Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

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World War I Medal of Honor Recipients

These individuals earned the Navy Medal of Honor during the period specified. Their names are followed by their rank and rate, if known, the date of the action and the vessel or unit on which they served.

U.S. Navy Recipients (select name for complete citation)
  1. BALCH, JOHN HENRY, Pharmacist's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy., Vierzy, France, and Somme-Py, France, 19 July and 5 October 1918.
  2. BOONE, JOEL THOMPSON, Lieutenant (Medical Corps), U.S. Navy., Vicinity Vierzy, France, 19 July 1918.
  3. BRADLEY, WILLIS WINTER JR., Commander, U.S. Navy., USS Pittsburgh, 23 July 1917
  4. CANN, TEDFORD H., Seaman, U.S. Navy., USS May, 5 November 1917
  5. COVINGTON, JESSE WHITFIELD, Ship's Cook Third Class, U.S. Navy., USS Stewart, 17 April 1918.
  6. GRAVES, ORA, Seaman, U.S. Navy., USS Pittsburgh, 23 July 1917
  7. HAMMANN, CHARLES HAZELTINE, Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve Force, 21 August 1918
  8. HAYDEN, DAVID E., Hospital Apprentice First Class, U.S. Navy, serving with the 2d Battalion, 6th Regiment, U.S. Marines., Thiaucourt, France, 15 September 1918.
  9. INGRAM, OSMOND K. (posthumous), Gunner's Mate First Class, U.S. Navy., USS Cassin, 15 October 1917
  10. IZAC, EDOUARD VICTOR MICHEL, Lieutenant, U.S. Navy., Aboard German submarine U-90 as prisoner of war, 21 May 1918.
  11. LYLE, ALEXANDER GORDON, Lieutenant Commander (Dental Corps), U.S. Navy., France, 23 April 1918
  12. MacKENZlE, JOHN, Chief Boatswain's Mate, U.S. Navy., USS Remlik, 17 December 1917
  13. MADISON, JAMES JONAS, Lieutenant Commander, U.S. Naval Reserve Force., USS Ticonderoga, 4 October 1918
  14. McGUNIGAL, PATRICK, Shipfitter First Class, U.S. Navy., USS Huntington, 17 September 1917
  15. ORMSBEE, FRANCIS EDWARD, JR., Chief Machinist's Mate, U.S. Navy., NAS Pensacola, Fla., 25 September 1918
  16. OSBORNE, WEEDON E., Lieutenant, Junior Grade, (Dental Corps), U.S. Navy., Bouresche, France, 6 June 1918
  17. PETTY, ORLANDO HENDERSON, Lieutenant (Medical Corps), U.S. Naval Reserve Force, Boise de Belleau, 11 June 1918
  18. SCHMIDT, OSCAR, JR., Chief Gunner's Mate, U.S. Navy., USS Chestnut Hill, 9 October 1918.
  19. SULLIVAN, DANIEL AUGUSTUS JOSEPH, Ensign, U.S. Naval Reserve Force., U.S.S. Cristabel, 21 May 1918
  20. UPTON, FRANK MONROE, Quartermaster, U.S. Navy., USS Stewart, 17 April 1918
  21. SIEGEL, JOHN OTTO, Boatswain's Mate Second Class, U.S. Navy, USS Mohawk, 01 November 1918

 

U.S. Marine Corps Recipients
  1. CUKELA, LOUIS (Army Medal), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 66th Company, 5th Regiment., Near Villers-Cotterets, France, 18 July 1918.
  2. CUKELA, LOUIS (Navy Medal), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 66th Company, 5th Regiment., Viller-Cottertes, France, 18 July 1918
  3. HAYDEN, DAVID E., Hospital Apprentice First Class, U.S. Navy, serving with the 2d Battalion, 6th Regiment, U.S. Marines., Thiaucourt, France, 15 September 1918.
  4. HOFFMAN, CHARLES F. (Army Medal), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 49th Company, 5th Regiment, 2d Division, (Name later changed to Ernest August Janson), Near Chateau-Thierry, France, 6 June 1918.
  5. JANSON, ERNEST AUGUST (Navy Medal), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 49th Company. (Served under name of Charles F. Hoffman), Chateau-Thierry, France, 6 June 1918
  6. KELLY, JOHN JOSEPH (Army Medal), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, 78th Company, 6th Regiment, 2d Division., At Blanc Mont Ridge, France, 3 October 1918.
  7. KELLY, JOHN JOSEPH (Navy Medal), Private, U.S. Marine Corps, 78th Company 6th Regiment., Blanc Mont Ridge, France, 3 October 1918
  8. KOCAK, MATEJ (Army Medal) (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 66th Company, 5th Regiment, 2d Division., Near Soissons, France, 18 July 1918.
  9. KOCAK, MATEJ (Navy Medal) (posthumous), Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps., Soissons, France, 18 July 1918
  10. PRUITT, JOHN HENRY (Army Medal) (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps, 78th Company, 6th Regiment, 2d Division., At Blanc Mont Ridge, France, 3 October 1918.
  11. PRUITT, JOHN HENRY (Navy Medal) (posthumous), Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps., Blanc Mont Ridge, France, 3 October 1918
  12. ROBINSON, ROBERT GUY, Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 1st Marine Aviation Force, Pittham, Belgium, 14 October 1918.
  13. STOCKHAM, FRED W. (Army Medal) (posthumous), Gunnery Sergeant, U.S. Marine Corps, 96th Company, 2d Battalion, 6th Regiment., In Bois-de-Belleau, France, 13-14 June 1918.
  14. TALBOT, RALPH (posthumous), Second Lieutenant, U.S. Marine Corps., France, 8 October 1918

 

U.S. Navy recipients of the Medal of Honor, World War I

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Pharmacist's Mate First Class John H. Balch United States Navy

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty with the 6th Regiment, United States Marines, in action at Vierzy on 19 July 1918. Petty Officer Balch unhesitatingly and fearlessly exposed himself to terrific machine-gun and high-explosive fire to succor the wounded as they fell in the attack, leaving his dressing station voluntarily and keeping up the work all day and late into the night unceasingly for 16 hours. Also in the action at Somme-Py on 5 October 1918, he exhibited exceptional bravery in establishing an advanced dressing station under heavy shellfire. Petty Officer Balch's exceptional abilities, uncommon foresight, and impressive devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Lieutenant Joel T. Boone Medical Corps United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the 6th Regiment, United States Marines, in actual conflict with the enemy at and in the vicinity of Vierzy, France on 19 July 1918. With absolute disregard for personal safety, ever conscious and mindful of the suffering fallen, Lieutenant Boone, leaving the shelter of a ravine, went forward onto the open field where there was no protection and, despite the extreme enemy fire of all calibers, through a heavy mist of gas, applied dressings and first aid to wounded Marines. This occurred Southeast of Vierzy, near the cemetery, and on the road south from that town. When the dressings and supplies had been exhausted, he went through a heavy barrage of large-caliber shell, both high explosive and gas, to replenish these supplies, returning quickly with a sidecar load, and administered them in saving the lives of the wounded. A second trip, under the same conditions and for the same purpose, was made by Lieutenant Boone later that day. By his inspiring valor, steadfast perseverance, and selfless , dedication to duty, Lieutenant Boone reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Hospital Apprentice First Class David E. Hayden United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty-while serving with the 2d Battalion, 6th Regiment, United States Marines, Thiaucourt, France on 14 September 1918. During the advance when Corporal Creed was mortally wounded while crossing an open field swept by machine-gun fire, Petty Officer Hayden unhesitatingly ran to his assistance and finding him so severely wounded as to require immediate attention, disregarded his own personal safety to dress the wound under intense machinegun fire, and then carried the wounded man back to safety. By his extraordinary courage, steadfast perseverance, and total devotion to duty, Petty Officer Hayden reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Lieutenant Commander Alexander G. Lyle Dental Corps United States Navy

For gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty with the 6th Regiment, United States Marines, in action at Vierzy on 19 July 1918. Petty Officer Balch unhesitatingly and fearlessly exposed himself to terrific machine-gun and high-explosive fire to succor the wounded as they fell in the attack, leaving his dressing station voluntarily and keeping up the work all day and late into the night unceasingly for 16 hours. Also in the action at Somme-Py on 5 October 1918, he exhibited exceptional bravery in establishing an advanced dressing station under heavy shellfire. Petty Officer Balch's exceptional abilities, uncommon foresight, and impressive devotion to duty reflected great credit upon himself and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

 

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Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Weedon E. Osborne United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while attached to the Fifth Regiment, United States Marines, in actual conflict with the enemy and under fire during the advance on Bouresche, France on 6 June 1918. In the hottest of the fighting when the Marines made their famous advance on Bouresche at the southern edge of Belleau Wood, Lieutenant (jg) Osborne threw himself zealously into the work of rescuing the wounded. Extremely courageous in the performance of this perilous task, he was killed while carrying a wounded officer to a place of safety. By his exceptional fortitude, inspiring initiative, and selfless devotion to duty, Lieutenant (jg) Osborne reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country.

 

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Lieutenant Orlando H. Petty Medical Corps United States Navy

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with the Fifth Regiment, United States marines, in France during the attack in the Boise de Belleau on 11 June 1918. While under heavy fire of high explosive and gas shells in the town of Lucy, where his dressing station was located, Lieutenant Petty attended to and evacuated the wounded under most trying conditions. Having been knocked to the ground by an exploding gas shell which tore his mask, Lieutenant Petty discarded the mask and courageously continued his work. His dressing station being hit and demolished, he personally helped carry Captain Williams, wounded, through the shellfire to a place of safety. By his inspiring valor, steadfast perseverance, and selfless dedication to duty, Lieutenant Petty reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

Published:Fri Sep 21 07:52:36 EDT 2018