Naval History and Heritage Command

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Lebanon—They Came in Peace

 


Photo #: NH 107673  USS Guadalcanal

USS Guadalcanal (LPH-7) underway off Beirut, Lebanon, 13 May 1983, with several CH-46 Sea Knight and CH-53 Sea Stallion helicopters on her flight deck. Photographers: PH2 T. Lally and PH3 J. Donnelly. Official U.S. Navy photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command. Catalog#: NH 107673.


In August 1982, the governments of the United States, France, Italy, and Great Britain deployed a multinational peacekeeping force to Lebanon in an effort to stabilize the country and stop the fighting between Syria, the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), and Israel. The contingency—including the first 800 U.S. Marines from the 32nd Marine Amphibious Unit (MAU)—agreed to oversee the PLO’s evacuation and by 10 September through high-level diplomacy, the PLO left the port of Beirut. The Marines departed as well considering the mission complete. Just four days later, the president-elect of Lebanon, Bashir Gemayel, was assassinated. In response, elements of Lebanese forces avenged his death by massacring more than 1,000 unarmed Palestinians. Lebanon was once again in chaos. The multinational force was ordered back to Beirut, and by 29 September, elements of 32nd MAU had landed for a second time. 

Initially, the multinational force’s mission was to establish a presence in Beirut providing the stability necessary for the Lebanese government to regain control of the capital city and train the Lebanese armed forces to become strong enough to protect itself. Although the Marines were deemed “peacekeepers,” their presence was anything but peaceful. Hampered by a multitude of unexploded ordnance, sniper fire, and terrorist’s attacks, the presence of the Marines in Beirut turned to tragedy when on the morning of 23 October 1983 two truck bombs struck separate buildings housing U.S. Marines and French forces killing nearly 300 American and French servicemembers. It was the single deadliest day in U.S. Marine Corps history since World War II’s Iwo Jima battles.  

On 3 December, an F-14 reconnaissance flight from John F. Kennedy was fired on from Syrian-controlled territory. The following day, a strike force of 28 aircraft was launched from Independence and John F. Kennedy into the Bekaa Valley. During the engagement, two A-6 attack planes were shot down from intense ground fire. Lieutenant Mark Lange, pilot, was killed and Lieutenant Robert Goodman, bombardier-navigator, was taken prisoner. After the attack was complete, photos revealed the strike was a success. In the days following, reconnaissance flights were conducted without incident. 

In the first two months of 1984, the situation in the country had severely deteriorated. The Lebanese army was plagued by defections and desertions, and consistent heavy fighting had further reduced its capabilities. By 7 February, Beirut had been lost to Muslim and non-Muslim militia. At this point, the Marine presence could no longer contribute to the hoped-for national reconciliation; so on that day, President Ronald Reagan ordered the Marines to withdrawal to Sixth Fleet ships offshore. By 23 February, the Marines began movement to rejoin their supporting ships ending 17 months of continuous operations in the country. 

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Notable People

Notable Ships

Media

Additional Resources

Selected Imagery


Vice Admiral J.R. Hogg

Vice Admiral J. R. Hogg, Commander, Seventh Fleet, shook hands with 32nd Marine Amphibious Unit Commander, Colonel James M. Meade, after he arrived on the beach aboard a lighter amphibious resupply cargo (LARC-V) vehicle, 20 September 1982. National Archives identifier: 6381727.



U.S. Marines drove a lighter amphibious resupply cargo vehicle (LARC-V)

U.S. Marines drove a lighter amphibious resupply cargo vehicle (LARC-V) aboard utility landing craft 1657 (LCU-1657), 1 September 1982. National Archives identifier: 6370416.



Marines from the 32nd Marine Amphibious Unit

Marines from the 32nd Marine Amphibious Unit walked down the bow ramp of the tank landing ship USS Manitowoc (LST-1180). National Archives identifier: 6370377.



U.S. Marines patrol the streets of Beirut

U.S. Marines patrol the streets of Beirut, Lebanon in a truck. The Marines were deployed to Lebanon as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6415893.



U.S. Marine sniper scouts

U.S. Marine sniper scouts used surveillance equipment to study the surrounding territory. The Marines deployed to Lebanon as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6415806.



A CH-46E Sea Knight helicopter

A CH-46E Sea Knight helicopter hovers above the U.S. Marine Corps encampment at Beirut International Airport. National Archives identifier: 6415738.



The explosion of the Marine Corps building in Beirut, Lebanon

The explosion of the Marine Corps building in Beirut, Lebanon, created a large cloud of smoke that was visible from miles away. On 23 October 1983, 241 servicemembers were killed by a truck bomb at a Marine compound while serving as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force. Official U.S. Marine Corps photograph.



The bombed remains of the U.S. Marine barracks at Beirut International Airport

The bombed remains of the U.S. Marine barracks at Beirut International Airport stood as a reminder of the terrorist attack in which 241 Marines lost their lives. The Marines deployed to Lebanon as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6415852.



USS Nashville (LPD-13)

Two U.S. Marine lighter amphibious resupply cargo vehicles (LARC-V) left the amphibious transport dock USS Nashville (LPD-13), 1 September 1982. National Archives identifier: 6370475.



U.S. Marines at Beirut International Airport in Lebanon

U.S. Marines marched across the runway apron of Beirut International Airport in Lebanon upon their arrival. National Archives identifier: 6370471.



USS Nashville (LPD-13)

A U.S. Marine lighter amphibious resupply cargo vehicle (LARC-V) moved toward the amphibious transport dock USS Nashville (LPD-13), 1 September 1982. National Archives identifier: 6370425.



USS Saginaw (LST-1188)

Port bow view of the tank landing ship USS Saginaw (LST-1188) approaching the pier. The ship disembarked vehicles used by Marines assigned to Lebanon as part of a multinational peacekeeping force after a confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6370386.



U.S. Marines armed with M16 rifles

U.S. Marines armed with M16 rifles took cover behind sandbags during a terrorist attack, 1 April 1983. The Marines deployed to Lebanon as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6415703.



F-14 Tomcat aircraft

An F-14 Tomcat aircraft takes off from the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Independence (CV-62) during operations off the coast of Beirut, Lebanon, 6 December 1983. National Archives identifier: 6381804.



USS New Jersey (BB-62) fires a salvo

USS New Jersey (BB-62) fires a salvo from her 16/50 guns during a deployment off the coast of Beirut, Lebanon, 9 January 1984. Photographed by PH1 Ron Garrison. Official U.S. Navy photograph from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection. Catalog #: DN-SC-84-06362.



24th Marine Amphibious Unit's departure from Beirut

A rough terrain forklift loads platforms onto a utility landing craft (LCU 1644) as another landing craft stands nearby. The loading operations were part of the 24th Marine Amphibious Unit's departure from Beirut. The Marines deployed to Lebanon as part of a multi-national peacekeeping force following confrontation between Israeli forces and the Palestine Liberation Organization. National Archives identifier: 6415841.


Published: Wed Oct 09 16:15:46 EDT 2019