape shot. 182 bolts assorted iron.
100 tons of loose do. 11 pump bitts.
  1 brace.

Lead.

3,023 blocks.
  122 carronade gun beds.
8 cwt. 14 lbs. lead. 1 ton 3 cwt. 3 qrs. 16 lbs. broken ballast iron.
  542 gun breechings.

Iron.

10,414 cylinders.
153 tons iron. 122 chisels, &c. &c. &c

 

AT BALTIMORE.

1 anchor.

Provisions.

Copper.

193 barrels of pork.
1,883 sheets of sheathing copper.  
1 ton 15 cwt. 3 qrs. 3 lbs. do. nails.  
 

Sundries.

Cordage.

3 blocks.
1 hawser. 2 hooks.
Powder and materials. 1 old falls.
28,051 pounds crude salt petre. 3 axes.
27 tons 3 cwt. 1 qr. 17 lbs. sulphur.  

--723--

AT CHARLESTON, S. C.

5 anchors.

Small Arms.

Cordage.

 
3 cables. 123 boarding axes.

Copper.

312 boarding pikes.
2,913 pounds of copper. 541 cutlasses.
  571 muskets.
9 yards canvass. 187 pistols.
   

Ordnance.

Sundries.

29 carronades.  
3 cohorns. 1,606 cylinders,
975 shot. 9 quires cartridge paper.
64 canisters, empty. 142 blocks.
28 long guns. 140 oars and sweeps.
2 gunades. 229 pounds copper mountings.
871 stands of iron grape. 32 quoins.
19 star shot. 17 rammers and sponges.
30,300 round shot. 25 fathoms of rope.
  108 pins for grape stand.

Lead.

1 sextant.
1,960 pounds of lead. 7 spindles for guns.
  11 musket scrapers.

Iron.

49 spikes.
  15 gallons varnish.
46,188 pounds of kentledge. 42 tin sheets.
220 pounds nails. 299 sheaves, thimbles, travellers, trucks, saws, &c. &c. &c.

[END]

Published:Tue May 17 07:21:04 EDT 2016