Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

North Atlantic Fleet Squadron Bulletin No. 28

Squadron Bulletin.

U. S. Flagship New York.         Off Santiago de Cuba, Cuba.

SUNDAY, JULY 10, 1898.

THE Harvard left at 4.00 p. m. for Portsmouth, N. H., with prisoners.1

     The St. Paul arrived with troops at Sibouney.

     The New Orleans arrived at Guantanamo from Key West.

     The Solace was sent from Guantanamo to Sibouney to receive sick, she will return to Guantanamo, take on coal, and go to Hampton Roads.2

     The Army hospital ship Olivette left Guantanamo for Key West after coaling.

     The Army hospital ship Relief arrived at Sibouney.

     The lighter and provisions captured by the Scorpion and the Osceola have been appraised for condemnation.3 This lighter was cast off near Cape Cruz by a steamer which had it in tow when chased. It is of iron and in excellent order. The provisions came from the United States via Kingston [Jamaica]. The value of the lighter and provisions is considerable.

     The non-acceptance of the terms of capitulation offered the Spanish Commander in Santiago, a renewal of hostilities and a bombardment by the Navy will take place.4

     Arrangements for fitting out the Eastern Squadron are now progressing rapidly, the only detention will arise from the want of facilities for coaling.5

Source Note: Printed, DLC-MSS, Papers of William H. Emory. This bulletin was produced on a printing press on New York (the flagship of RAdm. William T. Sampson’s North Atlantic Fleet) and was distributed to the vessels. It is listed as number 28 in Squadron Bulletins, 51-52.

Footnote 1: Harvard, under the command of Capt. Charles S. Cotton, was one of the ships that took Spanish prisoners to the U.S. before their eventual return home. See: Lt. Joseph Beale to Capt. Charles S. Cotton, 4 July 1898.

Footnote 2: A major naval hospital was located in Norfolk, VA.

Footnote 3: For more, see: Joint Operations at Santiago de Cuba.

Footnote 4: Gen. José Toral y Vázquez had initially refused to surrender, but finally acquiesced to unconditional terms. Cosmas, Army for Empire, 224-26.

Footnote 5: The Eastern Squadron, under the command of Commo. John C. Watson, was slated to sail for Spain. For more, see: The Eastern Squadron.

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