Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

Captain Walter R. Sexton, Staff, United States Naval Forces in European Waters, to Rear Admiral Henry S. Knapp, Commander, United States Naval Forces Operating in European Waters

Action Copy.

File No.      

CABLEGRAM RECEIVED  APRIL 1, 1919.

Origin SIMSADUS LONDON                           Ser. No. 1456

PRIORITY FOR ADMIRAL KNAPP.

REPORTS RECEIVED BY BRITISH WAR OFFICE FROM GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING AT MURMANSK1 INDICATE SERIOUS UPRISING ABOUT 150 MILES SOUTH OF MURMANSK ON GREEK PORTS2 (?) IN THE COURSE OF NEXT FEW DAYS. HAVE DIRECTED USS GALVESTON AND USS CHESTER ORGANIZE COMPLETE LANDING PARTIES AND BE READY TO LAND ON ARRIVAL INMURMANSK IN CASE OF NECESSITY AND TO MAKE BEST PRACTICABLE SPEED. WITH YOUR CONCURRENCE INTEND DIRECTING MCCULLY3 USE LAND FORCE THESE TWO SHIPS AFTER CONSULTATION WITH GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING AT MURMANSK. IT IS PROBABLE LANDING PARTIES WOULD ONLY BE REQUIRED LOCALLY. SEXTON 173001

KNAPP4    

Source Note: Cy, DNA, RG 45, Entry 517B. A table with spaces for additional information about the cable’s sender(s) and intended recipient(s) is included with this copy, but as it is largely left blank the editor has chosen not to reproduce it.

Footnote 1: This probably refers to Brig. Gen. William E. Ironside, commander of the British forces in northern Russia.

Footnote 2: It is unclear what this refers to, and it is quite possible the cable was decoded incorrectly. Any Greek ports would be much farther than 150 miles from Murmansk, although the entire region was highly volatile with the Russian Civil War, and unrest 150 south of Murmansk was entirely possible.

Footnote 3: RAdm. Newton McCully, Commander, United States Naval Forces in Russia.

Footnote 4: Apparently, Knapp’s name was added to all documents originating from his office, even those in which he was the intended recipient.

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