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Ticonderoga V (CG-47)

1983-2004

A village in Essex County, N.Y., on La Chute River, 100 miles north of Albany. The name is an Iroquois Indian term which means "between two lakes" and refers to Lake George and Lake Champlain. Here, the French built a fort called Carillon in 1755, but it was captured four years later by British troops under General Amherst. Early in the American Revolution, on 10 May 1775, Ethan Allen and his "Green Mountain Boys" captured the fort from the British. General Sir John Burgoyne recaptured the fort in May 1777, holding it until his surrender at Saratoga, N.Y., on 17 October 1777.

V

(CG-47: displacement 9,600; length 567'; beam 55'; draft 33'; speed 30+ knots; complement 363; armament 2 5-inch, 2 Mk 41 Vertical Launch Systems (VLS) for BGM-109 Tomahawks, RIM-66 SM-2MR Standards, and RUM-139 VL-ASROC Antisubmarine Rockets, 8 RGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship missile canister launchers, 2 Mk 15 Close In Weapon Systems (CIWS), 4 .50 caliber machine guns, and 6 Mk 32 torpedo tubes, aircraft 2 Sikorsky SH-60B Light Airborne Multi-Purpose System (LAMPS) Mk III Seahawks; class Ticonderoga)

The fifth Ticonderoga (CG-47) was laid down on 21 January 1980 at Pascagoula, Miss., by the Ingalls Shipbuilding Division of Litton Industries; launched on 25 April 1981; sponsored by First Lady of the United States Nancy D. Reagan; and commissioned on 22 January 1983, Capt. Roland G. Guilbault in command.

Ticonderoga was decommissioned on 30 September 2004 at Naval Station Pascagoula, Miss., and is berthed at the Naval Sea Systems Command’s Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility, Philadelphia, Pa.

Ticonderoga is eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

Detailed history under construction.

Mark L. Evans

6 July 2015

Published:Wed Sep 30 08:53:43 EDT 2015