Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

Rear Admiral William T. Sampson, Commander, North Atlantic Fleet, General Order Number 13

North Atlantic Station.

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U.S. FLAGSHIP NEW YORK (1st Rate),

Off Santiago de Cuba, Cuba,

Squadron General Order No. 13.                       July 11, 1898.

 

     1.―By direction of the Navy Department, the vessels of this command, including those of the Flying Squadron, are organized in two Squadrons,1 as follows:

     2.―Flagship of Commander-in-Chief:

U. S. S. NEW YORK.

     Attached to flag of Commander-in-Chief2 for dispatch and special duty:

Gloucester,}

                    Vixen,    } and all torpedo boats

Vesuvius, }

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3.                   FIRST SQUADRON.

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Commodore J. A. HOWELL,3 Commanding.

San Francisco (flag)

Castine

 

Hudson.

Puritan.

Nashville.

Mayflower.

Woodbury

Terror.

Newport.

Leyden.

Windom.

Miantonomoh.

Annapolis.

Tecumseh.

McLane.

Amphitrite.

Vicksburg.

Uncas.

Hawk.

Montgomery.

Dolphin.

Hamilton.

Wasp.

Machias.

Bancroft.

Morrill.

Armeria.

 

--•--●--•--

4.                   SECOND SQUADRON.

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Commodore W. S. SCHLEY,4 Commanding.

Brooklyn (flag)

New Orleans.

Scorpion.

Hornet.

Iowa.

Marblehead.

Suwanee.

Eagle.

Indiana.

Detroit.

Wompatuck.

Hist.

Texas.

Helena.

Osceola.

Mangrove.

 

Wilmington.

Yankton.

Manning.

 

     5.―The St. Paul, Yale, Harvard, and St. Louis are not at present assigned to either Squadron.

     6.―The Solace, Resolute, supply vessels and colliers, are not assigned to either Squadron, but will be detailed as circumstances require.

     7.―New vessels will be assigned as they arrive, and the exigencies of the service will require frequent changes between the Squadrons, which will be made from time to time.

     8.―Experience on the Cuban blockade having demonstrated the difficulties and delays incident to communication between ships, it is directed that papers shall be sent by Commanding Officers directly to the Commander-in-Chief, when, to send them through the division Commander, would impede public business, but in such exigencies the division Commander shall be informed then, or subsequently, if the matter is important, that this has been done.

     9.―The following vessels have been assigned by the Department to the Eastern Squadron, intended for Special Service, under the command of Commodore J. C. Watson.5

Oregon (flag) 

Newark.

Yankee.

Massachusetts.

Dixie.

Yosemite.

 

A supply vessel and several colliers.

William T. Sampson,

Rear Admiral,

Commander-in-Chief, U. S. Naval Force,

North Atlantic Station.

Source Note: D, DNA, RG 313, Entry 2.

Footnote 1: RAdm. Pascual Cervera y Topete’s squadron had been destroyed on 3 July and the surrender of Santiago de Cuba by Brig. Gen. José Toral y Vázquez seemed imminent. Despite new information that RAdm. Manuelde la Cámaray Libermoore’s squadron was returning to Spain, the U.S. Navy was still planning to steam there. Finally, an invasion of Puerto Rico was in the planning stages.  These events prompted the Navy Department to order the new fleet divisions.

Footnote 2: RAdm. William T. Sampson, Commander, North Atlantic Fleet.

Footnote 3: Commo. John A. Howell, Commander, 1st Blockading Squadron.

Footnote 4: Commo. Winfield S. Schley, Commander, 2nd Blockading Squadron.

Footnote 5: The Eastern Squadron, under the command of Commo. John C. Watson, was initially slated to steam for Spain.

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