Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

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Navy Medal of Honor: World War II

These individuals earned the Navy Medal of Honor during the period specified. Their names are followed by their rank and rate, if known, the date of the action and the vessel or unit on which they served.

U.S. Navy Recipients
  1. ANTRIM, RICHARD NOTT, Commander, U.S. Navy., Makassar, Celebes, Netherlands East Indies, April 1942.
  2. BENNION, MERVYN SHARP (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Navy, USS West Virginia, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 07 December 1941
  3. BIGELOW, ELMER CHARLES (posthumous), Watertender First Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, USS Fletcher, 14 February 1945
  4. BULKELEY, JOHN DUNCAN, Lieutenant Commander, Commander of Motor Torpedo Boat Squadron 3, U.S. Navy., Philippine waters, 7 December 1941 to 10 April 1942
  5. BUSH, ROBERT EUGENE, Hospital Apprentice First Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, serving as Medical Corpsman with a rifle company, 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division., Okinawa Jima, Ryukyu Islands, 2 May 1945.
  6. CALLAGHAN, DANIEL JUDSON, (posthumous), Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy., Off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942
  7. CROMWELL, JOHN PHILIP (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Navy, Submarine Coordinated Attack Group, USS Sculpin, Off Truk Island, 19 November 1943
  8. DAVID, ALBERT LEROY (posthumous), Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy, USS Pillsbury, Off French West Africa, 4 June 1944
  9. DAVIS, GEORGE FLEMING (posthumous), Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Walke, Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 6 January 1945
  10. DEALEY, SAMUEL DAVID (posthumous), Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Harder
  11. EVANS, ERNEST EDWIN (posthumous), Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Johnston, Off Samar on 25 October 1944
  12. FINN, JOHN WILLIAM, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy [then a Chief Petty Officer], Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941
  13. FLAHERTY, FRANCIS C. (posthumous), Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve, USS Oklahoma, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 07 December 1941
  14. FLUCKEY, EUGENE BENNETT, Commander, U.S. Navy, Commanding USS Barb., Along coast of China, 19 December 1944 to 15 February 1945
  15. FUQUA, SAMUEL GLENN, Captain, U.S. Navy, USS Arizona. [then Lt. Cmdr.], Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941
  16. GARY, DONALD ARTHUR, Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Navy, USS Franklin., Japanese Home Islands near Kobe, Japan, 19 March 1945
  17. GILMORE, HOWARD WALTER (posthumous), Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Growler, Southwest Pacific from 10 January to 7 February 1943
  18. GORDON, NATHAN GREEN, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, commander of Catalina patrol plane., Kavieng Harbor, Bismarck Sea, 15 February 1944
  19. HALL, WILLIAM E., Lieutenant, Junior Grade, U.S. Naval Reserve., Coral Sea, 7 and 8 May 1942.
  20. HALYBURTON, WILLIAM DAVID, JR. (posthumous), Pharmacist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, serving with 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 10 May 1945
  21. HAMMERBERG, OWEN FRANCIS PATRICK (posthumous), Boatswain's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy., West Loch, Pearl Harbor, 17 February 1945
  22. HERRING, RUFUS G., Lieutenant, U.S. Naval Reserve, LCI (G) 449., Iwo Jima, 17 February 1945
  23. HILL, EDWIN JOSEPH (posthumous), Chief Boatswain, U.S. Navy, USS Nevada, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 07 December 1941
  24. HUTCHINS, JOHNNIE DAVID (posthumous), Seaman First Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, USS LST 473, Lae, New Guinea, 4 September 1943
  25. JONES, HERBERT CHARPOIT (posthumous), Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve, USS California, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 07 December 1941
  26. KEPPLER, REINHARDT JOHN (posthumous), Boatswain's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, USS San Francisco, Solomon Islands, 12-13 November 1942
  27. KIDD, ISAAC CAMPBELL (posthumous), Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy, USS Arizona, Pearl Harbor, T.H., 07 December 1941
  28. LESTER, FRED FAULKNER (posthumous), Hospital Apprentice First Class, U.S. Navy, attached to the 1st Battalion, 22d Marines, 6th Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 8 June 1945
  29. McCAMPBELL, DAVID, Commander, U.S. Navy, Air Group 15., First and second battles of the Philippine Sea, 19 June 1944
  30. McCANDLESS, BRUCE, Commander, U.S. Navy, USS San Francisco., Battle off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942
  31. McCOOL, RICHARD MILES,, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, USS LSC(L)(3) 122., Off Okinawa, 10 and 11 June 1945
  32. CALLAHAN, JOSEPH TIMOTHY, Commander (Chaplain Corps), U.S. Naval Reserve, USS Franklin., near Kobe, Japan, 19 March 1945
  33. O'HARE, EDWARD HENRY, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Fighting Squadron 3, South Pacific, 20 February 1942
  34. O'KANE, RICHARD HETHERINGTON, Commander, U.S. Navy, commanding USS Tang., Vicinity Philippine Islands, 23 and 24 October 1944
  35. PARLE, JOHN JOSEPH (posthumous), Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve, USS LST 375, Sicily, 9-10 July 1943
  36. PETERSON, OSCAR VERNER (posthumous), Chief Watertender, U.S. Navy, USS Neosho, 7 May 1942
  37. PHARRIS, JACKSON CHARLES, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, USS California. [then Gunner], Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941
  38. PIERCE, FRANCIS JUNIOR, Pharmacist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy serving with 2d Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, 15 and 16 March 1945
  39. POWERS, JOHN JAMES (posthumous), Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, Bombing Squadron 5, Battle of Coral Sea, 4 to 8 May 1942
  40. PRESTON, ARTHUR MURRAY, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy Reserve, Torpedo Boat Squadron 33., Wasile Bay, Halmahera Island, 16 September 1944
  41. RAMAGE, LAWSON PATERSON, Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Parche., Pacific, 31 July 1944
  42. REEVES, THOMAS JAMES (posthumous), Radio Electrician (Warrant Officer) U.S. Navy, USS California, USS California, 07 December 1941
  43. RICKETTS, MILTON ERNEST (posthumous), Lieutenant, U.S. Navy, USS Yorktown, Battle of the Coral Sea, 8 May 1942
  44. ROOKS, ALBERT HAROLD (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Navy, USS Houston, Southwest Pacific, 4 to 27 February 1942
  45. ROSS, DONALD KIRBY, Machinist, U.S. Navy, USS Nevada., Pearl Harbor, Territory of Hawaii, 7 December 1941
  46. SCHONLAND, HERBERT EMERY, Commander, U.S. Navy, USS San Francisco, Savo Island, 12-13 November 1943
  47. SCOTT, NORMAN (posthumous), Rear Admiral, U.S. Navy., Savo Island, 11-12 October, 12-13 November 1942
  48. SCOTT, ROBERT R . (posthumous), Machinist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, USS California, 07 December 1941
  49. STREET, GEORGE LEVICK, III, Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Tiranle., Harbor of Quelpart Island, off the coast of Korea, 14 April 1945
  50. TOMICH, PETER (posthumous), Chief Watertender, U.S. Navy, USS Utah, 07 December 1941
  51. VAN VALKENBURGH, FRANKLIN (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Navy, USS Arizona, 07 December 1941
  52. VAN VOORHIS, BRUCE AVERY (posthumous), Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Navy, Bombing Squadron 102, Battle of the Solomon Islands, 6 July 1943
  53. WAHLEN, GEORGE EDWARD, Pharmacist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, serving with 2d Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands group, 3 March 1945
  54. WARD, JAMES RICHARD (posthumous), Seaman First Class, U.S. Navy, USS Oklahoma, 07 December 1941
  55. WILLIAMS, JACK, (posthumous), Pharmacist's Mate Third Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, serving with the 3d Battalion 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima Volcano Islands, 3 March 1945
  56. WILLIS, JOHN HARLAN, (posthumous), Pharmacist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy, serving with the 3d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 28 February 1945
  57. YOUNG, CASSIN, Commander, U.S. Navy, USS Vestal, Pearl Harbor, 07 December 1941
U.S. Coast Guard Recipients
  1. MUNRO, DOUGLAS ALBERT (posthumous), Signalman First Class, U.S. Coast Guard, Point Cruz, Guadalcanal, on 27 September 1942
U.S. Marine Corps Recipients
  1. AGERHOLM, HAROLD CHRIST (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 4th Battalion, 10th Marines, 2d Marine Division, Saipan, Marianas Islands, 7 July 1944
  2. ANDERSON, RICHARD BEATTY (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 4th Marine Division, Roi Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, 1 February 1944
  3. BAILEY, KENNETH D. (posthumous), Major, U.S. Marine Corps, Company C, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on 12-13 September 1942
  4. BASILONE, JOHN, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, on 24 and 25 October 1942
  5. BAUER, HAROLD WILLIAM, (posthumous), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, Marine Fighting Squadron 212, Over Guadalcanal, 10 May 1942 - 14 November 1942
  6. BAUSELL, LEWIS KENNETH (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Peleliu Island, Palau Group, 15 September 1944
  7. BERRY, CHARLES JOSEPH (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 3 March 1945
  8. BONNYMAN, ALEXANDER, JR. (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserves, 2d Battalion Shore Party, 8th Marines, 2d Marine Division, Tarawa, Gilbert Islands, 20-22 November 1943
  9. BORDELON, WILLIAM JAMES (posthumous), Staff Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 18th Marines, tactically attached to the 2d Marine Division, Tarawa, Gilbert Islands on 20 November 1943
  10. BOYINGTON, GREGORY, Major, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Squadron 214., Central Solomons area, from 12 September 1943 to 3 January 1944
  11. BUSH, RICHARD EARL, Corporal, U .S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, 6th Marine Division., Mount Yaetake on Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands, 16 April 1945
  12. CADDY, WILLIAM ROBERT (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company 1, 3d Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 3 March 1945
  13. CANNON, GEORGE HAM (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, Battery H, 6th Defense Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Sand Island, Midway Islands, 7 December 1941
  14. CASAMENTO, ANTHONY, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, Company D, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division., Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, 01 November 1942
  15. CHAMBERS, JUSTICE M., Colonel. U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3rd Assault Battalion Landing Team. 25th Marines, 4th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 19 to 22 February 1945
  16. COLE, DARRELL SAMUEL (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company B, 1st Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945
  17. COURTNEY, HENRY ALEXIUS, JR. (posthumous), Major, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 22d Marines, 6th Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Islands, 14 and 15 May 1945
  18. DAY, JAMES L., Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2nd Battalion, 22nd Marines, 6th Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Islands, 14-17 May 1945
  19. DAMATO, ANTHONY PETER (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps., Engebi Island, Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, on the night of 19-20 February 1944
  20. DEBLANC, JEFFERSON JOSEPH, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighting Squadron 112., Off Kolombangara Island in the Solomons group, 31 January 1943
  21. DUNLAP, ROBERT. HUGO, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division., On Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 20 and 21 February 1945
  22. DYESS, AQUILLA JAMES (posthumous), Lieutenant Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 24th Marines (Rein), 4th Marine Division, Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, 1 and 2 February 1944
  23. EDSON, MERRITT AUSTIN, Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Marine Raider Battalion, with Parachute Battalion attached, Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands, 13-14 September 1942
  24. ELROD, HENRY TALMAGE (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, Marine Fighting Squadron 211, Wake Island, 8 to 23 December 1941
  25. EPPERSON, HAROLD GLENN (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, 2d Marine Division, Saipan, Marianas Islands, 25 June 1944
  26. FARDY, JOHN PETER (posthumous), Corporal, U.S Marine Corps, Company C, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Islands, 7 May 1945
  27. FLEMING, RICHARD E. (posthumous), Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Scout Bombing Squadron 241, Battle of Midway on 4 and 5 June 1942
  28. FOSS, JOSEPH JACOB, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighting Squadron 121, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing., Over Guadalcanal, 9 October to 19 November 1942, 15 and 23 January 1943
  29. FOSTER, WILLIAM ADELBERT (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain 2 May 1945
  30. GALER, ROBERT EDWARD, Major, U.S. Marine Corps, Marine Fighter Sqdn. 244, Solomon Islands Area
  31. GONSALVES, HAROLD (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 4th Battalion, 15th Marines, 6th Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 15 April 1945
  32. GRAY, ROSS FRANKLIN (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company A, 1st Battalion, 25th Marines, 4th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 21 February 1945
  33. GURKE, HENRY (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 3d Marine Raider Battalion, Empress Augusta Bay on Bougainville Island, Solomon Islands area, 9 November 1943
  34. HALYBURTON, WILLIAM DAVID, JR. (posthumous), Pharmacist's Mate Second Class, U.S. Naval Reserve, serving with 2d Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 10 May 1945
  35. HANSEN, DALE MERLIN (posthumous), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, Company E, 2d Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 7 May 1945
  36. HANSON, ROBERT MURRAY (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighting Squadron 215, Over Bougainville Island, 1 November 1943; and New Britain Island, 24 January 1944
  37. HARRELL, WILLIAM GEORGE, Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 3 March 1945
  38. HAUGE, LOUIS JAMES, JR. (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company C, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain on 14 May 1945
  39. HAWKINS, WILLIAM DEAN (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, Scout Sniper Platoon, Tarawa, Gilbert Island, 20 and 21 November 1943
  40. JACKSON, ARTHUR J., Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division., Island of Peleliu in the Palau group, 18 September 1944.
  41. JACOBSON, DOUGLAS THOMAS, Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 26 February 1945
  42. JULIAN, JOSEPH RODOLPH (posthumous), Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 9 March 1945
  43. KINSER, ELBERT LUTHER (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company I, 3d Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division, Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain, 4 May 1945
  44. KRAUS, RICHARD EDWARD (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 8th Amphibious Tractor Battalion, Fleet Marine Force, Peleliu, Palau Islands, on 5 October 1944
  45. LA BELLE, JAMES DENNIS (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 8 March 1945
  46. LEIMS, JOHN HAROLD, Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company B, 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 7 March 1945
  47. LUCAS, JACKLYN HAROLD, Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 20 February 1945
  48. LUMMUS, JACK (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 8 March 1945
  49. MARTIN, HARRY LINN (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company C, 5th Pioneer Battalion, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 26 March 1945
  50. MASON, LEONARD FOSTER (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 2d Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, Guam, Marianas Islands, 22 July 1944
  51. McCARD, ROBERT HOWARD (posthumous), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, Company A, 4th Tank Battalion, 4th Marine Division, Saipan, Marianas Islands, on 16 June 1944
  52. McCARTHY, JOSEPH JEREMIAH, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 21 February 1945
  53. McTUREOUS, ROBERT MILLER, JR. (posthumous), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, 3d Battalion, 29th Marines, 6th Marine Division, Okinawa in the Ryukyu Chain, 7 June 1945
  54. NEW, JOHN DURY (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 2d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Peleliu Island, Palau Group, 25 September 1944
  55. OWENS, ROBERT ALLEN (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps., Cape Torokina, Bougainville, Solomon Islands, on 1 November 1943
  56. OZBOURN, JOSEPH WILLIAM (posthumous), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division, Tinian Island, Marianas Islands, 30 July 1944
  57. PAIGE, MITCHELL, Platoon Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps., Solomon Islands, 26 October 1942
  58. PHELPS, WESLEY (posthumous), Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Peleliu Island, Palau Group, 4 October 1944
  59. PHILLIPS, GEORGE (posthumous), Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, on 14 March 1945
  60. POPE, EVERETT PARKER, Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, Company C, 1st Battalion, 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division., Peleliu Island, Palau group, 19-20 September 1944
  61. POWER, JOHN VINCENT (posthumous), First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps, 4th Marine Division, Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, 1 February 1944
  62. ROAN, CHARLES HOWARD (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 7th Marines, 1st Marine Division, Peleliu, Palau Islands, 18 September 1944
  63. ROUH, CARLTON ROBERT, First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division., Peleliu Island, Palau group, 15 September 1944
  64. RUHL, DONALD JACK (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company E, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, from 19 to 21 February 1945
  65. SCHWAB, ALBERT EARNEST (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve., Okinawa Shima in the Rykuyu Islands, 7 May 1945
  66. SHOUP, DAVID MONROE, Colonel, U.S. Marine Corps, commanding officer of all Marine Corps troops on Betio Island, Tarawa Atoll, and Gilbert Islands, from 20 to 22 November 1943., Tarawa Atoll, Gilbert Islands, from 20 to 22 November 1943
  67. SIGLER, FRANKLIN EARL, Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 14 March 1945
  68. SKAGGS, LUTHER, JR., Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Battalion, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division., Asan-Adelup beachhead, Guam, Marianas Islands, 21 -22 July 1944.
  69. SMITH, JOHN LUCIAN, Major, U.S. Marine Corps, Marine Fighter Squadron 223,, In the Solomon Islands area, August-September 1942
  70. SORENSON, RICHARD KEITH, Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 4th Marine Division., Namur Island, Kwajalein Atoll Marshall Islands, 1 -2 February 1944
  71. STEIN, TONY (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company A, 1st Battalion, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945
  72. SWETT, JAMES ELMS, First Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighter Squadron 221, with Marine Aircraft Group 12, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing., Solomon Islands area, 7 April 1943
  73. THOMAS, HERBERT JOSEPH (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 3d Marines, 3d Marine Division, Bougainville Islands, Solomon Islands, on 7 November 1943
  74. THOMASON, CLYDE (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Raiders, Makin Island, 17-18 August 1942
  75. TIMMERMAN, GRANT FREDERICK (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 2d Battalion, 6th Marines, 2d Marine Division, Saipan, Marianas Islands, on 8 July 1944
  76. VANDEGRIFT, ALEXANDER ARCHER, Major General, U.S. Marine Corps, commanding officer of the 1st Marine Division., Solomon Islands, 7 August to 9 December 1942
  77. WALSH, KENNETH AMBROSE, First Lieutenant, pilot in Marine Fighting Squadron 124, U.S. Marine Corps., Solomon Islands area, 15 and 30 August 1943
  78. WALSH, WILLIAM GARY (posthumous), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company G, 3d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 27 February 1945
  79. WATSON, WILSON DOUGLAS, Private, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 26 and 27 February 1945
  80. WILLIAMS, HERSHEL WOODROW, Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 21st Marines, 3d Marine Division., Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 23 February 1945
  81. WILSON, LOUIS HUGH, JR., Captain, U.S. Marine Corps, Commanding Rifle Company, 2d Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division., Fonte Hill, Guam, 25-26 July 1944
  82. WILSON, ROBERT LEE (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps, 2d Battalion, 6th Marines, 2d Marine Division, Tinian Island, Marianas Group, 4 August 1944
  83. WITEK, FRANK PETER (posthumous), Private First Class, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, 1st Battalion, 9th Marines, 3d Marine Division, Guam, Marianas, on 3 August 1944

 

U.S. Navy recipients of the Medal of Honor, World War II

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Hospital Apprentice First Class Robert E. Bush United States Naval reserve

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Medical Corpsman with a rifle company, in action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Jima, Ryukyu Islands on 2 May 1945. Fearlessly braving the fury of artillery, mortar, and machinegun fire from strongly entrenched hostile positions, Petty Officer Bush constantly and Hesitatingly moved from one casualty to another to attend the wounded falling under the enemy's murderous barrages. As the attack passed over a ridge top, he was advancing to administer blood plasma to a Marine officer lying wounded on the skyline when the Japanese launched a savage counterattack. In this perilously exposed position, he resolutely maintained the flow of life-giving plasma. With the bottle held high in one hand, Petty Officer Bush drew his pistol with the other and fired into the enemy's ranks until his ammunition was expended. Quickly seizing a discarded carbine, he trained his fire on the Japanese charging pointblank over the hill, accounting for six of the enemy despite his own serious wounds and the loss of one eye suffered during his desperate battle in defense of the helpless man. With the hostile force finally routed, he calmly disregarded his own critical condition to complete his mission, valiantly refusing medical treatment for himself until his officer patient had been evacuated, and collapsing only after attempting to walk to the battle aid station. Petty Officer Bush's daring initiative, great personal valor, and inspiring devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Pharmacist’s Mate Second Class William D. Halyburton, Jr United States Naval Reserve

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with a Marine 'Rifle Company in the 2nd Battalion, 5th Marines, 1st Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa Shima in the Ryukyu Chain on 19 May 1945. Undaunted by the deadly accuracy of Japanese counterfire as hit unit pushed the attack through a strategically important draw, Petty Officer Halyburton unhesitatingly dashed across the draw and up the hill into an open fireswept field where the Company advance squad was suddenly pinned down under a terrific concentration of mortar, - machinegun, and sniper fire with resultant severe casualties. Moving steadily forward despite the enemy I s merciless barrage, he reached the wounded Marine who lay farthest away and was rendering first aid when his patient was struck f or the second time by a Japanese bullet. Instantly placing himself in direct line of fire, Petty Officer Halyburton shielded the fallen fighter with his own body and staunchly continued his ministrations although constantly menaced by the slashing fury of shrapnel and bullet falling on all sides. Alert, determined, and completely unselfish in his concern f or the helpless Marine, he persevered in his efforts until he himself sustained mortal wounds and collapsed, heroically sacrificing himself that his comrade might live. By his outstanding valor, uncommon initiative, and unwavering dedication to duty, Petty Officer Halyburton reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life in the service of his country.

 

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Hospital Apprentice First Class Fred F. Lester United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Medical Corpsman with an Assault Rifle Platoon attached to the 1st Battalion, 22d Marines, 6th Marine Division during action against enemy Japanese forces on Okinawa shima in the Ryukyu Chain on 8 June 1945. Quick to spot a wounded Marine lying in an open field beyond the front lines following the relentless assault against a strategic Japanese hill position, Petty Officer Lester unhesitatingly crawled toward the casualty under a concentrated barrage from hostile machine-guns, rifles, and grenades. Torn by enemy rifle bullets as he inched forward, he stoically disregarded the mounting fury of Japanese fire and his own pain to pull the wounded man toward a covered position. Struck by enemy fire a second time before he reached cover, Petty Officer Lester exerted tremendous effort and succeeded in pulling his comrade to safety where, too seriously wounded to administer aid, he instructed two of his squad in proper medical treatment of the rescued Marine. Realizing that his own wounds were fatal, he staunchly refused medical attention for himself and, gathering his fast-waning strength with calm determination, coolly and expertly directed his men in the treatment of two other wounded Marines, succumbing shortly thereafter. Completely selfless in his concern for the welfare of his fighting comrades, Petty Officer Lester, by his indomitable spirit, outstanding valor, and competent direction of others, had saved the life of one who otherwise must have perished and had contributed to the safety of countless others. By his exceptional fortitude, inspiring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Petty Officer Lester reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

 

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Pharmacist’s Mate First Class Francis J. Pierce United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while attached to the 2d Battalion, 24th Marines, 4th Marine Division during the Iwo Jima campaign on 15 and 16 March 1945. Almost continuously under fire while carrying out the most dangerous volunteer assignments, Petty Officer Pierce gained valuable knowledge of the terrain and disposition of troops. Caught in heavy enemy rifle and machinegun f ire which wounded a corpsman and two of the eight stretcher bearers who were carrying two wounded Marines to a forward aid station on 15 March, he quickly took charge of the party, carried the newly wounded men to a sheltered position, and rendered first aid. After directing the evacuation of three of the casualties, Petty Officer Pierce stood in the open to draw the enemy's fire and, with his weapon blasting, enabled the litter bearers to reach cover. Turning his attention to the other two casualties, he was attempting to stop the profuse bleeding of one man when a Japanese fired from a cave less than 20 yards away and wounded his patient again. Risking his own life to save his patient, Petty Officer Pierce deliberately exposed himself to draw the attacker from the cave and destroyed him with the last of his ammunition. Then lifting the wounded man to his back, he advanced unarmed through deadly rifle fire across 200 feet of open terrain. Despite exhaustion and in the face of warnings against such a suicidal mission, Petty officer Pierce again traversed the same fire-swept path to rescue the remaining Marine. On the following morning, he led a combat patrol to a sniper nest and, while aiding a stricken marine, was seriously wounded. Refusing aid for himself, he directed treatment for the casualty, at the same time maintaining protective fire for his comrades. Completely fearless, completely devoted to the care of his patients, Petty Officer Pierce inspired the entire battalion. By his inspiring valor, steadfast perseverance, and selfless dedication to duty, Petty Officer Pierce reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Pharmacist’s Mate Second Class George E. Wahlen United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 2d Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, during action against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima in the Volcano group on 3 March 1945. Painfully wounded in the bitter action on 26 February, Petty Officer Wahlen remained on the battlefield, advancing well forward of the frontlines to aid a wounded Marine and carrying him back to safety despite a terrific concentration of fire. Tireless in his ministrations, he consistently disregarded all danger to attend his fighting comrades as they fell under the devastating rain of shrapnel and bullets, and rendered prompt assistance to various elements of his combat group as required. When an adjacent platoon suffered heavy casualties, Petty officer Wahlen defied the continuous pounding of heavy mortars and deadly fire of enemy rifles to care for the wounded, working rapidly in an area swept by constant fire and treating 14 casualties before returning to his own platoon. Wounded again on 2 March, he gallantly refused evacuation, moving out with his company the following day in furious assault across 600 yards of open terrain and repeatedly rendering medical aid while exposed to the blasting fury of powerful Japanese guns. Stouthearted and indomitable, he persevered in his determined efforts as his unit waged fierce battle and, unable to walk after sustaining a third agonizing wound, resolutely crawled 50 yards to administer first aid to still another fallen fighter. By his dauntless fortitude and valor, Petty Officer Wahlen served as a constant inspiration and contributed vitally to the high morale of his company during critical phases of this strategically important engagement. By his heroic spirit, self-sacrificing efforts, and loyal devotion to duty, Petty Officer Wahlen reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Pharmacist’s mate Third Class Jack Williams United States Naval Reserve

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 3d Battalion, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division during the occupation of Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands on 3 March 1945. Gallantly going forward on the frontlines under intense enemy small-arms fire to assist a Marine wounded in a fierce grenade battle, Petty Officer Williams dragged the man to a shallow depression and was kneeling, using his own body as a screen from the sustained f ire as he administered first aid, when struck in the abdomen and groin three times by hostile rifle fire. Momentarily stunned, he quickly recovered and completed his ministrations before applying battle dressings to his own multiple wounds. Unmindful of his own urgent need for medical attention, Petty Officer Williams remained in the perilous fire-swept area to care for another Marine casualty. Heroically completing his task despite pain and profuse bleeding, he then endeavored to make his way to the rear in search of adequate aid f or himself when struck down by a Japanese sniper bullet which caused his collapse, succumbing later as a result of his self-sacrificing service to others. By his courageous determination, unwavering fortitude, and valiant devotion to duty, Petty Officer Williams served as an aspiring example of heroism; thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

 

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Pharmacist’s Mate First Class John H. Willis United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Platoon Corpsman serving with the 3d Battalion, 27th Marines, 5th Marine Division, during operations against enemy Japanese forces on Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands on 28 February 1945. Constantly imperiled by artillery and mortar fire from strong and mutually supporting pillboxes and caves studding Hill 362 in the enemy's cross-island defenses, Petty Officer Willis resolutely administered first aid to the many Marines wounded during the furious close-in fighting until he himself was struck by shrapnel and was ordered back to the battle aid station. Without waiting for official medical release, he quickly returned to his company and, during a savage hand-to-hand enemy counterattack, daringly advanced to the extreme frontlines under mortar and sniper fire to aid a Marine lying wounded in a shell-hole. Completely unmindful of his own danger as the Japanese' intensified their attack, Petty Officer Willis calmly continued to administer blood plasma to his patient, promptly returning the first hostile grenade which landed in the shell-hole while he was working and hurling back seven more in quick succession before the ninth one exploded in his hand and instantly killed him. Through his great personal valor in saving others at the sacrifice of his own life, he inspired his companions, although terrifically outnumbered, to launch a fiercely determined attack and repulse the enemy force. By his exceptional fortitude, remarkable courage., and inspiring dedication to duty, Petty Officer Willis reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

 

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Lieutenant, Junior Grade, Albert Leroy David, United States Navy

For extraordinary heroism, distingushed service, and devotion above and beyond the call of duty while attached to the U.S.S. Pillsbury during the capture of an enemy German submarine off French West Africa, 4 June 1944. Taking a vigorous part in the skillfully coordinated attack on the German U-505 which climaxed a prolonged search by the Task Group, Lieutenant (then, Lieutenant Junior Grade,) David boldly led a party from the Pillsbury in boarding the hostile submarine as it circled erratically at 5 or 6 knots on the surface. Fully aware that the U-boat might momentarily sink or blow up by exploding demolition and scuttling charges, he braved the added danger of enemy gunfire to plunge through the conning tower hatch and, with his small party, exerted every effort to keep the ship afloat and to assist the succeeding and more fully equipped salvage parties in making the U-505 seaworthy for the long tow across the Atlantic to a United States port. By his valiant service during the first successful boarding and capture of an enemy man-o-war on the high seas by the United States Navy since 1815, Lieutenant David contributed materially to the effectiveness of our Battle of the Atlantic and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Chief Aviation Ordnanceman John William Finn, United States Navy

For extraordinary heroism, distingushed service, and devotion above and beyond the call of duty. During the first attack by Japanese airplanes on the Naval Air Station, Kaneohe Bay, T.H. on 7 December 1941, he promptly secured and manned a .50-caliber machine gun mounted on an instruction stand in a completely exposed area of the parking ramp, which was under heavy enemy machine-gun strafing fire. Although painfully wounded many times, he continued to man this gun and return the enemy's fire vigorously and with telling effect throughout the enemy strafing and bombing attacks and with complete disregard for his own personal safety. It was only by specific orders that he was persuaded to leave his post to seek medical attention. Following first aid treatment, although obviously suffering much pain and moving with great difficulty, he returned to the squadron area and actively supervised the rearming of returning planes. His extraordinary heroism and conduct in this action are considered to be in keeping with the highest traditions of the Naval Service.

 

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Commander Howard Walter Gilmore, United States Navy

For extraordinary heroism, distingushed service, and devotion above and beyond the call of duty as Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Growler during the Fourth War Patrol in the Southwest Pacific from 10 January to 7 February 1943. Boldly striking at the enemy in spite of continous hostile air and antisubmarine patrols, Commander Gilmore sank one Japanese freighter and damaged another by torpedo fire, successfully evading severe depth charges following each attack. In the darkness of night on 7 February, an enemy gunboat closed range and prepared to ram the Growler. Commander Gilmore daringly maneuvered to avoid the crash and rammed the attacker instead, ripping into her port side at 17 knots and bursting her wide plates. In the terrific fire of the sinking gunboat's heavy machine guns, Commander Gilmore calmy gave the order to clear the bridge, and refusing safety for himself, remained on deck while his men preceded him below. Struck down by the fusillade of bullets and having done his utmost against the enemy in his final living moments, Commander Gilmore gave his last order to the officer of the deck, 'Take her down!.' The Growler dived; seriously damaged but under control, she was brought safely to port by her well-trained crew inspired by the courageous fighting spirit of their dead captain.

 

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Commander (Chaplain Corps), Joseph Timothy O'Callahan, United States Navy Reserve

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Chaplain on board the U.S.S. Franklin when that vessel was fiercely attacked by enemy Japanese aircraft during offensive operations near Kobe, Japan, on 19 March 1945. A valiant and forceful leader, calmly braving the perilous barriers of flame and twisted metal to aid his men and his ship, Lieutenant Commander O'Callahan groped his way through smoke-filled corridors to the open flight deck and into the midst of violently exploding bombs, shells, rockets and other armament. With the ship rocked by incessant explosions, with debris and fragments raining down and fires raging in ever increasing fury, he ministered to the wounded and dying, comforting and encouraging men of all faiths; he organized and led fire-fighting crews into the blazing inferno of the flight deck; he directed the jettoning of live ammunition and flooding of the magazine; he manned a hose to cool hot, armed bombs rolling dangerously on the listing deck, continuing his efforts despite searing, suffocating smoke which forced men to fall back gasping and imperiled others who replaced them. Serving with courage, fortitude and deep spiritual strength, Lieutenant Commander O'Callahan inspired the gallant officers and men of the Franklin to fight heroically and with profound faith in the face of almost certain death and to return their stricken ship to port.

 

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Lieutenant John James Powers, United States Navy

For distinguished and conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty, while Pilot of an Airplane of Bombing Squadron FIVE, Lieutenant Powers participated, with his squadron, in five engagements with Japanese forces in the Coral Sea area and adjacent waters during the period 4 to 8 May 1942. Three attacks were made on enemy objectives at or near Tulagi on 4 May. In these attacks he scored a direct hit which instantly demolished a large enemy gunboat or destroyer and is credited with two close misses, one of which severely damaged a large aircraft tender, the other damaging a 20,000-ton transport. He fearlessly strafed a gunboat, firing all his ammunition into it amidst intense antiaircraft fire. This gunboat was then observed to be leaving a heavy oil slick in its wake and later was seen beached on a near-by island. On 7 May, an attack was launched against an enemy airplane carrier and other units of the enemy's invasion force. He fearlessly led his attack section of three Douglas Dauntless dive bombers, to attack the carrier. On this occasion he dived in the face of heavy antiaircraft fire, to an altitude well below the safey altitude, at the risk of his life and almost certain damage to his own plane, in order that he might positively obtain a hit in the vital part of the ship, which would insure her complete destruction. This bomb hit was noted by many pilots and observers to cause a tremendous explosion, engulfing the ship in a mass of flame, smoke and debris. The ship sank soon after. That evening, in his capacity as Squadron Gunnery Officer, Lieutenant Powers gave a lecture to the squadron on point-of-aim and diving technique. During this discourse he advocated low release point in order to insure greater accuracy; yet he stressed the danger not only from enemy fire and the resultant low pull-out, but from own bomb blast and bomb fragments. Thus his low-dive bombing attacks were deliberate and premeditated, since he well knew and realized the dangers of such tactics, but went far beyond the call of duty in order to further the cause which he knew to be right. The next morning, 8 May, as the pilots of the attack group left the ready room to man planes, his indomitable spirit and leadership were well expressed in his own words, 'Remember, the folks back home are counting on us. I am going to get a hit if I have to lay it on their flight deck.' He led his section of dive bombers down to the target from an altitude of 18,000 feet, through a wall of bursting antiaircraft shells and into the face of enemy fighter planes. Again, completely disregarding the safety altitude and without fear or concern for his safety, Lieutenant Powers courageously pressed home his attack, almost to the very deck of an enemy carrier and did not release his bomb until he was sure of a direct hit. He was last seen attempting recovery from his dive at the extremely low altitude of 200 feet, and amid a terrific barrage of shell and bomb fragments, smoke, flame and debris from the stricken vessel.

Published:Fri Sep 21 12:52:42 EDT 2018