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Records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, 1798-1921

Correspondence, 1798-1918

Letters and Telegrams Sent

1. Registers of Letters Sent.
Dec. 1823-Sept.1884. 97 vols. 17 ft.

Each volume covers a chronological period, usually several months. Thereunder, through July 1843, entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or title of addressee and thereunder chronologically. Beginning in August 1843, indexes to individual offices and yards or stations were added in separate sections. The volumes are numbered as follows: 1-16, an unnumbered volume, 18-42, 1-15, 18-27, 29-56, and 2 unnumbered volumes.

Registers to parts of the letters described in entries 3-4, 6-10, 12-13, 15-18, and 20-25. Register entries give date of letter; name or title of addressee; usually place of residence, ship, or station; and a brief summary of the contents of the letter. The registers are of limited use because they do not show the particular series in which a particular letter can be found.

2. Register of Letters Sent to Port Admirals and Commandants.
Nov. 1869-Jan. 1877. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by name of navy yard and thereunder chronologically. For each navy yard, the register shows the name of the commandant and a list of letters sent to him with the date, a brief summary, and the page number in volume 87 of Entry 3, where the letter appears.

3. Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Mar. 16, 1798-Nov. 13, 1886. 97 vols. 21 ft.

Arranged chronologically. The volumes are numbered 1-20, 20 1/2, 20 3/4, an unnumbered volume, and 21-94. The individual letters are numbered in volumes 20 1/2, 20 3/4, and the unnumbered volume. A name index prepared contemporaneously by the Secretary's office is in each volume. In addition, volumes 1-3 and 12 have typewritten name and subject indexes prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library. For registers of letters for the period December 1823-September 1884, see entry 1.

Letters dated from March 1798 to September 1868 are bound in volumes entitled "Letters to Officers, Ships of War." Letters dated 1798-1800 are addressed to all categories of U.S. Navy and U.S. Marine Corps officers, including warrant officers, line officers, medical personnel, commandants of yards, and squadron commanders. Later volumes are progressively less inclusive. Beginning with the volume for 1801, letters sent to Marine Corps officers are not included in this series. Letters to chiefs of bureaus (the bureau system was established in 1842) are not included in this series; however, letters to the Governor of the Naval Asylum (established in 1833) and Superintendent of the Naval Academy (established 1845) are included. For the period 1861-68, letters sent to officers commanding squadrons or flotillas are not included, if they relate to squadron operations. Beginning in October 1868, most of the addressees of the letters were either commandants of navy yards and naval stations or the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy (October 1868-November 1869 and August 1884-November 1886). Although few letters to other officers are included after September 1868, the date coverage of the later volumes and their numbering indicate that they were maintained with the earlier volumes and were considered a single series by the Secretary's office.

A number of letters for the period 1798-1815 order and instruct officers assigned to the command of vessels during the Quasi-war with France, the War with Tripoli, and the War of 1812. Other letters of that period deal with supplies, equipment, and ammunition of a ship; its complement; and the types of reports its commander had to submit to the Department during or after a voyage.

Most the Secretary's letters to naval officers for the period 1815-69 concern personnel appointments and commissions, resignations, discharges, assignments to duty, and disciplinary actions, including courts-martial. Letters give advice to officers expecting diplomatic contacts with foreign governments and instructions for the slave trade interdiction. Beginning in 1856 telegrams were copied into the volumes. Before 1860 general orders, circulars, and other directives were sometimes copied. Some letters deal with such wartime matters as security at navy yards, joint operations with the Army, distribution of prize money, and treatment of foreigners captured in neutral vessels violating the blockade. At the close of the Civil War, there are letters to naval officials relating to the search for John Wilkes Booth and custody of his body during the Lincoln assassination investigation.

In the Secretary's letters to the commandants of navy yards and naval stations after September 1868, he ordered them to carry out sentences of courts-martial, appointed them to retirement and examining boards, and provided instructions on administrative and personnel matters, including pay. Letters to the Superintendent of the Naval Academy relate to such subjects as assignment of naval officers to duty at the Academy, the use of naval vessels there, textbooks, uniforms, exhibits, and assignments, requests for leave, disciplinary actions, and other matters concerning cadets.

The letters in volumes 1-20, 20 1/2, 20 3/4, and 21-84 have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M149, Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to Officers, 1798-1868.

4. Letters Sent to the Secretary of War.
June 20, 1798-June 15, 1824. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of addressees and subjects.

The letters fall into the following distinct time periods.

1798-1801--These letters, which amount to over half of the content of the volume, include requests for supplies, powder, ordnance, and the use of Army troops to relieve marine guards on naval vessels and at various towns where French prisoners of war were being held. A letter of March 11, 1800, concerns the establishment of a cannon foundry at Harpers Ferry, VA. Most of the letters for 1801 requested signature of the Secretary of War on Treasury warrants.

1803-12--Most of these letters concern the loan, sale, transfer, or exchange of ordnance between the War and Navy Departments. There are no letters dated 1811 and only one for 1812.

1813-14--Many of the letters are concerned with the problems of delivering cannons to the naval vessels fighting on the Great Lakes.

1815-24--These letters pertain to various subjects, including a military survey of the coast of North Carolina, the detail of Army officers as members of courts-martial convened to try Marine Corps officers, and the transport of Army officers on naval vessels.

For registers, see entry 1. Later letters to the Secretary of War are among those described in entry 20.

5. Name Index to Part of the Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
Dec. 5, 1834-Dec. 9, 1835. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or occasionally position of addressee.

Index to addressees for volume 21 of the letters described in entry 6. Index entries give name or position and page number. This index has been reproduced as part of roll 8 of NARA Microfilm Publication M209, Miscellaneous Letters Sent ("General Letter Books"), 1798-1886.

6. Miscellaneous Letters Sent
("General Letter Books").

June 18, 1798-Nov. 13, 1886. 110 vols. 23 ft. Arranged for the most part chronologically. The volumes are numbered 1-18, 18A, 18B, and 19-107. There are two volumes numbered 32, the second being a corrected version of the first. A typewritten name and subject index prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library is in volume 1, and name indexes prepared contemporaneously by the Secretary's office are in the other volumes. The indexes are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or office in volumes 2-32 and 65-107 and alphabetically by first two letters of surname or office in volumes 33-64. The index for volume 21 is bound separately (see entry 5). The staff of the National Archives and Records Administration has prepared a comprehensive name and subject card index for volumes 1-36. For registers, see entry 1.

The letters were addressed to merchants, inventors, contractors, accountants, families of naval personnel, former naval officers, civilian employees of the Navy Department, U.S. Army officials, state officials, applicants for appointments, and a wide range of other non-U.S. Navy correspondents for the entire period covered by these volumes. The earliest volumes include letters to some naval officials. The volumes include letters sent to Navy agents, 1798-1813 and Members of Congress, except for the years 1820-31.

The contents of the letters are disparate in nature. The subjects for the years 1798-1815 reflect the Secretary's direct involvement in purchasing and transporting timber to build naval vessels, arranging contracts for various supplies, constructing and equipping vessels, authorizing pensions, and appointing officers and civilian personnel. After 1815 many of the letters are to appointment seekers, their friends and relatives, and Members of Congress who had written to the Secretary on their behalf; others are to relatives of enlisted men or to creditors of naval personnel. For the Civil War period, there are letters concerning shipbuilding on the western rivers, distribution of prize money, congressional medals of honor, individuals imprisoned for blockade running, recruiting, and new technologies. Letters to John Ericsson relate the design and contract for USS Monitor.

The letters in these volumes, except those in the first version of volume 32, have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M209, Miscellaneous Letters Sent ("General Letter Books"), 1798-1886.

7. Letters Sent to the Secretary of State.

June 20, 1798-June 14, 1824. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is no index. For registers for 1823 and 1824, see entry 1.

This series contains letters transmitting documents, letters requesting assistance or information, and letters sent in reply to inquiries. The transmittal letters accompanied documents detailing the illegal detention of Americans aboard British vessels prior to the War of 1812, lists of French vessels and property captured between October 1800 and March 1801 by U.S. warships, and letters received from naval officers on matters of interest to the Secretary of State. Other documents that were transmitted are not copied in the volume.

Among the letters of request are letters asking assistance in securing copies of U.S. laws for naval officers and Navy agents, and letters asking for instructions for U.S. Navy commanders on the Great Lakes during the War of 1812. There are also letters in reply to inquiries on such matters as complaints made by the British Government against U.S. naval officers and vessels on the Great Lakes.

For later letters to the Secretary of State, see entry 20.

8. Letters Sent to the Treasury Department.

June 22, 1798-June 5, 1821. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. A brief typewritten history describing Navy Department appropriations for the period 1798-1803, prepared by Rosa Pendleton Chiles, a member of the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library, precedes the name and subject index in the first volume (June 1798-August 1803). There is no index in the second volume (September 1803-June 1821).

An act of July 16, 1798 (1 Stat. 610), authorized the Treasurer of the United States to disburse money appropriated for the Navy Department by warrant from the Secretary of the Treasury. Most of these letters requested that the Secretary of the Treasury furnish these warrants to the Treasurer. Other letters deal with estimates of expenses, cooperation between officers commanding U.S. naval vessels and revenue officers, the Navy Hospital Fund, and the sale of gunboats. Also included are a number of letters dated from July 1798 to February 1800 sent to Tench Coxe, Purveyor of Public Supplies, directing him to procure food, uniforms, equipment, ammunition, and other supplies requested by commanders of vessels and Navy agents; a few letters to the Principal Clerk of the Treasury Department and the Comptroller of the Treasury concerning the settlement of naval officers' accounts; and a few letters of inquiry to the Auditor of the Navy Department concerning vouchers accounting for contingent expenses.

For later letters sent to the Treasury Department, see entry 20.

9. Letters Sent to the President.
July 6, 1798-June 26, 1824. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically with some overlapping between the two volumes. A typewritten name and subject index prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library and a register arranged by subject are in the first volume (July 1798-September 1820). A name index with a few subject entries prepared contemporaneously by the Secretary's office is in the second volume (March 1820-June 1824). For registers of the letters for 1823 and 1824, see entry 1. The first volume contains a typed history of the Navy Department, 1798-1820, and notes on early appointments in the Navy. The history was prepared by Rosa Pendleton Chiles, a member of the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

Most of the letters pertain to nominations, appointments, commissions, warrants, courts-martial, and other personnel-related matters. The letters dated between September 1798 and April 1799 include reports of captures of French vessels by U.S. naval vessels commanded by Capt. Samuel Nicholson, Capt. Stephen Decatur, and others and of U.S. naval engagements in the West Indies. There are also a letter of September 16, 1805, discussing U.S. relations with Spain and plans for offensive and defensive war with that country and a letter of December 22, 1806, proposing that the President withdraw Gen. James Wilkinson and U.S. troops from the Sabine River and that letters from Col. Aaron Burr be intercepted.

For later letters to the President, see entry 20. For annual reports to the President, 1824-86, see entry 10.

10. Letters and Reports Sent to Chairmen of Congressional Committees, Presiding Officers of the House and Senate, and the President.
Dec. 24, 1798-July 28, 1886. 18 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically, except that from December 1842 to March 1845 letters to Senate officials were copied in a separate volume (9). There are name indexes in volumes 2, 5-7, and 12-17 and name and subject indexes in volumes 1, 3, 4, and 8-11. Volume 18 has both a name and a name and subject index. The name indexes in volumes 12-18 have a brief description of the content of each letter. For registers covering most of the volumes, see entry 1.

More than half of the letters and reports were addressed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, the President of the Senate, and the Chairmen of the House and Senate Committees on Naval Affairs and concern such matters as changes in the organization of the Department, increases in rank for naval officers, and pay increases for naval officers and civilian employees. There are also reports of surveys and experiments and of major naval engagements addressed to chairmen of other permanent congressional committees, including the House Committees on Ways and Means and on Appropriations, the Senate Committees on Finance and on Foreign Relations and the House and Senate Committees on Claims. Annual reports of the Secretary to the President with accompanying documents for many of the years from 1824 to 1886 have been copied, and there are a small number of other reports and resolutions addressed to the President.

There are also letters and reports to chairmen of special committees. Examples include the Senate Committee on the Conduct of the War during the 1860s and the House Committee on Reform in the Civil Service during the 1870s.

Many of the documents have been published in American State Papers (Washington, DC, 1832-61), Class VI, Naval Affairs, 4 vols.; the Congressional Serial Set; Naval Documents Related to the Quasi-War Between the United States and France (Washington, DC, 1935-38), 7 vols.; or Naval Documents Related to the United States Wars With the Barbary Powers (Washington, DC, 1939-44), 6 vols.

For other letters and reports to Members of Congress for the time period covered by this series, see entries 6 and 18.

11. Letters Sent Concerning Supplies for the Dey of Algiers.
Mar. 26, 1803-May 24, 1808. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are only 44 pages of letters, nearly all of them dated before September 1805. There is a name and subject index.

The letters are to Israel Whelen, Purveyor of Public Supplies at Philadelphia; Navy agents, particularly Daniel Bedinger of the Norfolk agency; Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin; representatives of the State Department; and Capt. Thomas Tingey, Superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard. They relate to the procurement and shipment of timber, muslins, shawls, and other supplies for the Dey (ruler) of Algiers. Some of the letters to the Navy agents and State Department representatives concern passports for U.S. merchant vessels transporting the supplies. The supplies were furnished to the Dey as tribute payments in return for his pledges not to attack American shipping.

12. Letters Sent Concerning the Building of Naval Gunboats.
Dec. 21, 1803-Dec. 29, 1808. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index in the volume.

An act of Congress of February 28, 1803 (2 Stat. 206), provided for the construction of not more than 15 gunboats. Additional acts passed during the years 1805-7 increased the number by 263, but only 176 gunboats were actually built.

Most of the letters were addressed to naval officers and Navy agents authorized to make contracts on behalf of the Navy for the construction of gunboats and to supervise their construction. Included are a number of letters to Naval Constructor Josiah Fox and Capt. Thomas Tingey, both at the Washington Navy Yard, regarding construction plans for the gunboats. Other letters were addressed to private shipbuilders constructing gunboats and to naval officers ordered to serve on them.

13. Letters Sent to Commandants of Navy Yards and Naval Stations and to Navy Agents.
Jan. 2, 1808-Dec. 20, 1865. 10 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Name indexes in volumes 1-7 are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname. In volumes 8-10 they are arranged for the most part by initial letter of name of port or other location to which the agent was assigned, with letters to naval storekeepers usually indexed under the letter "S." For registers of most of the letters, see entry 1.

The letters to commandants, 1808-24, relate to the general administration of navy yards and naval stations, including the convening of courts-martial, but more especially to matters pertaining to the construction and repair of vessels, to supplies, and to personnel. Most of the letters prior to 1812 were addressed to Capt. Thomas Tingey who was in charge of the Washington Navy Yard.

Letters to Navy agents, 1814-65, contain instructions for the purchase of pistols, swords, bunting, provisions (food), copper, lead, and other supplies. They also relate to the sale of disposable vessels. Navy agents were appointed by the President, with the advice and consent of the Senate, for four-year terms and were paid a stated percentage of the money that they disbursed. When the Office of Purveyor of Public Supplies was abolished in March 1812, responsibilities relating to negotiating contracts and making purchases of naval stores and supplies were given to the Navy agents, who had been serving primarily as disbursing officials.

Some letters were addressed to live-oak agents in Florida and Georgia, to companies serving as temporary agents in foreign ports, and to naval storekeepers, pursers, naval constructors, surgeons, and other officers at yards and stations. The letters in these volumes have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M441, Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to Commandants and Navy Agents, 1808-1865. Letters to commandants before 1808 and after 1824 are among those described in entry 3. Letters to Navy agents before 1814 are among those described in entry 6.

14. "Confidential" Letters Sent ("Private Letters").
Feb. 1, 1813-Mar. 26, 1822. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume contains a typewritten name and subject index prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library and a name index prepared contemporaneously by the Secretary's office. Twelve letters were copied for the period January 2-20, 1840.

Most of these letters were addressed to commanding officers of vessels, squadrons, navy yards, and stations and to Navy agents. A small number were to Members of Congress, the Secretaries of State and War, and private individuals. The majority are dated 1813-15 and include plans for naval operations on the Great Lakes, orders to Navy agents to procure guns and other materials needed on the lakes, and instructions to commanding officers of vessels to intercept British commercial vessels off the European coast and to protect U.S. commerce in the West Indies. A number of 1814 letters addressed to Capt. Joshua Barney concern American defensive operations along the Patuxent River in Maryland and the defense of Washington. Some letters discuss allies of the British.

Most of the letters for the years 1816-22 contain confidential instructions to officers en route to the Mediterranean and to Latin America or discuss the suppression of the slave trade, the relocation of Africans rescued from slave vessels, and conditions in the Mediterranean. Most of the letters for 1840 were addressed to Lt. John S. Paine, commanding the U.S. schooner Grampus, who was ordered to Havana, Cuba, to give testimony concerning slaves captured on the Amistad.

For later confidential letters sent, see entries 23, 24, and 29-31.

15. Letters Sent to the Board of Navy Commissioners.
Apr. 26, 1815-Aug. 27, 1842. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. The first volume is unnumbered, and the other two volumes are numbered 3 and 4. There are no letters for the period August 12, 1829-December 31, 1835; presumably they were copied in a volume 2, which is missing. Each volume includes name and subject index and an additional index for the second volume (volume 3) has been inserted in the volume. Index entries contain a brief description of the content of each letter. For registers, see entry 1.

Included are requests from the Secretary to prepare vessels for cruises, to provide estimates of naval expenses and other information requested by congressional committees, to consider the procurement of supplies either by open market purchase or by contract, and to give opinions on the fitness of officer candidates for promotions.

Most of the original letters for the missing period are likely among the letters received by the board (see entry 315). There are also press copies of letters to the board for the period January-November 1833 (see entry 16). Enclosures usually were not copied but sometimes are among the letters received (entry 315).

16. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Board of Navy Commissioners.
Feb. 25, 1832-Nov. 25, 1833. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume has a name and subject index, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname, position title, or subject, which contains a brief description of the content of each letter. For registers, see entry 1.

These letters relate to the same subjects as the letters described in entry 15. For the period covered by this series there are no handwritten copies except for a few inserted in this volume. The originals of most of the letters are among those described in entry 315.

17. Letters Sent Relating to African Colonization.
Jan. 17, 1820-Apr. 13, 1840. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume includes six letters dated from 1843 to 1858. There is a name index in the volume. For registers of the letters from 1823 through 1840, see entry 1.

An act of Congress of March 2, 1807 (2 Stat. 426), prohibited the importation of slaves into the United States after January 1, 1808, and provided that U.S. naval vessels could seize and bring into port any vessels carrying slaves destined for the United States. An act of March 3, 1810 (3 Stat. 532), authorized the President to make regulations and arrangements for the "safe keeping, support, and removal, beyond the limits of the United States" of Africans seized from slave vessels bound for the United States. He also was authorized to appoint agents to reside on the coast of Africa to receive the returned Africans. The responsibility for overseeing the agents was delegated to the Secretary of the Navy.

Included are letters of appointment and instruction to the principal and assistant agents designated to receive Africans at Sherbro Island, Cape Mesurado, and Liberia in western Africa; letters to Navy agents requesting that they procure supplies for the reception centers and vessels to transport the Africans; letters to U.S. district attorneys, U.S. marshals, and other Federal officials involved with the temporary placement of the Africans and claims made upon the Government because of their seizure; and letters to President John Quincy Adams, Secretary of State Henry Clay, Francis Scott Key, bankers, merchants, and officers and agents of the American Colonization Society.

Other letters sent relating to African colonization during the periods 1816-22 and after 1840 are among those described in entries 4 and 6, respectively. The letters sent in this series and the letters received have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M205, Correspondence of the Secretary of the Navy Relating to African Colonization, 1819-1844.

18. Letters Sent to Members of Congress.
Nov. 16, 1820-Dec. 2, 1831. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index in each volume. For registers, see entry 1.

These letters were sent in response to communications received from Members of the House of Representatives and the Senate recommending young men for appointments as midshipmen or naval surgeons or for commission in the Marine Corps; asking the Secretary to settle claims or to reduce courts-martial sentences; or otherwise requesting the Secretary's intervention in matters relating to personnel of the Navy Department.

For earlier and later letters sent to Members of Congress on these matters, see entry 6.

19. Name and Subject Indexes to Part of the Letters Sent to the President and Executive Agencies.
Apr. 2, 1831-Nov. 10, 1848. 3 vols. 2 in.

Each index is arranged in alphabetical sections for the most part by position of addressee, but there are also entries for subjects of letters, including persons. The indexes cover the first part of volume 2 (April 1831-May 1833), the last part of volume 4 (August 1841-June 1844), and volume 5 (July 1844-November 1848) of entry 20.

In addition to the page number, an indication of the content is noted for most letters. In general, these indexes are more detailed than those in the volumes of letters. They have been reproduced as part of NARA Microfilm Publication M472, Letters sent by the Secretary of the Navy to the President and Executive Agencies, 1821-1886.

20. Letters Sent to the President and Executive Agencies.
July 2, 1821-Nov. 13, 1886. 41 vols. 9 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are indexes in each volume arranged by position (President and Cabinet Secretaries, Commissioners), most of which give a brief description of the content of each letter. For additional separate indexes for volumes 2, 4, and 5, see entry 19. For registers, see entry 1. For earlier letters to the President, see entry 9; for earlier letters to the Secretary of the Treasury, see entry 8; for earlier letters to the Secretary of State, see entry 7.

Addressees included the President, the Secretaries of War and State, the Attorney General, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, and the Fourth Auditor and other officers of the Treasury Department. After 1829 letters were sent to the Commissioner of Patents, Commissioner of Pensions, and the Postmaster General. There are also some letters to the British Ambassador, the Vice President, and the Assistant Secretary of the Navy and letters sent by the Secretary of the Navy, when he was away from Washington, to the Acting Secretary. These letters relate to the mutual responsibilities of the Navy Department, the President, and other executive agencies in the areas of pay, appointment, promotion, and retirement of Navy officers; pensions for former enlisted men; relations with foreign governments; military and naval cooperation; contracts with private firms; and mail delivery. The large number of letters for the Civil War period deal mostly with joint Army-Navy military operations and relations with Great Britain in connection with the blockade. For 1861 and most years after 1870, there are annual reports of the Secretary of the Navy.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M472, Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to the President and Executive Agencies, 1821-1886.

21. Letters Sent Relating to the Naval Asylum, Navy Hospitals, and the Navy Hospital Fund.
July 9, 1834-Sept. 30, 1840. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Attached to the flyleaf is a typewritten index to names of pensioners in Navy hospitals and the Naval Asylum that probably was prepared in the Office of Naval Records and Library. An index to addressees is bound in the volume and arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname. Apparently it was prepared contemporaneously in the Secretary's office. For registers, see entry 1.

A Navy Hospital Fund to be administered by three commissioners, the Secretaries of War, the Navy, and the Treasury, was established by an act of February 26, 1811 (2 Stat. 650). The act required the commissioners to establish hospitals and an asylum for old and disabled seamen and marines. During the more than 20 years before any hospitals were erected, temporary facilities at navy yards were used. Property was acquired in 1826 in Philadelphia for the site of the Naval Asylum, and a building was constructed and opened for occupancy in 1833. An act of March 4, 1840 (5 Stat. 369), transferred all pension business previously handled by the Navy Department to the Office of the Commissioner of Pensions.

Most of the letters were to the commandants of navy yards at Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola; the commandant of the naval station at Baltimore; the Commandant of the Marine Corps, and the Governor of the Naval Asylum; and they authorized the admission of officers, seamen, and marines to Navy hospitals and the Naval Asylum. There are also letters to persons seeking admission to the hospitals and the asylum, to Navy agents who had requested advances to pay transportation costs of seamen and marines; to the Board of Navy Commissioners and private individuals pertaining to the hospitals and asylum; and to the Fourth Auditor and Solicitor of the Treasury concerning rations for employees, the deed to hospital land near Norfolk, and other matters.

Later letters to the Governor of the Naval Asylum are among those described in entry 3. A few letters concerning the hospital fund are with the letters to the Treasury Department (see entry 8).

22. Letters Sent to Chiefs of Navy Bureaus and Offices.
Sept. 10, 1842-Nov. 13, 1886. 7 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index by name of bureau chief or bureau in each volume. A brief description is given of the content of each letter. The letters are also registered in the volumes described in entry 1.

Many of the letters advised the bureau chiefs of changes in assigned duties, legislation passed by the Congress affecting them, and impending inspections of their installations. Others requested information and advice on contracts for equipment and supplies. For the Civil War period, there are many letters concerning the detail, appointment, and removal of naval officers at yards, stations, and the bureaus; the appointment of civilians at navy yards and other shore facilities; the construction and repair of ships; and ordnance and supplies.

For other records concerning the bureaus, see entries 386-422. The letters sent have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M480, Letters Sent by the Secretary of the Navy to Chiefs of Navy Bureaus, 1842-1886.

23. "Confidential" and Other Letters, Telegrams, and Cablegrams Sent to Commanding Officers of Squadrons and Vessels.
Sept. 12, 1843-Nov. 6, 1886. 13 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically in volumes numbered 1-9 and 1-4. There are indexes to names of officers in the first 10 volumes and to squadrons or naval forces in the last 3. In the first volume, if there is more than one letter to the same addressee on a page, the number is written above the page number. Indexes in the first 10 volumes give brief descriptions of the content of most letters. For registers, see entry 1. See Appendix B for a list of commanding offices of squadrons for whom there are letters received (see entry 45), along with the dates of coverage and names of their flagships. For earlier letters to commanding officers of squadrons and vessels, see entry 3; for confidential letters to them, March 1861-October 1876, see entry 25.

The communications in these volumes frequently contain orders detailing routes to be followed, ports to be entered, and passengers to be taken on board and instructions regarding the conduct of officers newly assigned to the command of squadrons and the extension of courtesies to American and foreign dignitaries. Courts-martial, promotions, transfers, and the repair of vessels and changes in their names also are discussed. There are also letters to volunteer (acting) officers who commanded ships during the Civil War.

Many of the letters for 1847 and 1848 were sent to the commanding officer of the Home Squadron in the Gulf of Mexico and concern the prosecution of the war with Mexico. During the Civil War period, letters and telegrams regarding the blockade of Southern ports, belligerent rights, "suspicious" or Confederate vessels, contraband, prisoners of war, and prize vessels were addressed to the flag officers commanding the squadrons along the Atlantic coast and the squadrons from the cape of Florida to the Gulf of Mexico. There are also letters and telegrams to the commanding officers of flotillas (Bomb, James River, Western or Mississippi, and Potomac), and letters discussing the formation of these flotillas. The last volume includes letters to officers commanding naval forces, such as Naval Forces Pacific and Naval Forces North Atlantic.

The first four volumes (September 1843-September 1861) were at one time referred to as "confidential" letter books. The first volume (September 1843-February 1849) contains a large number of letters marked "confidential," "strictly confidential," or "secret and confidential." Circular letters are included after 1861. For the most part enclosures have not been copied with the letters.

24. Letters and Telegrams Sent to Naval Officers on Special Duty.
Nov. 16, 1860-Nov. 23, 1886. 18 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically in volumes numbered 1-15 and 1-3. The last three volumes are identified on the spines as "Letters to Officers Generally." There are name indexes in the individual volumes. For registers through September 1884, see entry 1.

Approximately half of the letters and telegrams were sent to medical and pay officers, engineers, naval constructors, naval attachés and to commissioned officers at various yards and stations and on leave. Other correspondents included the Superintendent, Commandant of Cadets, and professors at the U.S. Naval Academy; the Superintendent of the Hydrographic Office; the Superintendent of the Nautical Almanac Office; and the Governor of the Naval Asylum. They relate to such matters as the detail of officers to boards and special commissions, convening of general and summary courts-martial, courts of inquiry, examination boards, and review boards; charges and specifications brought against officers and court-martial sentences; resignations and dismissals from the service; and pay and accounts of officers. Many of the letters relate to travel orders or travel expense accounts. Letters of admonition and reprimand to officers as well as congratulatory letters are included. Letters to the Superintendent of the Naval Academy relate to the admission of new cadets.

For earlier letters sent to commanding officers of vessels and other commissioned and warrant officers, and the Superintendent and other Naval Academy officials, see entry 3. For letters to the Superintendent of the Naval Asylum, 1834-40, see entry 21.

25. "Confidential" Letters and Telegrams Sent.
Mar. 11, 1861-Oct. 13, 1876. 1 vol. 2 in.

The volume is arranged chronologically but contains an unusually large number of letters copied out of strict chronological order. There are no letters from January 1866 through May 1869, and there are two letters dated May 10, 1878, and December 5, 1879. There is a name index in the volume. For registers, see entry 1.

The letters were addressed to commandants of navy yards; commanders of squadrons or naval forces, flotillas, and vessels; the Commandant of the Marine Corps; and bureau chiefs. The letters often forwarded intelligence reports and consular reports from Great Britain during the Civil War. Most of the letters and telegrams are for the Civil War period and concern operations against the Confederates, movements of blockade-runners, employees suspected of disloyalty, and frauds at navy yards. Some of them contain orders to officers, and a few of the telegrams were sent in cipher.

The volume contains only a small number of letters for each of the years from 1869 to 1876. Many of them deal with Spanish vessels in the waters off Haiti and Cuba, including the capture by a Spanish vessel of the Virginius and the subsequent mobilization of U.S. naval vessels. Other letters concern measures taken to prevent the departure from New York of gunboats built for the Spanish Government. For other confidential letters sent by the Secretary, see entries 14, 23, and 29-30.

26. Register of Telegrams Sent and Received.
June 1861-Apr. 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries for the telegrams sent and telegrams received are on alternate pages, each arranged chronologically.

Entries give date, name of writer or addressee, place from which or to which sent, and the number of words. Most of the telegrams were exchanged with commandants of naval stations or commanding officers of squadrons. For many of the actual telegrams sent, see entries 3 and 23. For many of the telegrams received see entries 45 and 51.

27. Telegrams Sent to Naval Officers.
Sept. 1, 1869-Sept. 18, 1871. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of these telegrams were sent through the War Department Telegraph Office by the Secretary of the Navy and his bureau chiefs to naval officers, including commandants of navy yards and the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy. They relate to duty assignments, examinations of officers, promotions, and other personnel matters. A few were sent to private citizens on unofficial matters and to Members of Congress regarding midshipmen candidates. On the flyleaves of both volumes appear notations that the volumes were transferred to the Navy Department by the Old Records Division of the Army Adjutant General's Office in February 1928.

28. Translations of Messages Sent in Cipher.
Oct. 1888-Dec. 1911. 4 vols. and 2 binders. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically. The first volume also contains messages received for the period November 3, 1888-December 14, 1897.

Messages are press copies of typed letters originally sent in code. Generally, the letters are addressed to commanders of squadrons or ships or naval attachés in foreign locations. The messages relate for the most part to operations during the Spanish-American War and the Philippine Insurrection and to operations in response to the political situation in various parts of Latin America and other parts of the world. Included are messages to Commodore George Dewey at Hong Kong in 1898 containing orders for the distribution of vessels to the blockade of Manila and to Commodore William T. Sampson at Cuba.

29. "Confidential" Communications Sent.
Sept. 27, 1893-July 31, 1917. 10 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, except that there is much overlapping between the first two volumes. Some of the volumes have name and subject indexes, which often contain brief summaries of the letters.

The letters for 1893-1911 are press copies; the letters for 1912-17 are carbons marked "green copies." The letters, telegrams, memorandums, and endorsements are to commanders of fleets and squadrons, commandants of navy yards and other installations, naval attachés in London and Paris, bureaus and offices of the Department, other naval officers, superintending constructors, and inspectors of naval materials, the President, the Secretary of State, the Attorney General, private attorneys, and heads of manufacturing companies. They relate to frauds and irregularities in the manufacture of armor, the Secretary's proposed trip to London in 1897 to determine whether a monopolistic combination existed between American and European armor makers, violations by British sealing schooners of the Bering Sea Award Act of 1894 (28 Stat. 52), corrections to codes and war portfolios, visits of foreigners to naval vessels and yards, the disposition of German cruisers held at Philadelphia and interned personnel, war mobilization plans, the Navy's 1918 shipbuilding program, and the sending of cipher messages and confidential publications.

30. "Confidential" Communications Sent Relating to World War I.
July 1, 1917-Aug. 31, 1918. 9 binders. 3 ft.

Arranged in nine binders chronologically by time period and thereunder for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of surname of addressee or name of office. Communications addressed to more than one official are together before the other letters in each binder.

Communications consist of carbon copies (marked "pink copies") of letters, memorandums, and endorsements sent by the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of Naval Operations to Commanders-in-Chief of fleets; force, squadron, division, and detachment commanders; chiefs of Navy Department bureaus; commandants of naval districts and navy yards; the General Board; the Secretary of State; and private owners and shipbuilders. The communications concern the general conduct of World War I, including such matters as the preparation of merchant vessels to receive armed guards, operation of the armed guard vessels, construction of submarines and development of antisubmarine devices, installation of sound detection devices on naval vessels, vessel collisions, intelligence work in the Far East, oil shipments to Great Britain, and the return of disabled soldiers to the United States on naval transports.

31. Press Copies of Communications Sent Concerning the Construction of Battleships for the Argentine Naval Commission.
Apr. 4, 1910-Apr. 11, 1910. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

A memorandum to four Navy Department bureaus; two letters to the Presidents of the Argentine Naval Commission and the Fare River Shipbuilding Company of Quincy, MA, respectively; and six endorsements to the Office of Naval Intelligence.

Letters and Telegrams Received

32. Registers of Letters Received.
Dec. 1823-Jan. 1886. 103 vols. 23 ft.

Each volume covers a chronological period. Within volumes entries are arranged for the most part alphabetically by first letter or first two letters of surname or title of writer and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt. Beginning in 1842, separate sections were provided for letters from yards, stations, bureaus, and some other offices.

Entries provide date of letter and date on which it was received; name and usually rank or position of writer; ship, station, or residence of writer; initials or surname of clerk handling the letter; and a one-sentence summary of its content.

Letters from almost every series of letters received by the Secretary of the Navy are registered in these volumes. The registers, however, are of limited use; for they give no indication of the series in which a particular letter can be found.

33. Supplementary Registers of Letters Received.
Aug. 1844-Dec. 1858. 11 vols. 1 ft.

Each volume covers a particular period of time. Within each volume, entries are arranged alphabetically by name of squadron, station, or person and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt.

Most of the entries are duplicates of those in entry 32, but are in a briefer format. Entries include date of letter; date of receipt; surname or title of writer; a one-word subject for the letter; and disposition made of it.

34. Registers of Letters Received That Were Referred to Navy Department Bureaus and Certain Other Offices.
May 1, 1874-Nov. 1884. 3 vols. 4 in.

Entries in the first two volumes appear to be arranged chronologically by date of referral. Entries in the third volume are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt of letter.

Entries are for letters referred to Navy Department bureaus, the Marine Corps, the Secretary of War, the Treasury Department, and the Pension Office. They give the name or abbreviation of bureau or other office to which referred, name of writer, and subject of letter. Occasionally noted in both the second and third volumes are the dates on which letters were returned to the Secretary's office after referral. The last volume also includes the date of the letter and of its receipt and the residence or station of the writer. Most of the writers were private citizens. The first volume includes several lists pertaining to newspaper advertisements authorized by the Navy Department.

35. Register of Letters Received From Commandants of Navy Yards and Stations.
Jan. 1877-Oct. 1881. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by yards and stations, thereunder chronologically.

Entries give the date and an abstract of the content of each letter. Some of the letters registered in this series are in entry 51.

36. Miscellaneous Letters Received.
Jan. 3, 1801-Dec. 31, 1884. 823 vols. 157 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Letters are numbered sequentially within each volume. There are no letters for the period October 1846 through December 1847. There is a name index in every volume except the one for September 1840, which has a typewritten name and subject index prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library. For registers, see entries 33 and 34.

Most of these letters were received from private citizens and public officials. Except for the very earliest letters, which include letters from some naval officials, the letters are predominantly from non-Navy persons. They include requests for appointments as midshipmen, pursers, and surgeons; for civilian appointments in the Department; and for the Secretary's consideration of various inventions and manufactured goods for possible use by the Navy. Also included are many letters from the friends and families of enlisted men dealing with matters of personal or special interest to them, such as discharges. Members of Congress transmitted inquiries from constituents and sent letters of introduction or recommendation on their behalf. For the Civil War period, there are many letters from U.S. Army officials, such as provost marshals and quartermasters in charge of building Army gunboats. Sometimes letters have enclosed petitions, maps, sketches, or pictures. Plans of the USS Monitor are enclosed with letters from designer John Ericsson.

There are also letters from other classes of correspondents whose letters from earlier or later time periods form separate series. These include letters from the Board of Navy Commissioners, 1815-26 (see entry 43); Navy agents and storekeepers, 1801-42 (see entry 47); the President and executive departments, 1801-37 (see entry 44); and Congress, 1801-25 and 1862-84, transmitting resolutions and requested information (see entry 42). The content of these letters is similar to that described for the separate series. For letters similar to those bound in these volumes for 1798-1800 and for the missing period in 1846-47, see the Area and Subject Files (entries 500 and 502).

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M124, Miscellaneous Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy, 1801-1884.

37. Letters Received From Commissioned Officers Below the Rank of Commander and From Warrant Officers
("Officers Letters").
1802-84. 844 vols. 193 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Letters received from long distances after some delay were often bound according to the date received instead of the date of the letter. For 1884 there is a supplemental volume (with a few letters dated as late as 1886) for letters apparently missed during the original binding. There are name indexes in the volumes. For registers, see entries 32 and 33.

Included are letters from lieutenants, lieutenant commanders, ensigns, assistant surgeons, masters (Civil War period), mates (Civil War period), pursers, paymasters, chaplains, and professors of mathematics holding commissions as regular or volunteer officers of the U.S. Navy. Also, there are letters from officers holding warrants as midshipmen (before 1862), boatswains, sailmakers, coopers, carpenters, gunners, and engineers. The supplemental volume for 1884 has some letters from higher ranking officers, including the Colonel Commandant of the Marine Corps; and there are a few letters from officers of higher rank in other volumes.

Many of these letters concern administrative and personnel matters, such as orders for duty, leave or furlough, pay, desertions, resignations, general courts-martial, health, and the settlement of accounts. Letters also include descriptions of naval engagements, epidemics, reports of captures, reports of delays in sailing, arrivals in port, and repairs performed on vessels. After 1865 the Office of Detail, a division of the Bureau of Navigation, handled many of the matters concerning duty assignments and leave for commissioned officers and received the letters from officers on these subjects. There are also post-1860 reports of services performed by chaplains.

For the period 1802-7, the "Officers Letters" include reports from lieutenants assigned to the command of gunboats and other vessels that were part of the American fleet in the Mediterranean. Some of these are published in Naval Documents Related to the United States Wars With the Barbary Powers: Naval Operations Including Diplomatic Background from 1785 through 1807 (Washington, DC, 1939-44), 6 vols.

Among the letters received relating to naval operations are reports of captures of enemy vessels received from lieutenants in command of or assigned to vessels in the Mediterranean during the war with Tripoli and on the Great Lakes or in the Atlantic during the War of 1812 and Lt. John McLaughlin's reports of Indian hostilities during the second Florida Indian War, 1839-42. A number of letters contain reports from lieutenants and passed midshipmen who led or participated in exploring and relief expeditions during the period 1839-84; other such letters are among those described in entry 40.

Scientific matters are the subjects of letters received from officers assigned to the Depot of Charts and Instruments, the Naval Observatory, and the Nautical Almanac Office during the 1830s, 1840s, and 1850s. Reports of local political conditions in various parts of Latin America, particularly Mexico, are included in many of the volumes dated immediately before and after the Mexican War. There are reports of Lt. C. G. Hunter from Trieste on the movements of the combined fleet of Sardinia and Naples and the Austrian Army in June 1848 and a letter of April 23, 1850, from Lt. Thomas J. Page describing conditions in China after the death of Emperor Kaou Kwang. Also, lieutenants who traveled to various parts of Europe submitted lengthy reports of their observations of foreign naval vessels and shipyards upon their return to the country.

Enclosures in the form of returns, lists, muster rolls, drawings, and maps are bound with some of the letters, and there are some telegrams after 1850.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M148, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy From Commissioned Officers Below the Rank of Commander and From Warrant Officers ("Officers' Letters"), 1802-1884.

38. Letters Received From Commanders.
Apr. 7, 1804-Dec. 28, 1886. 223 vols. 46 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for 1822 or 1823. There are name and some subject indexes in the volumes. Some of the indexes give brief descriptions of the content of letters from senders of multiple letters. For registers, see entries 32-34.

In the early letters, masters commandant (as commanders were designated until 1837) acknowledged receipt of their commissions and reported to the Secretary on their preparations to join their ships and their efforts to recruit men to fill their ships' complements. They informed the Secretary of such matters as arrivals in port and transfers or deaths of men serving under them and requested promotions for officers serving under them or for themselves. Many of the more important letters are in the form of reports and relate to the U.S. warships off Tripoli, capture of British vessels during the War of 1812, the second Florida Indian War in 1839, protection of U.S. citizens at Puget Sound against Indians in the 1850s, measures taken to suppress the slave trade during the 1840s and 1850s, and seizures of Confederate blockade runners and other vessels during the Civil War. Post-Civil War letters from officers commanding vessels off the coasts of South America and Africa and in waters off Hawaii, Samoa, and other Pacific islands contain considerable information on local political conditions. There are reports from officers assigned to special duty, including, Comdr. Alexander Murray, commander of a special squadron to Russia in 1866-67; Comdr. Charles Hatfield, head of an expedition to Nicaragua in 1872; and Comdr. S. A. Beardslee, Comdr. Henry Glass, and others who sought to preserve peace between white miners and Indians in the vicinity of Sitka, AK, 1879-82. There are also letters from the first Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, Franklin Buchanan, 1845-47; and from commanders who served as commandants of midshipmen (cadets) at the Academy. Letters from Buchanan's successors are described in entry 49.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M147, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from Commanders, 1804-1886.

39. Letters Received From Captains.
1805-1861, 1866-1885. 413 vols. 88 ft.

Arranged chronologically except for enclosures that are filed with the covering letters. Letters for the years 1862-65 are in entry 54. There are indexes to names and sometimes subjects in the volumes. Often the index entries include descriptions of the contents of individual letters. For registers, see entries 33 and 34. There is an incomplete calendar of the letters from captains relating to South America, 1825-34, in the Subject File (see entry 502).

From 1805 to 1841, there are letters from captains commanding at sea, at navy yards, and at naval stations. In 1841 a separate series was established for letters received from captains commanding squadrons (see entry 45), and in 1848 a separate series was established for letters from captains commanding yards and stations (see entry 51). Letters received from captains during the Civil War period are bound with those from rear admirals and commodores (see entry 54).

Most of the letters from captains commanding at sea consist of despatches or reports concerning shipboard discipline, requests for transfer, desertions, discharges, repair and supply of vessels, arrivals and departures of vessels, and financial matters. Detailed reports of unusual occurrences or disputes between officers and foreign officials are included, frequently accompanied by letters from subordinate officers, U.S. and foreign diplomatic officials, foreign military personnel, and private individuals.

Included for the early 1800s are letters from captains pursuing Spanish privateers and pirates in the Caribbean, captains holding the honorary rank of commodore commanding the Mediterranean Squadron during the period of the Barbary Wars, and captains engaging the British on the Great Lakes during the War of 1812. Reports about the Battle of New Orleans in 1814 were enclosed with a 1846 letter from Capt. Thomas Ap R Jones. Letters dated 1826 from Commodores Isaac Hull and James Biddle commanding the Pacific and Brazil Squadrons, respectively, are segregated from other captains' letters for that year. Letters from commandants of navy yards and other shore establishments, 1805-41, among these letters deal with such matters as arrivals and departures of warships, repairs and refurbishments required to make vessels seaworthy, and the opening and closing of recruiting rendezvous.

Letters from captains earlier than 1805 were not bound together but are dispersed among several series, including those described in entries 36, 500, and 502. The letters in this series have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M125, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from Captains ("Captains' Letters"), 1805-61; 1866-85.

40. Letters and Reports Received From Officers Commanding Cruises and Expeditions.
Jan. 1818-Dec. 1885. 23 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged by cruise or expedition in chronological order and letters within volumes for the most part chronologically. Some volumes have name or name and subject indexes, and many of the letters are registered in the volumes described in entries 32-34.

Cruises were conducted to discover new commercial markets and to strengthen U.S. ties with foreign nations. Expeditions were launched to explore and survey various parts of the world for scientific or other purposes and to provide relief following disasters. The Secretary also assigned officers to investigate incidents that occurred in foreign countries involving the safety of American citizens and property. For descriptions of the records for the individual cruises and expeditions, see Appendix A.

Other letters relating to these and other expeditions are among those described in entries 38 and 39. For records of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition, see entry 397.

41. Letters Received Relating to African Colonization.
Jan. 5, 1819-Mar. 10, 1841. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. In four volumes there are name and subject indexes, which include a brief description of the content of each letter. The other volume, July 1832-April 1836, has a name index. Some of the letters are registered in the volumes described in entry 32.

Included are letters from U.S. agents for captured Africans on the African coast and from officers of the American Colonization Society concerning the slave trade and conditions at the reception agencies at Shebro Island, Cape Mesurado, Sierra Leone, and Monrovia; reports from U.S. marshals along the eastern coast of the United States concerning captured Africans received in their districts; reports from U.S. district attorneys regarding provisions made for Africans in southern states; and reports from the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury, Navy agents, and foreign bankers concerning the sale of captured slave vessels.

These letters have been reproduced as part of NARA Microfilm Publication M205, Correspondence of the Secretary of the Navy Relating to African Colonization, 1819-1844. For later letters received concerning African colonization, see entry 39. For letters sent, see entry 17.

42. Letters and Resolutions Received From Congress.
Dec. 12, 1825-Dec. 24, 1861. 6 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically with some overlapping between volumes. There are name and subject indexes in the individual volumes.

Most of the letters for the period 1842-46 are from the Chairmen of the House and Senate Committees on Naval Affairs, but beginning in 1827 letters requesting information or the Secretary's opinions on pending legislation were received from the Chairmen of the Committee on Claims and the Committee on Ways and Means of the House and from other committee chairmen and Members of Congress. Occasionally, several representatives from the same state petitioned the Secretary to take action on naval matters affecting their home districts.

The series also includes resolutions passed by the House of Representatives and Senate requesting the Secretary of the Navy to prepare reports on naval matters or to make available proceedings of general courts-martial; lists of officers appointed to the Navy; copies of reports, charts, and other documents received from naval officers who commanded exploring expeditions; and other records pertaining to the Navy Department. The action taken by the Secretary is frequently noted, and sometimes petitions or other enclosures and letters of reply by the Secretary are also included.

For letters received from Congress, 1801-25 and 1862-84, see entry 36. There are also resolutions of Congress among the records described in entry 44.

43. Letters Received From the Board of Navy Commissioners.
Jan. 3, 1827-Aug. 1842. 27 vols. 5 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name and subject indexes or lists of subjects of letters in the volumes.

Most of the letters relate to contracts for food, timber, uniforms, and equipment and to the construction and repair of vessels. Other subjects include the placement of advertisements for supplies and equipment, work performed at navy yards, civilian employees at the yards, vessels used in the coast survey, construction of lighthouses, and claims made against the Navy Department. Some of the letters were written in response to requests of the Secretary for the Board's comments on proposals for vessel improvements and inventions submitted to him by Navy officers and private individuals. Included are a few letters, 1837-38, pertaining to supplies for the Wilkes expedition.

For letters received from the Board, 1815-26, see entry 36.

44. Letters Received From the President and Executive Agencies.
May 19, 1837-Dec. 10, 1886. 131 vols. 29 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are three "supplemental" volumes for letters apparently missed when the original binding was done. There are name or name and subject indexes in the volumes except those for the years 1882-86. For registers, see entry 32.

These letters not only greatly exceed in number the letters sent by the Secretary of the Navy to the President and other agencies of the executive branch during this period, but they also reveal more about the Navy Department's daily contacts with the President and executive agencies. The majority of the letters predating the Civil War were received from offices of the Treasury Department, including letters forwarded by the Secretary of the Treasury from the Coast Survey Office, and relate to audit and revision of Navy agents' and pursers' accounts, allowances of pay and rations for naval officers, and the detail of officers to the Coast Survey.

Many of the letters from the Secretary of War for the pre-Civil War period concern the transfer of War Department facilities to the Navy Department and the transfer or loan of Navy Department vessels, ordnance, and other equipment to the War Department. During this and later time periods, the Secretary of State addressed the Secretary of the Navy on the need for the presence of U.S. naval vessels in foreign ports to protect U.S. citizens and their property, forwarded despatches received from State Department officials stationed abroad, and requested that naval officers perform diplomatic functions such as securing ratification of treaties. Other letters for the pre-civil War period were received from the Postmaster General, the Commissioner of Pensions, the Commissioner of Patents, the Attorney General, and the President. The number of letters received from the Secretaries of State and War and the President sharply increases during the Civil War period and thereafter. Many letters from President Lincoln concern joint Army-Navy operations and other war-related matters. Numerous despatches or extracts of despatches were forwarded as enclosures to letters from the Secretary of State. These letters were in regard to the activities of Confederate agents in Europe and various parts of the South Atlantic and complaints from foreign governments, particularly Great Britain, over foreign nationals being held by the U.S. Government as prisoners of war (also see entry 187). During the war, the Secretary of the Navy received a number of letters from the Secretary of War concerning prisoners of war and the transport of Army officers and enlisted men by naval vessels. He also received from the Secretary of the Treasury many letters concerning prize money, estimates of funds needed by the Navy, and persons arrested for violations of revenue laws or Treasury regulations. There is also a small number of letters and telegrams received from Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus Fox on important matters connected with the war.

In addition to those already mentioned for other time periods, the correspondents for the post-civil War period also include the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, the Commissioner of the Department of Agriculture, the Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General, and the Vice President. Congressional resolutions are bound with the letters beginning in 1868. During the Andrew Johnson and subsequent Presidential administrations, applications for appointment in the Navy, letters proposing naval inventions, and other requests for Presidential intervention in matters relating to the Navy were usually forwarded to the Secretary of the Navy by the White House and are included in this series. During this period the other executive agency heads continued to address the Secretary of the Navy on matters of mutual concern, such as Secretary of War Robert Lincoln's request of December 13, 1883, for the Navy's cooperation in the organization and conduct of the Greely Expedition to the Arctic.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M517, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from the President and Executive Agencies, 1837-1886. Letters received from the President and executive agencies for the period 1801-April 1837 are among those described in entry 36.

45. Letters Received From Commanding Officers of Squadrons.
Feb. 16, 1841-Nov. 11, 1886. 307 vols. 60 ft.

Arranged for the most part by squadron and thereunder chronologically. There is overlapping for periods when there was a change of command, because a commanding officer's letters from the time of his appointment until the time he returned home following release from command or otherwise ceased all connection with the squadron were filed together. Some volumes have letters from officers during periods of successive commands. There are indexes or lists of contents in most of the volumes. There are many orders, maps, lists, diplomatic communications and reports enclosed with the letters. For registers, see entries 32-34.

The six earliest squadrons established on a permanent basis were the Mediterranean Squadron, the West India Squadron, the Pacific Squadron, the Brazil Squadron, the East India Squadron, and the Home Squadron. All of these squadrons, except the West India Squadron, were still in existence in 1841 when the Navy Department began this series of records. The African Squadron was established in 1843 and the Eastern Squadron in 1853.

During the Civil War six new squadrons were established: the West India Squadron; the Mississippi Squadron; the North and South Atlantic Blockading Squadrons, formed from the Atlantic Blockading Squadron; and the East and West Gulf Squadrons, the former being the successor of the Gulf Squadron. In addition, three detachments of smaller vessels were formed; the Mortar Flotilla, the James River Flotilla, and the Potomac Flotilla. The letters from commanding officers of these flotillas were filed with the letters from commanding officers of squadrons with the exception that letters from the commanding officers of the Potomac Flotilla , October 1862-December 1863, are with records described in entry 51. By the end of 1865, all of these Civil War squadrons and flotillas had ceased to exist.

In the postwar period, the Pacific Squadron, the only prewar squadron to survive the Civil War intact, underwent a number of organizational changes, becoming successively the North Pacific and South Pacific Squadrons, the Pacific Station divided into a Northern and Southern Squadron and later a North Pacific and South Pacific Station, and finally the Pacific Station (without divisions).

The other squadrons created after April 1865 were the South Atlantic Squadron, the European Squadron, the Atlantic Squadron, the Gulf Squadron, the Asiatic Squadron, and the Special Squadron. In 1866 the Atlantic Squadron was replaced by the North Atlantic Squadron. The Gulf Squadron was discontinued in 1867. In 1882 the Training Squadron was established to train apprentice seamen.

The letters and the enclosed maps, reports, orders, newspaper clippings, charts, and treaties relate to diplomatic negotiations with other nations, intelligence gathering around the world, protection of Americans in foreign places, the assignment and deployment of ships in the squadrons, reports of captures or naval engagements, reports of war casualties or illnesses, and other naval activities at sea. The letters of the East India Squadron document Commodore Matthew Perry's cruise to Japan in 1853-54 and his contacts with the Japanese Government. Letters of the African and Home Squadrons include descriptions of the antislavery efforts of the U.S. Navy. Reports from the Civil War blockading squadrons relate to joint military operations with the Army, battles with the Confederate Navy, and shore operations launched from ships.

These records have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M89, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy From Commanding Officers of Squadrons ("Squadron Letters"), 1841-1886. For other letters received from commanding officers of squadrons, see entry 603. For registers to some squadrons, see entries 623-626.

46. Letters Received From the Chiefs of Navy Bureaus.
Sept. 12, 1842-Dec. 5, 1885. 87 vols. 18 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are three supplemental volumes for letters apparently missed when the original binding was done. There are two letters from January 1886. There are name and subject indexes in most of the volumes. For registers, see entries 32-34.

Much of the series consists of letters and a few telegrams relating to procurement of supplies, equipment, and ordnance; enlistment of naval personnel; appointment of civilian employees; construction, repair, and lay up of vessels; use of vessels for defense; medical care; and inventions. The U.S. Naval Academy is the subject of some letters after 1850 from the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography and the Bureau of Navigation. From 1851 to 1862, the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography had responsibility for overseeing administrative and financial affairs at the Academy, and from 1862 on, the Bureau of Navigation had much of this responsibility. Also included are reports of boards on which bureau heads served, examples of which are the reports made in April and May 1862 by a board composed of the Chiefs of the Bureaus of Construction and Repair and Yards and Docks, Engineer-in-Chief of the Navy Benjamin F. Isherwood, and Naval Constructor Edward Hartt regarding the use of riverboats for defensive purposes and the use of armored ships for coastal and harbor defense. Enclosures to the letters include newspaper clippings, contracts, circulars, pamphlets, and a few drawings and sketches.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M518, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from Chiefs of Navy Bureaus, 1842-1885. For letters sent to the bureaus during the same period, see entry 22. For other records concerning the bureaus, see entries 386-422.

47. Letters Received From Navy Agents and Naval Storekeepers.
Jan 1, 1843-Nov. 30, 1865. 36 vols. 7 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Originally there were 28 volumes. In the process of rebinding, it was necessary to divide eight of the volumes into two parts. There are name indexes for all of the volumes except the last one: for the divided volumes, the index for both parts is at the beginning of the first part.

Navy agents purchased and disbursed supplies. Naval storekeepers were civilian employees of the Navy Department, but commissioned and warrant officers did sometimes serve as temporary storekeepers in foreign ports. They were in charge of stores at stations and yards and distributed the stores to vessels and to the departments at the installation. Serving under the direction of the commanding officer of the installation, the storekeeper made requisitions upon Navy agents for the purchase of supplies needed and not received at the installation. Most of these letters are from Navy agents and concern appointments to office, purchase and distribution of supplies, and payments to creditors. Enclosures include oaths of office, declarations of citizenships, receipts for supplies, lists of persons entitled to prize money, monthly and quarterly returns of expenditures, materials and labor, abstracts of payments, and newspaper clippings.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M528, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from Navy Agents and Naval Storekeepers, 1843-1865. For earlier letters, see entry 36.

48. Letters and Reports Received From the Engineer-in-Chief.
Jan. 2, 1847-Dec. 20, 1850. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name and subject index in the volume.

The reports on technical matters, submitted either to the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair and forwarded to the Secretary or directly to the Secretary, concern examinations of boilers, engines, steam pumps, percussion gages, and various inventions proposed by the Engineer-in-Chief or chief engineers for use by the Navy. Several drawings are included with the reports. The letters relate to pay, uniforms, candidates for admission to the Engineer Corps, promotions, and other personnel matters. Most of the letters in this volume were signed or endorsed by Engineer-in-Chief Charles H. Haswell, and the small number remaining, by Benjamin F. Isherwood and Charles B. Stuart. Additional letters and reports for earlier and later time periods are described in entry 391.

49. Letters Received From the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy.
Jan. 4, 1847-Dec. 31, 1884. 55 vols. 11 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically in volumes numbered 225-238, 240-243, 245-273, and three unnumbered volumes. Five of the original 50 volumes were divided into two parts in the process of rebinding. There is one supplemental volume for letters apparently missed during the original binding. There are name or name and subject indexes in most of the volumes. For the divided volumes, the indexes are at the beginning of the first parts. Some volumes also have lists of letters. For registers, see entries 32-34.

These letters from the Superintendent of the Academy (known as Naval School until July 1850) relate to admission policy, academic courses, rules and regulations governing discipline, the academic staff and other civilian personnel, naval officers assigned to the Academy, removal of the Academy to Newport, RI, during the Civil War, charges of disloyalty, local political sentiment, enlargement of the Academy after its return to Annapolis, and many other subjects. The Superintendent also forwarded reports of various kinds and letters for or on behalf of midshipmen and cadets and applicants. Included are reports of the Board of Visitors, boards for the examination of midshipmen, investigative boards, summer cruises, relative standing and deficiencies of midshipmen or cadets, and monthly, quarterly, and final class reports.

During the period 1851-53, the Secretary sometimes referred letters to the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, which supervised Academy affairs. Letters received from the first Superintendent of the Academy, Comdr. Franklin Buchanan, from September to December 1845, are described in entry 38.

50. Letters Received Relating to the Naval Asylum.
Feb. 12, 1848-Dec. 2, 1850. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index that includes brief descriptions of the individual letters.

Included are letters from or on behalf of men seeking admission to the Asylum, from men wishing to be discharged and granted a pension, and from the Governor of the Asylum relating chiefly to individual residents. For other letters received relating to the Naval Asylum, see entries 54 and 58.

51. Letters Received From Commandants of Navy Yards and Naval Stations.
1848-86. 332 vols. 65 ft.

Arranged by year, thereunder by name of yard or station, and thereunder chronologically. There are no letters for 1885. There are name indexes, name and subject indexes, or lists of letters in most of the volumes. For registers, see entries 32-34.

Following is a list of yards and stations with the years for which there are letters:

Baltimore, MD, Naval Station, 1862-65
Beaufort, SC, Naval Station, 1882
Boston (Charlestown), MA, Navy Yard, 1848-84 and 1886
Key West, FL, Naval Station, 1882-84
League Island (Philadelphia), PA, Naval Station, 1868-73 and 1876-84
Mare Island, CA, Navy Yard, 1854-58, 1860-63, and 1866-84
Memphis, TN, Navy Yard, 1848-50 and 1853-55
Mound City, IL, Naval Station, 1864-73
New London, CT, Naval Station, 1872-73, 1882-84, and 1886
Newport, RI, Torpedo Station, 1882-84 and 1886
New York, NY, Navy Yard, 1848-84
Norfolk (Gosport), VA, Navy Yard, 1848-61, 1863-84, and 1886
Pensacola, FL, Navy Yard, 1848-60, 1863-84, and 1886
Philadelphia, PA, Navy Yard, 1848-75
Portsmouth, NH, Navy Yard, 1848-84 and 1886
Sackett's Harbor, NY, Naval Station, 1850 and 1853-59
Washington, DC, Navy Yard, 1848-84 and 1886

Most of the letters concern arrivals, departures, and trial runs of vessels; recruitment, transfer, and discharge of enlisted men; employment of civilian personnel; deaths; and the apprehension of deserters. Other letters relate to such unusual occurrences as the June 1848 explosion in the laboratory at the Washington Navy Yard of fireworks being prepared for the celebration of the laying of the cornerstone of the Washington Monument and the 1877 visit of Grand Duke Alexis of Russia to the Norfolk Navy Yard. Enclosures include reports of boards of investigations, reports concerning prisoners and civilians employed at the yards, and letters from officers commanding vessels at the yards. Many of the letters for the Civil War period were copied in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (Washington, DC, 1894-1927). They include letters pertaining to the evacuation and destruction of Government property at Norfolk (Gosport) Navy Yard in April 1861 and reports of captures of Confederate vessels and of arrivals of contraband at the yards and stations. Letters received from the Potomac Flotilla for October 1862-December 1863 were bound with the letters from the Commandant, Washington, DC.

For earlier letters from commandants of yards and stations, see entry 39. For letters for the period 1801-13, during which civilians commanded the yards, see entry 36. Letters received in 1883 from the commanding officers of naval stations at New London and Key West and the torpedo station at Newport are with the letters received from the commanding officer of the Training Squadron (see entry 45).

52. Letters Received Relating to Gorham Parks, Former U.S. Consul at Rio de Janeiro.
Mar. 1849-June 1853. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters in support of Parks's reinstatement as consul were referred by the Secretary of State. They were received from the Board of Underwriters of New York City, merchants, shipowners, shipmasters, and foreign diplomatic officials. Parks was recalled after he removed the masters of four U.S. commercial vessels (Pacific, Xylon, Friendship, Sacramento) in the Port of Rio de Janeiro in 1848 and 1849. Included is a pamphlet defending Parks.

53. Supplementary Letters Received.
Aug. 1860-Dec. 1879. 16 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are letters for the years 1860-63 and 1871-79 only. There are name indexes in the individual volumes. Most of the letters are registered in the volumes described in entry 32.

These are letters that seem to have been missed when the records described in entries 37-39, 43, 45-47, 51, and 54 were bound. Most of the letters are from highBranking officers such as admirals and captains. There are also letters from the Commandant of the Marine Corps and other Marine Corps officers. Many of the letters relate to disciplinary actions, accusations about officers and enlisted men, and court-martial charges. Apparently other letters bound in this manner were later removed and incorporated with the records in the Area and Subject Files (entries 500 and 502).

54. Letters and Telegrams Received From the Vice Admiral, Rear Admirals, Commodores, and Captains.
Jan. 1, 1862-Dec. 30, 1865. 26 vols. 7 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters from the vice admiral until after that grade was established on December 21, 1864 (13 Stat. 420). There are name indexes, some with brief descriptions of each letter, in the individual volumes. For registers, see entry 32.

Most of the letters concern such matters as transfers of crew, trial runs of vessels, and disposition of prize vessels. There are also many letters from officers acknowledging receipt of orders, requesting transfers or promotions, or reporting on their physical condition. Some letters were written by officers in their capacities as presidents of court-martial boards. There are letters from several officers on the retired list, including Como. Frederick Engle serving as Governor of the Naval Asylum and President of the Naval Retiring Board at the Asylum; Como. Henry Eagle, a U.S. prize commissioner; and Rear Adm. Francis H. Gregory, superintending the construction of ironclads at the New York Navy Yard. Civil War letters include commendations of naval personnel and the recommendation for medals. Capt. John A. Winslow's reports (with maps) of the battle of the USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama are in this series.

Other letters from admirals for this period are with the letters received from commanding officers of squadrons (see entry 45). For earlier and later letters from captains, see entry 39. For later letters from admirals and commodores, see entry 58.

55. Letters Received From the Board of Examiners on Inventions and Plans.
Jan. 4, 1862-July 10, 1862. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

The letters are from the Senior Officer of the Board, Como. William B. Shubrick, commenting on inventions and plans submitted for possible use by the Navy and making recommendations for and against their adoption. An ironclad steamer, a floating battery and ram for harbor defense, an "invulnerable gunboat" for sea and river service, a submarine cylinder bomb, and other proposals for improvements in ordnance were considered. All of these letters appear to be negative comments; each letter ends in "not recommended" or "not practical". There are copies of these reports in the minutes of the board (see entry 361).

56. Letters Received Relating to Union Naval Prisoners of War.
May 12, 1862-July 27, 1865. 1 vol. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index in the volume.

Included are many letters from the War Department Adjutant General, Commissary General of Prisoners, and Commissioner for the Exchange of Prisoners concerning the locations at which Union naval prisoners were held and arrangements for their exchange. They are frequently accompanied by lists of Union naval prisoners paroled by the Confederates, announced as exchanged, or still held in the South. Also included are letters from officers whose vessels were captured by the Confederates, Union naval personnel exchanged by the Confederates or who escaped from Confederate prisons, Union officers requesting their early exchange, and family members inquiring about Union prisoners of war. There are also some extracts of declarations of exchange of prisoners, general orders concerning exchanges, newspapers clippings, and a typewritten list of Union naval officers captured during 1863 and 1864 and released at Aiken's Landing on October 18, 1864. Some of the letters from prisoners describe the treatment received or conditions at POW camps. Others describe the naval engagement in which they were captured. Many of the letters are from men reporting that they have arrived home following their release or escape from Southern prisons.

57. Letters Received From the Permanent Commission on Science and Art.
Mar. 31, 1863-Sept. 21, 1865. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

In these letters, the commission gave its findings on the practicality of various devices and plans submitted by private inventors to the Navy Department. A torpedo that could be used underwater at the end of a boom, a binocular telescope, a machine for removing piles and chains from harbors, and a plan for iron-plating naval vessels were just some of the inventions and plans considered. Other copies of some of the reports are among the records of the commission (see entries 363-366).

58. Letters Received From the Admiral, Vice Admiral, Rear Admirals, and Commodores.
Jan. 1, 1866-Dec. 27, 1884. 30 vols. 7 ft.

Arranged chronologically. The individual volumes have name indexes, some of which give brief descriptions of the content of each letter. For registers, see entry 32.

Included are letters from officers serving on various boards, the Superintendent of the Naval Observatory, the Governor of the Naval Asylum, port admirals, and commandants of navy yards and naval stations. Many of these officers were on the retired list. The letters relate for the most part to administrative and personnel matters, but there are letters and reports from rear admirals serving on examining boards, boards of inspection, and on ad hoc boards such as the 1884 board appointed by the Secretary to consider the establishment of a postgraduate school for training naval officers.

Many of the letters received from rear admirals at sea during this time period are among the letters received from commanding officers of squadrons (see entry 45). Most of the letters from officers serving as commandants of navy yards and naval stations for this and later time periods are described in entry 51. There are earlier admiral and commodore letters in entries 53 and 54. For later letters from admirals and commodores, see entries 60 and 603.

59. Letters Received From the Permanent Senior Naval Officer at Port Royal, S.C.
Feb. 18, 1876-Dec. 30, 1876. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence from 1 to 73. There is a list of letters giving subjects.

These letters were written or forwarded by Commodore John M. B. Clitz on board the USS New Hampshire. They relate to arrivals and departures of vessels, including a visit of French Navy vessels, the condition of vessels, personnel matters, precautions against yellow fever, political conditions in Beaufort, SC, and other subjects. For later letters from Clitz in the same capacity, see entry M60.

60. Cipher Messages Received and Translated.
Dec. 17, 1897-Nov. 3, 1912. 6 vols. 9 in.

Arranged chronologically in volumes numbered 2-7. Indexes to names of persons, squadrons, vessels, and installations give a brief description of each message.

The first five volumes contain press copies; the sixth volume contains carbon copies. Nearly all messages were sent by officers in command of squadrons or vessels stationed in the South Atlantic, Caribbean, and the Pacific. Most of the messages were received directly by the Secretary's office; the remainder were received by the Bureau of Navigation and forwarded to the Secretary. The first volume (volume 2), which covers the Spanish-American War period, includes messages from Capt. Charles Sigsbee, commanding officer of the USS Maine, following the explosion of that vessel at Havana in February 1898; and Rear Adm. William T. Sampson, commander of the U.S. fleet in the Caribbean, and Rear Adm. Montgomery Sicard, commander of the U.S. fleet assembled at Key West, FL, discussing the recovery of bodies from the Maine, the care of its wounded, the raising of the vessel, and steps taken to prepare for war against the Spanish Navy in the Caribbean. Messages from Adm. George Dewey at Hong Kong transmit intelligence regarding activities of the Spanish fleet in the Pacific, the blockade of Manila, and the procurement of fuel and supplies for fleet vessels. Other 1898-99 messages provide information concerning the activities of representatives of the Spanish Government in London and Paris.

Messages in the next three volumes transmit information concerning the activities of the French and German Governments, national forces, and insurgent groups in Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and other parts of Latin America for the period 1903-10. A few messages reporting on the political situation in other parts of the world, such as relations between the Turks and Armenians and the condition of Armenian refugees in 1909, are also copied.

The last volume (volume 7) contains messages from naval officers of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Asiatic Fleets stationed at or en route to Panama, Ecuador, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Honduras, Santo Domingo, Cuba, Hawaii, Turkey, and China. There are also a few messages from the commanding officers of the Pacific Reserve Fleet and the Pacific Torpedo Flotilla. For additional messages relating to disturbances in Santo Domingo, Ecuador, Cuba, Honduras, China and other countries, see the correspondence described in entries 282-292.

For translations of earlier ciphers received and ciphers sent by the Secretary of the Navy, see entry 28.

Other Correspondence

61. Press Copies of Reports Sent Concerning Navy and Marine Corps Service in the Second Seminole War, 1835-42.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

One report consists of typed press copies of a December 19, 1853 response of the Secretary of the Navy to a request from the Commissioner of Pensions for information that would assist in the adjudication of bounty land claims. In particular the Commissioner wanted to distinguish between service (in the war with the Seminoles of Florida, 1835-42) that was merely cooperation given the Army by the Navy and Marine Corps as separate services and service detached from the Navy and "incorporated with the Army or under its immediate command." The response consists of a transmittal letter and three parts: letters or extracts of letters of instruction to naval officers, reports or extracts of reports from the officers, and a list of vessels used during the war and extracts from their logs. Many of the reports relate to Lt. John Mclaughlin. The reports also mention U.S. Navy ships that surveyed the Florida Coast.

62. Correspondence Concerning Construction of New Vessels.
Apr. 19, 1882-Jan. 13, 1888. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically.

This volume includes copies of letters from Congress, the Naval Advisory Board, and Bureau of Construction and Repair, with copies of draft replies. Enclosed with the letters are tables, lists, clippings, printed notices, and other records (some in draft form) relating primarily to plans and specifications for and costs of construction of the cruisers Atlanta, Boston, and Chicago and the dispatch boat Dolphin. The volume was probably compiled by Secretary of the Navy William E. Chandler. Most of the documents have penciled comments with the initials "W. E. C."

63. Correspondence Concerning the Repair and Equipment of Third- and Fourth-Rate Naval Vessels.
Jan. 1889-Dec. 1890. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by class of vessel and thereunder by vessel. The volume relating to third-rate vessels is for January 1889-November 1890, and that relating to fourth-rate vessels is for July-December 1890.

Copied are the endorsements of the Secretary of the Navy and the Chief Clerk on correspondence received from the bureaus concerning ship repairs, memorandums concerning the repairs being performed on vessels, letters appointing naval officers to boards of survey for naval vessels and the reports of these boards, and correspondence between the commandants of navy yards and naval constructors. The reports and memorandums sometimes include estimates of the costs of the repairs and equipment.

64. Correspondence and Other Records Concerning the Hudson-Fulton Celebration.
May 1909-Oct. 1909. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part by subject. There is a name and subject index.

The series contains copies of letters, reports, endorsements, memorandums, lists, orders, a printed calendar of events, newspaper articles, and other records concerning the Navy's participation in the celebration of the 300th anniversary of the discovery of the Hudson River by Henry Hudson and the 100th anniversary of the first successful use of a steamboat.

65. Memorandums Sent by the Aide for Operations.
Oct. 28, 1910-June 30, 1915. 8 vols. 10 in.

Arranged chronologically in volumes labeled "Miscellaneous Memoranda."

These are carbon copies of memorandums commenting on papers referred by other aides or officials of the Navy Department. Changes to Navy Regulation Number 6 of November 18, 1909, announced the appointment of four aides to assist the Secretary of the Navy: aides for operations, materials, personnel, and inspections. In 1915 these positions were discontinued. There are some memorandums received and occasionally copies of documents referred for comment. Examples of the many subjects dealt with are military characteristics of submarines and destroyers, number and kind of capital ships being built by Japan and other foreign powers, issuance of Navy Department general orders and regulations, use of the cipher code by the Navy, and the design of boat clothes for the President and the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy.

The correspondence that these memorandums accompanied is interspersed among the general correspondence of Record Groups 24, 38, 80, and 19.

Directives, 1798-1913

The application of the term "directives" to general orders and circulars issued by the Navy Department is of recent origin. Meaning any communication that initiates or governs action, conduct, or procedure, it accurately describes most of the Navy Department general orders and circulars sent by the Secretary of the Navy to commanding officers of ships, squadrons, yards, and stations and to other naval officers between 1798 and 1913. Throughout most of the period 1798-1862, it appears that the titles "general order," "naval general order," and "general naval order" were used interchangeably. The title "naval general order" was most frequently used between 1813 and 1842. The general orders issued before 1863 were unnumbered and usually not printed, but beginning in 1863 they were numbered continuously within series (with the exception of a small number of unnumbered orders and general orders for the period 1866-97) and printed. Beginning in the 1860s other directives were issued by the Secretary's office in addition to the general orders and circulars, including general court-martial orders, special orders, U.S. Navy regulation circulars, and special circulars.

66. Register of Directives.
Jan. 1863-Oct. 1913. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by type of directive and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

Entries for individual directives give date, subject, and, when applicable, number. The entries are grouped in the following sections.

General orders, Jan. 1863-Oct. 1913
Circulars, June 1863-Jan. 1907
Special circulars, Nov. 1891BFeb. 1900
Orders and special orders, Apr. 1865BFeb. 1891
Special orders, Apr. 1891-Dec. 1911
Navy regulation circulars, Jan. 1866-Dec. 1911
Changes in uniform regulations, Feb. 1906-Oct. 1911
Bureau of Navigation orders, Oct. 1889-Jan. 1892
Bureau of Navigation information circulars, Feb. 1890-July 1892
Departmental orders, Dec. 1898-Mar. 1908

67. Directives.
1798-1911. 14 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged in several sets, to a considerable extent by type of copy, and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

The volumes contain handwritten, printed, and press copies of general orders, special orders, circulars, special circulars, general court-martial orders, departmental orders, U.S. Navy regulation circulars, and other directives issued by the Secretary of the Navy. They prescribed policy in such matters as uniform dress, pay, other financial matters, and recruitment and discharge; gave instructions concerning the performance of duties; announced deaths of and tributes to high-ranking naval officers and other prominent persons, convening and proceedings of courts-martial, examinations for promotions, appointments, meetings and findings of boards; and transmitted honors and awards, commissions, acts of Congress, and Presidential messages. Occasionally directives issued by the bureaus are included.

Each set of directives has omissions, but together they are the most complete compilation of directives among Navy Department records in the National Archives. Many of the general orders and circulars in this series have been reproduced in NARA Microfilm Publications M977, Navy Department General Orders and Circulars, 1798-1862, and M984, Navy Department General Orders, 1863-1948.

Muster Rolls, Payrolls, Officer Rolls and Related Records, 1798-1889

Pre-Civil War U.S. Navy muster rolls generally include the names of individual officers and crew members, the date and place of their appearance on board, their rank or rating, their ship number (muster number), and the date of muster. If an individual was no longer on board or at the shore establishment (yard or station), the roll indicates whether he was detached (D), dead (DD), or had deserted (R) and includes the date, place, and the reason for the absence. The muster rolls usually include not only the names of officers and of the crew of the vessel, yard, or station but also the names of clerks, marines, supernumeraries, prisoners of war, recruits and recruiting officers, and the personnel on furlough, at rendezvous, and sometimes passengers on board vessels.

U.S. Navy payrolls generally contain the names of officers and crew members, their rank or rating, their muster number, the date of the commencement of their term of service or of the settlement period, their terms of service, the amount of pay due for the period of settlement, and other related details. They usually include similar information for marines and supernumeraries.

Combined muster rolls and payrolls generally include the same kind of information found in the muster rolls and in addition contain details relating to pay. Most combined muster rolls and payrolls are for vessels and date between 1800 and 1830, although there are a few dated as late as 1842. Both payrolls and muster rolls were signed by the commanding officer and by the purser of the ship or station.

The earliest known reference to Navy muster rolls and payrolls is in a letter sent to Capt. Thomas Truxton from the War Office, March 16, 1798, which states in part: "The names of the Marines and Seamen, are to be entered alphabetically, in the Muster and Pay Rolls. . . ." An act of Congress approved March 2, 1799 (1 Stat. 709), states in part:

  1. Whenever a captain shall enter or enlist a seaman, he shall take care to enter on his books the time and terms of his entering, in order to his being justly paid.
  2. The Captain shall, before he sails, make return to the Secretary of the Navy a complete list of all his officers and men, with the time and terms of their entering, and during his cruise of station shall keep a true account of the desertion or death of any of them, and of the entering of others, and after the expiration of the time for which they were entered, and before any of them are paid off, he shall make return of a complete list of the same, including those who shall remain on board his ship.

These regulations relating to pay and muster rolls were amplified by a later act of April 23, 1800 (2 Stat. 45), which states in part:

  1. Each commanding officer shall whenever a seaman enters on board, cause an accurate entry to be made in the ship's books of his name, time, and term of his service; and, before sailing, transmit to the Secretary of the Navy a complete list or muster roll of the officers and men under his command, with the date of their entering, time and terms of their service annexed; and shall cause similar lists to be made out on the first day of every second month, to be transmitted to the Secretary of the Navy, as opportunities shall occur; accounting in such lists, or muster rolls, for any casualties which may have taken place since the last list or muster roll.

Apparently these regulations were not followed by all officers of the Navy, including commanding officers of navy yards and stations after 1800, as there were many circulars issued by the Navy Department requesting officers to submit pay rolls and muster rolls.

The regulations relating to pay and muster rolls were changed by a circular of the Navy Department, June 18, 1846, which states:

Before sailing you will transmit to the Department a complete . . . Muster roll of the Officers and men that have been transferred . . . under your command. With the date of their expirations of service annexed. On the first of every second month thereafter, you will cause lists to be made showing all deaths, desertions, discharges, transfers, enlistments and punishments that have taken place since the date of the last returns.

68. Muster Rolls and Payrolls for U.S. Navy Vessels.
1798-1860. 138 vols. 34 ft.

Arranged for the most part according to physical format (bound by single ship, bound together with other ships, miscellaneous bound and unbound), thereunder alphabetically by name of ship, often thereunder by type of roll, and thereunder chronologically. There are rolls of single vessels bound in one or more volumes, 120 volumes, 1798-1845; rolls of several vessels bound in one volume, 18 volumes, 1799-1859; 7 volumes ("miscellaneous"), that are unarranged; and unbound rolls, 1798-1859. If there are two or more volumes for a vessel, usually the muster rolls and payrolls are bound separately. A few of the volumes have typed name indexes. On each muster roll or payroll, names are arranged by ship (muster) number. On most rolls the commanding officer's name is first, followed by the other officers, clerks, and then enlisted men. Usually, marines and supernumeraries are on separate rolls. In rare cases, names are arranged alphabetically. There are very few muster or payrolls for the Mexican War period.

Filed with the muster rolls and payrolls are lists of officers and crews, receipt rolls, accounts, registers of allotments, reports and returns of officers and crews, and various types of abstracts. Office clerks substituted these records when no muster roll or payroll was available for a vessel for a particular timespan. Some of the rolls are only for officers, the crew, or marine guards.

For a list of rolls, see Appendix C. In the list of muster rolls and payrolls, numbers placed in parentheses are used to distinguish between identically named vessels. Some rolls are in the Subject File (see entry 502). Later rolls, dated after 1860, are among the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24. Additional Marine Corps muster rolls are in Records of the U.S. Marine Corps, Record Group 127. Additional Navy payrolls are in Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department the Treasury, Record Group 217. The muster and payrolls, except the unbound ones, are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

69. Muster Rolls and Payrolls for Shore Establishments.
1805-69. 51 vols. 12 ft.

Divided into bound rolls, 1805-42, and unbound rolls, 1810-49 and 1859-69. Thereunder arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of shore establishment and thereunder chronologically. Usually, if there is only one volume for a yard or station, there are muster rolls and payrolls bound together. If there is more than one volume, usually the muster rolls and payrolls are bound in separate volumes. For a list of rolls, see Appendix D.

In addition to the officers and crews assigned to the yard or station, other naval personnel who were temporarily there or who were unassigned were sometimes carried on the rolls. These include recruits, officers and men serving on vessels that were to take part in expeditions, and occasionally officers and men attached to a vessel at a yard or station or to a flotilla. Also in this series are reports and returns, receipt rolls, accounts, articles of agreement, and various kinds of lists that were kept in place of or in addition to the muster rolls and payrolls.

Many of the rolls in this series have the Subject File marking "NA," and were probably segregated from that series because of their size. A few rolls still remain in the Subject File (see entry 502). It is not known whether rolls for the missing period exist. The muster rolls and payrolls, except the unbound ones, are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

70. Payrolls and Lists of Civilian Personnel at Navy Yards.
1811-79. 1 vol. and unbound records. 2 ft.

Arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of navy yard and thereunder chronologically.

These are chiefly payrolls, with some lists and a few muster rolls.

The following unbound rolls are included.

Charlestown Navy Yard, MA, 1819-33.

Muster rolls of mechanics and laborers, 1821.
Payrolls of mechanics and laborers employed, 1830-33 and n.d.
Payrolls of workmen on drydock, 1830-33.
List of men not paid on rolls, 1828-30.
List of laborers discharged on drydock, 1831.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1819 and 1819-23.

Gosport Navy Yard, VA, 1819-22 .

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1819-20, 1822, and n.d.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1819.

Jefferson Barracks Navy Yard, MO, 1868

Payroll of persons employed by the Bureau of Ordnance, 1868.

Mare Island Navy Yard, CA, 1879 .

Payrolls of persons employed by the Bureau of Construction and Repair on Jeanette, 1879.
Payrolls of persons employed by the Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting on Jeanette, 1879 and n.d.
Payrolls of persons employed by the Bureau of Steam Engineering on Jeanette, 1879.

Mound City Navy Yard, IL, 1868-72.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1869-70 and n.d.
Payrolls of persons employed by the Bureau of Ordnance, 1872.
Payroll of persons employed by the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing, 1868.

New Orleans Navy Yard, LA, 1821-65.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers employed, 1821-24.
Payrolls of employees, 1865.
Payrolls and receipt rolls of mechanics and laborers, 1824.
Reports of work done, 1824.

New York Navy Yard, NY, 1819-64.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1820, 1839, and n.d.
Payrolls and receipt rolls of draughtsmen and workmen, 1863-64.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1819-20.
List of employees, n.d.

Pensacola Navy Yard, FL, 1829-64.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1829 and 1863-64.

Philadelphia Navy Yard, PA, 1822-23.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1823 and n.d.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1822 and n.d.

Portsmouth Navy Yard, NH, 1821-28.

Muster rolls and payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1824-26, 1828.
Receipt rolls of mechanics and laborers, 1824-26 and 1828.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1821 and 1823-24.

Washington Navy Yard, DC, 1811-55.

Payrolls of mechanics and laborers, 1811, 1854-55, and n.d.
Lists of personnel employed by the year, 1819-20.

The single volume contains payrolls of laborers and mechanics at the Navy Yard, Cairo, IL, October 1863, and at the Navy Yard, Mound City, IL, July 1871-July 1873.

Some rolls are in the Subject File (entry 502).

71. Lists of Officers Aboard Vessels on Cruises.
1824-32. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by name of vessel. There is a name index to vessels.

These are lists of officers (and sometimes passengers) on board vessels departing for or returning from cruises to the West Indies, South America, the Pacific, and the Mediterranean. There is also information concerning places and dates of departures and returns. For some vessels there is no information.

72. Lists of Officers Aboard Vessels.
1824. 2 vols. 1/2 in.

Arranged by class of ship with the largest classes first. There is a name index to vessels in the first volume.

Only the names and ranks of officers are given. The second volume nearly duplicates information in the first volume.

73. Monthly Returns of Navy and Marine Corps Officers and Civilians at Shore Establishments.
Apr. 1845-Dec. 1889. 25 vols. 7 ft.

Divided into two slightly overlapping time periods. Returns, 1845-77, are arranged by name of establishment, thereunder divided into officers and civilians, and thereunder arranged chronologically. For 1876-89 returns are arranged chronologically, for the most part by year, thereunder by establishment, and thereunder divided into officers and civilians. A supplemental volume for 1874-76 is at the end of the series. The returns for Bay Point, Port Royal, Beaufort, Baltimore, and Jefferson Barracks for April 1845-June 1866 are bound in one volume with the February 1866-December 1872 returns for Mound City. There are returns for Baltimore, Bay Point, Beaufort, Boston, Jefferson Barracks, League Island, Mare Island, Mound City, New London, New York, Norfolk, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Port Royal, Portsmouth (NH), and Washington, DC. For officers, the returns usually give name, rank, type of duty or office to which assigned, and an indication of whether awaiting orders. The information for civilians includes name, rating, department in which employed, date of appointment, and annual salary. For similar records, see Preliminary Inventory 10, Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, Record Group 71, entry 27.

74. Lists of Officers and Clerks of Vessels, Squadrons, Fleets, and Flotillas.
July 1859-Jan. 1878. 35 vols. 6 ft.

Arranged for the most part in five overlapping chronological periods and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel. Most of the lists for the period July 1859BFebruary 1871 (25 volumes) are in one alphabetical sequence. There are smaller sets for the periods July 1864-June 1865 (3 volumes), September 1864-January 1878 (3 volumes), December 1873-December 1875 (1 volume), and January 1876-March 1877 (1 volume). The overlapping probably was a result of erratic binding procedures. There is also a volume for lists of officers assigned to squadrons, fleets, flotillas, and some shore stations, September 1862-October 1872; and a volume for lists of officers assigned to ironclad vessels at League Island, Mound City, and New Orleans, December 1865-December 1872. Some lists for the Civil War period were prepared at a later date by the Treasury Department to fill gaps in the records. There are indexes to names of vessels in most of the volumes.

The lists were prepared by paymasters or assistant paymasters. They were supposed to be submitted quarterly and whenever the vessel returned to the United States. The lists include regular and acting Navy officers, Marine Corps officers, and clerks. Some just record the names and positions of Navy and Marine Corps officers and of passengers, if any. More detailed lists include such information as date of appointment, residence, date and state of birth, and amount of time on vessels. Some have explanations of changes since the previous report, and some list the crew as well as the officers.

Extracts from the lists relating to individual officers are in entry 526. Additional lists for ships in the Mississippi Squadron are in entry 620. Earlier lists of officers on ships are included in Preliminary Inventory 123, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24, entry 181. For later lists, see Preliminary Inventory 123, entry 185. This series is reproduced on NARA Microfilm Publication M1976, Lists of Officers of Vessels of the United States Navy, August 1860-December 1877.

Fiscal Records, 1798-1890

The fiscal records in this record group and in Record Group 80, General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947, are fragmentary and represent only a part of the records pertaining to finances maintained in the offices of the Secretary of the Navy, the Accountant of the Navy, and the Fourth Auditor and Second Comptroller of the Treasury. More complete records of the Fourth Auditor and the Second Comptroller of the Treasury pertaining to Navy Department fiscal matters are in the Records of the Accounting Officers of the Department of the Treasury, Record Group 217.

The Office of the Accountant of the Navy was established on July 16, 1798. The Accountant's principal duty was settling accounts for money advanced and supplies issued by the Navy Department; his records were subject to Treasury Department inspection. On March 3, 1817, the Office of the Accountant of the Navy was abolished and in its place the Office of the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury was established. The Fourth Auditor of the Treasury was concerned only with the Navy Department accounts and for many years had offices in the same building with the Navy Department. The Fourth Auditor examined the accounts, certified the balances, and transmitted the accounts (with their vouchers and certificates) to the Second Comptroller of the Treasury for review. He also (fourth auditor) recorded all warrants drawn by the Secretary of the Navy, reported to the Secretary of the Navy when requested, and reported annually to the Secretary of the Treasury. In 1894 the Fourth Auditor's office became the Office of the Auditor for the Navy Department.

In addition to examining accounts settled by the Fourth Auditor, the Second Comptroller also certified the balances in Navy Department accounts to the Secretary of the Navy and countersigned warrants, reported to the Secretary of the Navy the official forms to be used for disbursing money and the correct manner and form of keeping accounts, and supervised the preservation of the public accounts. The Second Comptroller also reviewed War Department accounts. In 1894 his duties were taken over by the Comptroller of the Treasury.

75. Letters Sent by the Accountant of the Navy.
Sept. 17, 1798-May 4, 1800. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

Included are letters to the following: Secretary of the Navy, regarding payment of salaries of Navy Department employees; businessmen and naval officers, informing them of warrants drawn on the U.S. Treasury in their favor; the Auditor of the Treasury, concerning the payment and audit of Navy accounts; and Navy agents and pursers, questioning information in vouchers and accounts that they had submitted, instructing them on procedures to be followed in the keeping of their accounts, and advising them of Navy Department regulations concerning pay.

76. Register of Warrants Drawn on the Treasurer of the United States.
Sept. 20, 1798-Feb. 6, 1809. 3 vols. 4 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence. There is a ship, name, and subject index in the first volume and a typed name and ship index in the second volume. Entries give warrant number, date, name of person to whom issued, purpose, and amount. There is also a running total (in pencil). Many warrants are for the pay of officers, recruiting expenses, and ship construction expenses. The warrants often show an officer's promotion date or ship assignment.

77. Abstracts of Records Relating to Pay Arrearages.
May 1800-June 1835. 3 vols. 9 in.

Divided into three overlapping time periods: 1800-13, 1811-27, and 1824-35. Thereunder arranged by vessel or station. The overlapping is the result of some abstracts covering an extended period. There are indexes to names of vessels and, in the last two volumes, to stations.

These abstracts were compiled from vessel and station muster rolls and payrolls after the purser settled his accounts. They show the name of the vessel or station; its commanding officer and purser; and the amount due each man for pay, subsistence, clothing, or spirit rations; and usually the date and place of settlement and the person who made it.

78. Register of Correspondence Relating to Procurement and Payment for Supplies, Equipment, and Services.
Jan.-Mar. 1802. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of correspondent. Thereunder, letters received are abstracted on the left of facing pages and letters sent on the right. The location of the corresponding letters is unknown.

79. Receipts for Salaries in Offices of the Accountant of the Navy and the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.
Oct. 3, 1808-Jan. 1820. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The receipts are for quarterly payments of the salaries of messengers and clerks. Some quarterly summaries are included.

80. Ledger of Navy and Marine Corps Accounts.
Jan. 1811-Jan. 1813. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by account and thereunder chronologically.

Some typical accounts are pay, provisions, navy yards, repairs of vessels, medicines, and clothing.

81. Register of Warrants Drawn Upon the Treasury Department.
Dec. 2, 1811-Sept. 29, 1832. 15 vols. 2 ft. Arranged chronologically. There are no entries for the period July 1820-June 1822. In the last volume there are some entries for January-March 1835 arranged by navy yard.

Entries give warrant number, date, name of person to whom issued, often the purpose, and amount broken down by Navy and Marine Corps appropriation items. There are also page totals and recapitulations.

82. Register for Warrants.
May 1, 1816-Sept. 29, 1817. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volume is labeled "Treasurer's Daybook," but it is a preliminary version of the last part of one of the registers of warrants described in entry 81. Entries give date, warrant number, name of person in whose favor drawn, amount broken down by appropriation item, and total amount. There is also a running grand total. No other such volumes have been found.

83. Register of Repayment Warrants Drawn Upon the Treasury Department.
Jul. 1, 1822-Sept. 26, 1842. 4 vols. 9 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries are for warrants for payment of amounts owed to the Navy Department, although usually they are not so identified. The records are on forms used for issuing warrants to persons and give date, warrant number, name of person on whom drawn, amount broken down by appropriation item, and total amount. There are also page totals.

84. Register of Monthly Summaries of Accounts of Navy Agents and Pursers.
Jan. 1824-Jan. 1826. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by name of agent or purser and thereunder chronologically. There is a name index.

Individual entries include previous balance, requisition numbers and amounts, total expenditures for the month, and the new balance.

85. Schedules of Navy and Marine Corps Appropriations and Expenditures.
June 1828-Jan. 1831. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entered monthly were Navy and Marine Corps accounts for which money was appropriated by the Congress, the amount appropriated for each account for the quarter or year, the balance remaining in each account before money was drawn for the month, the amount drawn by requisition on each account for the month and other figures, and the balance remaining. Information is not complete for January 1831.

86. Register of Bills of Exchange Drawn Upon the Secretary of the Navy
("Bill Books").
Aug. 1830-May 1865. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically by date of payment.

Information in individual entries varies, but it usually includes date and place at which bill was drawn, name of person or company in whose favor it was drawn, amount, date paid, requisition number, and person or company to whom it was paid. Most of the bills were drawn in foreign ports in favor of naval officers, Navy agents, pursers, and consuls.

87. Register of Expenditures Under Various Shipbuilding and Ordnance Contracts.
Oct. 1838-Aug. 1854. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the shipbuilding accounts, the name and type of vessel, the yard at which the vessel was being built, and the amounts and types of wood and other supplies on hand are recorded. For the ordnance accounts the date of the initial contract and its expiration date, the article contracted for, the quantity delivered, and the place of delivery are given. Following the ordnance accounts is a statement of liabilities under ordnance contracts, July 1, 1854.

88. Ledgers of Contingent Expenses of the Navy Department and Its Bureaus.
May 1845-Dec. 1856. 2 vols. 1 in.

The first volume covers the period May 1845-July 1851; and the second volume, January 1849-December 1856. Thereunder arranged by office or bureau in which the expense was incurred and thereunder chronologically.

Entered in both volumes are the name of the person who served as agent or disbursing official for each office, the date of each expense, person or company to whom payment was made, the articles or services furnished, and the amount of the expenditure. In the second volume, the requisition number was sometimes entered. Payments were made from contingent funds for such services as extra clerical help, housekeeping, washing towels, scrubbing floors, bookbinding, and for such articles as books, periodicals, newspaper, stationery, and postage.

89. Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy From the Fourth Auditor and the Second Comptroller of the Treasury.
Jan. 2, 1847-Dec. 30, 1884. 59 vols. 12 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. The first two volumes are entirely letters from the Fourth Auditor. In the third volume, there are separate sections for letters from each official. There is also a supplemental volume, apparently for letters missed during the original binding. Except for the last volume, there are indexes to names and some subjects, sometimes with brief descriptions of the content of the letters.

Many of the letters are notifications of the completion of review and certification of accounts by both the Fourth Auditor and the Second Comptroller. Other letters relate to eligibility of former naval personnel, including those at the Naval Asylum, for pensions. The monthly rates of pensions are also included. The Fourth Auditor sometimes gave his opinion on claims brought by naval officers before the House and Senate Committees on Naval Affairs. For earlier letters from the Fourth Auditor and the Second Comptroller and their predecessors, see entries 36 and 44.

90. Ledger of Receipts and Expenditures of Money From War Duties Levied in Mexico.
May 1847-Feb. 1849. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by name of ship or port in Mexico. There is a name index to naval officers.

The volumes contain accounts of each U.S. naval officer who, during the Mexican War, served as an acting purser of a naval vessel ordered to Mexico or as governor and duty collector in a Mexican port town. Information includes amounts of duties collected, amounts and dates of transfers and expenditures, and purposes of expenditures or persons to whom transfers were made.

91. Monthly Summary Statements of Receipts and Expenditures Submitted by Navy Agents and Pursers and Officers of the Quartermaster and Paymaster's Department of the Marine Corps.
Jan. 1849-Dec. 1849. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by name of agent or purser or by department and thereunder chronologically.

Each statement gives the balance at the beginning of the month, receipts and expenditures, appropriations under which the money was drawn, amounts, and balance remaining at the end of the month.

92. Pay and Clothing Accounts for Enlisted Men.
1860-records 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by name of sailor and thereunder chronologically. There is no index.

Entries include date of transaction, item or service for which money was spent, and amount.

93. Press Copies of Requisitions.
May 1861-June 1864. 3 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence (6701-7791).

The requisitions were prepared on forms. These copies are only of the filled-in portions of the form. They give number and date of requisition, amount, purpose for which money was to be expended, and the account on which drawn. They were signed by Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles.

94. Press Copies of Vouchers for Contingent and Other Expenditures Approved by the Secretary of the Navy.
Jan. 2, 1862-June 30, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Many of the vouchers are for expenses charged to the contingent account and do not show the purpose of the expenditure. The remaining vouchers show name of payee, amount and date of payment, purpose, and account on which drawn. Included in this group are vouchers for payments to the American Telegraph company, Robert Smalls and other pilots who served the Navy during 1862-63, the New York Times and other daily newspapers running advertisements for the Navy Department, naval officers for travel expenses, and clerical personnel hired by the Secretary's office and the bureaus.

95. Statements of Receipts and Disbursements of Navy Agents and Paymasters.
Sept. 1862-Sept. 1866. 3 in.

Arranged by station or vessel and thereunder chronologically.

Included are monthly summary statements of Navy agent, Portsmouth, September 1862-July 1865, and quarterly summary statements of Acting Assistant Paymaster, USS St. Mary, December 1863-December 1864. The entry also includes weekly statements of Navy agents: Portsmouth, June and August 1864 and January 1865; New York, February-June 1864; Philadelphia, March-December 1864; and Baltimore, March 1864-July 1865. Monthly summary statements of paymaster, Washington Navy Yard, February 1865-September 1866 are also in this entry. These statements usually include the amounts received and appropriations from which withdrawn, amount of money paid out and to whom paid, purposes of expenditures, and balance on hand.

Paymaster's Account Book for Clothing, Small Stores, and Money Issued at U.S. Naval Depot Port Royal, SC.
1865-66. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by name of individual and numbered sequentially.

Entries contain information as to monthly disbursements for clothing, small stores, and cash monies paid. Sometimes names of vessels and naval ratings are given. The account book was kept by Acting Assistant Paymaster R. W. Allen.

97. Registers of Receipts and Disbursements for Provisions, Clothing, Small Stores, and Contingent Expenses by the Paymaster at U.S. Naval Depot Port Royal, SC.
1865-74. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by category (provisions, clothing, small stores, and contingent). Under each category, entries are arranged chronologically. There is no register for 1867-72. This register was kept by Acting Assistant Paymaster R. W. Allen.

98. Inventories of Property at Shore Establishments.
1878. 4 vols. 10 in.

Arranged by shore establishment.

The inventories include estimates of the value of land, buildings and other structures, machinery, boilers, and other property, submitted by the Boston, Mare Island, Norfolk, Pensacola, Portsmouth, New York, League Island and Washington Navy Yards; the Key West and New London Naval Stations; the U.S. Torpedo Station at Newport; the U.S. Naval Observatory; the U.S. Naval Academy; and the Marine Barracks in Washington, DC.

The Secretary of the Navy on August 6, 1878, ordered an inventory to provide an estimate of the amount and value of all property, including land, buildings, and vessels, at each establishment or bureau. Most of the navy yards submitted separate inventories for each of the internal departments into which they were divided.

99. Weekly Statements of Purchases by Bureaus.
Jan. 1883-June 1890. 7 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by time period, thereunder by bureau, thereunder chronologically.

Statements were transmitted by heads of bureaus to the Secretary of the Navy.

100. Form Requests From the Secretary of the Treasury Concerning Customs Duties on Naval Materials.
Jan.-Nov. 1884. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged in chronologically. Indexed.

Acknowledgment on a printed form of requests from the Treasury to the Navy that specified articles be admitted at ports of entry free of duties or charges for the use of the Navy.

101. Inventories of Office Equipment
("Personal Property") at Navy Department Bureaus and Offices.

Mar. 1885-Mar. 1893. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by name of building or office, thereunder by room number.

The first volume covers March-June 1885; the second is a continuation to December 1887, with an inventory of March 1893. "Personal property" is apparently understood as furniture and office equipment.

Personnel Records, 1803-97

Prior to 1861, control of personnel functions such as appointments, promotions, approvals of resignations, and orders for duty for naval officers rested almost solely with the Secretary of the Navy or the Chief Clerk of the Navy Department acting on his behalf. In 1861 Commodore Silas Stringham was ordered to take over responsibility for assigning and detaching Navy officers and an Office of Detail was established within the Secretary's office. The outbreak of the Civil War and the resulting appointment of a large number of volunteer officers moved Congress to pass an act on July 24, 1861, that ratified and confirmed all previous and subsequent temporary appointments of acting lieutenants, acting paymasters, acting assistant surgeons, acting masters, and master's mates until the return of the vessels in which these officers were serving or until the end of the Civil War. This act was partially revoked by Congress on May 16, 1864, when it passed legislation requiring that all volunteer appointments above the rank of acting master had to be submitted to the Senate for confirmation, just as had been required for regular appointments throughout the war.

The act of July 5, 1862, reorganizing the bureaus gave the new Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting responsibility for enlisting personnel at naval rendezvous points and on board receiving ships and other navy vessels. The new Bureau of Navigation established by the same act assumed an important role in personnel matters when the Office of Detail was transferred to its jurisdiction in 1865. The Chief of the Bureau of Navigation also served as Chief of the Office of Detail. The duties of the Office of Detail following its transfer were enumerated in a letter of August 31, 1865, from the Secretary to the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation.

They included the signing of orders for duty for both regular and volunteer officers; issuing notifications to regular officers that their resignations were approved by the Secretary and approving the resignations of volunteer officers and notifying them of the same; and submitting nominations of officers for command of vessels, duty at the Naval Academy, Naval Observatory, recruiting rendezvous, and ordnance duty, and for lighthouse inspector and minor appointments at shore establishments. In 1889 the responsibility for overseeing the enlistment of naval personnel was transferred from the Bureau of Equipment to the Bureau of Navigation. Throughout the Civil War and until the establishment of the Civil Service Commission in 1883, the selection, hire, and promotion of civilian employees of the Navy Department, its bureaus, and the shore establishments was mainly the responsibility of the Secretary of the Navy, the bureau chiefs, and commandants of yards and stations.

Other records pertaining to the service of Navy officers and enlisted men are part of the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24. Other records pertaining to naval and civilian personnel at shore establishments are with the Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks in Record Group 71.

Records Relating Primarily to Civilian Employees

Letters Sent

102. Letters Sent to Appointees to Civilian Positions.
Dec. 17, 1825-June 16, 1855. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period June 1829 to April 1841, when letters of this nature were copied in the miscellaneous letters sent (entry 6). There is a name index with a brief description of the content of each letter.

Included are letters sent by the Secretary of the Navy to civilians appointed as Navy agents, timber agents, U.S. agents on the coasts of Africa to receive liberated Africans, and naval storekeepers; naval constructors appointed to serve at navy yards and on boards of naval construction; professors appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy; and naval officers appointed to serve on the Board of Navy Commissioners. A typical letter announced the appointment and the salary and gave instructions concerning reporting for duty and, when necessary, executing a bond or oath of office. There are also letters revoking or terminating appointments and letters to incumbents notifying them of their replacement. Sometimes in the margin there are cross-references to the docket described in entry 105.

Registers of Letters Received and Other Registers and Lists

103. Registers of Letters Received Relating to the Naval Academy and to Employment at Navy Yards.
July 1872-May 1875. 2 vols. 4 in.

One volume covers 1872-73, and the other, 1874-75. Thereunder for the most part entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer and thereunder chronologically by date of receipt. There are separate sections for letters from the Superintendent of the Naval Academy and the President.

Entries give date of receipt of letter, name and residence of writer, date of letter, clerk to whom it was assigned, and a summary of its contents. The letters from the Superintendent relate for the most part to the status of midshipmen and sometimes faculty members. Most of the letters from the President referred applications or recommendations for appointments. Most letters from other persons are from or on behalf of applicants for appointments as midshipmen, positions at navy yards, and some other positions. The letters relating to the Naval Academy are in Entry 49. The other letters have not been found.

104. Register of Letters Received Relating to Employment with the Navy Department.
Jan. 1885-Mar. 1887. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged in chronological order. The volume contains a name index.

Each entry specifies date of receipt of application letter, applicant's name, date of application, to what clerk referred, action taken, and abstract. The corresponding letters of application have not been located.

105. Register of Navy Agents, Navy Commissioners and Others.
Nov. 1799-June 1854. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by rank or position and thereunder chronologically by date of first action. There is a index to types of positions.

Entries give name of individual, date of appointment, state of residence, and, when appropriate, dates of promotion, resignation, orders, revoking of appointment, death, and leaves of absence. Some of the entries have cross-references to the letters described in entry 102. There are a few entries for early Marine Corps and Navy officers, but most entries are for Navy commissioners, Navy agents, naval storekeepers, chief naval constructor, naval constructors, blacksmiths, joiners, agents for the preservation of timber, agents to the coast of Africa, general superintendent of timber agencies, civil engineers, agents for the purchase of hemp, professors of ethics and other teachers at the Naval Academy, pyrotechnists, lithographers, Navy pension agents, and bureau chiefs.

106. Register of Applications for Civilian Positions.
Feb. 1834-Dec. 1853. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by application number (534-4807), apparently assigned in chronological order. There are name indexes. No register has been found for numbers 1-533.

Entries give name of applicant, position sought, application number, month and year of application and place from which it was made, names of persons recommending applicant, and sometimes date of examination or appointment. Among the positions sought were Navy agent, storekeeper, live-oak agent, professor, chaplain, civil engineer, purser, clerk, and messenger. There are some entries for applicants for appointment as warrant officers such as carpenters and boatswains and a few for persons who wished to be restored to former positions as petty officers. The actual applications have not been found.

107. Lists, Abstracts, and Other Records Concerning Applicants for Civilian Positions.
1853. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged for the most part by type of record and thereunder by position sought, by yard or other location of the position, or alphabetically by initial letter of surname.

Included are lists of applicants seeking various civilian positions; abstracts of recommendations submitted on behalf of applicants for positions at the Portsmouth, Boston, and New York Navy Yards; notes on applicants and incumbents; and lists of applicants for advertising and of newspapers selected for advertisements.

108. Registers of Applications for Civilian Positions and for Appointments as Volunteer Naval Officers.
Jan. 1854-Dec. 1873. 5 vols. 1 ft.

The first four volumes, through May 1864, are arranged by application number (1-9603), assigned in approximately chronological order. The last volume is arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname and thereunder by application number (9604-10225).

Prior to 1860 most of the applications were for bureau chief, Navy agent, Naval Academy professor, storekeeper, clerk, messenger, and other civilian positions. Thereafter applications for appointments as volunteer officers became more common, particularly acting masters, sailing masters, and master's mates. By July 1862, almost all of the applications were for appointments as acting ensigns or acting master's mates (mates beginning in March 1865). Most entries include name of applicant, application number, position sought, month and year of application, state of residence, and, until October 1862, names of persons recommending the applicant. Dates of appointment are sometimes noted.

109. Register Pertaining to Applicants for Clerkships.
May 1872-June 1874. 1 vol. 2 in.

Applications are registered under three headings: for clerkships of class one, candidates eligible for examination for clerkships, and candidates examined for promotion. There is a name index.

Information in entries includes name of applicant, residence, and age. Other data varies for each of the headings.

110. Letters to Commissioned and Warrant Officers Transmitting Appointments and Orders and Accepting Resignations.
May 15, 1813BFeb. 12, 1842. 8 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are typewritten name indexes prepared by a member of the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library. The volume for May 1813-November 1815 also has a name index prepared contemporaneously by the Secretary's office.

These are chiefly letters from the Secretary of the Navy transmitting commissions or warrants and orders concerning duty assignments. There are also letters accepting resignations, giving notice of dismissals, and approving leaves and furloughs. Later letters of a similar nature are in Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel (see Preliminary Inventory No. 123, entry 158). These letters are reproduced on rolls 382-384 and 391-395 of NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

111. Press Copies of Letters Sent Concerning Naval Appointments and Other Personnel Matters.
Jan. 3, 1832-Nov. 30, 1833. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Most of these letters were sent by the Secretary of the Navy in response to requests for appointments as midshipmen received from Members of Congress acting on behalf of constituents, parents writing on behalf of their sons, or the applicants themselves. There are also replies to letters concerning promotions from officers or persons writing on their behalf; letters from individuals seeking appointments as pursers, surgeons, and gunners; and letters from persons wanting civilian positions with the Navy Department. Also included are letters concerning discharges, furloughs, courts-martial, and other personnel matters.

The letters in the first two volumes were copied in volumes 18A and 18B of the letters described in entry 6 after the practice of making press copies was discontinued.

112. Letters of Appointment and Orders Sent to Volunteer Officers.
May 8, 1861-June 5, 1879. 10 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

The volumes contain letters notifying persons of their appointments as volunteer lieutenants, ensigns, masters, assistant engineers, assistant paymasters, assistant surgeons, and boatswains; accepting or declining resignations; revoking appointments; granting discharges; giving assignments to duty; and approving or denying requests for leaves of absence. Most of the letters from 1869 to 1879 are to acting assistant surgeons and acting engineers. The letters were signed by the Secretary of the Navy until September 1865 and thereafter by the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation and Office of Detail.

113. Letters Sent to Mates.
Jan. 1862BFeb. 10, 1890. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. Most of the letters are dated between 1862 and 1865, and very few are dated after 1873. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Letters are from the Secretary of the Navy and concern appointing or discharging mates, accepting or declining their offers of resignation, ordering them to duty, requesting such information as age and length of service, answering inquiries concerning promotions and other matters, and granting or denying them leaves of absence. By an act of March 3, 1865 (13 Stat. 539), the title "acting master's mate" was changed to "mate."

Similar letters sent by the Office of Detail are described in entry 117.

114. Letters Sent to Volunteer Officers of the Mississippi Squadron.
Nov. 7, 1862-Dec. 29, 1865. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

Included are letters signed by the Secretary of the Navy notifying volunteer lieutenants, ensigns, masters, mates, chief and assistant engineers, assistant paymasters, and assistant surgeons of their promotion or of their dismissal from the service, granting or denying them leaves of absence, and accepting or refusing their resignations. Similar letters, May-December 1865, sent by the Office of Detail to volunteer officers of the Mississippi Squadron are described in entry 116.

115. Press Copies of Letters Sent to Commissioned Officers of the Regular Navy Relating to Personnel Matters.
Jan. 1865-Aug. 1889. 9 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters ordered officers of both the line and staff to shore duty at navy yards, Navy Department bureaus, and the U.S. Naval Academy, or to sea duty aboard naval vessels. They also detached them from duty; granted them leave; notified them to report before medical, naval examining, or retiring boards; accepted their resignations; and announced their dismissal from the service. The orders are signed either by the Secretary of the Navy or by the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation and Office of Detail at the direction of the Secretary.

116. Letters Sent by the Office of Detail to Volunteer Officers of the Mississippi Squadron.
May 13, 1865-Dec. 30, 1865. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

These letters are similar in content to those described in entry 114, except that they were signed by the Chief of the Bureau of Navigation and Office of Detail rather than the Secretary of the Navy.

117. Letters Sent to Mates by the Office of Detail.
May 12, 1865-Aug. 4, 1884. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

Included are letters transmitting appointments, granting honorable discharges, accepting or rejecting resignations, and dismissing mates from the service. There are also orders assigning mates to vessels and granting them leaves of absence. Similar letters sent to mates signed by the Secretary of the Navy are described in entry 113.

118. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Commissioner of Pensions.
Dec. 1882-Mar., 1890. 6 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volumes contain indexes to names of ships.

These letters from the Chief Clerk or Office of Detail provide the names of officers on board ships on a particular date in reply to inquiries by the Commissioner of Pensions. The Commissioner of Pensions used this information to locate witnesses to verify the service or disability of pension applicants. Most of the letters show the name of the pension applicant and the pension application number. The lists of officers relate to Civil War ships.

Letters Received

119. Letters of Resignation Received From Commissioned and Warrant Officers.
1803-25. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer and thereunder chronologically. A typed name index is inserted in the volume.

Most letters have an explanation of the reason for the resignation. Sometimes there are warrants, letters from commanding officers, and other enclosures. The resignations are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

120. Letters Received Accepting Appointments as Commissioned and Warrant Officers.
1804-11. 3 vols. 8 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of appointee. Typed name indexes are inserted in the volumes.

These are letters received from persons receiving appointments with the Navy but not from Marine Corps appointees. Many are accompanied by signed oaths of allegiance. The letters are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

121. Letters of Acceptance and Resignation Received.
Jan. 1804-June 1826. 1 vol. 1 in.

The volume is divided into three parts: letters of acceptance, 1805-12; letters of resignation or declination, 1804-20; and statements concerning state or territory of birth, appointment, and citizenship, January and June 1836. Thereunder arranged either chronologically or alphabetically by surname of officer.

Most of the acceptances are from appointees as Marine Corps officers; others are from Navy chaplains and purser appointees. Often they are accompanied by oaths. Most of the resignations and letters declining appointments are from midshipmen or midshipmen appointees. The statements concerning birthplace and residences are from chaplains and pursers. For other such statements, see entries 122, 125, 128, 129, and 131.

122. Letters Received Accepting Appointments as Midshipmen.
1809-39. 4 vols. 10 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of appointee. Typed name indexes are inserted in the volumes. Often accompanying the letters accepting warrants as midshipmen are signed oaths of allegiance and, after 1826, statements concerning states or territory of birth, appointment, and citizenship. Most of the letters are dated after 1825. For similar letters for 1810-14, see entry 123.

123. Letters Received from Midshipmen Acknowledging Receipt of Warrants and Enclosing Oaths of Allegiance.
Jan. 25, 1810-Dec. 31, 1814. 1 vol. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically except that the letters for 1813 are first. There is a name index.

Similar in format and content to the letters and oaths described in entry 122; there are few records dated 1810-14 in that series.

124. Letters of Resignation Received from Midshipmen.
1810-25. 2 vols. 5 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of midshipman. For the first volume (ABK), a typed name index has been inserted.

The content of these letters is similar to the letters described in entry 126. Sometimes a notation indicating acceptance of the resignation is on the back. The letters are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

125. Letters Received Accepting Appointments as Commissioned and Warrant Officers.
Apr. 20, 1812-Oct. 1864. 43 vols. 13 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

In addition to letters acknowledging original appointments, there are also some acceptances of promotions. Many letters enclose oaths of allegiance and, after 1826, statements giving state or territory of birth, appointment, and citizenship. Other such statements are among the records described in entries 121, 122, 128, 129, and 131. For the later years the oaths and statements are on the same forms, which also give date of birth. There are some acceptances from acting officers for the early part of the Civil War. Acceptances dated before 1840 are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

126. Letters of Resignation Received from Commissioned, Warrant, and Acting Officers.
July 23, 1812-July 19, 1877. 11 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

This is the successor to the series described in entries 119, 121, and 124. Explanations of the reasons for the resignation were gradually given less frequently. Sometimes there are warrants or other enclosures. Often there are notations of acceptance and citations to the registers described in entry 33. Also included are resignations from cadets at the Naval Academy and some resignations from Southern officers who resigned in April 1861. Resignations dated before 1834 are available on National Archives Microfilm Publication, T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

127. Letters Received From the Senate Confirming Appointments and Promotions of Officers.
Oct. 18, 1814-Dec. 27, 1842. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of officers.

The volume includes letters of confirmation for captains, masters commandants (commanders), lieutenants, midshipmen, surgeons, surgeon's mates (assistant surgeons), chaplains, pursers, Navy agents, Marine Corps officers, and officers appointed to the Board of Navy commissioners. There are a few rejections.

128. Letters Received Stating Birthplaces of Officers.
Aug.-Dec. 1816. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of officer; there are letters only for officers with surnames starting with C and D.

The letters were received from commissioned and warrant officers or occasionally a relative, in reply to an order of August 1, 1816, from the Secretary of the Navy. Additional letters are with the records described in entry 129.

129. Letters Received Relating to the Birthplace and Residence of Officers.
1816-26. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of officer. There are records for 1816 and 1826 only.

The form letters were sent in reply to circulars sent by the Secretary of the Navy in 1826 requesting commissioned and warrant officers to furnish the names of the state or territory in which they were born, from which they were appointed, and of which they were citizens. This information was recorded in space provided on the form letters, which were then returned to the Secretary. The same information was returned in letter format by officers who had not received the form letters. There are additional circulars, including later ones, among several series of letters received accepting appointments (see entries 121, 122, 125, 128, and 131).

130. Letters of Resignation Received From Commissioned Officers at the Outbreak of the Civil War.
1860-61. 2 vols. and unbound papers. 4 in.

One volume is arranged alphabetically by surname of officer. The other volume is arranged chronologically and includes a name index.

These are letters received just before and at the beginning of the Civil War and replies to them. Most are from Southern officers or those opposed to the Civil War. There are a few resignations from warrant officers and Naval Academy professors. The responses in some cases are formal acceptances, but sometimes they merely acknowledge receipt of the resignation and state that the person had been stricken from the rolls. In many cases, there is a notation by the Secretary of the Navy that the officer was dismissed rather than being allowed to resign. In a few cases, there is a notation indicating that the officer was dismissed by order of President Lincoln. The letters are available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

131. Letters Received Accepting Appointments as Acting Commissioned or Warrant Officers and Clerks.
May 1861-July 1871. 39 vols. 10 ft.

Arranged by rank of officer and thereunder chronologically. There are comparatively few letters dated later than 1867. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Many of these letters to the Secretary of the Navy are on standard forms. The ranks include acting lieutenant commanders and acting lieutenants; acting ensigns; acting masters and sailing masters; acting master's mates; mates; and first-, second-, or third-class acting engineers. There is one volume each for acting assistant paymasters, acting assistant surgeons, clerks, and acting warrant officers (carpenters, sailmakers, boatswains and gunners). There are oaths of allegiance with many of the letters, some with statements of state or territory of birth, appointment, and residence and date of birth. Acting officers were also called volunteer officers.

132. Letters of Resignation Received From Volunteer Officers.
May 1, 1865-Nov. 12, 1875. 2 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

Many of these letters received by the Secretary of the Navy are from officers of the Mississippi Squadron, which was abolished following the Civil War. There are endorsements of forwarding officials and a notation of the date of final action. Resignations of other volunteer officers are in entry 126.

133. Letters Received From the Commissioner of Pensions Concerning Officers.
Jan. 1870-May 1872. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged in chronological order with a name index.

The letters consist of requests, chiefly in printed forms, for addresses and service records of officers who had pension claims pending. On the reverse side of the form, there are brief summaries of the officer's service prepared by the Bureau of Navigation and Office of Detail. Most of the requests relate to Civil War officers; however, there are a few for War of 1812 pension claims.

134. Letters Received From Persons Volunteering Services in the Event of a War with Spain.
Nov. 13-Dec. 15, 1873. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

Letters of application with some recommendations are for appointment as officers should war with Spain result from the virginius affair, in which Spain captured a vessel running arms to Cuban rebels and executed 53 crew members, including a number of American citizens.

Other Correspondence Concerning Naval Service

135. Correspondence and Lists Concerning Volunteer Naval Officers.
Aug. 31, 1861-Mar. 1873. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There is a name index.

Included are letters of application and recommendation, letters of appointment, letters requesting reassignments (including transfers from gunboat positions under War Department authority to equivalent positions with the Navy), letters revoking orders, Senate confirmations of appointments of volunteers, and many lists of officers, including those at various navy yards during the Civil War and those on vessels in the Mississippi Squadron on January 1, 1865.

Registers and Lists Pertaining to Applicants for Positions and Reinstatements

136. Register of Applications for Appointment as Midshipmen.
June 1814-Dec. 1857. 3 vols. 6 in.

Entries are arranged by application number assigned in approximately chronological order. A new set of numbers was started in 1847, probably for applications for admission to the Naval Academy. Registers for the period before 1814 and for the period March 1820-June 1840 are missing from this series. There are name indexes in the volumes.

Entries give application number, name of applicant, month of application, some indication of residence (city, state, congressional district), often names of persons recommending the applicant, and sometimes other information, such as action taken and age of applicant.

137. Register of Applications for Appointment as Assistant Surgeons.
Oct. 1834-Nov. 1875. 2 vols. 4 in.

Entries are arranged sequentially by application number (505-3758), assigned in approximately chronological order. There are name indexes in the volumes. No earlier volume has been found.

Entries include application number, name of applicant, month of application, place of residence (state, city, or both), (until 1863) the names of persons recommending the applicant, and sometimes an indication of the action taken.

138. Registers of Applications for Appointment as Pursers and Paymasters.
June 1837-Nov. 1873. 3 vols. 6 in.

Entries are arranged sequentially by application number (488-4159), assigned in approximately chronological order. There were few applications later than 1865. There are name indexes in the volumes. No earlier volume has been found.

Entries give application number, name of applicant, month of application, residence (usually just state), names of persons recommending the applicant, and sometimes date of appointment or other action. The title of purser was changed to paymaster by an act of Congress of June 22, 1860 (12 Stat.80).

139. Register of Applications for Appointment as Midshipmen.
Jan. 1840-May 1852. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged by state and thereunder by application number. For some states, entries for the same applications are further broken down by congressional district. The application numbers are those used in the register described in entry 136.

Entries give application number, month, name of applicant, age, and sometimes an indication of action taken and congressional district.

140. Register of Applications for Appointment as Chaplains, Pursers, and Marine Corps Officers.
1853-60. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by state and thereunder by position.

Most entries give only the name of the applicant and the application number.

141. Register of Applications for Appointment as Engineer Officers.
Sept. 1853-Aug. 1862. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged by application number (1-1099), assigned in approximately chronological order. There is a name index.

Most entries give application number, name of applicant, age, month of application, residence (usually just the state), and names of persons recommending the applicant. Sometimes there is information concerning examinations and action taken on the application.

142. Register of Applications of Commissioned, Warrant, and Petty Officers for Reinstatement.
Sept. 1853-May 1868. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged sequentially by application number (1-434), assigned in approximately chronological order. There is a name index.

Most entries give application number, name of applicant, rank, month of application, place of residence (usually just the state), and names of persons recommending the applicant. Sometimes there is an indication of reinstatement or other action. There are some entries for applications of Marine Corps officers.

143. Register of Applications for Appointment as Master's Mates, Acting Masters, and Acting Ensigns.
Apr. 1861-Apr. 1865. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by rank and thereunder chronologically. The entries for masters and ensigns are combined. There is a name index.

Typical entries give date of application, name of applicant, place of residence, age, amount of previous sea service, names of persons recommending the applicant, and indication of action taken. Some of these items, however, are omitted from many of the entries. At the beginning of the volume is a register, April-May 1861, of applications for active duty, new orders, or for reinstatement to duty. Included are names of applicants, duty or position sought, and action taken upon application.

144. Register of Appointments Made on Recommendations of Members of Congress, ca. 1861-65.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by state and thereunder by name of Member of Congress recommending appointee. There is an index to names of Members of Congress.

Entries show name of appointee, position, and serial number of appointment. Most of the appointments entered in this volume were for acting assistant paymasters but there were a few for clerkships, naval storekeepers, chaplains, Navy agents, positions with the Marine Corps, and other positions.

145. Register of Volunteer Officers Given Permits To Take Promotion Examinations.
Jan. 1863-Apr. 1865 1 vol. 2 in.

A sample permit for volunteer officers to appear for promotion examinations is at the beginning of the volume followed by an alphabetically arranged list of examination candidates.

The sample permit is signed by the Secretary of the Navy and has a blank space for the name of officer and for the date. Following the sample is an alphabetical list of volunteer officers with the date of their permit.

Registers and Lists Pertaining to Orders

146. Register of Applications of Commissioned and Warrant Officers for Service.
Apr. 1823-Sept. 1825. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Arranged by rank of officer and thereunder for the most part by date of application.

Entries include date of application, name of officer, substance of request, and sometimes an indication of assignment actually made.

147. Registers of Orders Issued to Commissioned and Warrant Officers.
Jan. 1828-Apr. 1851. 9 vols. 10 in.

Arranged by chronological period, thereunder alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer, and thereunder chronologically. There is overlap in the periods of time covered by some of the volumes and some duplication of entries.

Entries give date of order, name of officer, rank or staff position, and the substance of the order. Orders granted commissions and warrants, accepted resignations, ordered dismissals, reassigned officers, ordered them to report, approved leave, and revoked previous orders.

148. Registers of Applications for Service.
Feb. 1838-June 1862. 2 vols. 2 in.

One volume covers the years 1838-55; the other, the years 1856-62. Thereunder arranged by rank of officer and thereunder chronologically.

Entries include name of officer, date of request, present residence or station, and type of service desired. The type of service requested ranges from the general ("sea service") to the specific ("command of the Saratoga").

149. Registers of Revocations of Orders and of Leaves of Absence.
Aug. 1850-Dec. 1860. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

The volume is divided into two parts. The first, a register of orders revoked, August 1850-October 1851, is arranged in rough chronological order. Entries give name of officer affected by order, rank or staff position, date and subject of original order, and often date and reason for revocation.

The second part, a register of approved leaves of absence, August 1856-December 1860, is arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer and thereunder chronologically. Entries give name of officer, rank or staff position, station or vessel, and length of leave granted.

150. List of Commissioned Officers Available for Duty, 1861-65.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by rank of officer.

On the right of facing pages, names of officers are listed under one of three columns: ordnance, navy yard, or other shore duty. On the left page are listed names of these officers who were assigned to a vessel or other duty or who left the service and usually the date of the action. The volume also includes lists of volunteer officers recommended for command, lists of officers on sick reports, and lists of vessels ready for sea duty.

151. Register of Orders Issued to Acting Officers.
Apr. 5, 1861-July 1, 1862. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

Included are entries for orders appointing, assigning, detailing, detaching, and dismissing officers. Following the register are lists of officers dismissed, February-June 1864 and November 1864-April 1865, and a list of deaths, January-August 1863.

152. Register of Commissioned Officers Acknowledging Receipt of Orders and Reporting for Duty.
Mar. 18, 1862-Dec. 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically by date of order. There is a name index.

Entries give date of order, name and rank of officer, place or nature of duty, date of acknowledgment, and date officer reported for duty. Also included in the volume are separate lists of commodores, captains, commanders, lieutenant commanders, lieutenants, and ensigns available for duty in September and October 1862.

153. Record of Officers Assigned to U.S. Vessels
("Detail for Vessels").
1863-64. 1 vol. 1 in.

Indexed by name of vessel.

This listing of officer complements to U.S. Navy vessels, gives the name of the officer assigned and the date of assignment.

154. Register of Leaves of Absence Granted Volunteer Officers.
Nov. 1865-Nov. 1866. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer.

Entries include name and rank of officer, date of original entry into service, date of expiration of leave, and sometimes address while on leave.

155. Listing of Officers of the U.S. Asiatic Fleet
("No. 4, Miscellaneous, U.S.N.")
1869-70. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by the initial letter of the officer's surname.

Each entry contains full name; rank; date of commission, warrant, or appointment; name of vessel assigned; date joined fleet; date left United States; date detached; where ordered; and remarks.

156. Abstracts of Orders to Officers.
Jan. 2, 1872-Aug. 18, 1873. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the orders assigned officers to or detached them from naval vessels and stations.

Statements of Service and Compilations of Service

157. Register of Sea Duty Assignments of Commissioned and Warrant Officers, 1815-23.
n.d. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by rank of officer and thereunder by date of current commission. The volume covers the period from January 1815 through December 31, 1823, but appears to have been compiled sometime later.

Entries give name of officer, date of entry into the Navy (as early as March 1798), date of current commission (as early as March 1799), vessels to which assigned and dates of service on each vessel. For a register of commissioned and warrant officers, see entry 344.

158. Register of Midshipmen.
1834-47. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by state or territory of residence.

The names of midshipmen from each state or territory are listed. When an individual ceased to serve, his name was lined out and the reason for the deletion was noted. The reasons included promotion, dismissal, resignation, death, and revocation of appointment. The volume also contains a table showing the apportionment of the House of Representatives under the 1830 census and several memorandums relating to the number of midshipmen allowed and the number of vacancies.

159. Register of Service of Engineer Officers.
Jan. 1842-1903. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order by date of officer's entry into the Navy. There is a name index.

Most entries include name of officer; date of original appointment; dates and nature of assignments; time on sea duty, on shore duty, and unemployed for each assignment; and total time for each of these categories at the end of each assignment. The first volume also contains some letters sent (December 1850) by Chief of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair Charles W. Skinner, Secretary of the Navy William Graham, and Engineer-in-Chief B. F. Isherwood, ordering officers to duty. There are some lists for 1858-59 of engineers arranged by rank or by name of vessel to which assigned. The second volume includes the birth and death date of the engineer.

160. Tabular Summaries of Officers' Statements of Service, 1798-1842.
ca. 1842. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by rank. For captains, commanders, lieutenants, and pursers, thereunder divided into service before and after January 1, 1824. For surgeons, assistant surgeons, chaplains, and midshipmen there is information concerning only service from January 1, 1824. Thereunder arranged by officer. The summaries cover service to March 18, 1842. There are name indexes preceding the summaries for each rank and a comprehensive index near the back of the volume.

Information for each officer includes nature and dates of each duty assignment, length of duty at sea and of other duties for each assignment, and totals. There is also an entry number for each officer, and the same number is used for the same officer in the sections for service before and after January 1, 1824. The indexes refer to these numbers, not page numbers. In the back of the volume is a list of the officers with the amount of sea service and other duty of each. This list is also arranged by rank and uses the same numbers as the summaries. The comprehensive index may have been intended for use with this list rather than for the summaries.

161. Officers' Statements of Service, 1798-1844.
June 1842-Dec. 1844. 2 vols. 5 in.

Arranged by rank of officer and thereunder by individual officer. There are name indexes arranged by initial letter of surname and thereunder by rank of officer.

The statements are on forms sent to officers in June 1842, completed, and returned. There were two forms on a single sheet. Form A is a statement of service from original entry into the Navy (as early as 1798) through December 31, 1841. For each assignment, the officer provided the date of his order, issuing authority, name of vessel or station, type of duty, rank at the time, dates of attachment and detachment, name of official who ordered the detachment, and the length of service performed. Form B, often not completed, is a statement of the departures and arrivals of vessels on which the officer served. Given for each cruise is name of vessel, class, date and place of departure, destination, date and port of return, and the length of the officer's absence from the United States.

Sometimes there are notations on the statements added by the Navy Department that provide explanations of gaps and inaccuracies in the information. Usually there are calculations of totals of the amounts of service, but often these seem to have been made or corrected in the Navy Department. Additional pages have been added to some statements.

Some of the letters transmitting the statements and supplements to the statements are among the Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24 (see Preliminary Inventory 123, entry 195).

162. Register of Captain's Clerks, Commander's Clerks, Paymaster Clerks, and Pay Stewards Who Served from 1844 to 1871.
n.d. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of clerk or steward. There are name indexes in the volumes.

The entries include name of clerk or steward and of vessel(s), with some indication of dates of service and sometimes date and place of birth.

163. Register of Naval Academy Midshipmen and Related Records.
1850-53. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by state or territory.

Most of the volume is a register similar to that described in entry 162, with names of midshipmen who ceased to serve lined out. There is also a list of vacancies and appointments for the Academy, some tables showing the number of midshipmen from each state and congressional district, and a list of acting assistant paymasters applying for promotion to the regular service in 1863.

164. Registers of Volunteer (Acting) Officers.
May 1861-ca. 1880. 4 vols. 8 in.

The volumes cover overlapping time periods. Entries in individual volumes are arranged by rank of officer and thereunder alphabetically by initial letter of officer's surname or chronologically by date of appointment.

The same names appear in different volumes but the information is somewhat different. It may include date of commission; states of birth, appointment, and residence; duty assignments; and date of promotion, resignation, death, revocation of appointment, or other action terminating service at that rank. Registered are lieutenant commanders; lieutenants; masters; ensigns; mates; passed assistant surgeons; assistant surgeons; assistant paymasters; boatswains; gunners; carpenters; chief engineers; first, second, and third assistant engineers; and cadet engineers.

165. Registers of Honorable Discharges of Volunteer (Acting) Officers.
Aug. 1861-June 1870. 2 vols. 4 in.

One volume covers the period April 1865-September 1866; the other, August 1861-June 1870. Entries are arranged by rank of officer. There is some duplication between the two volumes. There are name indexes in the volumes.

Entries give name of officer, date of original entry into the service, rank at time of discharge, and date of discharge. In the second volume, there is also information as to the officer's permanent residence when discharged and rank at time of entry into the service.

Registered are officers of the following ranks: commanders, lieutenants, pilots, masters, ensigns mates, master's mates, assistant surgeons, passed assistant surgeons, assistant paymasters, boatswains, gunners, carpenters, chief engineers, first assistant engineers, second assistant engineers, and third assistant engineers.

166. Register of Dismissals of Volunteer Officers with Surnames Beginning with A or B
("Register of Volunteer Officers, U.S.N., Dismissals")
Dec. 1861-Nov. 1865 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by first letter of officers' surnames, thereunder in chronological order.

Entries give name, rank, and date of dismissal. The volume is labeled on its front cover as Journal 7 of the Ringgold Expedition, but the contents do not appear to be connected to the expedition.

167. Register of Union and Confederate Officers, Diplomatic Personnel and Blockade Runners
("Lists of Names, Acting Officers")
1861-65. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by surname of officer. Confederates are listed on separate pages from Union persons.

Entries give dates and nature of appointment, later occurrences (death, resignation, and the like), and references to document numbers upon which the information is based. The method of citation is too cryptic to permit identification of the actual documents referred to. Some of the references appear to relate to the War Department's Collection of Confederate records. Included are names of Union and Confederate Navy officers, foreign ministers, consular agents, blockade-runners and inventors of naval ordnance. There are tracings of officers' signatures on tissue paper attached to some of the pages. Some of the pages are in red ink and some in black, but it is unknown if there a meaning to the ink color. The volume was probably used in compiling the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion.

168. Register of Acting Officers of the United States Navy.
1861-65. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged in chronological order.

Entries give name of officer, by whom recommended, and station. The name of Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins is on the title page. The register seems incomplete.

169. Register of Service Performed by Officers, 1861-65.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by rank and thereunder chronologically by date of current commission. The volume covers the years 1861-65 but apparently was compiled sometime later.

Entries give name of officer, station, date of birth, state of citizenship, date of entry into the service, date of current commission, amounts of different kinds of service, and circumstances of wounds if applicable.

170. Register of Acting Engineer Officers.
May 1861-Sept. 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged in two subseries. Entries for acting first, second, and third assistant engineers are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer and thereunder by rank. Entries for acting chief engineers are arranged alphabetically in the second subseries.

The entries show the name, dates of appointment and acceptance, state of birth, state of residence, present duty or station, and remarks noting promotions, resignations, deaths, or revocations of appointments.

171. Lists of Midshipmen Appointments.
1863-75. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged for the most part by year, thereunder by state or territory, and thereunder by nominating official or congressional district. There are no lists for some years. Starting in 1873, there are just lists showing apportionment by congressional district. For the Civil War period, there are sections for appointments to fill vacancies from unrepresented Southern districts and appointments from "Disloyal States."

Information concerning individuals includes name, name or position of nominating official, year of appointment, and sometimes year of graduation, resignation, or other action terminating appointment. For Presidential appointments, the category of appointment is indicated (at large, son of officer, enlisted boy, or apprentice).

172. Compilation of Data Relating to Wartime Service of Naval and Marine Corps Officers, 1812-1865.
ca. 1867. 3 vols. 9 in.

Arranged by category of officer. The first volume is for Marine Corps officers. The second volume is for commissioned naval line officers, rank of ensign and above. The third volume is for nonline naval officers such as medical officers, engineer officers, and paymasters. Thereunder each volume is arranged by surname of officer. There are name indexes.

These volumes, which were never completed, were intended to provide the date and place of birth, date of appointment, and information about service in wars from the War of 1812 through the Civil War. The data about service concerns battles and wounds rather than administrative matters, such as promotions and duty assignments. The amount of information about an individual varies from nothing to fairly lengthy sketches. For Navy officers, it apparently was compiled from the statements of service described in entry 173. For Marine Corps officers, it was apparently compiled from statements of service that are in Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24 (see Preliminary Inventory 123, entry 196).

174. Records Concerning Civil War Pilots.
ca. 1897. 3 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by type of record. There are name indexes in the first two volumes.

These records probably were compiled in connection with claims for pay or pensions of pilots who served during the Civil War but were not regularly appointed in the Navy. The records include an undated alphabetical listing of pilots of the Mississippi Squadron, which gives name, class, dates of appointment and of end of service, and residence; originals and copies of letters of application and recommendation and letters discussing service of pilots, 1854-65; an undated register, arranged alphabetically by name of pilot that gives dates of such events as appointment, transfers, resignation, dismissal, death, and arrests; typewritten copies of correspondence of the Secretary of the Navy, with squadron commanders, 1864-65, concerning status, pay, and entitlement to benefits of those pilots not regularly appointed; and some letters and memorandums, 1894-97, concerning the same subject.

Other Registers and Lists

175. Oaths of Allegiance.
May 1861-July 1865. 3 vols. 6 in.

The first volume is arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname; the second volume is unarranged. There are name indexes in the first two volumes. The third volume is arranged chronologically.

The oaths of allegiance are addressed to the Secretary of the Navy. Most of the oaths for 1861 are in the first volume, and most of those for 1862 are in the second volume. There are no oaths for the period August 1861-June 1862. The third volume has oaths for 1863-65. Most of these oaths are identical to those usually included with the letters received accepting commissions.

Most of the oaths in the first two volumes are from naval officers; but there are also some from enlisted men and civilian employees of the Navy Department, including a number of group oaths. Most of the oaths in the third volume are for civilian workers at the Ordnance Department, Washington Navy Yard.

176. Index to Volume 2 of Warrants of Appointments Issued to Engineers.
Oct. 1860-June 1864 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Entries are arranged by initial letter of engineer's surname, and thereunder in chronological order. Entries predating October 1862 are to a missing volume of warrants.

177. Warrants of Appointment Issued to Engineers.
Oct. 22, 1862-Oct. 27, 1866. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are some warrants dated June 18, 1868. The volumes are labeled "No.2" and "No.3." No volume 1 has been found. There are name indexes in the volumes, and a separate index to volume 2 is described in entry 176.

Printed forms completed with name of appointee, effective date and date of issuance, and rank (first, second, or third assistant engineer). If more than one warrant was issued for a rank on the same day, they were numbered in sequence; and the appointee with the lowest number had the highest ranking.

There are additional warrants in Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24, (see Preliminary Inventory 123, entry 166).

178. List of Commissioned Officers Who Resigned or Were Dismissed Before or After the Start of the Civil War.
n.d. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged for the most part by rank of officer. The volume covers the period December 1860-December 1861 but apparently was compiled much later. Some of its pages are on the backs of sheets of stationery used in the 1880s.

Entries give name of officer and, as appropriate, date of resignation, date of acceptance, or date of dismissal. Sometimes the state in which the officer resided is included.

Records Relating to Enlisted Men

179. Returns of Boys Entered As Apprentices.
July 1837-Aug. 1842. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by site of naval rendezvous (recruiting station) and thereunder chronologically.

The returns, mostly submitted weekly on printed forms but in several different versions, include name, date of entry, rating, wages, time of expiration of service, and sometimes ship or other duty station to which assigned, date of birth or age, and name of parent or guardian. There are returns for Philadelphia and Kensington, PA; New York, NY; Portland, ME; Boston, MA; and Baltimore, MD. With the Norfolk, VA, returns is a monthly report of the school composed of apprentices and other boys serving on the USS Java, July 1839. The apprentice system was authorized by an Act of March 2, 1837. The purpose of the apprentice system was to train boys in duties of seamanship.

180. Certificates of Enlistment at Charlestown (Boston) Navy Yard on Receiving Ship Columbus.
Aug. 1839. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of recruit. There is a typed name index prepared by the Navy Department Library.

The certificates are for landsmen, ordinary seamen, and able seamen who enlisted on board the receiving ship Columbus. For each recruit there are four forms: the certificate of enlistment by the recruiting officer, certificate of the commanding officer of the ship that he had reported, certificate of the purser that he had been entered on the ship's books, and the recruit's receipt for bounty or advance pay. Information in these documents includes date of enlistment, rating, amount of bounty or advanced pay, amount of monthly pay, term of service, date of expiration of leave of absence before reporting, and date of reporting on the ship.

Legal Records, 1807-83

Prior to the creation of the Office of Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General on March 2, 1865, the Secretary of the Navy held primary responsibility for overseeing the legal business of the Navy department. Within this record group are records created and maintained by the Secretary in the exercise of this function, including records pertaining to contracts, claims, prize vessels and their cargoes, prisoners of war, courts-martial, and courts of inquiry. Under the provisions of the Judiciary Act of 1789, the Secretary requested and received legal opinions on matters affecting the Navy from the Attorney General of the United States (1 stat 73).

During the Civil War, Army officers were detailed to the Navy Department and appointed by the Secretary as special commissioners to aid in the investigation of naval personnel and private contractors involved in frauds and other abuses against the Government. Special counsels were also appointed to aid in the prosecution of those indicted. The correspondence between the Secretary and the Assistant Secretary and the officers detailed from the War Department--Cols. Lafayette Baker and Henry S. Olcott and Maj. George Chandleróis part of this record group, as well as the correspondence with Special Counsels Nathaniel Wilson, H. H. Goodman, and William E. Chandler.

Also in this record group are some of the records kept by the Offices of the Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General created in March 1865, the Naval Solicitor and Judge Advocate General of the Navy created in March 1877, and the Judge Advocate General of the Navy established in 1880. By far the greatest part of the records of these offices, particularly those relating to courts-martial and boards of investigation, are in the Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Navy), Record Group 125.

General Records

181. Letters Received from the Attorney General of the United States Containing Legal Opinions and Advice.
June 1807-Nov. 1825. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. The register of letters received bound in the front of the volume is arranged numerically with each entry consisting of the number of the letter and a brief description of its subject. Some of the letters are also registered in the volumes described in entry 32.

Among the legal matters discussed in these letters are the composition of naval general courts-martial, the awards of prize vessels and prize cargoes, claims involving private contractors with the Navy Department, the right of civil authorities to try servicemen, interpretation of various slave trade laws, and definitions of the duties and powers of the President in naval matters, as well as those of the Secretary of the Navy, and Navy and Marine Corps officers.

Some of the cases and opinions upon which the Attorney General based his responses to the Secretary are in the Opinion Books, 1817-32, which are part of the records of the Office of the Attorney General in the General Records of the Department of Justice, Record Group 60.

These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M1029, Letters Received by the Secretary of the Navy from the Attorney General of the United States Containing Legal Opinions and Advice, 1807-1825.

182. Case Files Concerning Claims Against the Navy Department.
Aug. 1846-Oct. 1874. 7 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged in rough order by type of case, thereunder by case, and thereunder for the most part chronologically. There are name indexes in six of the volumes; in three volumes, index entries give a brief description of each letter.

The records consist of letters received, lists, petitions, court orders, powers of attorney, briefs and other legal documents, inventories, transcripts of proceedings of civil courts and of boards or commissions, and documents submitted as evidence. Many of the claims were submitted by naval personnel for prize money. There were also claims for losses of persons who had vessels or cargoes seized or suffered losses because of collisions, for pay of naval officers, for compensation for goods or services furnished, and for violations of patent rights. Other cases concerned such matters as desertion, murder, drunkenness, and unlawful sale or appropriation of Government property. Included are records concerning the proceedings of a court of inquiry to investigate charges by Commodore William D. Porter against Comdr. Donald McN. Fairfax concerning accusations made against Porter by Fairfax in regard to the destruction of the CSS Arkansas by Porter's vessel, the USS Essex.

Similar records concerning claims and other cases are among the Records of the Judge Advocate General (Navy), Record Group 125.

183. Reports Received Concerning Abolition of Corporal Punishment and the Spirit Ration.
Feb. 1850-Mar. 1850. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by rank of officer submitting report. A list of officers from whom reports were received is at the front of the volume.

These 84 reports were in response to a circular letter issued by the Secretary on January 29, 1850, to captains, commanders, lieutenants, surgeons, and pursers, asking their views and those of "intelligent seamen" concerning the abolition of corporal punishment and the rum ration. A copy of the circular is bound in the front of the volume. The Navy Department abolished flogging in 1855. This volume has been reproduced on roll 451 of NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the office of Naval Records and Library.

184. Registers of Letters Received Relating to Claims Forwarded to Other Offices and Bureaus.
Jan. 1865-May 1876. 6 vols. 8 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname or position of writer or claimant and thereunder chronologically.

Entries include name of claimant or writer, date of letter, usually the subject of the letter or the nature of claim, and the office or bureau to which it was referred. Letters were referred to other offices and bureaus in the Department, officers presiding over naval boards, the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury Department, the Solicitor for the Navy Department, the Commissioner of Pensions, and the Commissioner of the General Land Office. The claims involve back pay or bounty, personal items lost in shipwrecks, unfinished contracts, and travel expense reimbursement. Many of the letters are from families of deceased officers or sailors claiming final effects.

185. Letters Sent and Endorsements by the Solicitor and Naval Judge Advocate General.
Mar.-June 1865. unbound. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. Letters are numbered 1-66.

The unbound letters relate to a wide variety of topics, such as investigations, suitability of officers, claims for damage and distribution of prize money.

Records Relating to Blockade Running

186. Correspondence With Consuls Concerning Blockade Runners and Vessels Fitted Out Abroad for the Confederacy
("Consular Letters").
Sept. 12, 1861-July 18,1863. 1 vol. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volume contains chiefly copies or extracts of letters and despatches originally received by the Secretary of State and subsequently referred by the Secretary of the Navy, but there are some originals (in addition to transmittal letters of the Secretary of the Navy). Most of the letters are from consular offices at London, Liverpool, Bristol, Glasgow, Dublin, Hamburg, Malaga, Havana, and Nassau. The letters relate to the departure of Confederate vessels and blockade runners from ports in Europe and the West Indies. A small number of letters concerning other matters such as the rules of the Federal district court at New York regarding prizes and cargo shipped to the Confederate States from Nova Scotia and Quebec are also part of this series.

For related letters, see entry 44.

187. Letters Received and Other Records Concerning Persons Captured by Navy Blockading Forces
("Letters From Blockade Runners").
Mar. 1863-July 26, 1865. 4 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

Filed with the letters are crew lists, reports, depositions, affidavits, transcripts of proceedings of military commissions, oaths of allegiance, and parole oaths. The records concern civilians and Confederate naval personnel captured on vessels attempting to violate the Union blockade. These records usually include personal descriptions and biographical information about individuals who were released or detained. Some of them were released as foreign citizens, others were released on parole, and others were imprisoned, usually in Northern prisons. Many of the letters have endorsements by the Navy Department recommending the release or continued imprisonment of the captive.

Many letters from Union Squadron commanders transmit names of Confederate naval personnel and civilians taken north on Union naval vessels and describe the conduct of the prisoners during the passage. A large number of letters are from the U.S. Marshals for the District of Massachusetts and the Southern District of New York reporting the delivery of blockade violators to their custody or the transfer of the violators to naval prisons at Fort Lafayette, NY, and Fort Warren, MA. In their letters the marshals also reported the names of civilian prisoners who were administered oaths of allegiance and parole oaths; the oaths are frequently enclosed with the letters.

Many letters are from imprisoned blockade violators or their families requesting their release, and a smaller number of letters are from the Commissary General of Prisoners and prize commissioners concerning civilian prisoners taken from prize vessels and from Army officers in charge of the prisons at which the blockade violators were held. Also included are copies of proceedings of military commissions convened in 1863 and 1864 to make recommendations concerning the disposition of civilian prisoners of war.

188. Register of Persons Captured on Blockade Runners.
May 1863-July 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged by date of capture. There is a name index.

Entries, which are in narrative form, include such information as name of prisoner, age, marital status, nationality, occupation, place and sometimes date of capture, activities in which engaged during the war, destination and purpose of voyage, place and dates of detention, date and place of release, and notation of whether willing to take an oath of allegiance. Also noted in some entries is the date on which the prisoner was turned over to the War Department. The volume also contains several lists of naval prisoners confined at Fort Warren, Fort Lafayette, and Fort Jefferson and copies of letters sent to the Secretary of the Navy concerning the transfer of naval prisoners to War Department custody and the release of prisoners. The information in the register does not appear to be complete.

Prize Case Records

189. Rough Lists of Captured and Capturing Vessels.
1861-65. 5 vols. 3 in.

The volumes and their arrangement are as follows.

  1. "Captures by U.S. Vessels," 1861-65, in alphabetical order by name of captor vessel, giving name of captor, name of prize, amount, and remarks.
  2. "Captures Made by U.S. Vessels," 1861-65, in alphabetical order by name of captor.
  3. "Captures Made by U.S. Vessels," 1861-65, in alphabetical order by name of captor, OBZ (A-N not being found).
  4. "Record of Captures Made by U.S. Vessels," 1863-64, in alphabetical order by name of captured vessel.
  5. "Prizes Captured by Vessels in the Civil War," 1864-65, in alphabetical order by name of captured vessel, apparently a continuation of (4).

These volumes appear to be compilations, probably prepared by different clerks for their temporary use.

190. Form Reports of U.S. Marshals and U.S. Attorneys Concerning Prize Cases.
June 1861-July 1867. 7 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by location of court and thereunder for the most part chronologically. Sometimes the marshal's reports are separate from those of the attorney.

There are chiefly two types of form reports. Returns from marshals on prize vessels (not always present) include, when appropriate, such information as name of vessel, date placed in the marshal's custody, disposition, gross amount realized from sales, expenses, disposition of proceeds, and maintenance costs and appraised value for vessels not sold. Reports of U.S. attorneys on prize adjudications usually include, when appropriate, name and brief description of prize vessel or cargo, date of capture, name of captor, description of cargo and its value, date of libel, date of interlocutory sale, date of district court hearing and the decree concerning disposition of the vessel and cargo (see entry 195), dates of appeals, total amount of sale and disposition of the money and of other actions. Other details are included under the heading "remarks." There are reports for the courts at Boston, Springfield (IL), Key West, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Baltimore, and New Orleans.

191. Lists of Officers and Crews Entitled to Share of Prize Money Received From Commanding Officers of Naval Vessels.
July 1861-June 1865. 12 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged in rough chronological order by date of list. The last list is dated March 1866. There is an index to names of U.S. Navy vessels in each volume.

The submission of these lists was made mandatory by an act of July 17, 1862 (12 Stat. 600, 607), which required that the commanding officer of a naval vessel claiming an award of prize money submit as soon as possible after the capture a list of the officers and crew on board his vessel at the time of the capture. Failure to do so would result in the loss of the commanding officer's share of the money and possible punishment by court-martial. Some of the lists are accompanied by explanatory comments or by reports describing the capture. The lists include the rank or rating of the officers and enlisted men and usually their monthly pay.

192. Index to Docket for Prize Cases, 1861-74.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of prize vessel or type of cargo.

Entries give name of vessel, location of court, and docket volume and page numbers.

193. Docket for Prize Cases.
Sept. 1861-Dec. 1874. 15 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged by location of court in which prize adjudication took place. There is an index to names of vessels and types of cargoes in each volume. For a separate index, see entry 192. One volume for Boston is missing.

Information given varies but may include name of prize vessel, name of captor and commanding officer, date of capture, type and value of cargo and its disposition, amount of prize money awarded by the court, dates of libel and other legal actions, and date referred to Fourth Auditor. For most prizes, there is also a list of officers and crew entitled to prize money.

194. Register of Prizes.
Nov. 1861-Nov. 1864. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged in rough chronological order by date of capture.

Entries give name and class of prize vessel, date and place of capture, name of captor, cargo, indication of disposition, and usually a citation to the report of the capture. The citations provide the squadron commander's name and page number in the Letters Received From Officers Commanding Squadrons, entry 45.

195. Federal Court Decrees Relating to the Distribution of Prize Money.
Sept. 1862-Dec. 1867. 6 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by location of court and thereunder in rough chronological order. There are indexes to names of captured vessels.

The decrees show the gross proceeds from the sales of prize vessels and cargoes, the amounts deducted for expenses, and the amounts remaining for distribution among officers and crew of the captor vessels. The names of vessels eligible to participate in the award also are indicated. Often accompanying the decrees are statements of expenses of marshals, district attorneys, prize commissioners, counsels for the captors, and court clerks. Included are decrees handed down by the Federal courts at Key West (FL), September 1862-June 1865 (3 vols.); New York, Springfield (IL), and St. Augustine (FL), September 1862-July 1866 (1 vol.); Philadelphia, December 1862-December 1867 (1 vol.); and Washington, Boston, and New Orleans, October 1863-November 1865 (1 vol.). A few 1866 decrees are included in the last volume for Key West, and a few 1867 and 1869 decrees are included in the volume for Washington, Boston, and New Orleans.

196. Register of Prize Cases.
1862-71. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged by initial letter of prize vessel's name or by of type of cargo.

Entries give name and class of prize or type of cargo, names of captor and flag officer, gross proceeds, costs, amount available for distribution, place (court) where adjudicated, and date sent to Fourth Auditor.

197. Summaries of Prize Adjudications in U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.
Jan. 20, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically by date on which libel was filed. There is an index to names of captured vessels.

The summaries were prepared by Francis H. Upton, counsel for the Government and for naval captors, of 133 prize cases filed during the period May 1861-December 1862 (with notations for actions up to January 19, 1863). Information provided varies but may include name and a general description of the prize vessel, name of captor vessel, date and place and other information concerning the capture, date on which libel was filed, dates of other legal actions and events, names of legal representatives for both sides, notations concerning appeals to the circuit court and to the Supreme Court, proceeds of sale, costs and disbursements, and the amount available for distribution. Remarks include personal opinions of Upton. There is an undated letter of transmittal to the Secretary of the Navy following the summaries.

198. Records Received Concerning Prize Case Auctions.
1863-65. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged in rough order by prize case or other subject. The volume has an index, largely to names of vessels.

There are letters with petitions, reports, inventories, depositions, receipts, lists, and other records concerning the appointment of auctioneers, determinations that vessels had been captured as prizes, appraisals of value of vessels and their equipment and cargoes, processing of cases in U.S. district courts, and sales and handling of proceeds. Many of the letters are from applicants for the position of auctioneer, inspector, or appraiser. Records include several auction posters and catalogs, including those for the prize steamers Georgia and Pearl.

199. Register of Cargo Captured.
1864-65. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of prize vessel.

Register includes date and place of capture, description of cargo, name of capturing ship, location of prize court, name of squadron commander, and page number of report relating to the capture. The page numbers refer to Letters Received From Officers Commanding Squadrons (see entry 45). Cargoes include cotton, medicines, guns, and clothing.

Records Relating to Navy Yard Cases

200. Letters and Telegrams Received From Special Commissioner H. S. Olcott, Special Counsel Nathaniel Wilson, and Judge Advocate H. H. Goodman.
Feb. 7, 1864-Dec. 30, 1864. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are lists of names of writers of letters in the volumes.

Most of the letters are from Special Commissioner Henry Steel Olcott, addressed to Assistant Secretary of the Navy Gustavus V. Fox. Olcott investigated frauds at the navy yards in New York, Boston, Portsmouth, and Philadelphia and arranged for arrest of persons believed guilty. Olcott's letters are written primarily from New York and Boston, where he was conducting investigations into frauds committed against the Navy Department by private contractors for oil, timber, and other supplies. Olcott's letters and telegrams also report progress made in investigations of Navy agents and other civilian navy yard employees suspected of selling permits to sutlers, having interest in companies doing business with the Department, running money brokerage rings, stealing property from the Government, or providing inferior products or insufficient quantities. Affidavits taken by Olcott and his assistants in their investigations frequently accompany his letters. Most of the letters from Special Counsel Nathaniel Wilson and Judge Advocate H. H. Goodman concern the prosecution of persons charged with frauds at New York and Boston.

In the second volume is a copy of Olcott's February 6, 1865, report to Assistant Secretary Fox of his activities up to that time as special commissioner for investigating frauds.

201. Press Copies of Letters Sent by Special Counsel William E. Chandler and Maj. George H. Chandler Concerning Frauds and Thefts at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
Dec. 15, 1864-Apr. 4, 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

The letters were sent by William E. Chandler until February 4, 1865, and thereafter, by his assistant, Maj. George H. Chandler, who took charge after William Chandler's departure. There are letters to the Secretary of the Navy, Special Commissioner Henry Steel Olcott (see entry 192), the U.S. District Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, Major Chandler, and others. They relate to the preparation for prosecution of cases against naval personnel, civilian employees of the yard, and contractors accused of being involved in the frauds and thefts. There are letters concerning evidence uncovered, confessions obtained, and recommendations for and against releasing prisoners on bond or parole. The last letter in the volume dated April 4, 1865, is signed by William E. Chandler as Solicitor of the Navy Department.

202. Letters Received by Inspector John. P. Veeder Concerning Navy Yard Accounts.
Oct. 7, 1865-Sept. 2, 1867. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Veeder was appointed in October 1865 to conduct an investigation into the manner in which the chief accountants at the navy yards were performing their duties. He examined procedures for receiving, inspecting, and disbursing supplies and materials; approving bills; and mustering and paying employees. As a result of the investigation, some of the chief accountants and other employees were replaced and new procedures instituted. Most of the letters are from the chief accountants, but also included are letters from Special Investigator Henry S. Olcott, under whom Veeder originally worked (see entry 207). Later Veeder was under the direct supervision of the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, from whom there are also letters.

Records Relating to Contracts

203. Contracts for Transport of Mail and for Steam Machinery.
Apr. 1847-Aug. 1860. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Name index to contractors.

Most of the copies of contracts and related documents copied into this volume were made between the Department of the Navy and private steamship companies for the transport of mail between ports within the United States; among U.S., Latin American, and European ports; and between the Navy Department and engineering companies for the construction and installation of steam machinery on vessels being built at various navy yards. Records include the contract to build the steamer Central America that was lost off the Carolina coast in 1857 with a large cargo of gold.

204. Contracts for the Manufacture and Delivery of Steam Machinery for Naval Vessels.
Aug.-Dec. 1862. 1 vol. 2 in.

No discernable arrangement, but there is an index to names of contractors.

There are copies of contracts, often with specifications are for manufacture and delivery of steam machinery, engines, coal bunkers, and other equipment to be installed on naval vessels. Some are on printed forms; others are handwritten.

205. Letters Sent Relating to Contracts for Work Performed at Navy Yards.
Oct. 1884-Aug. 1886. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are letters sent by the Secretary of the Navy (or Chief Clerk) to contractors, principally John Roach of the Morgan Iron Works, or members of the Naval Advisory Board.

Registers and Other Records Pertaining to U.S. Naval Vessels, 1797-1919

206. Registers of U.S. Naval Vessels.
1797-1845. 2 vols. 3 in.

Both volumes cover 1797-1815. The first volume is arranged by rate (class) of ship; the second volume is arranged alphabetically by vessel name.

Entries for individual vessels give name, rate (class), number and caliber and kinds of guns, name of commander, place and date of construction and name of builder, length of gun deck and keel, breadth of beam, and often current location or disposition of ship. The second volume contains more information concerning the dimensions of each vessel. For a later register, see entry 419.

207. Register of Vessels and Squadrons of the U.S. Navy.
1848-50. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

The volume has two segments. The first segment is arranged by class of vessel, and thereunder by number of guns. The second segment is arranged by squadron, and thereunder by class of vessel.

In the first segment, each entry contains name, rate, number of guns, where built, when built, and location (naval station or ocean). Entries in the second segment show name of squadron and name of squadron commander, followed by a list of each vessel in the squadron by class. For each ship, the number of guns, complement of men, time of sailing, and movements are shown.

208. Lists and Registers of U.S. Naval Vessels and Their Officers.
1801-9. 1 vol. 2 in.

The volume is arranged in five parts.

  1. Register indicating dates on which 11 brigs and 93 gunboats were contracted for or bought during the period 1803-8, and information concerning the contractors, place of construction, vessel dimensions, and materials used in construction.
  2. Register of 173 gunboats contracted for, 1803-8.
  3. Lists of vessels accompanied by the names of the commissioned and warrant officers serving on them, 1801-9.
  4. Lists of vessels and officers composing the Mediterranean Squadron under the commands of Como. Richard Morris (June 1802-December 1803), Como. Edward Preble (September 1803-September 1804), and Como. John Rodgers (July-September 1805). Also provided is information concerning the formation of the Mediterranean Squadron and details of operations against the Barbary States.
  5. Registers of vessels, mostly gunboats, stationed at certain stations, 1806-7.

Records of Chief Clerk John W. Hogg, 1875-92

John W. Hogg served as Chief Clerk of the Navy Department from 1875 until his death in 1893. Earlier he had served as disbursing clerk in the Department.

209. Records of Chief Clerk John W. Hogg Concerning Policies and Administration.
ca. 1875-91. 1 vol. 2 in.

No discernible arrangement except that records concerning the same subject sometimes are filed together. There is a typewritten subject index.

The volume consists for the most part of copies of documents assembled for reference purposes by John W. Hogg. Included are letters, memorandums, procedural issuances, and financial statements. The documents relate to a wide range of subjects including the duties of various naval boards and of the "Admiral of the Navy," the names of newspapers subscribed to by the Navy Department, the distribution of work in the Secretary's office, the number of Union and Confederate veterans employed in the Navy Department, and the order of arrangement of the Navy Register. While most of the memorandums and letters included were addressed to Navy officers and heads of bureaus, some represent correspondence between Hogg and the Secretary of the Navy. There are additional records relating to chief clerks in Record Group 80, General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947.

Records of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 1898-1921

An act of Congress of July 11, 1890, provided for an Assistant Secretary of the Navy to be appointed from civil life by the President with the advice and consent of the Senate. The Assistant Secretary of the Navy handled civilian personnel matters and the administration of shore stations, in addition to serving as Acting Secretary of the Navy in the absence of the Secretary. Most records of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy are in Record Group 80, General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947.

210. Letters Received.
1898-1907. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of correspondent.

For the most part personal and semiofficial letters received from officials and other persons outside of the Navy Department. They relate to such matters as applications for appointment; promotions of officers and other personnel actions; location of Navy personnel; invitations; and requests for information, publications, and tickets to launchings and football games.

211. Assistant Secretary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt's Personal Copies of Minutes of the Secretary's Council Meetings.
Mar. 21-Dec. 22, 1921. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically in a three-ring binder. There are subject indexes to some of the minutes.

The council was composed of the Assistant Secretary, the bureau chiefs, the Judge Advocate General, the Commandant of the Marine Corps, the Chief of Naval Operations, and other high-ranking naval officers. It advised the Secretary on many matters, including treaty arrangements, naval maneuvers and training, appropriations, repair and upkeep of the fleet, and aviation. A set of minutes for 1921-25 is in General Records of the Department of the Navy, 1798-1947, Record Group 80 (see Preliminary Checklist 31, entry 21).

Records of the Chief of Naval Operations, 1887-1945

The creation of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations by a naval appropriations act of March 3, 1915 (38 Stat 928), was the culmination of efforts made by the Congress and the Secretary of the Navy to bring more efficient administration to the Navy Department. As a result of its creation, the aide system was abolished and the new Chief of Naval Operations was given responsibility, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, for fleet operations and the preparation of war plans. On August 29, 1916, another naval appropriation act (39 Stat 556) was passed providing the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations more definite status and giving the Chief of Naval Operations the rank and title of admiral, taking rank after the Admiral of the Navy. All orders issued by him were to be considered as emanating from the Secretary. To assist him, the 1916 act provided for assignment to the office of not less than 15 officers of and above the rank of lieutenant commander of the navy or major of the Marine Corps.

Following his appointment in 1915, two principal assistants on operations and materiel were appointed to assist the Chief of Naval Operations, and the previously organized Communication Office, Office of Naval Intelligence, Office of Target Practice and Engineering Competition, Radio Service, Office of Naval Aeronautics, and Division of Naval Militia Affairs were brought under the new office. The oldest of these offices, the Office of Naval Intelligence, had been established in the Bureau of Navigation by Navy Department General Order 292 of March 23, 1882, to collect and record technical, scientific, and sometimes political information useful to the Navy Department in both war and peace. The first naval officer to head the office, Lt. Theodorus B. M. Mason, was given the title Chief Intelligence Officer; the title was changed in 1911 to Director of Naval Intelligence.

The Office of Naval Intelligence was transferred to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1890 but was returned to the Bureau of Navigation in April 1898. The bureau retained responsibility for the direction of the office until 1909, when the office was placed under the jurisdiction of the Aide for Naval Operations. Following the abolition of the aide system and the creation of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations on March 3, 1915, the Office of Naval Intelligence was transferred to the newly formed office.

The Office of the Assistant for Operations was established in 1918. About one year later, a Ship Movements Section was organized with responsibility for directing and keeping records of the movements of naval vessels and aircraft. In 1919 the section became part of the Division of Operating Forces with added responsibility for the operation of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS), which was organized by order of the Chief of Naval Operations in January 1918. The NOTS was composed of vessels taken over from the merchant marine, some foreign vessels, and new vessels furnished by the Shipping Board of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. The NOTS directed the operation of this fleet of vessels engaged in carrying supplies to naval forces in Europe and assisting the Army in transporting and supplying the American Expeditionary Forces in France. Part of the fleet was demobilized at the conclusion of the war, and the remainder was used to supply the forces maintained in Europe and to transport troops back to the United States. The NOTS was abolished in July 1920 and replaced by the Naval Transportation Service in the Ship Movements Division, the successor to the Division of Operating Forces.

In 1916 the title of the Radio Service was changed to the Naval Communication Service, and the head of the service became known as the Director of Naval Communications, with responsibility not only for radio communications, but also for telegraph, telephone, cable, and all other communications between the Navy Department in Washington and operating forces and shore establishments.

In June 1918 a Historical Section was organized in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations under the direction of Rear Adm. William Kimball and was composed primarily of staff detailed from the Office of Naval Intelligence. The section collected and arranged naval records relating to U.S. naval operations during World War I from both the Navy Department files and the files of naval forces operating abroad. Administrative histories prepared by various units in the Department were collected and a number of monographs of World War I naval activities were prepared, some of which were published.

During the latter part of 1919, major changes were made in the organizational structure of the office. An Assistant Chief of Naval Operations and Chief Clerk were appointed in the immediate office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and nine divisions were established: Planning, Operating Forces, Intelligence, Communications, Materiel, Naval Districts, Inspection, Gunnery Exercises and Engineering Performances, and Files and Records. The Naval Aviation Division created in 1918 was abolished, and the Director of Naval Aviation was placed under the Planning Division.

The Chief of Naval Operations records in this record group relate mostly to units of the office created prior to 1920. The records include some of the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, records that were given to the Office of Naval Records and Library by private donors; war diaries; lists and other records created by the office during World War I pertaining to ships and naval events; and copies of letters, cablegrams, telegrams, and reports sent and received by the Office of the Secretary of the Navy and by the Bureau of Navigation pertaining to Latin America and the Far East that were assembled for reference purposes.

Other records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations are among records in Record Group 38, Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Record Group 72, Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel; and Record Group 313, Records of Naval Operating Forces.

Most of the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, Director of Naval Communications, Board of Inspection and Survey and Division of Fleet Training are with Record Group 38. Records of fleets and operating units other than the World War I period are with Record Group 313. Records of the Division of Naval Militia Affairs and additional communication logs are with records of Record Group 24. Records created by the Office of Naval Aeronautics, Naval Aviation Division and the Director of Naval Aviation were transferred to the Bureau of Aeronautics in 1921 and are now in Record Group 72.

212. Messages Received Regarding Peace Negotiations.
1918. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged generally by country.

These messages were collected by Assistant William V. Pratt from the Commander-in-Chief of Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, Adm. William S. Sims; the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. William S. Benson; naval attachés; and other naval personnel stationed in Europe during the Armistice. Those in this series primarily concern the surrender of German vessels to the Allies and the reactions of various national groups, including the Bavarians, Jugo-Slavs, and Italians, to the Paris peace negotiations. A few of the messages are marked "secret." Also see entry 231.

213. Translations of Secret and Confidential Messages Sent and Received by the Chief of Naval Operations.
Apr.-Oct. 1918. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by time period, thereunder by subject, and thereunder chronologically.

These records were collected by the Assistant for Naval Operations. Most of these copied messages were exchanged by the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. William S. Benson, and the Chief of Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, Adm. William S. Sims. They concern operational matters, logistical support for operating forces, and relations with the Allies. Also discussed are recommendations on strategic and political matters taken by the Inter-Allied Naval Council and Inter-Allied Supreme War Council. Messages received by the Chief of Naval Operations from the Commander-in-Chief of the Asiatic Fleet, the naval attaché at Peking, and vessel commanders concerning Bolshevik activities in Russia, conditions among Austrian and German prisoners in Siberia, developments in the region of Siberia controlled by the Czecho-Slovaks, and Japan's possible intervention in the war are in this series. There are also a small number of memorandums prepared by the Assistant for Operations, William V. Pratt, for the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet on the same subjects. Some of the messages have been annotated by Pratt. Also see entry 231.

214. Copies of Memorandums, Messages, and Reports Received by the Chief of Naval Operations Concerning Russian Affairs.
1918-19. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These records were collected by the Assistant for Naval Operations. This copied correspondence, most of which was forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations from the naval attaché at Stockholm and by the State Department, concerns operations of Allied troops in Siberia and in eastern Russia, developments among the Bolsheviks, the struggle for control of the Chinese Eastern Railroad from Vladivostock to Chita, the attitude of the Finnish Government toward the Bolsheviks, and relations between the Czechs and other ethnic groups and the Bolsheviks. Other forwarded memorandums, messages, and reports in the series were submitted to the Navy Department by the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet, commanding officers of vessels stationed near Russia, and naval attachés. Also see entry 213.

Records of Divisions, 1897-1940

Ship Movements Division

215. Quarterly Cruising Reports of Vessels.
July 1897-June 1933. 105 vols. 18 ft.

Arranged in 19 volumes and 86 binders by fiscal year (July-June), thereunder for the most part alphabetically by name of vessel, and thereunder chronologically.

The reports include name of vessel and of commanding officer, departure and arrival times, names of ports visited, distances sailed, ship's speed, and the nature of the vessel's service or mission. Reports for the earlier years usually also include the date and place last docked and reason for docking and information concerning sailing and weather conditions and fuel consumption. Earlier reports for 1895-97 are in entry 421. Quarterly employment reports of vessels, which replaced the cruising reports, are described in entry 228.

216. Daily Reports of Movements of Vessels.
Sept. 1, 1897-Dec. 31, 1915. 34 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. The volume for July-December 1911 is missing.

These are printed or mimeographed (1914-15) reports that give dates of arrival of naval vessels at U.S. and foreign ports and of departures with destinations. Sometimes there are notes concerning commissioning and assigning of vessels and similar matters. They were prepared by the Bureau of Navigation until December 4, 1909, and then by the Division of Operations of the Fleet. Beginning in January 1912, now issued by the Department without any identification of a lower unit, the reports included lists of orders to officers and additional notes, including such items as the reports of deaths of officers.

217. Registers of Movements of U.S. Naval Vessels.
Jan. 1, 1900-June 30, 1941. 42 vols. 8 ft.

Most volumes cover a period of one year from July 1 through June 30 and are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. Volume 42, for July 1, 1940-June 30,1941, includes ships with names beginning with A-Q. The R-Z volume has not been located. There are indexes to names of vessels in the volumes.

Entries show dates and ports of arrivals and of departures (with destinations). There are also notes concerning commissioning, assignments, and other such matters. For separate registers for certain types or categories of vessels, see entries 220 (submarine chasers), 221 (submarines), 225 (eagle boats), and 222 (Army account vessels).

218. Registers of Voyages to France by Vessels of the Cruiser and Transport Force.
1917-1919. 7 in.

Arranged in three binders by time period. Entries within binders are arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Entries include the number (cycle) of the voyage, number of passengers transported westbound and eastbound, dates of westward and eastward sailings, ports of embarkation and debarkation, days at sea traveling westbound and eastbound, tons of cargo carried westbound and eastbound, and number of days spent in foreign and home ports. Delays are explained under remarks.

219. Register of Movements of Vessels Carrying Marines.
1917-20. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries give dates and ports of arrivals and of departures (with destinations) and sometimes the date due to arrive.

220. Registers of Movements of Submarine Chasers.
Oct. 1917-July 1940. 3 vols. 7 in.

The volumes cover overlapping time periods, but there does not appear to be duplication of information. Within volumes, entries are arranged by chaser number and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. Usually the entries for a chaser start on the same page number as the number of the chaser. Two of the volumes have lists of the vessels.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (with destinations). There is also information concerning the status of the vessel, nature of assignments, and its ultimate disposition (usually sold). There are entries for some vessels transferred to France in the first volume.

221. Registers of Movements of Submarines.
Jan. 1918-June 1937. 5 vols 1 ft.

Arranged by time period with some overlapping. Entries within volumes are arranged alphabetically by vessel and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There are references to a sixth volume that has not been located. There are indexes to names of submarines in the volumes.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (including destinations). There is also information concerning such matters as commissioning and disposal of the submarines.

222. Registers of Movements of Vessels of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (Including "Army Account Vessels").
Jan. 1918-June 1920. 2 vols. 5 in.

Divided into two somewhat overlapping time periods. Entries within each volume are arranged by vessel, for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of name and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There is an index to names of vessels in each volume.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departure (including destinations). There is also information concerning acquisition, commissions, transfers (for the most part the return of vessels acquired from the U.S. Shipping Board), retirements, and other such matters. Entries for vessels still operated by the Navy in 1920 were continued in the main series of registers of vessel movements (see entry 217).

223. Register ("Log") of Departures of Merchant Convoy Vessels From U.S. Ports En Route to Europe.
Mar.-Nov. 1918. 1 in.

Arranged in a binder in rough chronological order by date of departure. Included in the entries is the name of the vessel and whether it was assigned to the Army or Navy or privately owned, the port for which destined, ship's speed, cargo carried, port where loaded, date on which vessel was scheduled for sailing, date on which vessel was assigned to a convoy, the number of the notification sent to the local convoy officer, the unit issuing the ship orders, and the date of sailing. What appear to be actual or projected arrival dates have been entered under the remarks column. Most of the vessels were going to France, but some were bound for Great Britain, Italy, Gibraltar, or Russia.

224. Reports of Port Activities of Vessels of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service.
Sept. 1918-Aug. 1919. 6 vols. 9 in.

Divided into two sets: one (five volumes) is for U.S. ports; he other, principally for foreign ports. Thereunder arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder chronologically.

The reports consist of completed forms that include name and type of vessel, account (usually Army, Navy, or Shipping Board), port of arrival, port from which sailed, movements of the vessel within the harbor, time spent loading and unloading cargo and ballast, and information concerning fuel bunkered and time spent on repairs.

225. Registers of Movements of Eagle Boats.
Oct. 1918-Nov. 1940. 3 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by time period with some overlapping. Entries within volumes are arranged by vessel number and thereunder chronologically. The entries for each boat start on the page number that corresponds to the vessel number. The last two volumes have lists of the boats.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (with destinations). There is also information about such matters as commissioning and the placing of boats in ordinary. Eagle boats were a type of coastal patrol boat.

Entries for the three boats still in operation in 1940 are continued in volume 42 of the main series of registers of movements of vessels (entry 217).

226. Card Register of Naval Overseas Transportation Service Vessels.
ca. 1919. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Entries, on 3- by 5-inch cards, include some or all of the following: name of vessel, owners, information on inspections, dates of operation, place and date of demobilization, and information concerning authority and account chargeable.

227. Carded Records of Troop Transports for World War I.
ca. 1919. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of ship.

Most entries, on 3- by 5-inch cards, give name of transport, owner, place where surveyed and information concerning redelivery.

228. Quarterly Employment Reports of Vessels ("Cruising Reports").
July 1933-Dec. 1940. 21 vols. 6 ft.

Arranged in binders by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel, and thereunder chronologically. A few reports for January-March 1941 are with those for July-December 1940.

The reports are on completed printed forms that show name of vessel and its commanding officer; command to which assigned; and places, dates, and types of employment. These types include gunnery, tactics, services, fleet problem or exercise, upkeep, and navy yard. A remarks column gives more precise information such as "buoy upkeep," "engine trial run," "towing targets," and "at New York for liberty and recreation." The reports were submitted quarterly, but entries were made on a weekly basis. For earlier quarterly cruising reports, which these reports replaced, see entry 215.

Communication Divisions

229. Guide to Titles on Message Binders, 1917-26.
ca. 1917-26. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by message type, source, or country. Many of the cards are filed under the letter "I" for incoming or letter "O" for outgoing.

These 3- by 5-inch cards include the binder title, binder number, and dates of the messages in each binder in entry 231. Most of the cards show the full designation of the short message codes shown on the binders. For example, the binder title "O-O" refers to outgoing messages from Naval Operations.

230. Index to Messages Sent and Received, 1917-23.
ca. 1917-23. 241 ft.

Divided into four major categories: localities, flag officers, ships, and commandants. Within categories, arranged by year and hereunder divided into outgoing and incoming messages. Thereunder arranged alphabetically by surname or title of correspondent. Entries on cards are arranged chronologically.

Entries on these 4- by 6-inch cards include message number and sometimes the code name or title of correspondent, subject of message, and security classification, if any.

231. Messages Sent and Received.
Apr. 1912-Sept. 1926. 208 vols. 87 ft.

Arranged in binders numbered from 1 to 207, with some "A" (supplementary) binders and some missing binders. The binders are grouped according to some characteristic (for example, source, type, subject, or security classification). Usually incoming and outgoing messages are in separate binders. Messages in each binder are mostly arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence. Index cards for messages for the period 1917-23 are in entry 230. A guide to the binder titles is in entry 229.

Included are carbon copies and drafts of cablegrams, telegrams, radiograms, and other types of messages received and sent by the Secretary of the Navy; bureau chiefs; the Chief of Naval Operations; the Office of Naval Intelligence; commanders in chief of fleets; force, division, and squadron commanders; commanding officers of vessels and stations; naval attachés; U.S. representatives sent to France to conduct peace negotiations following World War I; and the War Department. Most of the binders are identified by the codes that are described on cards in entry 229 (for example: I-L, Incoming, London; I-Mess, Incoming Confidential Messages; and O-O, Outgoing, Operations). Binders arranged by subject include ones on Mexico, Russian affairs, and Santo Domingo. The messages relate to a wide variety of subjects, including transportation of Army troops and naval personnel to and from Europe, damages received by naval vessels and naval casualties, meetings of naval attachés with representatives of foreign governments, Paris peace negotiations, proposed plans for a League of Nations, mail censorship, revolutionary activities in Latin America, vessel repairs and inspections, and various administrative matters.

232. Communications Logs and Messages of U.S. Naval Vessels, Forces, Bases, and Squadrons.
1914-29. 123 vols. 14 ft.

Arranged in three subseries, the first of which is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel except in instances where dispatches for two vessels are contained in the same volume. The second subseries is arranged by name of force, base, or station. The last is arranged roughly by type of message (chiefly ALNAV, All Atlantic) and thereunder chronologically and numbered consecutively within the calendar year.

These logs were maintained by communications officers. About half of them actually follow the format of a log and contain extracts of the messages sent and received, the names of the officers or units to whom they were sent or from whom they were received, and the methods by which the messages were transmitted (blinker, flag, signal, or radio). Pasted into the remainder of the logs are the actual messages received and copies of messages sent. Messages were exchanged among vessels, bases, and stations.

Many messages in the first two subseries were transmitted through the U.S. Naval Radio Service and reported sinkings, mine dangers, movements of German and Allied vessels, and operations undertaken. Other messages concern such administrative matters as medical examinations to be conducted; reports to be completed; and instructions for coaling, docking, and repairing vessels and aircraft and transferring personnel. Messages received by the U.S. naval representative at Murmansk and intercepted messages also are included.

Most of the ALNAV and All Atlantic messages (third subseries) were transmitted through the U.S. Naval Radio Service. The ALNAV messages were sent to all vessels and shore establishments of the Navy, and the All Atlantic messages generally were of a confidential nature and were transmitted by the Chief of Naval Operations in code; translations usually are not included. The ALNAV messages usually were issued by the Secretary of the Navy, Bureau of Navigation, or the Chief of Naval Operations. They were not considered confidential, relating to such matters as conversion rates for foreign currency, procedures for reenlistment, examinations, uniforms and pay increases. There are additional communication and radio logs for the period 1917-23 in Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24 (see Preliminary Inventory Number 123, entries 129-131).

233. Orders and Other Directives Issued and Received by Naval Transports and Patrol Boats.
1917-19. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by vessel and thereunder in rough chronological order. The records for the USS Talofa are in a binder.

For the most part, these are volumes kept by the executive officers of certain vessels into which have been entered or pasted orders, memorandums, and other directives issued to the officers and crew of the ship. For some vessels, the records consist partially or entirely of orders, regulations, and other issuances received from or transmitted by naval districts. Many of the directives relate to operations, including patrol procedures, the routine for abandoning ship, inspections, antisubmarine procedures, signals, water supply, personnel, and watch duty. The directives received concern such matters as licenses to navigate and sailing orders.

234. Radio and Signal Messages Sent by Antisubmarine and Destroyer Escort Vessels.
Feb. 1918-Mar. 1919. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no messages for the period April 1918-January 1919.

The messages were sent to other U.S. and Allied merchant and naval vessels, division headquarters, and U.S. and Allied naval stations. They include reports of sightings of enemy vessels, requests for assistance, and instructions for vessel formations. Some of the messages for February-March 1919 were sent by the escort vessels accompanying the USS George Washington, carrying President Woodrow Wilson to the peace negotiations in Paris.

235. Register of Messages Sent and Received by the Commanding Officer of the Special Service Squadron.
Oct. 1920-Apr. 1924. 2 vols. 4 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Entries identify the sender, the receiver, and the reference number of the message and contain a brief description of the content of the message.

Division of Operating Forces

236. Logs and Reports of U.S. Naval Vessels, Bases, and Stations.
1917-19. 38 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged by vessel, base, or station and thereunder by type of record.

Included are logs kept by merchant convoys, bases, and stations; telephone logs; patrol reports; reports of ships' positions; shipping reports; and watch, quarter, and station bills. There is data concerning drills performed by vessels and crews, destinations of vessels, cargoes carried, and daily occurrences on board ship and at naval stations. Included are logs and reports for the U.S. Naval Station, Kilingholme, England; the U.S. Naval Air Station, Lough Foyle, Ireland; the U.S. Naval Base, Bordeaux, France; and vessels stationed in U.S. and European waters and at other bases in the United States and Europe.

Air Operations

237. Flight Logs of First Navy Airplanes.
June 27, 1911-Feb. 11, 1914 3 vols. 2 in.

The entries in the log are arranged chronologically. Two of the volumes have tables that show for each flight the name of pilot, name of passenger, designation of aircraft, distance flown, altitude, wind speed, and time in the air.

Volume one describes the first flight of Navy airplane A-1 piloted by Glenn Curtiss and Aviator Lt. Theodore G. Ellyson at Hammondsport, NY, on July 1, 1911, and three other flights on the same day. The second flight log is dated November 12, 1912-April 30, 1913 at Camp Curtiss (Hammondsport); Annapolis, MD; Washington, DC; and Guantanamo, Cuba. The third log, dated May 1, 1913-February 11, 1914, documents the first aviation casualty, the June 20, 1913, death of Ensign W. D. Billingsly and injury of Lt. John H. Towers over the waters near Annapolis, MD. The logs also describe flights at San Diego, CA; Baltimore, MD; and, on January 20-February 11, 1914, at Pensacola, FL. The entries contain data on flights undertaken, modifications and tests run on aircraft, weather conditions, and activities at the naval aviation camps. These rough logs were presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1927 by the Commandant of the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL.

238. Station Orders, Memorandums, and Notices Issued at Naval Air Station, Key West, FL.
Jan. 1918-Aug.1919. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order.

The station orders gave instructions for the operation of airplanes and dirigibles, prescribed procedures for the use of the radio and telephone, and announced assignments of enlisted personnel and holidays to be observed at the station. Announcements concerning procedures for submitting requisitions for supplies and preparing reports are in the notices. Many of the memorandums were addressed to the heads of departments and students at the base, and they usually concern the course of instruction.

239. Training Flight Reports, U.S. Naval Air Detachment, Lake Bolsena, Italy.
Feb. 24, 1918-Dec. 16, 1918. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically in a binder.

There are reports for both American and Italian students, which include names of students and instructors, flight numbers, times out and in, flight times, and summary information.

240. Balloon Flight Training Records, U.S. Naval Air Detachment, Akron, OH.
Apr. 1918-Feb. 1919. 1 ft.

Arranged in 11 binders for the most part by class or company and thereunder alphabetically by name of student.

There are reports for individual spherical balloon training flights and final reports on training.

241 Beach Logs of Flights Conducted by Ensigns of the Naval Reserve Force, Naval Air Station, Bay Shore, NY.
June-Sept. 1918. 6 vols. 6 in.

Arranged by squadron and division and thereunder chronologically. Most of the volumes were kept on alternate days with two volumes in use at a time, but there are many missing volumes.

Log entries include name of pilot, time out and time in for each flight, number of machine (aircraft) used, a description of the type of flight taken, and the name of the passenger, if any.

242. Registers of Communications Sent and Received by the U.S. Naval Air Station at Brest, France.
Dec. 1918-July 1920. 2 vols. 4 in.

One volume records messages sent; the other, messages received. Entries in both volumes are arranged chronologically.

Entries include the name of the sender or addressee, the date of the message, a brief abstract of its contents, and the number assigned to the communication. Some of these communications are part of entry 231.

European Operations

For a glossary of abbreviations used in communications sent and received by U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, see Appendix E.

243. Register of Letters Sent.
Aug. 30, 1917-Oct. 21, 1919. 8 vols. 1 ft.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Register entries include date of letter, addressee, serial number (316-96496), names or initials of person who prepared the letter, name of person who signed the letter, and, beginning in October 1917, an abstract of the contents. Lists of initials that identify officers who prepared and signed letters are pasted in the inside front covers of the volumes. Some of the letters registered are among those described in entry 231, but much of the commander's correspondence is in the Area and Subject Files (entries 517 and 520).

244. Register of Letters Received.
Aug. 30-Dec. 10, 1917. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Entries include date of receipt, correspondent's name or office, file number used by correspondent's office, office or officer to whom referred, and, beginning in October, the subject. Some of the letters registered are among those described in entry 231, but much of the commander's correspondence is in the Area and Subject Files (entries 517 and 520).

245. Messages ("DISPATCHES") Sent and Received by the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in France ("COMFRAN").
1918-20. 23 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by abbreviation of command or office and thereunder chronologically.

These messages cover many subjects including transfers of enlisted men and other personnel actions, supplies, mail, baggage, accounts, Liberty Bond drives, transport of troops, arrivals and departures and other vessel movements, and other administrative matters.

For a glossary of the abbreviations used for addressees and senders, see Appendix E.

U.S. Atlantic Fleet

246. Correspondence of the Commander, Battleship Force One.
Apr.-Dec. 1917. 1 binder 1 in.

Arranged in general chronological order.

Included are memorandums, lists, and transmittal letters sent and received by the commander pertaining primarily to enlisted personnel who were provided engineering training on training ships of Battleship Force One squadrons and divisions. Also included are lists of officer vacancies on vessels of Force One and routine weekly reports of vessel employment.

247. Orders and Bulletins of the Cruiser and Transport Force.
Aug. 1917-July 1919. 6 in.

Arranged in four binders by type of issuance and thereunder numerically. There are indexes to the special orders and information bulletins and a list of the force bulletins.

There are general orders (1-280), August 1917-September 1918; special orders (1-78), August 1917-September 1918; information bulletins (1-101), September 1917-October 1918; and force bulletins (2-211), November 1918-July 1919. The orders and bulletins concern such subjects as vessel complements, operating procedures, drills, sanitary measures, equipment, distribution of supplies, accommodations for naval personnel aboard transports, icebergs and other obstructions to navigation, courts-martial, and the use of the franking privilege.

248. Secret and Confidential Letters Sent by Cruiser and Transport Force.
Dec. 31, 1917-Nov. 6, 1918. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged numerically 1-94. Numbers 92 and 94 are listed as "special orders."

The letters were sent by Albert Gleaves, commander, Cruiser and Transport Force. The subjects cover such topics as embarkation of troops, communications with U.S. Destroyers in European waters, confidential radio calls, running lists, and special requirements for ships entering convoy.

249. Subject Index to Correspondence of the Commander, Mine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
1918-19. 6 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by subject.

The entries on 3- by 5-inch sheets include, when appropriate, subject of document, words or phrases under which indexed, writer, addressee, date of receipt, file reference of sender, date of document, organizations to which copies were referred, and file number. Some of the correspondence indexed is in entry 250.

250. Correspondence of the Commander, Mine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
1918-19. 15 ft.

Arranged according to a subject-numeric scheme and thereunder chronologically. Partial subject index is in entry 249.

Included are letters, telegrams and other messages, memorandums, and reports sent to or received from the Commander of Mine Squadron One, the Commander in Chief of U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, the commanding officers of the minesweeping detachment, divisions, and vessels, and the British Admiralty. They relate to organization of the staff; establishment and disbandment of units; equipment tests, inspections, and experiments; plans for the North Sea mine barrage; personnel matters; and many other subjects.

War Plans Division

251. "Confidential" Letters and Reports Received Concerning Tactical Exercises of Submarines and Torpedo Vessels.
Aug. 4, 1909-Apr. 15, 1910. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Press copies of reports on operations and exercises of the Atlantic Submarine Fleet with a battleship fleet in Cape Cod Bay during July and August 1909, summary of reports of a practice attack by torpedo boats, and a memorandum with endorsements concerning a system of tactics for torpedo vessels.

252. Records Concerning Naval District Coastal Defenses and Other Subjects.
Jan. 1916-Apr. 1917. 3 in.

Arranged in rough order by subject. There are some records dated 1915.

In this series are letters, memorandums, reports, circulars, orders, and other records, for the most part copies or drafts, relating in large part to measures for coastal defense in case of war, particularly at the naval district level. Specific subjects covered include naval district defense forces, civilian training cruises, Boy Scout coast guard program, motor boat patrols, use of merchant vessels for coastal defense, minesweeping, and assignment of submarines for local defense. This was probably a reference file, perhaps collected by Capt. George R. Marvell, who was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations during the period covered by the records.

253. Confidential Ship Characteristics Reports ("CARDS").
1920-41. 6 in.

Arranged in binders in vessel categories: old destroyers; old submarines ex-naval auxiliary vessels; and decommissioned battleships, cruisers, destroyers, and mine layers. Thereunder for the most part arranged alphabetically by name of vessel, except that the reports for destroyers are first divided into those that were sold and scrapped and those that were transferred to the British in 1941, and the reports for decommissioned vessels are first arranged by type of vessel.

These reports, apparently for vessels that were decommissioned and disposed of by the Navy, were usually prepared on a form (NOP-12-1), but the form was revised several times. They include such information as name of vessel, type, builder, classification, date launched, assignment, home navy yard, dimensions, speed, fuel capacity, capacity for food and water and ammunition, and number and type of boilers, engines, radio transmitters and receivers, and other special equipment. The dates on which the vessel was sold, scrapped, or removed from the Navy Register are noted frequently.

Records of the Historical Section, 1917-26

War Diaries and Related Records

254. War Diaries.
Apr. 1917-Mar. 1927. 100 ft.

Arranged in 777 binders. First are diaries of vessels arranged for the most part alphabetically by name, followed by diaries for commands arranged by designation. For a list of diaries, see Appendixes F and G.

In April 1917 orders were issued by fleet commanders to subordinate units to submit war diaries either weekly or daily to the immediate superior in command. The diaries eventually were forwarded to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Most vessels and commands discontinued keeping diaries after March 1919. At approximately the same time, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations turned over the war diaries in its possession to the Office of Naval Intelligence, which later transferred them to the Historical Section of the Office of Naval Records and Library. War diaries continued to be kept by vessels and commands still engaged in active operations following March 1919. These later came into the custody of the Historical Section of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

The war diaries of vessels contain information on movements, positions, operations, exercises, drills, personnel actions involving officers, weather conditions, vessels sighted and collided with, and other events. The number of officers, crew, and marines aboard ship is included in most diaries; some diaries consist only of rosters, muster rolls, and/or crew lists. The amounts of coal, oil, ammunition, and other supplies on hand is also recorded frequently. Ships' histories and issuances accompany some diaries. War diaries kept by commands usually contain data on important events occurring on the station and sometimes are accompanied by copies of diary entries of attached vessels and commands and by orders, instructions, and other issuances. The diaries kept following World War I by forces, squadrons, divisions, and detachments in the eastern Mediterranean, particularly off Greece and Turkey, often contain long reports on local political, economic, and military conditions and photographs of incidents.

The diaries for many vessels and commands are incomplete. Most war diaries are in the Subject File (see entry 520) among the files for individual ships or stations.

255. Memorandums and Lists Relating to War Diaries.
Apr. 9, 1917-Jan. 1921. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are memorandums exchanged by commanders of forces and divisions, the officers serving under them, and the Office of Naval Intelligence concerning proper procedures for preparing and submitting war diaries. Lists containing names of vessels and commands from which diaries were received or not received and information concerning the status of vessels from which diaries had not been received. The war diaries themselves are described in entry 254 and listed in Appendix G.

256. Chronology of Events Described in War Diaries and Other Navy Department Records for the Period May 1917-March 1919.
n.d. 15 ft.

Arranged by day and thereunder for the most part alphabetically by name of reporting vessel or unit.

Each 5- by 8-inch card entry provides the date, a description of the event, and sometimes the source of the information. Descriptions of events were taken from war diaries, armed guard reports, fleet commanders' reports, and correspondence files in Navy Department offices.

Carded Reference Compilations

257. Lists of U.S. and Foreign Naval Vessels Lost, August 1914-May 1919.
n.d. 2 ft.

Two lists. One, for foreign vessels lost by destruction or capture, from August 1914 to May 1919, is arranged chronologically by date of incident. The second, for both U.S. and foreign vessels, August 1914-November 1918, is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Each of these 3- by 5-inch cards includes date of incident; name, class, nationality, and tonnage of vessel; note on or brief description of how the vessel was lost; and the source of the information or file reference.

258. Summary Reports of Movements of U.S. Naval Vessels, 1915-19.
n.d. 3 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder chronologically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards provide name and type of vessel, and dates o arrivals at and departures from U.S. and foreign ports. Some cards give tonnage, armament, and organizational affiliation of the vessel. Cards are included for submarine chasers, battleships, cruisers, destroyers, minesweepers, barges, fleet colliers, Army transports, barges, merchant vessels, tugs, and other types of vessels.

259. Reports of Movements of Foreign Vessels During the Years 1915-19.
n.d. 3 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of country of registry and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel, except that Great Britain is at the end and there is a section for unknown vessels.

Information on the 3- by 5-inch cards includes name of vessel and sometimes its type, name of country of registry, arrival and departure dates, and sometimes hours, source of the report, and other information. There are no entries for Germany.

260. Summary Reports of Movements of Foreign Vessels, 1915-19.
n.d. 5 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of port or locality visited and thereunder chronologically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards give name of port or other geographic place, nation, names and nationalities of ships, and dates of arrivals and departures.

261. List of Sinkings and Other Incidents Involving U.S. Naval Craft, 1915-19.
1921. 4 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel except that at the end there are cards for dirigibles, seaplanes, submarines, and submarine chasers arranged by type of craft and thereunder by numerical or alphanumerical designation.

These 3- by 5-inch cards usually provide name of vessel, type, gross tonnage, deadweight, normal displacement, date of commission and date placed out of commission, brief description of incident, date and time that it occurred, names and locations of other vessels involved, number of casualties, and sources of information. Sometimes more detailed information is given. In addition to sinkings, incidents recorded included submarine attacks, collisions, fires, explosions, and mine accidents.

262. List of Vessels Assigned to Naval Districts.
1917-18. 8 in.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries provide full vessel identification and the vessel type.

263. List of Sinkings and Other Incidents Involving Foreign Vessels, 1917-19.
n.d. 4 ft.

Arranged by country in which ship was registered and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel with unregistered vessels at the end.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide date of sinking or other incident, nature of incident, names of other vessels involved, and sources. The incidents recorded are similar to those on the cards described in entry 261. There are no entries for German vessels. Principal sources were Lloyd's List Weekly Summary, the Nautical Gazette, other periodicals, naval attachés, consuls, and other officials.

264. List of Merchant and Supply Vessels Armed, 1917-19.
n.d. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide some or all of the following information: name of vessel, type, gross tonnage, name of owner, and name of repair port.

265. List of Vessels Placed Out of Commission, 1917-19.
n.d. 6 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

These 3- by 8-inch cards provide name and type of vessel; date and place of decommissioning or return to former owner; and the force, fleet, squadron, or division to which it had been assigned. Many of the vessels were returned to the U.S. Shipping Board ("S.-." on the cards). Some cards have no indication of the decommissioning of the vessel.

266. List of Officers and Enlisted Men of the Regular Navy and the Naval Reserve Force Who Were Reported Dead or Missing During the Period 1917-19.
n.d. 1 ft.

The first list is of officers, and the other is of enlisted men. Both are arranged alphabetically by surname of officer or enlistee.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries include the name and rank of the officer or enlisted man, the date and cause of death, or the date reported missing. Sometimes the source of the report on which the entry was based and the name of the next of kin are given.

267. Index to Data Collected by the Historical Section in 1917 and 1918.
n.d. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by subject, name of ship, type of aircraft, or name of place.

The date of the event of the subject is usually copied on the 5- by 8-inch card entries. Most of the entries in the list under "A" are for the subject "aviation." The dates provided may be useful for using the U.S. Navy Area File, 1910-27.

268. List of U.S. Naval Vessels On November 1, 1918.
1919. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 5 x 8 inch cards provide the name of the vessel, its class, the service to which assigned, the name of the commanding officer on November 1, 1918, and sometimes its gross tonnage. Also noted is whether a war diary, log book, or both were received for the vessel. The data was obtained from the November 1, 1918, editions of Navy Directory and Ship's Data, U.S. Naval Vessels.

269. Record of U.S. Vessels Sunk or Damaged by German U-Boats During Atlantic Coast Raids of 1918.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged by submarine (U-151, U-140, U-117, U-155, U-152, U-156 and the raider Triumph) and thereunder chronologically by date of attack. At the end of the series there are a few cards for vessels sunk or damaged by mines laid down by the submarines.

These 3- by 5-inch cards include name of U.S. vessel, date and brief description of the attack, and the source of the report containing the information. Not included are reports for boats, shore patrol vessels, submarines, and submarine chasers, which are included on the cards described in entry 261.

270. List of Mines Sighted During 1918.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically for the most part by location at which sighting was made or by name of vessel making sighting.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries give the time of the sighting and the circumstances under which it was made. There are some entries for sightings of suspicious vessels and other objects.

271. List of U.S. Prisoners of War Taken During World War I.
n.d. 8 in.

The first list is arranged in three parts according to whether the prisoner was a member of the Navy, a civilian, or a merchant seaman and is thereunder arranged alphabetically by surname of prisoner. The second list is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder alphabetically by surname of prisoner.

Each 3- by 5-inch card entry includes the name, rank, date of capture, name and location of vessel at time of capture, place of internment, and sometimes source of the report and the name of the prisoner's next of kin.

Histories

272. Histories of Components of the Headquarters Staff of U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters.
1918-20. 6 in.

Arranged by subject in three binders.

These carbon copies of histories of units, bases, and sections were compiled in response to requests received in 1918 and 1919 from the Force Commander at London Headquarters for data to be used in the preparation of an official history of the U.S. Navy in World War I. Included are histories of naval air stations in Ireland and France; Coast Guard service with the Navy; patrol squadrons on Gibraltar; Mine Squadron One; convoy and routing offices of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service; the Telegraph and Cable Division of the Communication Section; and the Anti-Submarine, Planning, and Ordnance Sections of the Staff of the Force Commander. There are also a memorandum of the Chief of Naval Operations, November 15, 1918, on the subject "General Character of the Operations of our Naval Forces During Present War"; several memorandums prepared in 1918 by various naval officers concerning the establishment, organization, and functions of the proposed Historical Section at London Headquarters; and reports of similar Allied offices.

273. Financial Records Relating to Settlement of World War I Claims With Great Britain.
1918-26. 4 ft.

Arranged generally by claim.

These records appear to have been brought together after World War I by the Historical Section in order to provide information necessary for the settlement of claims both in favor of the British Government against the U.S. Navy and in favor of the U.S. Navy against the British Government. The claims grew out of contracts for coal, oil, spruce, hydroplanes, and shipping. Some were also made to obtain payments for losses resulting from collisions of vessels and expenditures in connection with the demobilization of U.S. naval forces in Europe. Some of these records appear to have been copied from the files of the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy Department offices and bureaus.

274. List of Persons and Organizations to Whom Publications and Historical Data Were Sent.
1920-24. 1 ft. Arranged alphabetically.

These 3- by 5-inch card entries provide the name and address of the person or firm making the request, the publications requested, the reason for the request, and the publications furnished and date on which sent.

Records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, 1887-1927

Until 1914 it was usually the practice of the Office of Naval Intelligence to accredit naval attachés, except the attaché at London, to more than one country. The attachés forwarded to the office from London, Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Rome, Vienna, and other foreign capitals publications and reports containing information pertaining to foreign ships, armament, and naval organization and operations, obtained primarily by exchange of information of equal importance concerning the U.S. Navy.

Directors of Naval Intelligence
T.B.M. Mason June 15, 1882-Apr. 2, 1885
Raymond P. Rodgers Apr. 2, 1885-July 22, 1889
Charles H. Davis Sept. 16, 1889-Aug. 21, 1892
French E. Chadwick Sept. 2, 1892-July 30, 1893
Frederick Singer June 30, 1893-Apr. 4, 1896
Richard Wainwright Apr. 4, 1896-Nov. 15, 1897
Richardson Clover Nov. 15, 1897-May 1, 1898
John R. Barlett May 1-Oct. 15, 1898
Richardson Clover Oct. 15, 1898-Feb. 1, 1900
Charles D. Sigsbee Feb. 1, 1900-Apr. 30, 1903
Seaton Schroeder May 1, 1903-Apr. 18, 1906
Raymond P. Rodgers Apr. 18, 1906-May 11, 1909
Charles E. Vreeland May 11-Dec. 17, 1909
Templin M. Potts Dec. 17, 1909-Jan. 25, 1912
Thomas S. Rodgers Jan. 25, 1912-Dec. 15, 1913
Henry F. Bryan Dec. 15, 1913-Jan. 20, 1914
James H. Oliver Jan. 20, 1914-Mar. 18, 1917
Roger Wells Apr. 16, 1917-Jan. 31, 1919

Naval Attachés, Oct. 28, 1882-Jan. 1, 1915

DOD - Denotes date of death
* Denotes that incumbent remained in office beyond cutoff date of Jan. 1, 1915.

London, England
Lt. Comdr. French E. Chadwick Oct. 28, 1882-Apr. 13, 1889
Lt. Comdr. William H. Emory Dec. 23, 1889-Feb. 24, 1893
Lt. Comdr. William S. Cowles Jan. 4, 1893-Apr. 5, 1897
Lt. John C. Colwell Apr. 21, 1897-June 5, 1900
Comdr. Richardson Clover Apr. 2, 1900-June 2, 1903
Capt. Charles Herbert Stockton May 29, 1903-Dec. 30, 1905
Lt. Comdr. John Henry Gibbons Dec. 23, 1905-July 21, 1909
Comdr. Edward Simpson May 28, 1909-Nov. 10, 1912
Comdr. Powers Symington Sept. 14, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. John H. Towers Aug. 29, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Maj. (USMC) Thomas Conrad Tredwell June 19, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Naval Constructor Lewis Bowen McBride Oct. 2, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Paris, France
Lt. Benjamin H. Buckingham Nov. 11, 1885-Mar. 30, 1889
Lt. Aaron Ward Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Raymond P. Rodgers Oct. 1, 1892-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Apr. 30, 1897-May 1900
Comdr. Giles Bates Harber June 1, 1900-Oct. 23, 1903
Lt. Comdr. Roy Campbell Smith Aug. 5, 1903-Nov. 12, 1906
Capt. John Charles Freemont Aug. 22, 1906-Feb. 11, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Lincoln Chapin Jan. 13, 1908-Apr. 3, 1911
Comdr. Henry Hughes Hough Jan. 20, 1911-May 5, 1914
Lt. Comdr. William Franklin Bricker Oct. 17, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. William Randall Sayles, Jr. Dec. 2, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. John Campbell Latham Oct. 3, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
1st Lt. (USMC) Bernard Lewis Smith Sept. 1, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Rome, Italy
Lt. Nathan Sargent Nov. 20, 1888-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-6
Comdr. John Baptist Bernadou Dec. 12, 1906-Oct. 2, 1908 (DOD)
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap 1908-9
Comdr. Andrew Theodore Long Sep. 2, 1909-Oct. 31, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Richard Drace White Aug. 4, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Charles Russell Train May 30, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Vienna, Austria
Lt. Nathan Sargent Nov. 20, 1888-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-6
Comdr. John Baptiste Bernadou Dec. 12, 1906-Oct. 2, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap 1908-9
Comdr. Andrew Theodore Long Sept. 2, 1909-Oct. 31, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Richard D. White Aug. 4, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Comdr. Stephen V. Graham May 30, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Berlin, Germany
Lt. Aaron Ward Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Nathan Sargent Aug. 1892-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Dec. 30, 1911-Dec. 1, 1913
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-Mar. 23, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap Nov. 30, 1907-Oct. 30, 1910
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Augustus Traut Sept. 4, 1910-Oct. 18, 1911
Lt. Jonathan Stuart Dowell, Jr. Jan. 17, 1912-Nov. 15, 1913
Lt. Arthur LeRoy Bristol, Jr. Jan. 17, 1912-Sept. 19, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Walter Rockwell Gherardi June 10, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. Victor Daniel Herbster Sept 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Surgeon Karl Ohnesorg Aug. 24, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
St. Petersburg, Russia
(became Petrograd in 1914 and Leningrad in 1924)
Lt. Aaron War Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Raymond P. Rodgers Oct. 1, 1892-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Apr. 30, 1897-May 1900
Comdr. Giles Bates Harber June 1, 1900-Oct. 23, 1903
Lt. Comdr. Roy Campbell Smith Aug. 5, 1903-Nov. 12, 1906
Capt. John Charles Freemont Aug. 22, 1906-Feb. 11, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Lincoln Chapin Jan. 13, 1908-Apr. 3, 1911
Comdr. Henry Hughes Hough Jan. 20, 1911-May 5, 1914
Capt. Newton Alexander McCully Aug. 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Madrid, Spain
Lt. Comdr. Raymond P. Rodgers 1895-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Feb. 16-Aug. 10, 1897
Lt. George L. Dyer July 1, 1897-July 1, 1898
 
The Hague, Netherlands
Capt. Albert Parker Niblack Dec. 30, 1911-Dec. 1, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Walter Rockwell Gherardi June 10, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. Victor Daniel Herbster Sept. 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915
Surgeon Karl Ohnesorg Aug. 24, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Korea
Lt. j.g. George C. Foulk Nov. 1, 1883-June 15, 1887
 
Tokyo, Japan
Comdr. Francis M. Barber Feb. 4-Dec. 28, 1895
Lt. Albert Lenoir Key Nov. 8, 1898-Sept. 28, 1901
Lt. Comdr. Charles Carlton Marsh Nov. 30, 1901-Jan. 1, 1905
Lt. Irvin Van Gorder Gillis Dec. 31, 1904-June 3, 1905
Apr. 23, 1911-June 30, 1914
Lt. Frank Marble Apr. 1, 1905-Apr. 11, 1907
Comdr. John Allen Dougherty Apr. 10, 1907-Dec. 9, 1908
Comdr. James Hamilton Sears Dec. 9, 1908-June 30, 1910
Capt. John Harry Shipley June 11, 1910-Dec. 13, 1911 (DOD)
Ensign George Ernest Lake Apr. 12, 1910-July 15, 1913
Ensign Fred Fremont Rogers Apr. 11, 1910-July 28, 1913
1st Lt. (USMC) William Thomas Hoadley Sept. 24, 1910-Dec. 10, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Frank Brooks Upham Aug. 11, 1911-Feb. 21, 1912
1st Lt. (USMC) Ralph Stover Keyser Jan. 1, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Lyman Atkinson Cotten Feb. 12, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Joseph Horne Dec. 11, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Peking, China
Comdr. Francis M. Barber Feb. 4-Dec. 28, 1895
Lt. Albert Lenoir Key Nov. 8, 1898-Sept. 28, 1901
Lt. Comdr. Charles Carlton Marsh Nov. 30, 1901-Jan. 1, 1905
Lt. Irvin Van Gorder Gillis Dec. 31, 1904-June 3, 1905
Sept. 16, 1907-Aug. 21, 1908
Apr. 23, 1911-June 30, 1914
Lt. Frank Marble Apr. 1, 1905-Apr. 11, 1907
Capt. (USMC) Henry Leonard June 1, 1905-Nov. 9, 1907
Comdr. James Hamilton Sears Dec. 9, 1908-June 30, 1910
Capt. John Harry Shipley June 11, 1910-Dec. 13, 1911 (DOD)
Capt. (USMC) Thomas Holcomb, Jr. July 28, 1910-Oct. 12, 1914
1st Lt. (USMC) Epaminodas Lawrence Bigler June 27, 1910- Sept. 22, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Frank Brooks Upham Aug. 11, 1911-Feb. 21, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Lyman Atkinson Cotten Feb. 12, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Charles Thomas Hutchins, Jr. Sept. 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Capt. (USMC) Louis McCarty Little Aug. 21, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Caracas, Venezuela
Lt. Marbury Johnston Jan. 8-Sept. 20, 1903
 
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
Lt. Comdr. Robert Whitehead McNeely June 20, 1911-Dec. 17, 1912
Lt. Guy Whitlock Apr. 21-Oct. 5, 1914
 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
 
Santiago, Chile
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
Lt. Comdr. Robert Whitehead McNeely June 20, 1911-Dec. 17, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Alfred Wilkinson Johnson May 9, 1912-Jan. 1, 1914

Correspondence and Records of Naval Attachés

275. Register of and Index to Communications Sent by Lt. Nathan Sargent.
Jan. 2, 1889-Aug. 23, 1893. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries in the register are arranged chronologically and assigned numbers in order (1-802). Index entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of subject.

Register and index entries give date of communication, number, subject, and volume and page where it has been copied.

276. Communications Sent by Lt. Nathan Sargent, Naval Attaché at Rome, Vienna, and Berlin.
Jan. 2, 1889-Aug. 23, 1893. 12 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are partial name indexes to some volumes. Communications are registered and indexed in entry 275.

The press copies of letters, reports, and other communications were sent by Sargent, who was naval attaché to the U.S. legations at both Rome and Vienna from November 1888 until June 1893 and also to Berlin starting in August 1892. There are communications to the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the Chief Intelligence Officer, U.S. consular officials, other U.S. Navy officers, foreign government officials (especially naval officers), and foreign merchants. The principal subjects are foreign technological developments in weaponry and vessels in comparison with those of the United States, foreign naval operations and coastal defenses in Germany, Austria, and Italy. There are also many communications concerning expenses incurred by Sargent in performing his duties.

277. Letters Received by Lt. Nathan Sargent, Naval Attaché at Rome, Vienna, and Berlin.
Nov. 1888-Oct. 1893. 9 vols 2 ft.

Arranged by time period. The volumes are divided into letters from the Navy Department and other letters and thereunder are arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters are from the Office of Naval Intelligence acknowledging receipt of Sargent's communications; giving instructions; requesting information about foreign naval vessels, ordnance, publications, and personnel; announcing visits of naval officers or officials; and transmitting copies of naval publications and issuances, contracts, navigational charts, and acts of Congress. Some of the letters are personal in nature. Also included are letters from foreign merchants concerning Sargent's accounts and letters from foreign government officials, most of which are written in Italian or German.

278. Letters, Reports, and Other Communications Sent by the Naval Attaché in London.
Apr. 4, 1889-Sept. 22, 1914. 40 vols 5 ft.

Arranged in part chronologically, but most of the time letters to the Navy Department were recorded in separate volumes from the other letters. There are indexes to surnames of addressees in some of the volumes. There are no letters for the years 1890-92.

The communications consist of press copies of letters and other communications to the Chief Intelligence Officer (later Director of the Office of Naval Intelligence) and other Navy Department officials; the British Admiralty; and British publishers, shipbuilding firms, universities, and professional societies. They relate to British naval maneuvers, ordnance, and armor; the number of new ships being built in Britain for the British Navy and foreign navies; frequency of repair of British vessels, visits of U.S. naval vessels; purchases from foreign merchants, accounts with British banks and many other subjects. There are translations of telegrams and reports, particularly in 1898 from Madrid when there was no attaché there, and there are some personal letters.

279. Accounts of the Naval Attaché in London.
1893-1914. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no records for July 1896-September 1899.

For the most part the volumes contain press copies of abstracts of expenditures for such purposes as pay, entertainment, travel, commutation of quarters, fuel, rent of office, stationery, postage, cablegrams and telegrams, newspapers, periodicals, and books. There are also receipts from the Chief Intelligence Officer for property received from the attaché.

280. Letters Sent by Lt. Albert P. Niblack, Naval Attaché at Berlin, Rome, and Vienna.
Sept. 21, 1896-May 3, 1898. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

In his letters to the Chief Intelligence Officer, Niblack describes a visit to the Kaiser's palace and his presentation to the King and Queen of Italy. Also noted are meetings with high-ranking civil and military officials of the countries to which he was assigned and information gained therefrom. His letters to the Austrian, German, and Italian naval officers most frequently concern the exchange of information regarding their respective navies. Letters concerning such subjects as naval armor and protective devices, naval ordnance, arsenals, torpedo boats and torpedoes, target practice in the German Navy, and signaling systems are included in this series along with a few cablegrams to the Secretary's office, some of which are in cipher code.

281. Letters and Endorsements Received from Lt. John C. Colwell, Naval Attaché at London.
Apr. 22, 1897-June 30, 1898. 1 vol. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. The letters are numbered in yearly sequences.

The volume consists largely of letters transmitting publications, documents, contracts, specifications, photographs, and other items concerning foreign (mainly British) naval vessels, ordnance and supplies to the Office of Naval Intelligence and letters acknowledging the receipt of similar information as well as orders. Cross-reference cards or file references have often been added to indicate the location of the publications and artifacts received among the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence.

The series does include some letters describing Colwell's activities and others requesting information concerning the U.S. Navy for the British Government.

Correspondence Concerning Disturbances in Foreign Countries

282. Correspondence Concerning the Panamanian Revolt of November 1903.
Oct. 15, 1903-Apr. 26, 1904. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

The volumes contain press copies of letters and messages exchanged between the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy and the Commanders of the Pacific, South Atlantic, and Caribbean Squadrons; correspondence of these commanders with their subordinates; and correspondence between squadron commanders and other officers, U.S. consular officials, and Colombian and Panamanian officials. The correspondence concerns measures to protect U.S. citizens, to ensure order and free transit at Panama, and to establish contacts with the new Republic of Panama. There are also naval intelligence reports relating to Colombian military installations and troop movements along the Rio Atrato, the Gulf of Darien, and the coast from Cartagena to Barranquilla; relations between native Indians and the U.S. troops; and British offers of assistance.

283. Messages concerning the Russo-Japanese War.
Feb. 6, 1904-July 19, 1905. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index with brief descriptions of the individual letters.

These press copies are for the most part of translations of cipher messages to and from officers of the Asiatic Fleet. Few of these messages appear to have been copied in the volumes described in entry 60. They concern actions taken by the British and German Fleets prior to and during the outbreak of hostilities between the Russian and Japanese Navies, Japanese and Russian efforts to close the channel at Port Arthur, the surrender of Port Arthur to the Japanese, movements of Japanese vessels in and out of Chefoo, and conditions at Cavite, Philippine Islands.

284. Correspondence Concerning the Dominican Customs Receivership.
Mar. 9, 1904-Jan. 26, 1907. 10 vols. 1 ft.

Divided into press copies and carbon copies and thereunder arranged for the most part chronologically. For the carbon copies there are overlapping and partially duplicating volumes for 1905 and 1906. The press copies are partially indexed by names and subjects.

The series consists of letters and deciphered messages exchanged among the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the commanders of the Caribbean Squadron, the 2d and 3d Squadrons of the North Atlantic Fleet, the U.S. Naval Forces in Dominican waters, other naval officers, the Secretary of State, U.S. diplomatic and consular officials, and Dominican governmental and political leaders. The communications relate to political conditions in the Dominican Republic, revolutionary movements, the occupation and operation of customhouses, and military and naval operations. The Records of the Dominican Customs Receivership, Record Group 139, are described in Preliminary Inventory No. 148.

285. Correspondence Relating to the Cuban Revolution of 1906.
Sept. 8-Nov. 9, 1906. 2 vols. 3 in.

One volume is identified as containing documents received from the Bureau of Navigation; the documents in the other volume are presumed to have been received from the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. The documents in each volume are arranged chronologically. There is a name index in the Bureau of Navigation volume.

The records consist of carbon copies of letters, telegrams, cablegrams, and reports sent to and received from the President, the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, naval and Marine officers commanding troops on shore and vessels off the coast of Cuba, managers of large American-owned sugar plantations, owners of stores and smaller agricultural holdings in Cuba, and leaders of the revolt. They relate to efforts of the Navy to protect American lives and property on the island, the dispatch of vessels and Marine Corps units to Cuba and the landing of U.S. Marines on shore, seizure of dynamite and detonators from U.S. citizens by revolutionaries, and meetings of Government and revolutionary leaders to negotiate peace.

286. Communications Concerning the January 14, 1907, Earthquake at Kingston, Jamaica.
Jan. 15-Feb. 18, 1907. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically.

The volume contains chiefly letters, cablegrams, memorandums, reports, and other communications received by the Secretary of the Navy from, but including some sent to, the Commander in Chief of the Atlantic Fleet, the Division Commander of its 1st Squadron, and other naval officers concerning the damage done by the earthquake and the fire that followed and the measures taken by the Navy to assist the victims of the disaster and to repair the damage.

287. Correspondence Concerning the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1909-10.
Oct. 26, 1901-Oct. 1, 1910. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part these are carbon copies of translated messages sent in cipher to the Secretary of the Navy by naval officers commanding vessels off the coast of Nicaragua. They concern such matters as political conditions in the country and the activities of the revolutionary leaders, reports of the Nicaraguan Expeditionary Squadron on military activities undertaken to protect American lives and property, orders of the Secretary of the Navy to naval and Marine officers, and the Secretary's correspondence with the Secretary of State and with consular officers in Nicaragua. There are also copies of letters received from revolutionary leaders and Nicaraguan Government officials.

288. Correspondence Relating to the Bonilla Revolt in Honduras.
Oct. 7, 1910-June 21, 1911. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are carbon copies of letters, telegrams, reports, and other records, some of which appear to have originally been written in cipher, concerning the Navy's role during the successful revolt led by Gen. Manuel Bonilla against the incumbent Davila government. Most of the correspondence was exchanged between the Secretary and Acting Secretary of the Navy and the naval officers assigned to the coasts of Honduras and Guatemala to protect U.S. interests during the early stages of the revolution. These officers were Comdr. Charles H. Hayes, commanding the Princeton; Comdr. Edwin A. Anderson, commanding the Yorktown; Comdr. Archibald F. Davis, commanding the Tacoma; and Comdr. G. F. Cooper, commanding the Marietta. There is also correspondence of these officers with General Bonilla (later Provisional President), officials of the overthrown Davila government, and U.S. consular officials concerning an armistice agreement.

289. Correspondence Relating to Political Disturbances in the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Cuba.
Feb. 16, 1911-July 30, 1912. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically in three parts.

The first part consists of letters, reports, and memorandums, February 16-May 31, 1911, concerning measures taken in response to allegations that ex-President Carlos Morales planned to lead a revolution against the Government of the Dominican Republic. Included are reports received by the Secretary of the Navy from the commanding officer of the Petrel, the naval vessel that had been ordered to Santo Domingo City to prevent the landing of rebel forces, and from the commanding officer of the Chester after the departure of the Petrel. Also included is correspondence between the Secretaries of State, War, and the Navy regarding conditions in the Dominican Republic and the withdrawal of the Chester.

The second part includes messages, January 2-April 5, 1912, exchanged between the Secretary of the Navy and the commanding officer of the Yorktown relating to the protection of American and British interests in Ecuador during the disturbances then taking place in that country.

The third part contains telegrams, reports, and other communications, May 22-July 30, 1912, concerning naval intervention in Cuba to protect American interests there. Included are messages to navy yards and naval stations along the Atlantic coast and to the naval stations at Caimanera and Guantanamo, Cuba, regarding the preparation of vessels for Cuban service and arrangements for the landing of U.S. Marines. Most of the correspondence for June and July consists of reports received from the commanding officer of the 4th Division, Atlantic Fleet, at Guantanamo Bay.

290. Correspondence Relating to the Mexican Revolution of 1911.
Mar. 6-Mar. 30, 1911. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the correspondence in this series concerns the dispatch of U.S. Navy vessels carrying marines to points along the Mexican coast. Included are many confidential telegrams sent by the Acting Secretary and Secretary of the Navy containing instructions for the Naval Station at Key West, the navy yards at Mare Island and Brooklyn, and the Fifth Division, Atlantic Fleet. Also included are reports of conditions in Mexico from officers assigned to naval vessels stopping at Mexican ports.

291. Messages Relating to Disturbances in Mexico.
Apr. 5, 1912-Mar. 31, 1914. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Many of these translated messages contain orders and instructions from the Secretary of the Navy to naval officers commanding U.S. vessels off the coast of Mexico and reports from these officers to the Secretary on the location, force, and destination of Federal and revolutionary troops in that country. Other messages concern the ordering of U.S. battleships to Vera Cruz in 1913 to offer protection to American and foreign oil interests and the taking on board of refugees from Tuxpam, Tampico, and Vera Cruz in 1913.

292. Correspondence Relating to the Chinese Revolution of 1911-12.
Sept. 8, 1911-June 12, 1912. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part the series consists of deciphered messages received by the Secretary of the Navy from the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet at Shanghai. He reported the seizure of ports along the Yangtze River by revolutionary forces; the fall of Shanghai to the rebels; developments in Manchuria; the presence off the China coast of British, German, and Japanese gunboats; the positioning of U.S. naval forces in Chinese ports to protect American citizens, and relations with the newly formed government of President Sun Yat-sen. There is a small number of letters and other communications from the State Department transmitting information concerning conditions in China and advising the Secretary of the Navy on policy matters.

Miscellaneous Records Primarily Relating to Foreign Nations

293. Scheme for the Classification of Information.
Oct. 9, 1896. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

A printed copy of the 1887 Office of Naval Intelligence scheme annotated in 1896 to show revisions. "Scheme" was intended to guide office clerks in properly filing information.

294. French and German Proclamations, Speeches, and Orders.
1892-1919. 6 in.

Unarranged.

These proclamations and orders are in the form of broadsides. These were collected by the Office of Naval Records and Library and include French military orders and proclamations, August 15, 1914-March 10, 1919; speeches, April 9, 1892-October 18, 1919; and German military orders, 1914-18. Seven of the German items are in the Russian language, and 18 have English translations made in 1942.

295. Descriptive Charts of Japanese Naval Vessels.
Mar.-June 1900. 2 in.

Arranged by class of vessel.

These are 15 charts, 13 by 17 1/2 inches, which describe in some detail the general characteristics (such as hull protection, engines, and armament) of various classes of vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy, give overall descriptions of individual vessels in each class, and include sketches and photographs of one or more vessels of each class. The charts also give the name of the builder and dates on which the keel was laid and the vessel was launched. Also included are serial and register numbers that appear to have been assigned by the Office of Naval Intelligence.

296. Logs, Journals, and Navigation Books of German and Dutch Commercial and Naval Vessels.
1902-18. 39 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by name of vessel.

There are records for the German commercial vessels Grier, Libengels, Oldenwald, and Prinz Eiter Friedrich; the Dutch commercial vessel Midjrecht; and the Imperial German Navy surveying vessels Planet, Condor, Mowe, and Cormoran. There are also an account book and a journal of two unnamed Russian vessels manned by Germans. The records are in German and Dutch and contain information similar to that in logs and journals of U.S. Navy vessels (entry 608). For the log of the German ship Nicaria, see entry 601. For the log for the German submarine U-20 that sank SS Lusitania on May 7, 1915, see entry 602.

297. English Translations of German Newspaper Articles Pertaining to the European War.
Aug.-Oct. 1914. 1/2 in.

Scrapbook with no discernible arrangement. There are lists of article titles.

The articles, with some clippings taken from the Berliner Tageblatt, Vorwarts, Der Tag, and other German dailies, and a few letters deal with aerial and naval aspects of the war, including the movements of the British Fleet in the Mediterranean, the activities of the German air fleet, air raids over Paris, the effectiveness of the "Mine Belt" on the British coast, and Japanese aviation efforts. The German sources of the articles are not always given.

298. German Newspaper Articles Concerning the Naval War in Europe.
Aug. 1914-Jan. 1917. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically in 69 scrapbooks. Lists of the English title of the articles are in the inside front covers of most of the scrapbooks.

Clipped from a variety of newspapers, most of which were published in Berlin, the articles concern such subjects as operations of German U-boats, the attack on the Lusitania, American press reaction to German naval victories, zeppelin attacks, English vessel losses and blockade policy, naval actions in the Dardanelles, activities of the Russian fleet in the Black Sea and the Turkish fleet in the Mediterranean, and the war situation in the Balkans. The scrapbooks probably were received from the naval attaché in Berlin. They were stamped with the date they were received in the Office of Naval Intelligence.

299. Intelligence Reports and Memorandums.
1917-18. 7 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There are some records dated as early as 1909 and as late as 1920.

For the most part these are carbon copies of memorandums and reports, many stamped as received by the Director or Assistant Director, from naval attachés stationed in Great Britain, France, Sweden, Italy, and other parts of Europe; U.S. diplomatic officials; the British War Office; and the General Board. Sources are not always identified. Among the many subjects covered are the military and naval situations and political, economic, and social conditions in Germany, Italy, France, Austria, China, Jutland, and Japan; German operations against Russia; the German intelligence and espionage services; losses of German manpower; the Swiss struggle against German economic penetration; relations between the United States and Japan; relations between the United States and China; U.S. Army deserters; and interned French prisoners in Switzerland. Included are some intercepted press releases and transcripts of intercepted radio communications. There is some correspondence of Adm. Albert W. Grant in various capacities; Grant probably gave these records to the Office of Naval Intelligence about 1931.

300. Record of Enemy Positions During 1918.
n.d. 3 in.

Arranged numerically by latitude and longitude reading.

These 3 x 5 inch card entries describe sightings of mines and enemy craft by American and foreign merchant ships, lighthouse keepers and U.S. Navy ships. The cards include "S.O.S." messages received from U.S. vessels under attack by the German Navy or in the process of sinking. The source of the information (naval district, lighthouse, naval office, or ship) is shown.

Other Records, 1945

301. Surrender Documents of Japanese Forces on Pacific Islands and in China.
Aug.-Oct. 1945. 5 in.

Arranged by title of document.

These documents of unconditional surrender of Japanese military, naval, air, home guard, and civilian forces in the areas listed below were signed on behalf of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, by Navy and Marine Corps officers and by a representative of the Australian Military Forces.

  1. Truk Atoll and all islands under the command of Lt. Gen. Mugikara, Imperial Japanese Army and Vice Admiral Hara of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Signed by Vice Adm. G. D. Murray, September 2, 1945.
  2. Japanese-held islands under the command of the senior Japanese Imperial forces based on Sonsoral, Fana, Merir, and Tobi Islands, Caroline Islands. Signed by Brig. Gen. F. O. Rogers, U.S. Marine Corps, October 6, 1945.

Records of Boards and Commissions, 1812-90

Board of Navy Commissioners

The establishment of the Board of Navy Commissioners by act of Congress on February 7, 1815 (3 Stat. 202), was the outgrowth of efforts to relieve the Secretary of the Navy of some of his responsibilities connected with the civil functions of the Navy so that he could devote more time to overall administration. The procurement of naval stores and materials; construction, armament, equipment, repair, and preservation of naval vessels; establishment of regulations to secure uniformity in the classes of naval vessels; preparation of estimates of expenditures for different parts of the naval service; and supervision of navy yards, naval stations, and Navy agents became the responsibilities of the board. The Secretary retained control over personnel and appointments, movement of ships, and other administrative matters not delegated to the board.

As provided by the act, the board, attached to the Office of the Secretary, was composed of three post-captains appointed by the President and confirmed by the Senate; the ranking officer of the board was to be its president. The board was authorized to establish its own regulations and employ a secretary to keep a record of its proceedings and two clerks to assist in other office work. Each commissioner was to receive $3,500 a year in lieu of wages, rations, and other pay due him as a naval officer.

During its 27 years of existence the board had five presidents: John Rodgers, 1815-24 and 1827-37; William Bainbridge, 1824-27; Isaac Chauncey, 1837-40; Charles Morris, 1840-41; and Lewis Warrington, 1841-42. The following other commissioners served during this period.

Isaac Hull, 1815
David Porter, 1815-22
Stephen Decatur, 1815-20
Jacob Jones, 1824-26
Thomas Tingey, 1827
Daniel T. Patterson, 1828-32
Charles Stewart, 1830-33
Alexander S. Wadsworth, 1837-40
John B. Nicolson, 1840--41
William M. Crane, 1841-42
David Conner, 1841-42

Presidents Chauncey, Morris, and Warrington also served on the board prior to their appointments to its presidency (Chauncey, 1822-24 and 1833-36; Morris, 1823-25, 1826-27, and 1832-39; Warrington, 1827-30 and 1840). James K. Paulding served as secretary of the board from 1815 to 1823, after which he was succeeded by the board's former principal clerk, Charles W. Goldsborough, who held the post until the board's dissolution.

The journal of its proceedings, correspondence, directives, and other records of the Board of Navy Commissioners described here are primarily those inherited by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, one of the five bureaus created by Congress after the dissolution of the board. The act of August 31, 1842 (5 Stat 579), which dissolved the board and created the bureaus, provided that the board's records be distributed to the bureaus according to the nature of their respective duties. The records inherited by the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair were, in turn, inherited by the Bureau of Construction and Repair established in July 1862. A small part of the records of the board now included in this record group were transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library by the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Navy). With the records is correspondence with the Depot of Charts and Instruments, established under the board in 1830. After the dissolution of the board, the Depot of Charts and Instruments was placed under the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography. Also with the board's records are drafts of rules and regulations promulgated for the Navy by members of a special board from 1832 to 1833.

Journals of Meetings

302. Registers of Naval Personnel and Other Persons Mentioned in Journal.
Jan. 1825-Aug. 1842. 6 vols. 8 in.

Each volume covers a chronological period. Entries within volumes are arranged by surname of officer or other individual mentioned in the journal and thereunder chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Entries include date, volume and page numbers on which the reference is found, and a brief description of the subject discussed.

303. Journals of Meetings.
Apr. 25, 1815-Sept. 3, 1842. 20 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, but there is some overlapping and duplication among the volumes. The last volume is identified as "rough minutes" and covers the period February-September 1842.

Entries for each day on which the board met consist chiefly of the names of people to whom the board wrote and the subjects of the communications. Often given are the names of the commissioners present and a brief discussion or indication of other business transacted. Also noted is the presence of the Secretary of the Navy at the meetings and the subjects discussed by him with the board.

Letters Sent

304. Registers of Letters Sent.
July 1817-Aug. 1842. 9 vols. 1 ft.

Volumes are arranged chronologically by time periods but with considerable overlapping in the earlier volumes. The overlapping is the result of carrying the letters for a particular person to the next volume when there was no more room. Entries within volumes are arranged by name of addressee. There is a name index at the beginning of each volume. The second volume, presumably covering about July 1820-November 1823, is missing.

Entries give the date of the letter and a brief description of its contents but not the volume and page on which it was copied among the letters described in entries 305-311.

305. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Apr. 1815-Aug. 1842. 11 ft.

Arranged for the most part by subject according to the system used by the Office of Naval Records and Library for the U.S. Navy Subject File (entry 502).

Mounted on white backsheets, these letters apparently were intended to be inserted into the Area and Subject Files (entries 500 and 502). Handwritten (fair) copies of some of the letters are in several series of letters sent by the Board of Naval Commissioners (entries 306-311).

306. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
Apr. 25, 1815-Aug. 26, 1842. 7 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Registers in the front of the volumes, arranged by name of secretary and thereunder by date of letter, include date, page number, and a brief summary of the contents of the letter.

Included are letters concerning constructing, equipping, and repairing vessels; contracts for food, timber, uniforms, and equipment; selection of sites for navy yards and other shore installations; construction at navy yards (including the drydocks at Boston and Norfolk), naval hospitals, and the Naval Asylum; inventions and scientific projects; and the employment of civilians at navy yards. Many of the letters were prepared in response to congressional inquiries to the Secretary of the Navy.

307. Letters Sent to Commandants of Navy Yards and Naval Stations.
Apr. 28, 1815-Aug. 31, 1842. 14 vols. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes that include date, page number, and a brief summary of the contents of the letter.

A large proportion of these letters gave orders or instructions, granted or withheld authority for some action, or requested or gave information. The many subjects of the letters include cloth, steel, iron, and other materials needed at the yards; food, ordnance, and other supplies for use at the yards and stations and on board naval vessels; contracts; constructing, equipping, arming, and repairing vessels; naval hospitals; and returns and other reports submitted to the board. The first volume, April 1815-December 1818, includes letters to commanding officers of squadrons, naval constructors, and other naval officers, including those in command of special expeditions. For a listing of the yards and stations for which there are letters in this series and the time periods covered, see entry 314.

308. Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Apr. 28, 1815-Aug. 29, 1842. 2 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

Most of the letters are addressed to officers in command of vessels, naval forces, and squadrons; inspectors of ordnance; and officers on special assignment. They relate to such subjects as supplies needed at navy yards; dimensions of vessels under construction; the purchase, repair, inspection, and sale of vessels; procurement, inspection, and testing of powder, cannon, and other ordnance and ordnance stores; and the acquisition and sale of property. The second volume contains many letters dated between 1830 and 1842 to Lt. Charles Wilkes and Lt. James M. Gillis at the Depot of Charts and Instruments concerning the issuance of chronometers, compasses, and other nautical equipment and charts for naval vessels and the production of charts and trials of chronometers at the depot. There are also letters to Capt. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones concerning plans for the proposed Pacific exploring expedition.

309. Letters Sent to Navy Agents.
Apr. 28, 1815-Feb. 28, 1842. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes; in the last three volumes (October 1826-February 1842), index entries include date of letter and a summary of its contents.

The letters to Navy agents in U.S. and foreign ports relate to such subjects as receipt and approval of requisitions for money, transmittal and execution of contracts and bonds, payments to contractors, delivery of items purchased under contracts, auction of obsolete equipment and materials, and purchase of supplies and equipment. For a listing of the Navy agencies for which letters are included in this series, see entry 318.

310. Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
May 2, 1815-Aug. 31, 1842. 8 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Most of these letters were sent in response to incoming letters from businessmen holding contracts with the Navy Department or bidding for contracts to furnish beef, pork, and other food supplies, vessel machinery and equipment, and timber. Also included are letters to shipbuilders, timber agents, naval storekeepers, and naval constructors concerning the procurement of supplies for naval shore establishments and for vessels. Letters addressed to Treasury Department officials usually concern the settlement of accounts. For many of the incoming letters from these same correspondents, see entry 313.

311. Letters Sent to Naval Constructors, Steam Engineers, and Civil Engineers.
Jan. 2, 1838-Aug. 27, 1842. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters are addressed to naval constructors and concern drafts and capacities of vessels, progress of vessel construction at navy yards, materials needed, and vessel launchings. Much of this correspondence relates to the construction of the first U.S. Navy steam vessels, Missouri and Mississippi. Characteristics and performance of steam engines are the subjects of most of the letters to steam engineers. The few letters to civil engineers Courtenay and Heron relate to the construction of drydocks at the New York and Pensacola Navy Yards.

Letters Received

In some of the series described below, there are letters predating the establishment of the Board of Navy Commissioners. These letters presumably were referred to the board by the Secretary of the Navy at a later date, or they were the result of misplaced enclosures.

312. Registers of Letters Received.
Jan. 1, 1820-Dec. 1837. 5 vols. 7 in.

Each volume covers a chronological period. Entries within volumes are arranged by name of correspondent and thereunder chronologically. The volume for the period September 1825-June 1827 is missing. There is a name index at the beginning of each volume.

Entries are for letters described in entries 313-323, 325-326, and 328. The entries give date of letter and a brief summary of its contents. Registers for the period 1838-42 can be found in the individual volumes of letters received.

313. Miscellaneous Letters Received.
Jan. 7, 1812-Aug. 25, 1842. 62 vols. 9 ft.

Arranged chronologically. No letters have been found for 1817-18 or April-June 1842. There are registers in the volumes for 1838-42, the period after separate registers (see entry 312) were discontinued.

Included are letters of application and recommendation for persons seeking civilian employment with the board and at navy yards, letters from persons offering to sell land to the Navy Department and offering to buy vessels and other excess property, letters from newspapers soliciting the board's advertisements and concerning bills owed them by the board, letters in the form of proposals from businessmen desiring contracts with the Navy Department to furnish supplies and equipment, and letters concerning contracts entered into with the board or bids for building ships. There are also letters on various subjects from other Government agencies and private letters to the president of the board.

314. Letters, Proposals, Reports, and Estimates Received From Commandants of Navy Yards and Naval Stations.
Mar. 1814-July 1842. 259 vols. 37 ft.

Arranged for the most part alphabetically by name of yard or station and thereunder chronologically, except that for some places there are separate volumes for certain kinds of records as noted below and that the letters from the Whitehall and Erie Stations are bound with the letters from Sackett's Harbor. There are registers for some of the volumes for 1836-42; entries include date and number of letter and a brief summary of its contents. For earlier separate registers, see entry 312. The first volume includes personal correspondence of Capt. Stephen Decatur that were left in his desk at the time of his death, March 22, 1820.

Most of the letters concern the construction and repair of vessels, erection of buildings and drydocks, purchase and delivery of timber and other supplies and equipment, and other normal activities at the yards. Other letters relate to contracts, payments of accounts, civilian employees and marines assigned to the yards, shipment of supplies to squadrons at foreign stations, and experiments conducted at the yards and stations. For the most part in separate volumes, there are proposals for improvements at the yards and stations, estimates of expenditures and supplies needed, and various kinds of reports, including reports of vessel surveys and reports of items sent from and received at the yard or station.

Below is a list of yards and stations and the years for which there are letters in this series.

Baltimore Naval Station, 1815-36 and 1838-42
Charleston, SC, Naval Station, 1815-22 and 1840-41
Charlestown (-oston) Navy Yard, 1815-42
Erie, PA, Naval Station, 1815-26
Gosport (Norfolk), VA, Navy Yard, 1815-42
New Orleans Naval Station, 1815-26
New York Navy Yard, 1815-42
Pensacola Navy Yard, 1826-42
Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1815-42
Portsmouth, NH, Navy Yard, 1815-42
Sackett's Harbor, NY, Naval Station, 1815-42
Washington Navy Yard, 1814-42
Whitehall, NY, Naval Station, 1816-26

315. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Apr. 2, 1814-July 5, 1842. 22 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically but with a considerable number of letters out of strict order. There are registers in the back of the first 9 volumes and the front of the last 13 volumes (in addition to the separate registers described in entry 312).

In these letters the Secretary frequently requested the board to prepare vessels for cruises, provide estimates of naval expenses and other information requested by congressional committees, consider the procurement of supplies either by direct purchase or by contract, and give opinions on the promotion of officers. Some of the letters were in response to requests for the Secretary's authorization of board actions. For the Secretary's copies of letters to the board dating to August 27, 1842, see entry 15. There are letters in this series that have not been copied in entry 15.

On letters dated after 1837, notations were made on the letters when enclosures were returned to the Secretary's office.

316. Letter Received From Naval Officers.
Sept. 5, 1814-July 5, 1842. 25 vols. 5 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically with some overlapping of dates between volumes, but for the years 1827-34 there are separate volumes for "reports, estimates, and surveys." There are registers in the volumes for the years 1838-42, the period after separate registers (see entry 312) were discontinued.

Most of these letters are directly addressed to the President of the Board of Navy Commissioners; the remainder appear to have been forwarded to the board by the Secretary of the Navy. The letters are primarily from Navy captains and lieutenants, but letters from masters-commandant (commanders), midshipmen, surgeons, pursers, and sailing masters (masters) are also included. During the 1830s, there are letters from the commanding officers of the Mediterranean and Brazilian squadrons.

The series is almost entirely made up of letters containing reports of defects in vessels such as leaks, faulty rudders, and damaged hulls and deficiencies in food and clothing supplied to Navy vessels. During June and July 1838 there are letters from Lt. Charles Wilkes regarding alterations, equipment, and apparatus needed for vessels to be used in the forthcoming surveying and exploring expedition to the Pacific Ocean and the South Seas.

317. Letters Received from Naval Constructors and Engineers.
May 9, 1815-July 5, 1842. 10 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged in part chronologically and in part by name of writer and thereunder chronologically. There are registers in the volumes, which usually give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents, for 1838-42, the period after separate registers were discontinued (see entry 312).

The first volume, May 1815-October 1821, contains many letters from naval constructors William Doughty (Washington Navy Yard), Henry Eckard (New York Navy Yard), and Francis Grice (Gosport Navy Yard), and others concerning procurement of timber, estimates for costs of vessel repairs, and prices of equipment and parts needed in ship construction. Also included in the volume are letters from naval constructors John Lenthall and Samuel Hartt. With the exception of these letters, most of the letters for 1815-37 are from Chief Naval Constructor Samuel Humphreys at both the Philadelphia and Washington Navy Yard concerning directions for building, preserving, and repairing vessels. Most of the 1838-41 letters are from (Steam) Engineer-in-Chief Charles Haswell, Principal (Steam) Engineer Charles W. Copeland, Engineer John Faron, and several other engineers concerning the construction of steam vessels at the New York Navy Yard. Other letters relate to the manufacture and testing of engines and other parts of steam vessels. All of the letters in the last volume, September 1841-July 1842, are from civil engineer Edward H. Courtenay discussing dredging operations and plans for the construction of a drydock at the New York Navy Yard.

318. Letters Received from Navy Agents.
May 1815-July 1842. 61 vols. 10 ft.

Divided in two parts: chronologically, 1815-36, and by naval agency and thereunder chronologically, 1815-42. For most volumes, 1837-42, there are registers in which the entries include date, number, and subject of letter. For earlier separate registers, see entry 312.

Most of the letters are from Navy agents at Baltimore, Charlestown (Boston), New York, Norfolk, Pensacola, Philadelphia, Portsmouth (ME), and Washington. Letters from agents at New Castle (DE), New Orleans (LA), Newport (RI), Portland (ME), Middletown (CT), Savannah (GA), and Wilmington (NC) and on the island of Gibraltar are in this series for the period May 1815-October 1818. Letters from agents in foreign ports including Valparaiso, Chile for the period June 1822-December 1834 and Canton, China; Lima and Callao Bay, Peru; Manila, Philippines; Port Mahon, Spain; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for the period April 1837-January 1842 are also part of this series.

Many of the letters transmitted reports, returns, and contracts submitted to the board that are not in these volumes. The remainder concern such matters as charters of vessels, procurement of supplies, allocation of contracts, requisitions for money, estimates of the requirements of squadrons on foreign stations, conditions in foreign money markets, and supplies in warehouse at overseas U.S. naval depots. Letters of recommendation for persons seeking civilian positions at navy yards are also included.

319. Letters Received from Inspectors and Assistant Inspectors of Ordnance.
Oct. 2, 1826-Aug. 28, 1842. 4 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period October 1840-June 1842. There are registers in the volumes (entries that give date and number of letter and brief summary of its contents), for 1838-42, the period after separate registers were discontinued (see entry 312). The letters primarily concern the inspection and testing of guns, shells, powder, and other ordnance and ordnance supplies and are frequently accompanied by tables. The following officers were among those who served as inspectors or assistant inspectors during the period covered by the letters: Capt. John Cassin, 1820-27; Capt. Alexander Wadsworth, 1827-29; Capt. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones, 1831-33; Capt. William B. Shubrick, 1834-38; Capt. Edmund P. Kennedy, 1839; Comdr. John L. Chauncey, 1839-40; and Capt. Matthew C. Perry, 1840. For related records, see entry 394.

320. Letters of Application Received for the Position of Clerk and Miscellaneous Documents.
1829-53. 3 in.

Unarranged. There are no letters for 1830 and 1835-52.

The largest portion of these records consists of applications received in 1832 by the board for the clerkship in the commissioners' office made vacant by the death of Robert Slye. The 1853 documents consist of copies of the application of Erastus W. Smith for the position of Engineer-in-Chief of the Navy and of testimonials in Smith's behalf addressed to the Secretary of the Navy and to the President of the United States. Other letters and documents relate to officers' quarters at navy yards, contracts entered into by the board including a contract for ship chandlery at Norfolk, tests of iron and copper at navy yards, cost of anchors made at navy yards, erection of a wall around the Norfolk Navy Yard, and laws of 1809-15 pertaining to procurement of ordnance.

321. Letters Received From the Officer in Charge of the Depot of Charts and Instruments.
June 10, 1831-Aug. 27, 1842. 7 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically, but a considerable number of letters are out of order. There are no letters for the period June-December 1839. There are chronologically arranged registers for 1838-42, the period after which separate registers were discontinued (see entry 312).

The letters chiefly concern the procuring, storing, and distributing of maps, charts, books on nautical and mathematical subjects, chronometers, compasses, spyglasses, and other scientific instruments. There are also letters describing tests performed on chronometers and the installation of a lithographic press for the production of charts. The successive officers in charge were Lts. Louis M. Goldsborough, 1830-33; Charles Wilkes, Jr., 1833-37; and James M. Gillis, 1837-42. There are also letters from Midshipman William Ward (1836) and Lt. Robert B. Hitchcock (1836-37) who were assigned to the depot.

322. Letters Received From the U.S. Consul at London Concerning Scientific Instruments.
Sept. 30, 1831-Apr. 14, 1835. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. Letters are registered in entry 312.

The letters are from Consul Thomas Aspinwall with accompanying invoices and other documents relating to the purchase from British firms and delivery of chronometers, sextants, quadrants, spyglasses, and other scientific instruments.

323. Letters Received From the Governor of the Naval Asylum.
Aug. 13, 1838-May 19, 1842. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a chronological register in the volume, in which entries give the date and page number of the letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Most of the letters transmitted monthly reports submitted by the governor of the asylum; the reports are not in the volume. The other letters concern conditions at the asylum and the status of its accounts.

324. Letters Referred to the Board by the Secretary of the Navy.
Nov. 17, 1838-June 28, 1842. 5 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically but with a considerable number of letters out of order. There are registers of letters in the first two volumes: Entries give name of writer, date and number of letter, and a brief summary of its contents.

Included are letters from shipowners, shipbuilders, and inventors concerning vessel design and repair; from businessmen concerning contracts with the Navy; from naval officers requesting supplies, ordnance, instruments, equipment, and publications; and from the Treasury Department concerning the use of naval vessels with the Coast Survey. The other letters for the most part are from private citizens, naval officers and other public officials recommending individuals for chief engineer, master blockman, and other civilian positions with the Navy. Some letters are from the applicants themselves.

325. Letters Received Concerning Applications for Civilian Positions at Navy Yards and Engineer Appointments.
Dec. 1839-Apr. 1842. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order by date of application. There are many enclosures, some of which are dated as early as July 1838. There is a register in the second volume, but it is for the first volume, December 1839-June 1841. Entries give name of applicant, date of application, page numbers of letters, and position sought.

Letters of application and recommendation for such positions as mechanic, painter, joiner, timber inspector, ropemaker, blacksmith, and clerk. Most of the letters concerning applications for positions as engineers are dated from October 1841 through April 1842.

326. Letters Received From Contractors Relating to Materials, Supplies, and Equipment.
Dec. 1, 1841-June 30,1842. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in registers in the first and last volumes include name of writer, date and number of letter, and a brief summary of its contents.

The letters concern proposals for furnishing the Navy live-oak and other types of timber, guns and gunpowder, chains, rope, hemp, coal, whiskey, and steam engines. Letters include specifications required by the board and terms of delivery and payment.

Reports

327. Reports, Returns, and Estimates Received From Navy Agents.
Sept. 1814-Apr. 1834. 7 vols. 9 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are no records for 1819-23 or 1825.

Included are reports of examinations of hemp and other materials and equipment, reports of naval property sold, quarterly returns of supplies and receipts and expenditures, and estimates of the amounts of money required from naval appropriations. There are also some invoices, receipts, and offers from contractors.

328. Proposals, Reports, and Estimates for Supplies and Equipment.
1814-33. 27 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged for the most part by type of item or service to be furnished and thereunder chronologically. Originally there were 16 volumes. In the process of rebinding, it was necessary to divide most of the volumes into two parts.

This series consists chiefly of proposals received from businessmen located in principal eastern and southern cities, including Boston, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, New York, Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk, seeking contracts with the Navy Department. The proposals appear to have been made in response to the board's or Navy Department's advertisements in these cities for live-oak and other types of timber; muskets, pistols, cannon, and other ordnance; iron; engines and machinery; food; and clothing. Other proposals were from private shippers soliciting charters to carry provisions to the squadrons. There are also estimates of the amounts of expenditures or quantities of material required to repair ships or to construct buildings at navy yards, reports of surveys of supplies at navy yards, and accounts of sales of Navy property. The 1842 volume contains notes on forms of English ships and on other subjects.

Some of these records are registered in the volumes described in entry 312. For proposals, estimates, and reports for the years 1834-42, also see entry 314.

329. Digests of Reports Concerning Live-Oak Timber.
Oct. 1815-Nov. 1817. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by state (North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Louisiana, and Alabama) and thereunder by date of report.

These are digests of reports of Timber Agents Nathaniel Hutton, Thomas M. Newell, and Abraham Thomas on the quality and quantity of timber suitable for the construction of naval vessels.

330. Estimates and Reports of Expenses of the Navy.
1815-37. 3 vols. 5 in.

The volumes are arranged for the most part by year and thereunder by nature of expense.

There are estimates and reports for vessel repairs, construction and improvement of yards and docks, salaries, supplies and equipment, food, clothing, and other provisions. Included are contract documents, reports on the location and condition of vessels at navy yards, and records concerning the Pacific Exploring Expedition.

331. Report of Timber Agents James L. Cathcart and James Hutton.
Nov. 1818-May 1819. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The report is in the form of a journal of the agents' trip on the USS Nonsuch from Norfolk to New Orleans and then to Mobile and an abstract of the journal of the return trip from Mobile to Baltimore. The two agents reported not only on the timber lands inspected and surveyed but also on weather conditions, bodies of water crossed, towns and cities visited, and other matters. Appended to the journal are some schedules, a recapitulation of the journal, and copies of correspondence. For a report of surveyor John Landreth, who also was on the voyage, see entry 348.

332. Reports of Chief Naval Constructor Samuel Humphreys Concerning the Condition of Naval Vessels.
Mar. 7, 1827-Apr. 22, 1834. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index to vessels.

In usually brief descriptions of the physical condition of the USS Constellation, Independence, Philadelphia, and other vessels at navy yards, Humphreys, who was appointed Chief Naval Constructor in 1826, also recommended the kinds of repairs needed and indicated the methods to be employed. These reports are not duplicated in the letters described in entry 317.

333. Financial Reports of Engineer Loammi Baldwin.
1827-34. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Baldwin was the civil engineer in charge of building the Navy's first two drydocks at the Charlestown, MA, and Gosport, VA, Navy Yards. The records consist mainly of accounts, statements, and "schedules" of the expenditures on the docks for labor and material. They show the particular work done or materials obtained, date, and amount. The names of the suppliers or contractors are sometimes given. Other documents include diagrams of the Charlestown drydocks and copies of letters received by Baldwin. The records in this series were enclosures to letters sent by Baldwin to the board.

334. Reports by Inspector of Naval Ordnance Capt. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones.
Jan. 20, 1834-Feb. 10, 1834. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The first report was submitted on January 20, 1834, in response to orders from the board that a thorough inspection be conducted of all ordnance at each of the navy yards, including armament on naval vessels at the yards. The condition and state of preservation of ordnance are described, but the major part of the first report are the inspection returns completed by Jones for each of the yards (Portsmouth, Charlestown, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Gosport, and Washington) indicating the number and types of ordnance found.

The board partially examined the January 20, 1834, report and requested in a letter of January 29, 1834, that Jones submit additional tabular reports on the number and kinds of guns at the yards. The letter and the requested reports submitted on February 10, 1834, are bound in the back of the volume. Also see entry 319.

335. Statements and Reports Concerning Vessels and Construction Projects at Navy Yards.
1837. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by name of yard. Entries in a register give date and page number of estimate or report and a brief summary of its contents. The series consists of responses submitted by the commandants of the seven navy yards to a board circular of August 24, 1837, listing the names of vessels "on the stocks" and "in ordinary or under repairs," the cost of "buildings and permanent works at the yards" completed in 1837, costs of similar projects to be undertaken in 1838, and balances due under several appropriations "for articles lent and borrowed, and not returned."

Contract Records

336. Contracts.
July 28, 1794-Dec. 1842. 15 vols. 3 ft.

Divided into two overlapping periods, 1794-1822 and 1815-42, and thereunder arranged for the most part chronologically. There are registers or name (and sometimes subject) indexes in the individual volumes.

These are contracts between private contractors and representatives of the Government (usually the President of the Board of Navy Commissioners beginning in 1815 and earlier by other officials of the War, Treasury, and Navy Departments). Most of the contracts were for the purchase of materials, supplies, and equipment, including cannon, carbines, pistols, gunpowder, swords and cutlasses, iron, turpentine, varnish, anchors, sails, timber, cloth, beef, bread, pickles, whiskey, hats, and shoes. Other contracts were for the lease of land and buildings and the transportation of supplies to overseas squadrons ("charter parties"). For other contracts, see entry 390.

337. Registers of Contract Offers ("Scale of Offers From Bidders").
1815-42. 6 vols. 8 in.

Entries are arranged for the most part chronologically. There are records for 1815-23 and 1827-42. There is a name index in the first volume (1815-20) and lists of items contracted for in the last four volumes (1827-42).

The first volume is in standard register form, with entries giving name of person offering goods, articles offered, date, price, and place and date for delivery. In the other volumes, offers in response to one advertisement are entered together. Most advertisements sought bids for a particular class of goods (such as food or clothing), but they usually were for different types of items and often were for more than one place of delivery. There are notations concerning acceptances of bids.

338. Contractors' Bonds.
Apr. 1820-July 1842. 5 vols. 9 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

The handwritten and form copies show names of contractor and sureties, amount of bond, a brief description of the contract, and conditions of the obligation.

339. Abstracts of Contracts.
1820-39. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

There are records for 1820-22, with references to contracts as early as 1817, and for 1836-39. The section for 1820-22 has a register arranged alphabetically by name of contractor, which gives page number of abstract, names and residences of sureties, and articles contracted for. Entries in the section for 1836-39 are arranged in rough order by date of contract.

Abstract entries include name of contractor, date of contract, articles contracted for, place of delivery, and, in the first section, scheduled date of completion and amount paid.

340. Annual Contracts.
Dec. 1835-Feb. 1842. 3 vols. 8 in.

There are no contracts for the period February 1837-December 1840. Within each time period, arranged by item contracted for and there [text missing] for the most part chronologically. There is a name index in each volume.

The volumes contain form contracts awarded for the purchase of commodities during 1836, 1837, and 1842. Items included copper, iron, paints, biscuits, butter, cheese, candles, flour, and whiskey.

341. Ledger for Disbursements Made Under Contracts.
Oct. 1838-Oct. 1842. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by name of contractor. Entries in a register arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of contractor include date of contract, brief description of item contracted for, navy yard to which deliveries were to be made, and page number on which disbursements were posted.

Information concerning disbursements includes name of contractor; letter, order, or circular under which contract was proposed; items contracted for; quantity and cost of items; time and place of delivery; quantity delivered; and amount of money disbursed at time of each delivery according to Navy agents' returns. Contracts are for timber, coal and ordnance materials. At the end of the volume is an unidentified 1843 register of letters and reports received, apparently by the Bureau of Construction and Repair, concerning repairs and equipping vessels.

Miscellaneous Records

342. Lists of Dimensions of Masts and Spars.
1813-26. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by type of vessel.

Lists were prepared by Naval Constructor William Doughty for 74-gun ships of the line and 44-gun frigates. Also included are some lists and notes on deliveries of timber to yards where naval vessels were being built and some circulars.

343. Inventories of Equipment and Supplies at Navy Yards.
Jan. 1814-Dec. 1843. 57 vols. 8 ft.

For the most part divided into two sets arranged by navy yard and thereunder by month, but in two volumes there are entries arranged chronologically or by year and thereunder by kind of stores.

Some inventories were prepared at the navy yards; others apparently were prepared or copied by the board. They report the quantities and costs of such items as anchors, duck and canvas cloth, copper, iron, timber, blocks, oars, sails, and ordnance; for 1814-16 there is an inventory of food kept at the yards. Inventories submitted for the years after July 1842 were sent to the Bureau of Yards and Docks (see entry 62 in Preliminary Inventory No.10).

344. Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officers.
1815-21. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of officer and thereunder in chronological order by date information concerning the officer was entered in the volume. Most of the volume seems to have been compiled in May and June 1815, with additions made later.

Typical entries include officer's name, age, rank and date of appointment to that rank, duty assignment, and a brief comment on his fitness for office furnished by a senior naval officer. Often there is a reference to a letter received from the senior officer. For similar records, see entry 157.

345. Circulars, 1815-42.
June 3, 1823-Aug. 20, 1842. 2 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. Each volume has a register arranged in three categories--commandants and other naval officers, Navy agents, and miscellaneous.

Most of the circulars give orders, instructions, or information concerning such matters as employment, duties, and pay of civilian workers; submission of reports, inventories, financial statements and other documents; care and preservation of vessels, buildings, docks, and timber and other supplies; the acquisition of books, periodicals and newspapers; procurement of timber, steam engines, and hemp; contract specifications; and advertisements for proposals for provisions and stationery. Included are examples of forms used to report on fiscal and property matters.

346. Journal of James Keen, Supervisor of Timber Cutting on Blackbeard (Sapello) Island, GA.
Nov. 27, 1817-Apr. 5, 1818. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

A daily records of events. Keen supervised the labor of workmen who shipped with him from Philadelphia to Blackbeard Island and that of slaves hired from their masters in Georgia. The first entries describe the passage from Philadelphia to Georgia. In the back of the volume are lists of workmen and slaves and a set of rules and regulations to be observed by all workers.

347. Estimates of Types and Quantities of Materials Needed for Building Naval Vessels.
1817. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by type of material.

The estimates were compiled by William Doughty, naval constructor. Materials include white pine, oak plank, iron, copper, and lead. Vessels included 77-, 44-, and 36-gun ships and also sloops.

348. Journal of Surveyor John Landreth on an Expedition to the Gulf Coast.
Nov. 15, 1818-May 19, 1819. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Landreth served as surveyor of the expedition of Timber Agents James Cathcart and James Hutton to the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama to select "unappropriated Lands of the United States as may be found to produce Cedar Timber Suitable or Naval purposes." The agents sailed from Norfolk to New Orleans, on board the US Schooner Nonsuch, commanded by Lt. Alexander Claxton. In addition to surveying data, the journal contains descriptions of the land along the coasts and the varieties of trees found. There are several watercolor sketches of islands visited. The report of Cathcart and Hutton is described in entry 331.

349. Register of Approved Bills ("Account Books").
June 1819-Feb. 1845. 4 vols. 7 in.

Arranged chronologically but with a considerable number of entries out of strict order. There are name indexes in the individual volumes.

Several transactions were often included on one bill. Entries include name of payee, amounts claimed, dates and nature of the expenditures, name of commissioner approving the payment of the bill, and date of approval. The bills approved after August 1842 were contracted by the board and approved for payment by the Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks, Capt. Lewis Warrington, a former commissioner.

350. Advertisements for Supplies, Equipment, and Services.
Mar. 12, 1827-July 5, 1833. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a subject index. The volume is identified as "No. 2," but no earlier volume has been found.

These are mostly manuscript copies, but there are some clippings of published advertisements soliciting bids for such items as pistols, cutlasses, timber, cord, copper, iron, canvas, surgical instruments, bread, beef, and pork and for such services as the transport of freight and the construction of wharves and other structures.

351. Requisitions of Navy Agents.
June 1828-Dec. 1841. 25 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged by time period, usually a year, thereunder by city in which the Navy agency was located, and thereunder chronologically.

The requisitions were submitted to the board for approval. They usually indicate object of expenditure, appropriation to be charged, amount, and the board's action (almost always approval but sometimes with a qualification). Estimates for pursers are sometimes enclosed.

352. Abstracts of Receipts and Disbursements Under Ordnance Accounts.
Jan. 1, 1829-Oct. 1, 1837. 2 vols. 1 in. The first volume covers 1829-32; the second volume, 1833-37. Within each period arranged for the most part by kind of account and thereunder chronologically.

Entries are posted under two kinds of accounts: "gradual increase" and "repair." For each specific type of ordnance or ordnance store, entries give number of the item available and its cost. There are entries or different types of cannon, gun carriages, beds and slides, worms and ladles, rammers and sponges, mortars, gun powder, and shot and shell.

353. Register of Improvements and Repairs Made at Navy Yards.
Apr. 1830-June 1836. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by navy yard.

Entered in the register are the date on which the estimate for each improvement or repair was made; purpose; estimated cost; dates of authorization, appropriation, and completion; final cost; and remarks.

354. Register of Approved Requisitions Submitted by Navy Agents.
Apr. 1830-Dec. 1835. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged by month. Entries for each month are arranged chronologically.

Entered are the amounts drawn against each appropriation and total amount of requisition. There are monthly totals.

355. Monthly Statements ("Exhibits") of Requisitions Submitted by Navy Agents.
Dec. 1831-Dec. 1841. 5 vols. 5 in.

For 1831-35 arranged by year (December through November), thereunder by location of Navy agency, and thereunder by month. For January-November 1841 arranged by month and thereunder by location. There are no records for 1836-40.

Statements usually showing for requisitions drawn by the agent upon the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners, appropriation item and sometimes specific purpose, amount received, amount of payments made, unexpended balance, amount of any overpayments, and amounts of money, if any received for articles sold. Appropriation items include pay and subsistence, Marine Corps pay, provisions, medicines, repairs, "gradual improvement of the Navy," navy yards, ordnance, enlarging and repairing wharves, completing Navy hospitals, building and rebuilding vessels, and contingent expenses. There are records for agencies in Pensacola, Charlestown (1841 only), Norfolk, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York, Boston, and Portsmouth, NH.

356. Monthly Statements of Balances of Naval Appropriations.
Jan. 1832-Dec. 1836. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These statements give appropriation items and balances on hand in the Treasury under each. The appropriation headings include pay and subsistence, provisions, repair of vessels, ordnance and ordnance stores, and suppression of the slave trade. Included are letters from the Secretary of the Navy transmitting the statements to the president of the "Navy Board."

357. Drafts of 1833 Revision of the Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Navy.
1832-33. 9 vols. 4 in.

Seven of the volumes bear labels with the name of a member of the revising board. There is a list of contents in eight of the volumes.

The board responsible for the revisions was appointed under the act of May 19, 1832 (4 Stat. 516), "authorizing the revision and extension of the rules and regulations of the naval service." It met from November 1832 until November 1833 and consisted of Comos. John Rodgers, Charles Morris, Charles Stewart, Isaac Hull and Charles G. Ridgely. Each volume contains a draft of portions of the rules and regulations. The texts of some of the chapters and articles appear in more than one volume. For a complete version of the board's revision see American State Papers, Naval Affairs (Washington, DC, 1832-61), vol. 4, pp. 395-427.

358. Minutes of the Board for Testing Ordnance.
Aug. 12, 1836-Oct. 1837. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The board, appointed by the Secretary in July 1836, consisted of Como. Charles A. Morris (also a member of the Board of Navy Commissioners) and Capts. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones, William B. Shubrick, and David Conner It conducted experiments at Old Point Comfort in Virginia to determine the safety and efficiency of certain Navy guns and proposed substitutes. Incorporated with the minutes are copies of correspondence and final reports of the board submitted in September and October 1837.

359. Invoices for Supplies Shipped by Naval Storekeepers.
Jan. 1838-Sept. 1842. 4 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in registers in each volume indicate navy yard from which the supplies were shipped, date of shipment, navy yard or other place to which shipped, and name of vessel carrying the supplies.

The invoices include the name and station of the naval storekeeper, name of the vessel on which the supplies were shipped and of its captain, a detailed list of the items shipped, their destination, name of the consignee, and the accounts against which the costs were to be charged.

360. Instructions for Building Ships of War.
n.d. 2 vols. 1 in.

Arranged by subject.

The contents of the volumes are similar but not identical. They cover the relative dimensions of the length of keel and breadth of beams, the depths of hold and rakes of all vessels of war; lengths and diameter of masts, yards, and booms; size of sails; ballast; method of sparring in the British Navy; rules for sparring frigates by Commodore Rodgers; rule made by Commodore Bainbridge for masting and sparring ships presented to the Navy Department in 1809; Commodore Bainbridge's rule for placing masts; proportions of masts and yards for boats, launches, and cutters with lug sails; and dimensions of the masts and spars of a 74-gun ship of the United States as established by the Board of Navy Commissioners.

Naval Inventions Boards

Board for Examination of Naval Inventions

By order of the Secretary of the Navy of December 27, 1861, a board, presided over by Como. William B. Shubrick, was established to review and report on naval inventions and plans submitted to the Navy Department. Other members of the board were Capt. Charles Wilkes and Naval Constructor Samuel M. Pook. In February 1863 this board was replaced by the Permanent Commission on Science and Art.

361. Minutes.
Jan. 2-July 10, 1862. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of persons mentioned.

The minutes describe each invention and plan submitted and indicate the board's judgment on its practicality and usefulness. Incorporated are copies of letters (reports) from Commodore Shubrick to the Secretary of the Navy giving in some detail the reasons for the board's recommendation. For the originals of the letters, see entry 55.

362. Letters Referred to the Board.
Mar. 1861-July 1862. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There is an index to names of writers.

The letters were originally addressed to the Secretary of the Navy or other Navy Department officials or to the President, Members of Congress, and the Secretary of War. The board secretary usually referred them to the board without comment, but sometimes the assistant secretary reviewed them. Letters dated 1861 had not been acted upon by the secretary before the establishment of the board. There are a few letters addressed directly to the board. Most of the letters are from inventors with proposals concerning submarines, gunboats, ironclad steamers and rams, hull plates, floating barriers, and signal systems. Some are accompanied by drawings, sketches, and statistical tables.

Permanent Commission

The Secretary of the Navy established the Permanent Commission on Science and Art by a letter of February 11, 1863. It replaced the Board for Examination of Naval Inventions. The original members were Como. (later Rear Adm.) Charles H. Davis, chairman; Joseph Henry, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution; and Alexander D. Bache, Superintendent of the Coast Survey. Later Bvt. Brig. Gen. John G. Barnard of the Corps of Engineers, and Joseph Saxton, Assistant Superintendent of Weights and Measures, joined the commission. The commission was authorized to call in other scientists to aid in their deliberations. It was discontinued in late 1865.

363. Minutes.
Feb. 20, 1863-Feb. 23, 1864. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The minutes include the time and place of the meeting, the names of the members present, and the business transacted. Incorporated into the minutes are copies or abstracts of letters received from the Secretary transmitting plans and inventions, letters of the commission reporting to the Secretary their findings and recommendations, and letters to and from scientists invited to assist the commission in experimenting and testing. For other copies and originals of the correspondence of the commission, see entries 364-366.

364. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Mar. 31, 1863-Sept. 21, 1865. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. In each volume there is a list of letters sent that provides the date of the letter, name of addressee, and a brief description of the content of the letter.

These letters were sent to the Secretary reporting on plans and inventions examined and tested, to inventors requesting that they provide exhibits, to scientists inviting them to become associates of the commission, and to members of the commission from the chairman concerning meetings. For other copies of some of these letters, see entries 363 and 57.

365. Letters Received.
Feb. 11-Aug. 4, 1863. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a list of contents provide for each letter its date, name of writer, and a brief description of the content of the letter.

Included are letters received from the Secretary of the Navy transmitting communications sent to his office concerning plans and inventions (see entry 363 for the communications), from scientists accepting invitations to become associates of the commission, and from inventors requesting appearances before the commission to explain their inventions and submitting models, drawings, and other material. Copies of many of the letters are also among the minutes of the commission (see entry 363).

366. Letters Referred to the Commission.
Jan. 11, 1861-Dec. 5, 1865. 3 vols. 9 in.

Two of the volumes form one chronological sequence, January 1861-December 1865. The other volume, identified as "supplemental," is arranged chronologically, February 1862-February 1864. There are indexes to names of writers in the volumes.

Letters, similar to those described in entry 362, addressed to the Secretary of the Navy or other Navy Department official or to the President, Members of Congress, the War Department, the Smithsonian Institution, and state governors and referred to the Secretary and then to the commission. The Secretary initially referred most of the letters dated before 1863 to the predecessor Board for Examination of Naval Inventions, which did not act upon them before it was replaced by the commission. Many of the letters for 1862 in the supplemental volume, however, are for the latter part of the year, when the board was inactive, and probably were held in the Office of the Secretary until the commission was established. There are only two letters dated after September 21, 1865, the date of the last action of the commission.

Naval Policy and Planning Boards

367. Minutes of the Board To Prepare a Code of Regulations for the Government of the Navy.
Aug. 10, 1857-Feb. 19, 1858. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The minutes provide a record of business transacted. The board was appointed by the Secretary of the Navy on August 3, 1857, under provisions of the naval appropriations act for fiscal year 1858 (11 Stat. 314). The members of the board were Capt. William Shubrick, Purser John De Bree, Comdr. J. L. Lardner, Lt. W. L. Maury, and Surgeon Charles W. Maxwell. A Marine Corps officer also attended most of the meetings representing the Commandant.

368. Minutes of the Joint Army and Navy Board on Harbor Defense.
Mar. 1-July 20, 1866. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Noted in the minutes are communications read, resolutions submitted and approved by the board, and officers' appearances before the board. The board's correspondence with the Secretary of the Navy has been copied as part of the minutes and contains extensive reports on harbor defense plans and the board's final report of July 14, 1866.

The board, headed by Rear Adm. Charles H. Davis, was created by order of the Secretary of the Navy on March 1, 1866, to consider and report on methods of defending harbors. Other board members were Rear Adm. J. A. Dahlgren, Capt. James Alden, Bvt. Maj. Gen. John G. Barnard, Brig. Gen. B. S. Alexander, and Brig. Gen. Z. B. Tower.

369. Records of the Board on Navy Yards Appointed in 1876 and the Commission on Navy Yards Appointed in 1882.
Dec. 1876-Dec. 1883. 1 vol. 1 in.

A board was created by Congress in 1876 (19 Stat 65) to make recommendations on the retention or disposal of navy yards and other naval facilities and the acquisition of other naval property. Its report, dated December 5, 1876, is bound in the back of the volume. It includes minutes of board meetings, October 3-December 5, 1876, which incorporate an 1867 report concerning the suitability of League Island, PA, as a navy yard site. The minutes contain detailed discussions of various locations.

Records of a commission established by Congress in 1882 (22 Stat 284, 289), arranged for the most part chronologically, include several reports and memorandums to the Secretary of the Navy and the Congress, January 18-December 1, 1873, with recommendations concerning the retention, discontinuance, and reorganization of navy yards.

370. Records of the Advisory Board To Suggest the Number and Classes of Navy Vessels.
July-Nov. 1881. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by type of record. There is a table of contents.

Included are correspondence, a printed copy of the board's report, a manuscript copy of the minority report with an analysis of it, proceedings, and papers furnished to the board, including tables. Adm. John Rodgers was president of the board and Lt. Edward Very was recorder. The other board members are listed in the Secretary of the Navy's order of June 29, 1881, a part of the report.

Naval War Board

This board apparently originated in informal consultations between the Secretary of the Navy and various officers concerning matters of strategy in the war with Spain. No orders or letters of appointment have been found. During a brief period in April 1898, when an Army officer served on the board, it was known as the Army and Navy Board. Throughout the war the Secretary's correspondence pertaining to strategic operations was in large part drafted by or prepared in collaboration with the board.

371. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Naval Member of the Army and Navy Board.
Apr. 2-Apr. 18, 1898. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. Only 17 pages of the volume were used.

These letters were sent by Capt. Albert S. Barker, later a member of the Naval War Board.

372. Press Copies of Letters and Telegrams Sent and Recommended by the Naval War Board.
Apr. 28-Aug. 12, 1898. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically through May 31. Thereafter recommended telegrams are segregated from other communications. There are name and subject indexes.

Included are letters, endorsements, and memorandums to the Secretary of War giving advice concerning the conduct of the Spanish-American War; drafts of letters and telegrams to commanding officers and others that the board recommended be sent by the Secretary; and responses to persons making suggestions.

373. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the "Strategy Board".
Apr. 24-Aug. 12, 1898. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names and subjects.

This series consists principally of letters sent by Secretary of the Navy to commanding officers, the Secretary of War, the President, and others concerning operations during the Spanish-American War. There does not appear to have been any unit formally known as the "Strategy Board"; these letters and telegrams seem to have been prepared by the Naval War Board for the signature of the Secretary.

374. Report of the Board of Arbitration on the Army and Navy Maneuvers, New London and Naragansett Artillery Districts, September 1-6, 1902.
Oct. 30, 1902. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

The report, addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, describes war games between naval ships and Army coastal defenses. The board was headed by Rear Adm. Stephan B. Luce and consisted of both Army and Navy officers.

Officer Examination Boards

375. Records of a Board for the Examination of Volunteer Officers for Admission to the Regular Navy.
Dec. 5, 1867. 6 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by type of record.

The board was appointed by the Secretary of the Navy on August 27, 1866, under a provision of an act of July 25, 1866 (14 Stat 222), for the appointment to the Regular Navy of a specified number of volunteer officers. The board considered the claims of the candidates, gave written and oral examinations, and reported to the Secretary on its findings. In addition to the report are the minutes of the board, August 7, 1866-December 5, 1867; correspondence; two somewhat different registers of candidates, one arranged chronologically by for the most part date of application and numbered in sequence (with an index), and the other arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname; records concerning preliminary examinations of officers attached to squadrons; and a register showing the numerical standing of officers who were examined. There are records concerning candidates who waived the examination, failed to appear, withdrew, or were rejected for physical reasons as well as for those whom the board actually examined. There are also minutes for a few meetings from April 21-May 5, 1868, of a second board with the same membership as the first board.

Naval Examining Board for Officers Seeking Promotion

In order to establish and equalize the grades of line officers in the Navy, an act of July 16, 1862, provided for the appointment by the Secretary of the Navy of an advisory board to meet at least once every four years to select the line officers most worthy of promotion.

An act of April 21, 1864, amended the original legislation and provided that no line officer on the active list below the grade of commodore, nor any other naval officer, could be promoted until his mental, moral, and professional fitness was reviewed by an examining board of not less than three naval officers appointed by the President. The board members were picked by the President under the provision of the 1864 act. Most records of proceedings of the boards are among the Records of the Office of the Judge Advocate General (Navy), Record Group 125.

376. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Presidents of the Naval Examining Board.
Oct. 1, 1868-Apr. 23, 1869. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are letters addressed to the Secretary of the Navy on matters connected with the examinations such as requests for documents in Navy Department files needed for review by the board. Capt. W. H. Macomb signed as president until December 17, 1868. He was followed by Capt. J. C. Howell, who was President pro tempore until the assumption of the presidency by Como. T. O. Selfridge on December 22, 1868. Some of the letters transmit copies of questions presented to senior naval officers concerning candidates for promotion, or transmit the proceedings and findings of the board with regard to candidates examined. Enclosures to these letters are not copied in the volume. There are a few letters sent by Captain Macomb and the other officers as President of the Naval Retiring Board that primarily summoned officers to testify before that board.

377. Letters Sent by the Naval Examining Board for Promotion.
Jan. 1870-Dec. 1872 3 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. The third volume has a name index.

These letters addressed to the Secretary of the Navy are mostly transmittals forwarding the records of proceedings that are not enclosed. The board met at Washington and considered the cases of officers who were candidates for promotion. In some cases, the letters discuss reexaminations of failed candidates or explain why officers failed their exams.

378. Report of a Board To Review Cases of Officers Passed Over for Promotion.
Dec. 21, 1871. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged for the most part by case. There is an index to names of claimants.

The board, established under provisions of a joint resolution of Congress of July 1, 1870 (16 Stat 382), examined cases in which officers claimed that they had been improperly passed over for promotion under terms of the act of July 25, 1866 (14 Stat 222). The report consists chiefly of the board's findings on each case together with abstracts of service, letters from the officers, letters of testimonial from senior officers and other exhibits. At the end there are minutes of the board, February 1-December 21, 1871, correspondence concerning persons denied a review, and other letters.

379. Records of a Board To Review Cases of Officers Passed Over for Promotion.
May 1-May 26, 1879. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged by type of record. There is an index to names of claimants.

The board (known as the Le Roy Board after its president Rear Adm. William Le Roy) was established under the authority of a joint resolution of Congress of February 5, 1879 (20 Stat 481). It examined the claims of 23 officers, whose cases had not been presented to the 1871 board, that they had been improperly passed over for promotion under provisions of the act of July 25, 1866. The records consist of Senate Executive Document No. 42, 46th Cong., 2d sess., which includes the report of the Secretary of the Navy on each case; the transmittal report of the board; minutes, correspondence, and the board's recommendation and the exhibits for each of the 23 cases.

380. Records of the Board of Examining Professors in Mathematics.
Feb.-May 1881. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged by type of record.

Records include minutes, correspondence and examination papers. The board, appointed in compliance with an act of Congress of January 20, 1881, was presided over by Simon Newcomb at the Naval Observatory.

Commission to Ascertain the Cost of Removing the Naval Observatory

The commission was established by an act of Congress of June 20, 1878 (20 Stat. 241), to determine the cost of moving the Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, to a new location to be selected by the commission.

381. Minutes and Correspondence.
July 1-Dec. 7, 1878. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder chronologically. There is a table of contents for the minutes and a name index for the correspondence.

382. Letters Sent and Received.
July-Dec. 1878. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Series includes correspondence exchanged between Superintendent of the Naval Observatory Rear Adm. John Rodgers and Rear Adm. Daniel Ammen regarding plans for the removal and estimates of the number of buildings needed on the new observatory site, suggested relocation sites, and estimates of cost of the move. Architectural considerations are discussed in letters to and from Rodgers and architects William Bauman and Joseph C. Hornblower. There are also letters received from private citizens or their attorneys offering land for the new site. A copy of the letter of December 7, 1878, which accompanied the final report of the commission, describes the records created by the commission that were transmitted through the Secretary of the Navy to the President.

Other Boards

383. Minutes and Other Records of the Commission To Oversee the Sale of the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
Apr.-Dec. 1875. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part by type of record.

In addition to the minutes, April 12-December 29, 1875, there are plans; an appraisal report on yard property; manuscript and printed copies of newspaper advertisements announcing the auction of the yard property on December 2, 1875; copy of the deed of sale; correspondence; and a manuscript copy of the report submitted by the commission, including appendixes.

384. Letters and Reports Sent by the Gun Foundry Board.
Apr. 5, 1883-Feb. 20, 1884. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. The board was established to examine navy yards and arsenals and to report to Congress as to which was the best adapted for use as a gun foundry. The correspondence stops in June 1883, when the board traveled to Europe to examine foreign foundries, and begins again upon its return on October 31. Thereafter there are only occasional letters, including a printed copy of the board's report to the House of Representatives (Executive Document No.97, 48th Cong., 1st sess.), which includes the proceedings of the board, April 10, 1883-February 16, 1884. The board was reconvened in May, but the only records for this period are a letter of December 20, 1884, transmitting a supplemental report and a memorandum summarizing the recommendations of the final report which is not in this series.

385. Report of the Steel Inspection Board.
Jan. 1890. 1 vol. 3 in.

This report is divided into three major parts: (1) the introduction, which cites legislation passed by the Congress during the years 1822-87 authorizing the Navy to build ships constructed of steel and notes the establishment of the board in September 1, 1887; (2) printed copies of specifications for cruisers and gunboats and tables showing results of tests and chemical analyses of steel plates constructed by private companies for cruisers and gunboats; and (3) printed copies of specifications for the armored battleships Texas and Monterey and tables showing the results of tests and chemical analyses of steel plates used in the construction of these two vessels. There is also a list of the companies making the steel parts for these two vessels.

Records of Bureaus, 1823-1933

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair

The Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, one of the five original bureaus established on August 31, 1842, was for administrative purposes treated as two separate bureaus headed by a single chief. The construction and repair responsibilities included the building and repair of all naval vessels and the procurement of materials and labor needed for such activities. The equipment to be obtained by the bureau included sails, anchors, cables, cordage, fuel, furniture for vessels, lights, and signals.

The bureau reorganization of July 5, 1862, removed the responsibility for procuring equipment for the Navy to the newly formed Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting.

Some of the records of the bureau in this record group were inherited from the Board of Navy Commissioners. Other records of the bureau are with Records of the Bureau of Ships, Record Group 19.

386. Letters Sent to Navy Agents.
Dec. 2, 1850-Dec. 30, 1858. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged chronologically. Entries in a register, arranged by location of agency and thereunder by name of agent, give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its content. The volume is labeled as "No. 2," but no other volume has been found.

These are primarily letters requesting that the agents have contracts signed and that they procure items needed at the navy yards. Some letters were sent to notify the agents of the approval of their requisitions, to inform them of amounts available under certain appropriations, and occasionally to reprimand them.

387. Letters Received From the Engineer-in-Chief.
Oct. 3, 1844-Apr. 22, 1856. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters from the periods October 3, 1844-November 14, 1850, and October 4, 1853-April 22, 1856. There is a name and subject index in the volume.

These letters apparently are copies made in the bureau. They are similar in content to the original letters described in entry 46, and there is some duplication between the two series. Most of the letters for 1844-50 are addressed to the bureau and are signed by Engineer-in-Chief Charles H. Haswell. The later letters are addressed to the Secretary and are signed by Engineer-in-Chief Daniel B. Martin.

388. Receipts for Signal Books and Telegraphic Dictionaries.
Aug. 2, 1824-Oct. 28, 1848. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. For August 1824-November 1845, there is a register in which entries give number, date, name of recipient, person from whom received, name of vessel, and page number.

Most of the receipts are from commanders of vessels. Included are a list of lantern signals for use at night and a list of "private signals" of the Navy.

389. Cost Accounts for Building, Repairing, and Equipping Vessels.
Jan. 1828-Aug. 1853. 2 vols. 1 in.

Arranged by name of vessel.

The first volume, January 1825-August 1853, includes accounts for the USS Franklin, Fulton, John Hancock, Michigan, Saranac, and Susquehannah; the U.S. schooners Flirt, Grampus, Phoenix, and Wave; the U.S. sloops of war Fairfield, Falmouth, and Levant; and the U.S. storeship John P. Kennedy. It has costs under various headings for months or other periods of time. It also has lists of orders received relating to each vessel. The second volume, May 1832-June 1842, includes the USS Lexington, Naragansett, Congress, and Savannah and the U.S. brigs Bainbridge, Somers, and Truxton. It itemizes costs under various headings.

390. Contract Ledgers.
1833-57. 2 vols. 6 in.

The first volume, which appears to have been maintained by the Board of Navy Commissioners, covers roughly 1833-42, and the second volume, 1843-57, but there is some overlapping for individual transactions. The first volume is arranged by navy yard, thereunder by account of individual contractor and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of opening of account. Accounts in the second volume are arranged in rough chronological order by date of opening. There are registers of contractors arranged alphabetically, by initial letter of surname.

Most ledger entries include appropriation under which contract was drawn, navy yard at which contracted item was to be delivered, beginning and ending dates of the contract, articles contracted for, estimated costs, dates and quantities of deliveries, and amounts paid. Among the items contracted were timber, canvas, anchor iron, and hemp. For earlier contracts, see entry 336.

391. Reports Received From Chief Engineers.
Nov. 20, 1844-July 17, 1849. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order.

Included are reports concerning inspections and repairs of engines; safety apparatus attached to engines, boilers, and pipes; comparative values of various types of coal; and recommendations for vessel improvements and for building iron steamers. There are some abstracts of reports and logs of vessels and reports from persons other than chief engineers.

392. Reports of the Sailing Qualities of Naval Vessels, 1826-48.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There is an index to names of vessels.

The volume contains copies of reports submitted to the bureau, the Board of Navy Commissioners, the Secretary of the Navy, and other officials, for the most part by commanding officers of vessels. They relate to such matters as the construction of the vessels; their draft, speed, and capacity for carrying water and supplies; and the condition of their sails. Suggestions for alterations are included.

Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography

The Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography was established by an act of August 31, 1842 (5 Stat. 579), with cognizance over ordnance supplies and equipment and hydrographic equipment. For administrative purposes the hydrographic and ordnance functions of the bureau were separate. The Depot of Charts and Instruments, established under the Board of Navy Commissioners in 1830, was transferred to the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, and in 1850 the U.S. Naval Academy was also placed under the bureau. The U.S. Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office were established in 1854 within the bureau.

In 1862 the ordnance and hydrographic functions were separated and placed under different bureaus, the Bureau of Ordnance and the Hydrographic Office within the Bureau of Navigation.

Other records of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography are in Records of the Bureau of Ordnance, Record Group 74; Records of the Hydrographic Office, Record Group 37; and Records of the U.S. Naval Observatory, Record Group 78.

393. Report of J. N. Reynolds on the Preparations for a South Pacific Expedition.
Sept. 24, 1828. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Reynolds traveled to several New England ports to interview whaling captains and owners of whaling ships and to examine log books, journals, and charts for geographical, navigational, and topographical information for the use of an exploring expedition. Much of the report pertains to longitude and latitude of certain islands and reefs. There are also extracts from log books and journals and introductory remarks by Reynolds concerning his research and the whaling industry.

Reynolds was later secretary to Capt. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones during the first part of the Pacific exploring expedition, 1837-42 (see entry 40). Instructions from the Secretary of the Navy to Mr. Reynolds are in entry 6.

394. Reports on Ordnance Experiments Conducted by Capt. Matthew C. Perry.
Oct. 12, 1839-Jan. 4, 1841. 1 vol. 1 in.

These are reports of October 12, 1839, and January 4, 1841, and a letter of January 25, 1840, concerning experiments ("gun practice") conducted at Sandy Hook Bay, NJ. The experiments involved several types of guns (including the bomb gun), gun locks, fuses, shells, targets, and ranges. Captain Perry was Inspector of Ordnance for the Navy. Accompanying the reports are tables detailing the results of gun firings and sketches of gun parts and targets. For related records, see entry 319.

395. Letters Received Relating to Hydrography.
Aug. 1842-July 1862. 19 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by category of correspondent and thereunder chronologically. The categories are as follows: Secretary of the Navy, September 1842-September 1853 and June 1856-July 1862, four volumes with one volume missing (many of the letters were received by the Secretary and referred by him to the bureau); commandants of navy yards, August 1842-December 1858, with gaps, six volumes; Superintendent of the Naval Observatory and the Hydrographic Office, September 1842-January 1844, January 1846-June 1851, and June 1856-June 1858, three volumes; U.S. Naval Academy with some letters from the Secretary of the Navy relating to the academy, November 1860-May 1862, one volume; and miscellaneous letters, September 1842-April 1862, with gaps, four volumes. There are registers in the volumes that give date of letter, number, name of office of writer and subject.

The letters relate mainly to hydrographical and meteorological observations and to the purchase and distribution of instruments equipment, charts, maps, logs, and books relating to hydrography.

396. Abstract of Bills Approved for the Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office.
July 1852-Nov. 1862. 1 in. 1 vol.

Arranged by appropriation on which drawn, such as wages, equipment, instruments, printing, and grounds, and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

The entries include date, name of individual or company paid, service or item for which payment was made, place of payment, and amount. The abstract shows the names and pay of "calculators" and other scientists employed at the Naval Observatory and cartographers at the Hydrographic Office.

397. Journals of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition Under the Command of Comdrs. Cadwallader Ringgold and John Rodgers.
Mar. 1853-July 1856. 12 vols. 10 in.

Arranged by author of the journal(s) and thereunder chronologically.

The following journals were kept in obedience to an order of Comdr. Cadwallader Ringgold "to keep careful and minute journals during the cruise":

Journals of Lt. Henry K. Stevens, commanding the USS Fenimore Cooper, March 1853-January 1854 and June-August 1854, and the USS John Hancock, August 1854-July 1855. (3 vols.) The last volume of the three includes some sketches of islands and other landmarks.

Journal of Lt. Henry Rolando commanding the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, May-September 1853, and the U.S. Brig Porpoise, March-August 1854. (1 vol.) The journal includes a letter sent by Rolando to Lieutenant Rodgers on July 10, 1857, and a letter sent by Rodgers in response on July 14, 1857. Both letters relate to several pages of the journal that were removed by Rolando upon his relinquishment of the command of the Porpoise in 1854 and their return by Rolando to Rodgers in 1857.

Journal of William R. Baker, Assistant Draughtsman on board the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, June-September 1853. (1 vol.) The volume also includes a copy of the receipt received by Baker when he turned the journal over to Fleet Surgeon W. Grier and Purser W. Brenton Boggs, October 5, 1853.

Journal of Acting Master Edwin Osgood Carnes on board the U.S. Brig Porpoise, June-July 1853, December 1853-March 1854, and September-November 1854, and the USS John Hancock, March-April 1855. (1 vol.) The volume also includes a sketch of Cone Island of Killen Harbor and a map showing the route taken during a cruise between Norfolk, VA, and the Madeira Islands.

Journal of Fleet Surgeon William Grier on board the U.S. Flag Ship Vincennes, June 1853-July 1856. (1 vol.)

Journal of Acting Lt. Jonathan H. Carter on board the U.S. Survey and Store Ship John P. Kennedy, commanded by Lt. N. Collins, June 1853-July 1854. (1 vol.)

Journal of Acting Lt. and Assistant Astronomer John M. Brooke on board the U.S. FlagshipVincennes, June 1853-January 1854. (1 vol.)

Journal of Lewis M. Squires on board the USS John Hancock, commanded by Lt. Henry K. Stevens, June 1854-May 1855. (1 vol.) Apparently this volume is a continuation of an unlocated earlier volume.

Journal of Captain's Clerk F. H. Bierbower on board the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, commanded by Lt. John Rodgers, April-May 1855. (1 vol.) A note on the front flyleaf states that the journal is "composed of extracts taken from my private lettersónoted down without corrections or revisions--I had not leisure to copy in this book all that I have written concerning our cruise."

Journal of Second Hydrographer Arthur Witzleben on board the USSVincennes, February-July 1856. (1 vol.) The journal was written in German.

The journals include information about the flora, fauna, geography, and hydrography of the areas involved and observations regarding the manners, morals, customs, and modes of expression of the peoples visited.

The first 11 volumes were transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library by the Hydrographic Office in July 1939. The last volume, the journal of Arthur Witzleben, was presented to the Hydrographic Office, April 1941 and then transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library. All of these journals have been microfilmed as part of NARA Microfilm Publication M88, Records Relating to the United States Surveying Expedition to the North Pacific Ocean, 1852-1863.

Other journals kept by officers on the expedition are found in entry 608.

398. Contract Proposals and Testimonials Concerning Wells and Gowen Underwater Diving Equipment.
Ca. 1862. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Documents submitted by Thomas F. Wells, of Boston, MA, who continued business of the firm of Wells and Gowen after the departure of J. E. Gowen in 1857 for Russia. Wells apparently hoped to receive a contract with the Navy for the use of his diving equipment for underwater salvage and ship repair. The documents include a brief history of the company, a description of the "submarine armor" it manufactured and its adaptations for naval service, testimonials dated from March to September 1851, and a newspaper clipping from the Baltimore Sun about the armor, dated November 15, 1861.

Bureau of Yards and Docks

A Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks was established by an act of August 31, 1842 (55 Stat. 579), with authority over navy yards at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola and naval stations at Baltimore, New Orleans, Charleston, Sackett's Harbor, and Lake Erie. Yards, docks, buildings, vessels in ordinary, equipment, and personnel all came under the supervision of the newly formed bureau. Civil engineers acted as the bureau's agents at the yards.

In April 1845 vessels at navy yards were transferred to the custody of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs. In that same month responsibility for controlling naval timber reservations and overseeing the activities of timber agencies was transferred from the Office of the Secretary of the Navy to the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks. By an act of March 1, 1817 (3 Stat. 347), the Secretary of the Navy received authorization to explore live-oak and red cedar tracts on vacant and unappropriated lands with a view to reserving the timber for naval purposes. He was also authorized to appoint agents and surveyors to explore the tracts and was left the discretionary power to accept or reject their recommendations. Subsequent acts expanded the provisions of the 1817 act to include lands containing other kinds of timber considered valuable for naval purposes and also provided for the imposition of penalties for cutting, destroying, or carrying away live-oak, red cedar, or other timber from reservations in Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

In 1862 the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks became the Bureau of Yards and Docks; the functions of the bureau remained relatively unchanged.

The records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks and its predecessor in this record group relate primarily to the selection and control of oak, red cedar, and other timber reservations. Most of the records of the bureau are in Record Group 71, Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks (described in Preliminary Inventory No. 10).
Timber Reservations
Letters Sent

399. Letters Sent Concerning the Preservation of Timber.
Apr. 24, 1845-Apr. 20, 1861. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are registers arranged alphabetically by surname, position, or by location; entries give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its content. There are some letters as early as March 16, 1840, from the Secretary notifying persons of their appointment as timber agents.

Most of the letters are addressed to timber agents, but there are many to the Secretary of the Navy and some to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Quartermaster General of the Army, Treasury Department officials, Members of Congress, and others. They relate to such subjects as reservation of timber lands, trespassers, seizures by agents of timber believed to have been cut from reservations, rights of settlers in East Florida to cut public timber under the Armed Occupation Act of 1842 (5 Stat. 502), appointments and dismissal of timber agents, their rates of compensation and leaves of absence.
Letters Received

400. Registers of Letters Received From Timber Agents.
Apr. 1845-Jan. 1861. 2 vols. 1 in.

The volumes cover overlapping time periods, caused by carrying entries for an individual to the second volume whenever space was exhausted in the first volume. Within volumes, entries are arranged by surname or office of correspondent and thereunder chronologically. There are name indexes.

Entries include date of letter and a brief summary of its content. The registers are primarily for the letters described in entry 401, but there are some entries for letters described in entries 404, 405, and 407.

401. Letters Received From Timber Agents.
Jan 1, 1828-Dec. 31, 1859. 15 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are indexes to names of writers. There are few letters for the period April 1835-June 1839.

Included are letters reporting depredations on timber reservations, the arrest and prosecution of suspects (including cases in admiralty courts), and information from customs agents concerning shipments of timber. There are some letters from other persons, particularly before the series of miscellaneous letters received described in entry 404 was started. For registers see entry 400.

402. Letters and Reports Received From Charles Haire and Thomas F. Cornell, Agents for Surveying Public Lands in Florida.
June 18-Oct. 24, 1828. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged chronologically.

These are copies of original reports and letters, including tables and map enclosures, to the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners. They relate principally to the quantity and quality of live-oak timber that Haire and Cornell discovered. Included are copies of correspondence between the two agents and owners of timber lands in West Florida. The originals of these letters and reports and of later ones from Haire and Cornell are among the records described in entry 401.

403. Extracts of Letters Received Concerning Live-oak Lands in Florida and Louisiana.
Apr. 1831-Apr. 1835. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by live-oak district and thereunder chronologically. There is a partial name index.

The extracts of letters from agents, naval officers, and others primarily concern the location of live-oak tracts and the results of examinations to determine the suitability of the timber for shipbuilding. In the front of the volume are a list describing the boundaries of each live-oak district and a list of names of district agents. The originals of most of the letters are among those described in entries 401 and 407.

404. Miscellaneous Letters Received Concerning Timber Reserves.
Sept. 2, 1843-May 7, 1855. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are indexes to names of writers.

Letters are from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, registers of district land offices, U.S. district attorneys, customs inspectors, private citizens, and others and concern such subjects as disputed land titles, complaints against timber agents, depredations on reservations and prosecution of accused persons, sale of exhausted timber lands, and applications for appointment as timber agents. Some of the letters are registered in the volumes described in entry 400.

405. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy Concerning Timber Reservations.
Apr. 16, 1845-Mar. 9, 1855. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of Secretaries of the Navy that gives a brief summary of the content of each letter.

The series contains the letter transferring responsibility for timber agencies to the Bureau of Yards and Docks and other letters concerning such matters as opinions of the Attorney General on the rights of settlers on Government timber reservations, cases involving timber cut from the reservations, appointments of timber agents, and the discontinuance or the consolidation of certain agencies.

Other Timber Reservation Records

406. Copies of Correspondence of the General Land Office Concerning Naval Timber Lands, March 19, 1825-May 18, 1844.
n.d. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. Most of the records are for 1831-33; there are very few for 1834-43. There is a name and subject index with a brief description of the content of each letter.

This correspondence, copied by the General Land Office for the use of the Navy Department, is with the President; the Chairmen of the Naval Committee and the Committee on Private Land Claims of the House of Representatives; the Secretaries of the Treasury, the Navy, and War; naval timber agents; and registers and receivers of district land offices and the surveyors general of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The letters relate to policies adopted concerning the selection of timber lands and public reservations and the detection and arrest of trespassers.

407. Records Relating to Live-Oak and Red Cedar Timber Reservations.
Oct. 1, 1829-Apr. 15, 1861. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a name and subject index include a brief description of the contents of each document.

Included are letters, reports, tables, schedules, lists, and other records, many of which are enclosures to letters received from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Secretary of the Navy, U.S. marshals, private citizens, and other sources. Many of the records relate to explorations for unappropriated live-oak and red cedar timber lands.

408. Annotated Plats of Timber Reservations.
ca. 1831-ca. 1857. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by state (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana) and thereunder by range and township. There is a list of the plats.

The land survey plats are annotated to show location and acreage of reservations and sometimes of private land claims.

409. Records of Purser William F. Lynch Relating to a Cruise to Protect Timber Reservations.
Mar. 1840-Oct. 1848. 2 in.

Arranged in rough order by type of record and thereunder chronologically.

Most of the records are for the period of Lynch's service as commanding officer and acting purser of the U.S. steamer Colonel Harney while cruising between Norfolk and New Orleans. Included are letters sent, October 1844 and November 1845; letters received from the Fourth Auditor, Treasury Department, relating to pay, October 1844-July 1845, and from the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, February 1845; invoices relating to charts and instruments, small stores, and clothing, February-August, 1845; receipts, March 1840-September 1848 with gaps; orders relating to personnel and accounts, October 1844; and an article of agreement relating to the schooner Maid of Orleans, February 1845. There are also some records of Lynch's Dead Sea Expedition.

410. Ledger for Expenses of Timber Agents.
1845-1860. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by name of timber agent. There is a name index.

Entries give only dollar figures for each agent carried (most often quarterly) from the account books described in entry 411.

411. Accounts of Timber Agents Approved for Payment ("Live-Oak Bill Book").
Mar. 1845-Apr. 1861. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are indexes to names of agents.

Most of the accounts are for quarters of a year. They usually give date of account or quarter covered; purposes (salary, horse hire, boat hire, postage, etc.), amounts, and voucher numbers for expenditures; and date of approval and signature of bureau chief. Sometimes particular vouchers were disapproved. In the front of the first volume is a list of timber agents in Alabama, California, Florida, and Mississippi in 1845.

412. Reports of Experiments by Timber Inspector James Jarvis on the Preservation of Timber.
Jan. 15, 1850-Jan 24, 1855. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are narrative descriptions and tabular statements of the experiments conducted and their results. The experiments were conducted by Jarvis at the Gosport Navy Yard to determine the proper time at which timber should be cut, causes of dry rot, and measures to be taken to prevent the decay of naval vessels constructed of live-oak, white oak, yellow pine, and other types of timber.
Other Records

413. History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1797-1874.
June 30, 1875. 3 vols. 5 in.

This is apparently the handwritten original work submitted by Como. George H. Preble. It consists of a preface and introduction, a chronological history, a number of appendixes, and an index. It is illustrated with photographs of buildings, maps, drawings showing the layout of the yard at various times, and newspaper clippings. The history has been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M118, History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1797-1874, by Commodore George Henry Preble, U.S.N., 1875.

414. Report of Naval Constructor Theodore D. Wilson on British Dockyards.
Nov. 16, 1870. 1 vol. 2 in.

Report of Assistant Naval Constructor Theodore D. Wilson of a tour during the summer of 1870 of government and private dockyards in Great Britain where he viewed vessels completed and under construction. He also visited shipbuilding yards and armor plate rolling mills. As enclosures there are copies of reports of British naval officers, tables, charts, drawings, and photographs.
Bureau of Equipment
A Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting was established in the Navy Department on July 5, 1862. The recruiting function of the bureau was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation on June 25, 1889. The Bureau of Equipment was left with many responsibilities relating to the equipment of vessels including the purchase of coal, hemp, iron, wire, and other materials; procurement of foreign and local pilotage and towage for naval vessels; repair of ship's equipment; and installation and maintenance of electric lights, lanterns and lamps, signal communications, equipment, and sounding devices.

The records of the Bureau of Equipment in Record Group 45 are quite incomplete, the majority being found in the Records of the Bureau of Ships, Record Group 19.

415. Press Copies of Letters Sent by Lt. Albert Grant, Resident Inspector at the Union Iron Works at San Francisco.
Dec. 14, 1888-Sept. 22, 1890. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a chronologically arranged register of letters sent providing the date and page number of the letter and a brief summary of its content.

Many of the letters are addressed to the Naval Inspector of Electric Lighting concerning estimates of material needed for installation of dynamos, lamps, and other electrical equipment on board naval vessels and concerning the progress of work being performed.

416. Correspondence and Reports on Experimental Cruises of Vessels of the U.S. Pacific Fleet Towing Torpedo Boat Destroyers.
May 27, 1908-Nov.8,1908. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters exchanged between the Secretary of the Navy and the chief of the bureau concerning the time, cost, and amount of work involved in the towing operations; detailed reports submitted to the bureau by naval officers conducting the experiments; and memorandums containing instructions to officers taking part in the experiments. These are copies of enclosures to correspondence received by the Bureau of Equipment in 1909.

417. Reports on the Installation of Wireless Telegraph Systems at Puget Sound Navy Yard and San Juan Station.
1907. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by subject of report. The first volume contains the report for Puget Sound and the second the report for San Juan. Partial subject index in volume containing report for Puget Sound.

In addition to narrative descriptions of the systems and their operation, the volumes also contain photographs and blueprints. Both reports were apparently submitted to the Bureau of Equipment as enclosures to correspondence.

Bureau of Navigation

The Bureau of Navigation, established by an act of July 5, 1862 (12 Stat. 510), was responsible for overseeing all matters related to the navigation of naval vessels. Included under the bureau were the Hydrographic Office, Signal Office, Naval Observatory, Nautical Almanac Office, and Office of Detail. The latter office was originally established in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy in March 1861 for the purpose of issuing duty orders to officers but was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation in April 1865. Many of the records of the Office of Detail are described with the personnel records in this record group; other records of the office are with Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24, where other records of the Bureau of Navigation are located.

418. Registers of Arrivals and Departures of Vessels.
May 1866-May 1874. 2 vols. 1 in.

Entries are arranged in rough chronological order. There are records for May 1866-December 1868 and January 1871-May 1874.

Entries give date of arrival and departure, name of ship, port, and often destination or port from which sailed. There are some entries for commissioning and other actions and a number of memorandums relating to vessels, schedules, disposition of vessels, postal guides, and navy yards.

419. Register of U.S. Naval Vessels, 1846-92.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. At the end are entries that probably were added after the alphabetical sequence had been completed. There is an index to names of vessels.

The entries are for vessels that served during the Civil War, and there is information concerning actions from 1846 to 1892. Entries usually include name of vessel; description of it, rate, dimensions, tonnage, statement as to how acquired and; date and method of disposition. Newspaper clippings relating to the vessels are inserted in the volume, which also has several lists of vessels. Registers for the period 1797-1845 are described in entry 206.

420. Register of U.S. Naval Vessels.
Apr. 1875-June 1880. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries show name, rate, armament, stations and voyages, and dates of voyages and other events.

421. Compiled Cruising Reports of Vessels.
July 1895-July 1897. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel. There is also an index to names of vessels. The volume is identified as No. 2, but no earlier one has been found.

The reports are on printed forms that show the name of the vessel; dates commissioned and docked for repairs; type of construction; information relating to fuel consumption and speed; complement of crew, officers, and marines; names of ports and stations visited with dates; abstracts of instructions or orders received; and name of commanding officer.

422. Announcements of Orders Issued to Officers.
Mar. 9, 1910-Jan. 19, 1912. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no announcements for July-December 1910.

Included are announcements of orders assigning officers to duty, detaching them from duty, and placing them on the retired list. Also announced are commissions, appointments, resignations, desertions, dismissals, deaths, and revocations of previously issued orders. Later announcements are part of the daily reports of movements of vessels (see entry 216).

Records of Shore Establishments, 1814-1919

Baltimore Naval Station

A naval station was established at Baltimore, MD, during the War of 1812. Many vessels were sent to Baltimore for repair, a practice which continued through the time of the Civil War. During the Civil War the naval rendezvous at Baltimore furnished crews to vessels at the station and equipment and supplies were provided to vessels ordered to the South.

423. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Jan. 1863-Mar. 1864. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of addressees.

The letters were sent primarily to the Secretary of the Navy and bureau chiefs. They relate to such matters as orders, vessels, ordnance, supplies, and requisitions. The volume was presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library on June 11, 1925, by Miss Nannie Dornin Barney and her brothers and sisters, grandchildren of the commandant, Como. Thomas A. Dornin.

Boston (Charlestown) Navy Yard

In 1800 the State of Massachusetts ceded to the U.S. Government 65 acres of land at Charlestown for the establishment of a navy yard. A purchase of 35 additional acres was made in the same year, and other purchases were made in subsequent years. Capt. Samuel Nicholson was the first officer-in-charge of the yard. Some of the most famous vessels of the U.S. Navy for the Civil War period were launched at the Boston Navy Yard including the USS Cumberland, Merrimac, Princeton, and Hartford.

Most of the records for the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years and consist primarily of correspondence between the commandant of the yard and the Secretary of the Navy, the Navy Department bureaus, officers commanding vessels, heads of departments at the yard, and private companies and individuals. Records of the yard for other time periods are in the Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181. For a history of the yard, see entry 413.

424. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
Sept. 1859-Aug. 1866. 22 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for February 7-April 10, 1863.

The letters are to officers commanding naval vessels, other officers at the yard, the commanding officer of the naval rendezvous at Boston, the Navy agent at Boston, commandants at other navy yards, civilian employees of the yard, private contractors, local law enforcement officials, and other public and private individuals. Among the many subjects discussed are recruitment, apprehension of deserters, preparation of vessels for sea duty, assignment of vessels to search for privateers off the Massachusetts coast, and procurement of supplies and equipment.

425. Press Copies of Letters and Telegrams Sent to Secretary of the Navy.
May 1859-Aug. 1867. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name and subject indexes in the volumes for May 1861-March 1862.

The letters relate mainly to such matters as arrival and departure of vessels, transfer and discharge of enlisted men, and the assignment of officers to duty. The originals of these records are among those described in entry 51.

426. Letters and Telegrams Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Oct. 8, 1861-Dec. 1, 1864. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are a name and subject index in the volume for January-November 1864 and chronologically arranged lists of subjects of letters in the volumes for October 1861-May 1862 and October 1862-May 1863. There are no letters for June-October 1863.

The records relate to such matters as examination and appointment of officers, discharges of crews, departure dates of vessels, disposition of prisoners of war and contraband at the yard, and wages paid to civilian employees. The date on which acknowledgment was sent and other action taken is usually noted on the letter.

427. Register of Courts-Martial.
June 13, 1814-Sept. 19, 1833. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically by date of trial.

There are entries for courts-martial held at the yard and on vessels in Boston Harbor. The information given includes location, date, name and rank of person tried, nature of charge, verdict, sentence if applicable, and remarks, usually including names of members of the court-martial board.

428. Canceled Checks of the Boston Navy Yard.
1830-39 2 ft.

There are checks for the year 1830, arranged alphabetically by the surname of the payee and for the years, 1831-33, arranged chronologically. For the year 1837, the bundle is labeled "destroyed checks, April, May June, July." There is only one check for 1839.

The checks are issued to naval officers, enlisted men, civilian employees, suppliers, and contractors. They are signed by Purser Edward N. Cox.

Gosport (Norfolk) Navy Yard

The navy yard at Norfolk (Gosport), VA, was permanently established in 1801. During the 1830s and 1840s the yard was constantly used for fitting out, refitting, and laying up Navy vessels. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during this period were the John Adams, Yorktown, Union, Southampton, Perry, and Jamestown.

Most of the records of the Norfolk Navy Yard are in Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

429. Report of Annual Survey of Articles on Hand in Departments.
Oct. 1, 1840. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by department and thereunder for the most part by vessel.

Entries include type of article, number or amount (sometimes broken down by those in good order and those needing repair), and value.

430. Reports of an Inspection and Work Performed on the USS Trenton at the Norfolk Navy Yard.
Sept. 17, 1886-June 22, 1887. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically with a subject index.

The inspection report, prepared by Chief Engineer Joseph Trilley in September 1886, comments on the condition and operation of the vessel machinery. The report of work performed, which is accompanied by a drawing detailing the repairs made on the vessel machinery, was submitted by Chief Engineer B. H. Wharton in June 1887.

Havana, Cuba, Naval Station

In an Executive order of December 6, 1898, President William McKinley directed the Commission for the Evacuation of Cuba to turn over to the U.S. Navy Department the entire naval establishment at Havana, Cuba, formerly the property of the Spanish Government. In a subsequent order of December 12, 1898, the commission was directed to give the U.S. naval officer in command of the station jurisdiction of the harbor of Havana, Cuba, which would include enforcing the rules and regulations regarding anchorage of vessels and enforcing quarantine regulations.

Because of unsuitable docking facilities and places for unloading bulky cargoes, the navy yard, which came under the jurisdiction of the commandant of the naval station, was turned over to the U.S. Army in June 1900. The property occupied by the naval station was eventually returned to the Cuban Government.

431. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
Jan. 1899-Mar. 9, 1903. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are primarily letters to U.S. Navy and Army officers, private contractors, and Spanish naval officers in Cuba. They concern the shipment of stores, sanitary measures adopted at the stations, claims for coal at the station, the decoration of grave sites of naval personnel killed on the Maine, and numerous other subjects. Also included are letters to Cubans temporarily appointed as pilots, sanitary inspectors, and lighthouse inspectors.

432. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
Mar. 2, 1899-Mar. 9, 1903. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters concern such administrative matters as the station's requirements for clothing and small stores, orders for officers, and the closing of the station and the transfer of personnel and records to the naval station at Key West, FL.

433. Press Copies of Telegrams Sent.
Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 4, 1903. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The telegrams, most of which were addressed to the Secretary of the Navy and the chiefs of bureaus, concern such subjects as deaths of naval personnel at the station from yellow fever and other causes, payroll difficulties, departures of foreign vessels from the port of Havana, and delays in the delivery of coal and other supplies.

434. Orders.
Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 2, 1903. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are press copies of orders issued by the commandant to officers concerning such matters as the duty assignment and pay accounts of officers and enlisted men.

435. Office Timebook of the Department of Yards and Docks.
Jan. 1899-Mar. 1903. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged by month and thereunder numerically.

The information is on a printed from and includes the name, occupation, which days worked, total number of days worked, pay per day, and total pay for each employee.

The volume also contains the office timebooks for the Department of the Captain of the Port, January-June 1899; the Department of Construction and Repair, July 1901-October 1902; and the Department of Steam Engineering, May-August 1899.

436. Vouchers.
Sept. 1899-Mar. 1903. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are press copies of vouchers for various supplies and stores, medical and transportation services, and funeral expenses.

Mare Island Navy Yard

In January 1852 a board was appointed by the Secretary of the Navy to select a site for a navy yard in California. The Mare Island site was selected and purchased in March 1853. Most of the records of the Mare Island Navy Yard are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

437. Log.
Sept. 16, 1854-Mar. 22, 1856 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically. A note in the inside cover states that the log was written in the hand of Admiral Farragut.

The log contains weather data and brief descriptions of yard activities.

438. Photographs of Drydock Excavation.
July 4, 1873-Nov. 1874. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Twenty-three numbered black-and-white photographs depicting various stages of the work. The contractor for the excavation was Charles Murphy.

Mound City, IL, Naval Station

A naval station was established in 1864 at Mound City, IL, on the Ohio River 8 miles above its confluence with the Mississippi River. Because of its location, the station was vital to the Union Navy's plans for control of the Mississippi River. After the Civil War the station continued to operate, but its relative unimportance resulted in its discontinuance in the 1870s. Other records for this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

439. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
Dec. 3, 1864-Jan. 10, 1871. 5 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name and subject indexes in the volumes. There are no letters for January 1868-September 1869.

The letters concern such matters as employment and pay of civilians at the station, examination of officer candidates, marines and apprentices attached to the station, deserters, surveys of repairs needed by vessels, contracts, and supplies. Letters to the Secretary or July-October 1864 are among those described in entry 440.

440. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
July 4, 1864-Nov. 16, 1867. 4 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name or name and subject indexes in the individual volumes. There are no letters for the period October 2-December 2, 1864.

The volumes include letters to officers and civilian employees at the station; the commanding officer and other officers attached to the Mississippi Squadron; the commanding officer of the ordnance department at Jefferson Barracks, MO, and other Union Army officers; the commanding officer of the U.S. receiving ship Great Western at Cairo, IL; and private contractors. The letters concern coal and other supplies and stores needed at the station and by vessels of the Mississippi Squadron, payment of bills, recruits, leaves of absence, and numerous other subjects. During the period July 4-October 1, 1864, the commandant also served as a flag officer of the Mississippi Squadron, and there are letters transmitting orders to officers commanding vessels of the squadron and reporting the outcome of naval expeditions and the movements and locations of Confederate forces along the Mississippi River. There also are some letters concerning Confederate prisoners of war and cotton seized by Union vessels. Letters to the Secretary of the Navy are included for this July-October 1, 1864, period.

441. Letters Received.
July 29, 1864-Aug. 30, 1869. 7 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, with gaps. There is some overlapping between volumes. There are name or name and subject indexes in most of the volumes.

The letters are primarily from chiefs of bureaus in Washington, the commanding officer of the Mississippi Squadron, and the commanding officer of the U.S. receiving ship Great Western at Cairo, IL. For the period of the Civil War, they concern numerous subjects including coal for the squadron, repairs and equipment needed on vessels at the station, surveys performed on vessels and ordnance stores, payment of bounty money to recruits, charges of embezzlement, paroled prisoners, and deserters. The letters for the postwar period primarily concern such administrative matters as vacancies in the crews of vessels at the station and assignments of officers.

442. Letters Received Concerning Coal Shipments.
Dec. 6, 1864-Aug. 6, 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There is a name and subject index.

Most of the letters are from Comdr. R. N. Stembel at the U.S. Naval Coal Agency at Pittsburgh, PA, concerning the delivery of coal and sale of barges. Other correspondents included the commanding officer of the Mississippi Squadron and officers commanding vessels attached to the squadron.

New Orleans Naval Station

New Orleans was one of the sites selected for establishing a naval station during the war of 1812. Ordnance was furnished to vessels calling at the port, and crews were raised for vessels awaiting orders to sail. During the Civil War, New Orleans once again served as an ordnance depot for the Union Navy. Other records for this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

443. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Oct. 1, 1863-July 22, 1867. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, but the end of the volume includes a considerable number of letters out of order. Entries in a register, arranged mostly by office of addressee, at the beginning of the volume include name of addressee, subject, and page number.

The letters were addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, chiefs of bureaus, and the commanding officer and other officers attached to the Gulf Blockading Squadron concerning ordnance requirements of vessels, results of vessel surveys, bills for labor and repair of vessels, and other administrative matters. The letters were signed by persons with a succession of titles and the office was identified for the most part as the U.S. Naval Ordnance Depot, October 1863-September 1865; U.S. Naval Headquarters, October-December 1865; U.S. Naval Station, February-August 1866; U.S. Iron Clads in Ordnance, August 1866-July 1867.

New York (Brooklyn) Navy Yard.

On February 7, 1801, the U.S. Government purchased 41.9 acres of land on the left bank of the East River (Brooklyn), which included a privately constructed shipyard at which the U.S. frigate Adams had been launched in 1799. Later purchases of adjacent property were made by the Government in 1824, 1848, and 1867. Following the 1801 purchase, Lt. Jonathan Thorne was ordered to the yard to act as officer-in-charge.

No vessels were constructed by the Navy at the yard prior to 1817, but many naval vessels received equipment and supplies there during the War of 1812. Beginning in the 1830s steam vessels were constructed at the yard, and during the period of the Civil War 14 vessels were constructed and about 400 vessels equipped and supplied.

The records of the New York Navy Yard in Record Group 45, many of which fill gaps in series in Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181, consist primarily of letters sent and received by the commandant. Correspondents included the Secretary of the Navy, the Board of Navy Commissioners, Navy Department bureaus, and naval officers and civilians at the yard. Some of the records appear to have been transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library from private sources.

444. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
June 15, 1859-Feb. 6, 1862. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. A chronologically arranged list of letters is at the beginning of the volume.

The letters concern occurrences or activities at the yard, including arrivals and departures of vessels, recruitment and transfer of enlisted men, employment of civilian personnel, apprehension of deserters, and repair of vessels.

445. Letters Sent to Naval Officers and Civilians at the Yard.
Nov. 21, 1859-Aug. 4, 1865. 8 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period September 20, 1864-February 10, 1865. Entries in registers in the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of addressee, include date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

The letters concern assignments to duty, sailing orders, discharges, pay, crews for vessels, examination of officer candidates, repairs needed on vessels, and numerous other subjects. A few letters are addressed to other persons, including the customs collector at New York, prize commissioners, and Army officers.

446. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy and Board of Navy Commissioners.
Jan. 26, 1815-Aug. 31, 1842. 22 vols. 7 ft.

Arranged chronologically, except that in the volume for 1817 letters rom the board are separated from letters from the Secretary. Entries in chronologically arranged registers in most of the volumes give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents. There are no letters for 1816, 1818, or April 6, 1823-December 22, 1824.

Letters from the board relate to such subjects as timber, ordnance, and other supplies delivered to the yard; uniforms; wages paid mechanics; vessels under construction; and sale of vessels and condemned supplies and equipment. Letters from the Secretary are similar in content to those described in entry 447. There are few letters from the Secretary after 1817 and none after 1823.

447. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Nov. 13, 1826-June 8, 1875. 49 vols. 15 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, but for the late 1850s and the 1860s there is much overlapping. Entries in chronologically arranged registers in most of the volumes give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents. The volume for December 1864-March 1865 is in Record Group 181, Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments.

The letters relate to many subjects including crews for vessels, personnel actions, deaths of officers, pay of enlisted men, marines attached to the yard, courts-martial, and repairs and supplies for naval vessels. For the period prior to 1843, most letters concerning vessel repairs, supplies, and equipment were from the Board of Navy Commissioners. See entry 446.

448. Letters Received from Officers.
Mar. 1, 1842-May 31, 1875. 29 vols. 9 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the periods July 16, 1853-June 7, 1855; October 15, 1868-July 18, 1869; October 5-December 22, 1869; or March 19, 1870-July 1, 1874. Entries in registers in most of the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer, give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Included are letters from commanding officers of receiving ships at the yard and the naval rendezvous, commanding officers o vessels and squadrons, commandants of other navy yards, and Army and Marine Corps officers. Subjects of the letters include transfers of crew, surveys of vessels, transportation of troops during the Mexican and Civil Wars, ship collisions, delivery of supplies and equipment to the squadrons, prisoners of war, and deserters. Other letters from commanding officers of receiving ships are described in entry 452; there a few letters from officers among those described in entry 450.

449. Letters Received From the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.
Sept. 15, 1843-June 7, 1850. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is one letter each for the years 1854, 1856, and 1859. Entries in a register in the front of the volume give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Almost all of the letters are requests to have the purser of the yard add names of officers to the rolls for pay.

450. Miscellaneous Letters Received.
Jan. 3, 1845-July 24, 1874. 9 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in registers contained in the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer, give date and page of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Correspondents included the U.S. Marshal and the U.S. District Attorney for the Southern District of New York, consular officials at New York City, officials of New York City and the State of New York, the Acting Assistant Provost Marshals General and Superintendents of Volunteer Recruiting for the Northern and Southern Divisions of New York, the U.S. Sanitary Commission, officials of private businesses, the clerk and other civilian employees of the yard, and the parents and other family members of enlisted men stationed at the yard. There are a few letters from naval officers. The letters relate to such subjects as proposals and contracts for furnishing goods and services, inspections, recruits, arrival of foreign vessels, purchase of land for the yard, claims, bounties, prize vessels, prisoners of war, civilian pay, and applications for positions.

451. Letters Received from Naval Constructor B. F. Delano.
Sept. 2, 1861-July 15, 1869. 1 vol. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a register at the beginning of the volume give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

The letters concern such subjects as results of vessel examinations, equipment and machinery to be fitted on vessels, and material and labor used in the Naval Contractor's Department of the yard. There are a few letters from other persons concerned with naval construction.

452. Letters Received From the Commanding Officers of Receiving Ships Stationed at the Yard.
July 10, 1863-Aug. 22, 1865. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in the volume's chronologically arranged register include date and page number of letter and a summary of its contents.

The letters, most of which were received from the USS North Carolina, relate to such subjects as deserters, personnel removed from the ships under writs of habeas corpus, prisoners held on the ships, and requests for leave of absence. Other letters from commanding officers of receiving ships are among those described in entry 448 and in Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, in entry 394.

453. Letters Received From the Bureau of Navigation and the Office of Detail.
Nov. 30, 1866-Nov. 20, 1868. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a chronologically arranged register include date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Included are letters transmitting orders to officers at the yard, informing the commandant of officers granted leaves of absence and enlisted men accused of desertion, authorizing discharges, and directing that civilian employees be employed in the yard's Navigation Office.

454. Fiscal Records.
Mar. 1823-May 1873. 1/2 in.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically. Included are accounts relating to the repair and supply of vessels, March 1823-October 1824, 1828, March 1857, and November 1858; and transfer, pay, receipt, and muster rolls, February 1871-May 1873, with gaps.

455. Reports of Boards of Survey.
Dec. 30, 1824-Aug. 1853. 4 vols. 7 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a subject index in the first volume and a register in the third volume.

The first volume contains reports, December 30, 1824-March 14, 1842, of surveys in the yard and of the USS Franklin, Cyane, Brandywine, United States, and Ontario and other vessels in the yard. The next volume, for August 1842, contains the reports of a survey conducted on the USS Grampus. The third volume contains requests for and reports of surveys conducted at the yard during the period January 1845-September 1849, and the last volume contains the repor of a survey conducted on the USS Congress in August 1853. Some are general reports of examinations of the hull, equipment, and stores of all departments of the ships and estimates of the costs of making repairs; others are of a more specific nature. Many concern the quality of provisions, clothing, and stores. A few relate to the health of certain men.

456. Station Logs.
1834-47, with gaps. 7 vols. 10 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The logbook entries include weather information, number of workers employed, type of work projects, and the names of arriving and departing ships.

457. Autographs of Officers and Lists of Ships.
ca. 1861-ca. 1863. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by type of record.

The purpose for which the autographs were assembled is unclear; the signatures appear to be those of famous people including most Civil War admirals, other notable officers, and a Russian prince. The purpose for which the list of ships was assembled is equally unclear.

458. Register of Orders Filled by the Naval Storekeeper's Office.
Mar. 27-Oct. 30, 1863. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries include order number, appropriation on which drawn, vessel or personnel for whom the items were requested, brief description of items, and the quantity ordered.

459. Rules for the Government of the New York Navy Yard.
ca. 1865. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

These rules, which may have been compiled by the executive officer of the yard, relate to almost all aspects of yard operations and to the duties of civil and naval officers at the yard, including the heads of yard departments. Also included are general orders for persons on watch duty and fire department regulations.

460. Records Relating to the Improvement of the New York Navy Yard.
1897-1905. 5 in.

Unarranged.

The records include correspondence, reports, recommendations, blueprints, maps, and specifications relating to improvements made at the New York Navy Yard.

Newport Torpedo Station

In 1869 a torpedo school was established at Newport, RI, to offer training in explosives and electricity to naval officers. An experimental laboratory also formed part of the station at which the attack and defensive capabilities of various torpedo devices were tested. In 1889 the Naval War College at Newport was consolidated with the torpedo station. Other records of this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

461. Classroom Notebooks Kept by Officers Attending Lectures.
ca. 1884. 6 vols. 6 in.

Arranged by officer and thereunder by subject.

Notebooks of Master Nathan Sargent, Lts. Albert R. Couden and Charles M. McCarteny, and Comdr. George C. Remey, kept during lectures given at the station on torpedoes, electricity, and explosives. The lecturer is usually identified.

Pensacola Navy Yard

On March 3, 1825, Congress passed an act (4 Stat. 127) authorizing the establishment of a navy yard on the Florida coast and appropriating $100,000 for the purchase of a site and for construction. A survey team of naval officers selected Pensacola Bay as the location for the yard, and in 1826 work was begun. The first commandant of the yard was Capt. Lewis Warrington.

In 1837 a plan for the development and improvement of the Pensacola Navy Yard was adopted, and subsequent congressional appropriations made possible the construction of a floating drydock and other facilities for the docking, repairing, and building of naval vessels.

In January 1861 the Pensacola Navy Yard fell into the hands of the Confederates and was not retaken by Union forces until the fall of 1862. The yard was almost destroyed by the Confederates but was restored adequately to serve as a repair and supply base for the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.

Most of the records of the Pensacola Navy Yard included in this record group are for the period following the recapture of the yard in 1862 and the post-Civil War years and consist primarily of correspondence between the commandant of the yard and the Secretary of the Navy, chiefs of Navy bureaus, and officers at the yard.

462. Letters Sent.
Dec. 30, 1862-Feb. 27, 1874. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters for the following time periods: December 30, 1862-November 10, 1863; March 6, 1864-January 17, 1865; June 21,1865-August 25, 1866; January 18, 1867-April 24, 1869; October 6, 1869-June 7, 1867; and June 18, 1872-February 27, 1874. There are name indexes in all of the volumes except those dated later than October 6, 1869.

The 1862-63 letters are handwritten fair copies; the other letters are press copies. Addressees included the Secretary of the Navy and bureau chiefs; the commanding and other officers of the Gulf Blockading, West Gulf Blockading, and Gulf Squadrons and the North Atlantic Fleet; Army officers, including the commanding officer of the District of West Florida; the Provost Marshal at Pensacola; and Treasury agents. The many subjects of the letters include coal, timber, and other supplies and equipment; vessel repair; contractors; mail delivery; deserters and prisoners; and the outbreak of yellow fever at the station.

463. Letters Sent to the Assistant Naval Constructor.
Jan. 23, 1865-Mar. 27, 1868. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There is a list of letters in the front of the volume.

Most of the letters gave orders for the repair of vessels or requested equipment. Some are letters of request sent to the commandant and returned with his decision noted on them.

464. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Constructing (Civil) Engineer's Office.
Oct. 24, 1865-Nov. 23, 1867. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters to the Secretary of the Navy, bureau chiefs, the commandant of the yard, and various civilians relating primarily to repairs and replacement of equipment at the yard and to civilian employees.

465. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Acting Naval Storekeeper and Other Officers at the Yard.
Aug. 13, 1866-Aug. 5, 1868. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part, the letters were sent by the naval storekeeper and, beginning in July 1867, the equipment officer, to the commandant and Navy bureau chiefs, particularly concerning materials coming into the yard and accompanying bills and invoices. Other letters were sent by inspectors and the acting navigation officer.

466. Letters Received From Naval Officers.
Jan. 9, 1863-Dec. 9, 1873. 4 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Letters were from commanding and other officers of the Gulf Blockading Squadron, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Gulf Squadron, and North Atlantic Fleet. Many concern supplies for vessels and vessel repairs needing to be performed at the yard. Other subjects of the letters include facilities at the yard, courts-martial, and employment and pay of workers. There are also a few orders received.

467. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
July 17, 1865-Apr. 9, 1869. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters only for July 17, 1865-May 16, 1866, and January 24, 1868-April 9, 1869. There is a list of letters in the volume for the latter period.

The letters pertain to civilian employees, the naval hospital at the yard, vessel surveys, contracts, and many other subjects.

468. Station Logs.
Jan. 1837-Dec. 1875. 12 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no logs for 1838-64.

Log entries describe the weather, ships arriving or departing, and work done at the yard.

469. Register of Officers.
Dec. 1862-Oct. 20, 1911. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged for the most part chronologically by date reported.

A complete entry (many are incomplete) includes name and rank of officer, date of order to report, date on which reported, previous duty, date of detachment order, date of detachment, and duty to which ordered or other change of status. Included is a list of commandants of the navy yard, 1851-1911.

470. Journal of Comdr. John F. Armstrong, Commandant.
Jan. 2, 1865-Mar. 31, 1866. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The entries include meteorological data and information concerning activities at the yard, including the kind of work performed, number of persons employed, and arrivals and departures of vessels. There is also a list of persons buried, January 1866-January 1867.

Philadelphia Navy Yard

During 1800 and 1801 the Navy Department purchased from private owners several parcels of land at Southwark, PA, to be used as the site of a navy yard. Immediately after the purchases were completed, construction was begun of storehouses, blacksmith ships, mould lofts, an office for civilian personnel, and various other buildings needed for the yard. Subsequent additions were made during the period 1807-21. The first keel laid at Philadelphia Navy Yard was that of the USS Franklin in 1815. During the Civil War the City of Philadelphia purchased and presented to the U.S. Government over 900 acres of land on League Island in the Delaware River. The navy yard at Southwark was sold at public auction to the Pennsylvania Railroad and all navy yard activities were transferred to League Island in January 1876. Most of the records of the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years.

471. Letters Sent.
May 16, 1817-Oct.29, 1822. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters were sent to the Secretary of the Navy or Board of Navy Commissioners. They relate to such subjects as the construction and equipping of the USS Franklin and North Carolina, conditions at the yard, the yard hospital, courts-martial, copper, timber, and wages of employees.

472. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Sept. 20, 1859-July 26, 1862. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters to commandants of other yards, naval storekeepers in foreign ports, the Governor of the Naval Asylum, companies doing business with the Navy, private citizens, and, occasionally, officers at the yard concerning such subjects as coal shipments, other supplies furnished under contract, naval operations on the Susquehanna River, and admissions to the Navel Asylum.

473. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
Sept. 1, 1860-May 14, 1862. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters concern such matters as arrivals and departures of naval vessels and their sale, purchase, and repair; naval personnel suspected of disloyalty to the Union; and deaths at the yard.

474. Press Copies of Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Nov. 1860-May 1865. 20 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters were addressed to officers stationed at the yard, including those commanding vessels and serving as recruiting officers. Also included are a few letters addressed to civilian employees at the yard. Among the subjects discussed are crews and repairs for vessels, supplies furnished under contracts, examinations of officer candidates, enlistment of recruits, and reports of bribery occurring at the yard.

475. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Jan. 5, 1861-Dec. 31, 1862. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are lists of letter subjects in the volumes.

Subjects of letters include detachments of officers from the yard, prize vessels and crews, complements for newly purchased vessels, and expenditures.

476. Register of Receipts for Goods (Articles) Received.
Jan. 12, 1823-Nov. 1828. 1 vol. 1 in. Arranged chronologically.

Entries include name of supplier, date, account charged, types and amounts of articles, and cost.

477. Orders Issued by the Commandant.
June 8, 1826-Oct. 6, 1831. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The orders relate to pay, leave, desertion, duties, promotions, courts-martial, and other matters. There are a few letters received relating to the orders.

478. Registers of Officers.
June 1860-Dec. 1866. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by time periods: June 1860 and June 1861-September 1864, December 1863-December 1866, and September 1864-December 1866. Entries within volumes are arranged for the most part chronologically. There is duplication between volumes.

Entries include name and rank of officer, date or reporting, duty to which assigned and from which relieved, date and source of order, and sometimes remarks.

479. Register of Naval Officers Granted Leaves of Absence From the Yard.
Aug. 1864-Jan. 1867. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries include the date on which leave was granted, the name of the officer, his rank, ship to which assigned, date on which leave expired, address while on leave, and remarks that generally indicate when the officer returned from leave.

480. Register of Vessels in Dock.
June 1866-June 1876. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically by date docked. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries show name of vessel, dates docked and undocked, the draft and other measurements of vessel, and usually some indication of the work done on it. The volume also contains a list of monitors and ironclads docked, June 1862-October 1868, arranged chronologically, which shows the name of the vessel and the date docked, and a letter sent by the Naval Constructor at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, December 4, 1867, forwarding the volume to the Assistant Naval Constructor.

Portsmouth, NH, Navy Yard

The Portsmouth Navy Yard was established on January 12, 1801, on Dennet's Island, an island of 58 acres on the Piscatagua River south of Kittery, NH. The first line officer to serve as commandant of the yard was Capt. Isaac Hull, who took charge on October 4, 1812. Little activity occurred at the yard prior to the War of 1812, but during the war and the period following, shipbuilding and ship repair activities increased. Numerous improvements were proposed and carried out, and additional land purchased for expansion of the yard during the period 1818-59. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during this period were the USS Porpoise, 1821; USS Preble, 1839; USS Congress, 1842; USS Saratoga, 1843; USS Portsmouth, 1844; USS Saranac, 1848; and USS Mohican, 1859.

481. Station Logs.
1840-45 3 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Log entries show weather data, arrival and departure of ships, and personnel actions.
Rio Grande Station
The Rio Grande Station was established about the year 1875 to oversee operations on the Rio Grande following the outbreak of violence along the U.S.-Mexican border. The station was successively under the command of Comdr. George C. Remey, Lt. Comdr. Henry L. Johnson, Comdr. Benjamin F. Day, Comdr. Bartlett J. Cromwell, Lt. Thomas A. De Blois, and Comdr. Charles F. Schmitz.

482. Letters Sent by Officers Commanding the USS Rio Bravo and the Naval Forces in the Rio Grande.
Nov. 16, 1875-Apr. 7, 1879. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters, addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, bureau chiefs, and the Senior Naval Officer at New Orleans, concern recruiting personnel at New Orleans for duty on the river, measures taken to prevent attacks by cattle thieves on settlements along the river, and revolutionary activities in Mexico, particularly in the area around Matamoras. The officers were stationed primarily at Brownsville, TX, and Matamoras, Mexico.

U.S. Naval Academy

The U.S. Naval Academy was established as the U.S. Naval School on October 10, 1845, on the site of Fort Severn at Annapolis, MD. In 1850 the Naval School was renamed the U.S. Naval Academy and was transferred from the supervision of the Secretary of the Navy to that of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

Most of the records of the Academy, 1845-1926, are part of the Records of the U.S. Naval Academy, Record Group 405.

483. List of Books in the Academy Library.
Feb. 7, 1852-Feb. 10, 1852. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by initial letter of key word of title.

Entries show title and usually the author and the number of volumes and, when appropriate, indicate that the book was a gift.

Washington Navy Yard.

The Washington Navy Yard, established in 1800, was built on a tract of land previously reserved for Government use that bordered on what was then called the eastern branch of the Potomac River (now the Anacostia River). During its early years the yard was primarily engaged in construction, maintenance, and repair of vessels. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during the years 1806-25 were the Wasp, Frolic, Brandywine, and Shark.

An ordnance department was organized at the yard under the direction of Lt. John A. Dahlgren in 1847. By the time of the Civil War, the yard had developed into the principal ordnance depot of the U.S. Navy. The ordnance department of the yard was detached from the supervisio of the commandant in 1862 but was restored in 1866. In 1886 a gun factory was established at the yard.

From July 1801 to July 1832, the commandant performed the additional duties of Navy agent for the yard. During the Civil War, telegraphic orders from the Navy Department to vessels on blockade duty along the Potomac were transmitted through the office of the commandant. On March 28, 1863, the commandant of the Washington Navy Yard took on the additional title of commanding officer of the Potomac Flotilla.

Most of the records for the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years. In addition to the commandant's correspondence with the Secretary of the Navy, the Navy Department bureaus, and other naval officers, there are also several series of records primarily pertaining to ordnance activity at the yard. For oaths of allegiance of civilian workers at the ordnance department, see entry 175.

484. Letters Sent Relating to Requisitions.
Jan. 9, 1832-July 11, 1832. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volume contains letters to the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners requesting that requisitions be issued by the Secretary of the Navy for funds to cover various yard expenses. They are addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, the Board of Navy Commissioners, and the President of the "Navy Yard Board."

485. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
Jan. 1, 1858-June 26, 1868. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters primarily concern such occurrences as arrivals and departures of vessels, discharges of personnel, examination of officer candidates, and pay of civilian employees at the yard. There are some letters relating to prisoners of war brought to the yard. Letters include information about the repair and display of USS Monitor in October 1862, including a plan of the ship and letter by John Ericsson. For April 1865, there are instructions for the John Wilkes Booth autopsy and confinement of Lincoln assassination suspects on ships in the yard.

486. Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Nov. 1, 1860-June 30, 1866. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period December 17, 1861-December 31, 1863.

Most of the letters give orders or instructions concerning such matters as assignment to and detachment from duty, vessel repairs, machinery experiments, preparation of parts, transfer of supplies and equipment to other yards and stations, and discharge of crews.

487. Telegrams Sent by the Commandant and the Officer in Charge of the Ordnance Yard.
Nov. 1, 1862-Oct. 12, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. Most of these telegrams were sent in response to telegrams received from the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance concerning civilian employees and the repair and equipment of vessels.

488. Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
July 2, 1864-June 19, 1869. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Addressees included the Secretary of War, the Navy agent at Washington, the commanding officers of the North Atlantic Squadron and the Potomac Flotilla, the officer in charge of the Naval Observatory, the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, the Provost Marshal of the District of Columbia, businessmen, and private citizens. The letters relate to such subjects as purchases of goods and equipment, repairs to squadron and flotilla vessels, transfers of crews, and deserters.

489. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Nov. 1, 1861-June 28, 1866. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters concern such matters as enlistments, discharges, and transfers of crews; civilian employees at the yard; paroled prisoners; and repair and equipment of naval vessels. A few letters for the period April 1865-June 1866 relating to admittance of visitors to prisons ships at the yard, including persons authorized to view the body of John Wilkes Booth, are signed by both the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of War. There are also a few general orders.

490. Telegrams Received by the Commandant and the Officer in Charge of the Ordnance Yard.
Nov. 1, 1862-Sept. 2, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the telegrams were received from the Secretary or Assistant Secretary of the Navy or the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and relate to different types of ordnance and the shipment of ordnance to various locations.

491. Report Concerning Removal of Gunpowder From the Naval Magazine During the British Invasion of Washington.
Sept. 10, 1814-Sept. 10, 1815. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Report submitted by clerk Mordecai Booth to the commandant covering the period August 22-September 10, 1814, during which Booth supervised the removal of the gunpowder to the farm of Daniel Dulany near Falls Church, VA, and its subsequent return to the magazine. The powder was removed on orders of Comdt. Thomas Tingey.

492. Station Log.
Nov. 1822-Mar. 1830. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The entries describe the weather, ship arrivals and departures, and activities of employees.

493. Inventory of Public Property at the Yard on April 1, 1844.
May 20, 1844. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by department of the yard.

494. Register of Guns and Miscellaneous Ordnance Registers.
1858-93. 4 vols. 6 in.

The registers of guns and howitzers are arranged by type of gun and thereunder numerically by ordnance number.

These volumes were loaned to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1939 from the Bureau of Ordnance. They are marked "Washington Navy Yard Ordnance." The entries in the registers of guns show the base ring, trunnions, dates received and issued, the number of test fires made, and condition of the gun or howitzer. The other volumes include: Rough Data Concerning Ordnance Received, 1859, which shows the articles delivered, their costs, and the places from which received; and register of metal sheets assigned for testing, 1883.

495. Records of the Wheelrights and Coopers Department.
July 1861-Nov. 1873. 1 vol. 1 in.

Divided into a daily register of work performed and other records, and thereunder for the most part arranged chronologically. The register was maintained in compliance with an order issued by the commandant on July 15, 1861, requiring that all master workmen and heads of departments keep a daybook with the following information: article(s) ordered for manufacture, date and purpose of order, date completed, and disposition of the articles(s). The other records include general orders, circulars, letters received, a list of articles manufactured in the department with costs, and list of applicants for work.

496. Press Copies of Reports Concerning Tests and Experiments Conducted by the Office of the Chief Engineer.
Nov. 9, 1874-July 30, 1887. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are a few letters dating from 1898 to 1908.

The reports to the commandant are on such diverse items as a liquid cooler, a patented furnace door, a vitrified emery wheel, an electric marine governor a steam generator, and a spiral punch. There are a few drawings and diagrams illustrating the experiments and equipment.

497. Inventory of Ordnance Stores.
July 1, 1886. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by category of equipment. There is a table of contents.

Entries include type of equipment, the number and value of serviceable articles and of articles needing repairs. There is a summary recapitulation of all categories of equipment.

498. Register of Vessels Supplied With Guns and Mounts at the Yard.
1889-1909. 2 vol. 6 in.

Arranged by name of vessel. Vessels assigned to expositions or militia units are entered under the name of the expositions or unit. The volumes contain indexes to names of ships.

These volumes were loaned to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1939 from the Bureau of Ordnance. They are marked "Washington Navy Yard Ordnance." Entries show the types of guns and mounts supplied to the vessels.

Records Created and Organized by the Office of Naval Records and Library

Collections for 1775-1910

499. Partial Index to Ships and Persons Named in Area File, 1775-1819.
ca. 1924. 4 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

Most of the 3- by 5-inch card entries are for records dated from 1775 to 1819, but some are for documents of an earlier or later date. A typical card entry includes the name of a vessel; American or foreign naval officer or private or public individual mentioned in the document; file designation of document; and its date. There are a few entries for persons or vessels mentioned in the Subject File (entry 502).

500. Area File of the U.S. Navy, 1775-1910.
ca. 1924-ca. 1940. 162 ft.

Arranged by geographical area, and thereunder chronologically. The geographical areas into which the Area File is divided are described in Appendix H. There are a few documents dated as early as 1648.

This artificially assembled series consists primarily of letters, telegrams, cablegrams, reports, maps, and other documents removed or copied from the records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, the Bureau of Navigation, other Navy Department offices and bureaus, and other executive agencies. There are also semiofficial correspondence of naval officers donated or loaned for copying, copies of documents from the Library of Congress and from private and state records and manuscript collections, and foreign documents. Documents removed from the War Department's Collection of Revolutionary War Manuscripts relating to naval affairs were added to this collection. Typed documents indicate that the original record was copied from loaned materials that were returned to the donor. Many documents have a stamp showing the name of the donor or a stamp showing it was published in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (Washington, DC: 1894-1922).

The documents relate mainly to specific occurrences or to conditions in particular areas during a short period of time. There are many records concerning movements of vessels, naval operations and engagements, intervention of U.S. naval vessels in foreign crises, and attacks on naval vessels and personnel. There are also reports on political, economic, and military conditions in certain locales, some of which were received from naval attachés. There are many records concerning occurrences and conditions in the North Atlantic and the Great Lakes. For the Revolutionary War period, there are mostly photostatic copies of documents copied during 1914 and 1915 from originals in manuscript collections in the States of Massachusetts, Virginia, and North Carolina.

In 1963 documents pertaining to the Confederate States Navy, 1861-65, were removed to form a separate series (see entry 501). The records for both the U.S. Navy, 1775-1910, and the Confederate States Navy, have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M625, Area File of the Naval Records Collection, 1775-1910. For a list of private donors, see entry 533.

501. Area File for the Confederate States Navy, 1861-65.
ca.1924-ca. 1929. 2 ft.

Arranged by geographical area (areas 4-8), and thereunder chronologically. For a description of the geographical areas, see Appendix H.

In 1963 documents pertaining to the Confederate States Navy were removed by the National Archives from areas 4-8 of the Area File for the U.S. Navy (see entry 500) in order to facilitate research. The original filing scheme of the documents removed was unchanged. The records include originals and copies of correspondence of the Confederate States Navy Department, naval and privateer officers, Army officers, the First Auditor and Secretary of the Treasury, and the War Department. Much of the correspondence relates to operations and engagements involving vessels of the Mississippi River, Mobile, James River, North Carolina, Charleston, and Savannah Squadrons and to activities of privateers and conditions at Mobile, Columbus, Pensacola, Galveston, and other ports. Area 4 includes records of Confederate activities in Europe. There are also such documents as contracts, vouchers, and receipts for vessel repair work; narratives of the recollections of naval officers; and orders to officers. These records have been reproduced as rolls 410-414 of NARA Microfilm Publication M625, Area File of the Naval Records Collection, 1775-1910. For a list of private donors, see entry 533.

502. Subject File of the U.S. Navy, 1775-1910.
ca. 1924-ca. 1946. 360 ft.

Arranged by subject according to an alphabetical classification scheme developed by the Office of Naval Records and Library. There are lists of private donors' papers in the file in entry 533. A list of the principal subdivisions of the file is in Appendix I.

Unbound records that did not fit into the filing scheme of the Area File (see entries 500 and 501) were placed in the Subject File by the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library. General naval policy, strategy, and administration of forces are the principal topics of documents selected for this file. The correspondence, reports, and other documents concern operations of vessels, naval commands, personnel, activities at U.S. and foreign navy yards and naval stations; naval and civilian personnel employed at these shore establishments and elsewhere in the Navy Department; logistics activities of the Department and its component offices and bureaus bearing directly on naval operations; activities of U.S. and foreign merchant vessels; and domestic and foreign governmental relationships affecting directly or indirectly U.S. naval operations and the conduct of American commerce.

The documents mainly consist of letters, memorandums, various kinds of reports (patrol reports, operation reports, investigative reports, etc.), bulletins, muster rolls, payrolls, returns, narratives, and directives, some of which were transferred to the Navy Department from the files of the War Department and of other executive departments. Most files came from component units of the Navy Department, such as from the Bureau of Navigation and the Bureau of Construction and Repair.

Private collections of papers, published articles, copies of documents in print, newspaper clippings, maps, charts, broadsides, drawings, ships' plans, and sketches were also added to the Subject File. Reference letters, memorandums, and reports prepared on topics requiring research in archival and published materials by the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library were frequently copied and placed in the file. However, much of this type of correspondence dated prior to 1920 was organized in the Biography or Personnel (Z-), Ships (ZC), Places (ZE), Operations (ZO), Sources of Historical Material (ZR) and Miscellaneous (ZW) files now in the custody of the Naval Historical Center of the Navy Department. Placed with this correspondence were originals and copies of contemporary records and manuscripts pertaining to the subjects discussed in the letters. Sometimes cross-references are found with the correspondence to documents in the Subject File, 1775-1910.

In 1963 documents pertaining to the Confederate States Navy were segregated to form a separate subject file and thus facilitate reference. This part of the original Subject File is described in entry 503. The records originally in Pensions and Pensioners (YA) (YI) (YS) (YV) and (YX) categories that were at one time part of the Subject File are now part of the Records of the Department of Veterans Affairs, Record Group 15.

503. Subject File for the Confederate States Navy, 1861-65.
ca. 1924-ca. 1929. 32 ft.

Arranged according to subject classification. For a list of the principal subdivisions, see Appendix J.

In 1963 documents pertaining to the Confederate States Navy in the Subject File for the U.S. Navy were segregated to form a separate file and thus facilitate reference. The original filing scheme of the documents removed was unchanged. Among the documents removed to form the new series were original correspondence, reports, drawings, vouchers, muster rolls and payrolls pertaining to personnel, medical supplies and equipment, shore establishments, construction of vessels, prisoners of war and operations of squadrons. In some cases, personal papers of particular Confederate naval officers were kept together under one subject designation. The papers of John M. Brooke and Catesby ap R. Jones were put in the category for naval ordnance, and the papers of Samuel Barron and George W. Gift were put in the category for operations.

The "Z," or history, files, formerly part of this series and now in the custody of the Naval Historical Center, include alphabetically arranged records on people, ships, and places. The National Archives transferred documents originally in the category Naval Policy (VN) to the War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Record Group 109. For a list of private donors to the Confederate Subject File, see entry 539. The records have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M1091, Subject File of the Confederate States Navy, 1861-65.

Collections, 1910-27

504. Chronology of Significant Events, August 1914-December 1918.
n.d. 6 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

Included on these 5- by 8-inch card entries are a description of the event, date on which it occurred, and sometimes a file reference, usually to the Subject File (see entry 520).

505. Index to Reports Relating to Non-Navy Ship Movements during World War I.
n.d. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by subject or name of ship.

References are to reports from U.S. consuls, naval intelligence, Canadian intelligence, etc. There are reference numbers at the upper right corner of the card to ship movement reports. These reports have not been identified.

506. Card Record of Merchant Vessel Movements and Inspections in U.S. Ports During World War I.
n.d. 6 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

Information contained includes name of vessel, nationality, rig, agent, "due" (date), "from" (port), cargo, (date) "arrived", and (place) "docked."

507. Card Record of German Vessels "Taken Over" by the U.S. Government and Armed.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

Information contained includes original and subsequent names of vessel, location (where interned), net tonnage, year built, length, beam, and depth, and date armed.

508. Carded History of Dirigibles, Seaplanes, Submarines, and Sub Chasers During World War I.
n.d. 1 ft.

Arranged by type of ship, and thereunder by name of ship.

For dirigibles, seaplanes, and submarines, the cards summarize records of collisions, groundings, fires, and other accidents. The cards for submarine chasers show the ships' movements. The source of information is sometimes given.

509. Card Record of Interred Vessels at Ports.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of port.

Information contained is name of vessel only. Ports are in the United States, Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, and the Philippines.

510. Index to Non-Navy Vessel Movement Reports, World War I.
n.d. 10 in.

Arranged alphabetically by ship.

The cards provide the name of ship and ship movement report number. The reports have not been identified.

511. List of Merchant Vessels Armed by the U.S. Navy.
Apr. 1917-Sept. 1919. 1/4 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

Photostatic copy of a list of 1,689 vessels for which the following information is provided: name of vessel; identification number assigned by the Bureau of Construction and Repair; vessel type; tonnage; name of former owner; nature of service; date on which vessel was commissioned, delivered, or taken over; disposition; and date of disposition.

512. Card Record of Merchant Seamen Casualties During World War I.
Aug. 1914-Nov. 1918. 5 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel

Information contained includes name of seaman, nationality, rank and duties, date of loss, name of vessel, locality of loss, address of seaman.

513. Miscellaneous Lists and Indexes for World War I.
n.d. 1 in.

For the most part, entries on the individual lists and indexes are arranged alphabetically.

Included on 3- by 5-inch and 5- by 8-inch cards are a list of subjects pertaining to World War I discussed in periodicals and other publications, a list of U.S. naval vessels employed during World War I, and a name index to correspondence designated "Vessels Various."

514. List of Names and Subjects Included in Documents in the Area and Subject Files for the Years 1917 and 1918.
n.d. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 5- by 8-inch card entries provide the name or subject and the date of the document, but they do not provide the Area File designation under which the document is filed in entry 525. A few documents included in the list were part of other files in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations.

515. Chronological Index to Cables and Messages in the Area and Subject Files.
Nov. 1, 1917-Jan. 21, 1918; July 1-Dec. 31, 1918. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These 5- by 8-inch cards provide the date and summary of incoming messages. In the right corner of many of the cards, there is a file citation for the Area or Subject File or a cable number.

516. Partial Name and Subject Index to Documents in Area and Subject Files.
n.d. 4 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 5- by 8-inch cards, mostly for documents of the World War I period, provide a description of the document, its file designation, and usually its date. Some cards provide references to publications or cable numbers.

517. Area File of the U.S. Navy, 1910-27.
1924-46. 128 ft. Arranged by geographic area and thereunder chronologically. See Appendix H for a description of the areas.

This artificially assembled series consists of letters, telegrams, radio messages, reports, and maps removed or copied from the records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, Bureau of Navigation, Office of Naval Intelligence, and other Navy Department offices. There are also records transferred from the Historical Section of London Headquarters of U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters. Most of the records relate to operations in the war in Europe and Russia. The documents relate mainly to specific occurrences or to conditions in particular areas during a short period of time.

518. Name and Subject Index to Subject File, 1911-27.
n.d. 5 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide the file designation under which the documents relating to the name or subject were filed.

519. Subject Index to Correspondence in the Subject File Relating to Operations, 1911-27.
n.d. 4 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards provide the file designations under which documents were filed.

520. Subject File of the U.S. Navy, 1910-27.
ca. 1924-46. 128 ft.

Arranged by subject according to an alphabetical classification scheme developed by the Office of Naval Records and Library. A list of the scheme is in Appendix I.

This artificially assembled series consist of letters, reports, cables, telegrams, maps, muster rolls, and other types of mostly unbound records. Most came from the files of component units of the Navy Department, particularly from the Bureau of Navigation, Bureau of Aeronautics (and predecessor aviation offices), and the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI). Removed from ONI's Central File and transferred to the Subject File in 1940 were 768 files of "significant" foreign intelligence reports submitted by naval attachés, other naval observers, and intelligence agents for the period immediately before, during, and after World War I. Titles of reports include the "Report of the British Committee on Loss of SS Titanic, 1912"; "European War, Naval Operations, Germany, 1915-22"; "British Naval Raid, Zeebruge and Ostend, 1915-25"; "U.S. building progressórecommendations of the General Board since 1900, 1922"; and "Military mission in Siberia, etc. 1918." A list ("Folders Received from O.N.I. Archives," 1940, 40 pp.) has been prepared by NARA showing the titles, original file designations, and the Subject File citations of the 768 files.

Included in the 1911-27 part of the file are documents received from the Historical Section at London Headquarters, U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, many of which were received at London following the Armistice from subordinate commands that were being deactivated in England, France, Italy, the Azores, and Gibraltar. Also added in were correspondence donated or loaned for copying by naval officers, private and state records and manuscripts collections, foreign governments, and citizens of foreign governments, and the official correspondence that formed a principal part of the London Historical Section's collection.

The Subject File, 1911-27, contains over 40 unpublished historical manuscripts, many of which were prepared by Navy and Marine Corps officers, concerning such topics as submarine warfare during 1914-18, U.S. intervention in Haiti in 1915, Thomas A. Edison and the work of the Navy Consulting Board during World War I, and the Marine Corps occupation of Tientsin during 1927-28. Histories of units and of naval districts that were prepared by officers and submitted to the Historical Section after World War I are also found in the series. Many of the histories include photographs of personnel and installations.

In the file for the 1911-27 period are the voluminous "U.S. Naval Vessels" files (OS) for 3,117 ships, boats, and other craft of the Navy, Bureau of Fisheries Coast Guard, Lighthouse Service, and Coast and Geodetic Survey; the files are arranged alphabetically by name of vessel. "Merchant Vessels" (SD) files for 6,480 U.S.- and foreign-owned vessels, also arranged alphabetically by name of vessel, are also included. The OS files contain data concerning the construction and commissioning of the vessels and vessels' complements; copies of correspondence exchanged between commanding officers of the vessels and their immediate superiors or between Navy Department units concerning the vessels; newspaper clippings and copies of press releases concerning the vessels; extracts from war diaries; copies of proceedings of investigations held by the Navy Department into vessels' activities; and sometimes cross-references to documents in other parts of the Subject File and in the Area File. The SD files include vessel applications for armed guards, correspondence concerning losses of vessels to the Germans and the condition of survivors, copies of communications between U.S. vessels or stations and foreign flag vessels, confidential sailing instructions issued by the Navy Department to U.S. and foreign vessels, troop transport information and voyage reports.

Most of the documents were assembled by the staff of the Office of Naval Records and Library during the period 1924-31. However, there are documents included in the file dated as late as 1946, some of which were apparently placed in the File by the staff of the Early Records Section of the Office of Naval Records and Library, a unit that was housed in the National Archives Building following the accessioning of the Naval Records Collection by the National Archives in 1942. At the end of this part of the file are oversized enclosures and exhibits that accompanied correspondence found elsewhere in the file.

521. Subject Index to Logistics File.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards give file designations under which documents were filed.

522. Logistics File, 1916-20.
ca. 1924-ca. 1931. 40 ft.

Arranged for the most part by subject or location according to a filing scheme devised by the Office of Naval Records and Library. The series was originally intended to cover the years 1911-27, but there are only a few documents for the years 1911-15 and not many for 1921-27. For a list of the principal subdivisions of the scheme, see Appendix K. For a subject index, see entry 520.

The file contains letters, memorandums, reports, and other documents selected primarily from the records of the Office of the Secretary of the Navy, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and the bureaus relating to measures taken to supply, equip, and provide personnel for vessels and stations preparing for active operations. The records also document the involvement of the U.S. Shipping Board and Emergency Fleet Corporation, General Board, Red Cross, and other units in these mobilization activities. There are additional records concerning preparation and maintenance of aircraft; experimentation with various forms of ordnance, including torpedoes and mines and illumination devices; the sale and salvage of naval vessels following World War I; hygiene and sanitation on ships and at stations; disposition of the dead; and the enlistment and discharge of naval personnel.

Compiled and Other Records Relating to Naval Service

523. Cards Concerning Revolutionary War Service and Imprisonment.
n.d. 1 ft.

There are three sets of cards, each arranged alphabetically by surname of individual.

Entries are on 3- by 8-inch cards captioned "War of the Revolution Navy and Privateer Records." The first set is for officers, men, and a few passengers of captured American vessels who were taken to Forton Prison in England. The information was taken from the "Journal of Forton Prison." The information in the second set was taken from Senate Executive Document No. 11, 37th Congress, 2d session, which pertains to money due to those who served under John Paul Jones. The third set of cards is for persons sent to the Old Mill Prison in England. The information was taken from volume 19 (1865) of the New England Historical and Genealogical Register and Charles Herbert's A Relic of the Revolution (Boston, 1847). The information given varies but may include prisoner's name, rank, vessel, and nationality or state of residence. For those who were imprisoned, there is information concerning their capture and imprisonment and sometimes the circumstances of leaving prison. For the second set there is information concerning the amount of prize money due.

524. List of American Vessels Captured, 1776-83.
n.d. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of captured vessel.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries include names of vessels, dates of capture, and sometimes the character of vessel (for example warship, brig, privateer, or private property), locations to which the prisoners were taken, residences of the crew, and other information. The information appears to have been taken from both printed and manuscript sources that are identified on the cards.

525. Service Records for the War of 1812.
n.d. 3 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 3- by 8-inch cards contain information on the service of officers and enlisted men that was copied from muster rolls (blue cards) and from payrolls and occasionally receipt rolls (salmon cards). The information varies considerably but may include rank, vessel, or station to which assigned; date of entry into service; date of starting current assignment; and monthly pay rate (on payroll cards). There is a separate card for each roll on which a man's name appeared, but the compilation does not appear to have progressed very far, and there are seldom more than a few cards for an individual.

526. Service Records for Officers of the Volunteer Union Navy, 1861-65.
n.d. 8 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of officer.

The information on these 3- by 8-inch cards appears to have been compiled from the "list of officers and clerks of vessels" (see entry 74). There is one card for each document from which the name was taken. The compilation work does not appear to have progressed very far, however, and there are few cards for an individual. It appears that information was collected from the lists of vessels for ships with names beginning with A-H. The information given varies but may include rank, vessel, location, commanding officer, date and state of birth, and other dates. The volume citation is also included.

527. Correspondence Concerning the Service of Officers and Enlisted Men of the Confederate States Navy.
1902-29. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of officer or enlisted man. There is no correspondence for the letters A and B.

Many of the letters sent and received by the Superintendent of the Library and Office of Naval War Records and, later, the Officer in Charge of the Office of Naval Records and Library concern veterans who were applying for pensions from southern state governments. Some wrote directly to the Navy Department for information documenting their service; others were represented by lawyers or Members of Congress. Some requests were made by state pension agencies and by veterans organizations. Frequently the records in which the requested information was found are cited in the letters of response.

Records Relating to the Acquisition and Publication of Documents in the Collection

Records Relating to Donors

528. Register of Officers' Private Papers Received.
Apr.1883-Apr. 1890. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged alphabetically by surname of officer.

Entries give name and rank of officer, date of receipt, file number of transmittal letter, date and file number of letter of return if applicable, and a page number in an unidentified index volume.

529. "Briefing Book" for Letters to Officers Regarding Donations.
1889-92. 1 vol.

Arranged by surname of officer in rough order by rank. There is a name index.

Entries include names of officers and relatives and digests of letters and replies. There is no information for many of the officers.

530. Register of Correspondents Kept by Hardin B. Littlepage.
ca. 1889. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of correspondent.

Littlepage entered in the register the names and addresses of former Confederate naval officers, their families, and others whom he contacted for papers that could be donated or loaned for copying for publication in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (Washington, DC 1894-1922). He also briefly noted the responses he received and indicated dates and places of deaths of correspondents.

531. Register of Letters Received From Officers in Reply to a Circular of December 1, 1904.
1904-07. 1 in. 1 vol.

Arranged by surname of officer. There is a name index and a list of persons to whom circulars were sent. The circular requested donations of personal papers.

532. List of Private Letter Books and Other Personal Papers Loaned and Later Transferred to the Office ("Ex-Loans").
ca. 1931. 7 in.

Arranged by name of officer to whom the letter book or personal papers originally belonged.

These 3- by 5-inch card entries usually include the name (and sometimes the address) of the donor, a description of the material, and the dates of the papers. Sometimes noted is the disposition of the material by the Office of Naval Records and Library; notations that the loaned material could not be found appear on some cards.

533. Lists of Donors of Private Papers.
n.d. 3 in.

The first list is arranged by type of donation (through the Navy Foundation or directly by naval officers or private individuals), and thereunder by title of series in which placed. The other list is arranged alphabetically by surname of donor.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide the date on which the item was transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library and, in the case of manuscripts, the designation under which it was filed in the Area or Subject File (entries 500 and 503).

Records Relating to Publications

534. Congressional Documents, 1798-1824.
n.d. 4 ft. 30 vols.

Arranged in rough chronological order with gaps. There are subject indexes in some volumes.

The series consists principally of printed copies of reports and other documents submitted to the Congress by the Secretary of the Treasury and other Treasury Department officials, the Secretary of the Navy, the Secretary of War, the President, the Secretary of State, commissioners of the Navy Pension Fund, and other officials. There are annual reports and special reports concerning such subjects as impressment of American seamen in the British Navy, relations with and disbursements to Barbary States, naval contracts, sale and survey of public lands, collection of customs, tonnage of shipping, patents for inventions, receipts and disbursements of funds. These documents appear to have been used during the 1930s in connection with preparing documentary publications concerning the early American Navy such as Naval Documents Related to the Quasi-War Between the United States and France (1935-38) and Naval Documents Related to the United States Wars With the Barbary Powers (1939-44). There are some annotations indicating that few of the documents were selected for publication.

535. Registers of Records Relating to the Civil War, 1861-65.
1885-1908. 12 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by type or source of record, such as "communications from stations" or "squadron reports." There is a printed index at the beginning of each volume.

These registers show records relating to the Civil War transferred to the Naval Records Office from the Office of the Secretary of the Navy for publication in the Official Records (see above). The registers show volume numbers and locations for each category of records.

536. Registers of Civil War Papers Received From Naval Officers or Their Heirs.
1885-1908. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by officer's surname. There is an alphabetical index at the beginning of the first volume.

Registers contain notations as to what records were printed in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above), with remarks on verification of copied passages, parts of records copied, and suitability of records for copying, and with initials of various clerks engaged in compiling the Official Records.

537. Lists of Confederate Documents, 1861-65.
Jan. 15, 1892-Nov. 25, 1908. 7 vols. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part by collection and thereunder chronologically.

The first volume describes personal papers of Confederate officers. The second volume describes naval records in the War Department's Collection of Confederate Records. The remaining volumes describe records in Navy Department collections. Entries give descriptions and dates of specific documents for publication in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above).

538. Register of Congressional Designees, Navy and Marine Corps Officers, and Other Private Individuals Receiving Copies of Volumes 1-14, Series 1, of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above).
1894. 4 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by class of correspondent and thereunder alphabetically. Names of members of Congress are arranged by state.

Entries provide the name and post office address of the recipient, the numbers of the volumes sent, and the number of copies of each volume number sent; a few entries for later numbered volumes are included.

539. Lists of Corrections Made to the Text and Indexes of Volumes 1-10 and 14-18, Series 1, of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion. (See above).
ca. 1894-1904. 4 in.

Arranged by volume number.

540. Correspondence Relating to the U.S. Revenue Cutter Service and U.S. Coast Survey, 1860-65.
1903-Aug. 7, 1905. 3 vols. 2 in.

One volume has press copies; the second has carbon copies of the same letters pertaining to the Revenue Cutter Service. The third volume contains typed copies pertaining to the Coast Survey. Each volume is arranged chronologically with name and subject indexes.

In the press copy volume is a note that says that copies of this correspondence were sent to the Department of the Interior on August 7, 1905. Most of the correspondence is between the Secretary of the Treasury and the Secretary of the Navy and concerns the transfer of Revenue Service vessels to the Navy during the Civil War and relations between Revenue Service vessels and naval vessels forming the blockade off the Virginia coast.

The volume for the Coast Survey contains lists of officers and vessels of the Coast Survey that served with the Navy during the Civil War, extracts from annual reports of the Survey, and copies and extracts of letters and reports chiefly from commanders of squadrons commending the services rendered by the Coast Survey. The volume was prepared by the Coast and Geodetic Survey, then in the Treasury Department, and presented to the Navy Department in 1903.

In 1914 the Office of Naval Records and Library published the information in these volumes in Correspondence of the Cooperation of the Navy with the Revenue Cutter Service and Coast Survey. This publication was approved by the Pension Office in 1914. It was probably used for pension regulations about Civil War service in the Revenue Cutter Service and Coast Survey.

541. Catalog of Bound Volumes in the Naval Records Collection.
ca. 1924. 6 ft.

Arranged in three subseries. The first is arranged chronologically by beginning date of volume. The second is arranged by class according to a system devised by the Office of Naval Records and Library, in which logs and journals were cataloged under class 1 and volumes containing muster rolls, payrolls, and records pertaining to personnel were placed under class 2. The third subseries is arranged according to series title assigned by the Office of Naval Records and Library.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries include date of volume and a citation of the series to which it belongs. Some of the entries in the first subseries are stamped "microfilmed," a notation that may have been added in 1943, when the Navy Department microfilmed for security purposes some of the records in the collection for the period 1807-86. The card entries for the second subseries frequently include the number of the class to which the volume was assigned, the name of the donor and the date received by the office, and sometimes the date on which the volume was returned to its owner.

542. Register of Vessels Acquired by the U.S. and Confederate Navies, 1861-65.
n.d. 3 vols. 9 in.

Arranged by U.S. or Confederate Navy and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel. There are indexes to names of vessels in the volumes. There are remarks concerning repairs as late as 1889.

Entries include such information as class, rate, type of construction, propulsion, speed, draft, number of engines and boilers, type of guns, length, beam, depth, tonnage, circumstances of acquisition and disposal, name of builder, place where built, cost, date of commission, previous name, and repairs. The entries for Union vessels are more nearly complete than those for Confederate vessels. For Confederate vessels there is also a section concerning prize vessels like that for Union prizes described in entry 539. The information in these volumes was gathered during the preparation of the lists of and statistical data on U.S. and Confederate vessels for inclusion in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above).

543. Register of Prize Vessels Captured by the U.S. Navy During the Civil War.
n.d. 3 in. 1 vol.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by name of vessel. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries include information concerning the rigging, tonnage, construction, draft, speed, number of engines and boilers, type of propulsion, length, depth, tons of coal carried, cargo, nationality, name of capturing vessel, place and time of capture, and distribution of the prize money. For many vessels none of this information has been entered, and for others only a small part has been recorded. The information was used in preparing lists of and statistical data on U.S. and Confederate vessels for inclusion in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above). A similar register for Confederate prizes is in one of the volumes described in entry 539.

544. List of Geographical Place Names Cited in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above).
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically.

Given for each place are its location and the source of this information. Also in the volume is a register of captured Confederate vessels.

545. Distribution List for the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (see above)..
n.d. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by surname or title of recipient.

546. List of the Manuscripts for the Period 1782-1864 Found in Classes "1," "2," and "3," of the Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library.
n.d. 1 in.

Arranged numerically by class.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries include brief descriptions of the manuscripts and their dates. Class 1 refers to logs, Class 2 refers to miscellaneous records, and Class 3 refers to operational records.

Copied Records Relating to the Early Navy

547. List of Nathaniel Shaw Papers.
n.d. 1 in.

Typewritten list of the records described in entry 548, arranged in the same order as the records.

548. Selected Papers of Nathaniel Shaw, 1775-82.
ca. 1930. 12 rolls microfilm.

Arranged in rough order by type of record, and thereunder chronologically.

Included are letters received, letters sent, bills for supplies and work performed, receipts for prize money, lists of seamen, and depositions pertaining to prize case proceedings. Shaw was a New London merchant and Continental agent during the Revolution. Correspondents included other merchants, Continental and state officials, and military and naval officers including the Continental Marine Committee, Board of Admiralty, Continental agents, Continental Navy Board at Boston, Robert Morris, and Esek Hopkins. The records relate to such subjects as shipment and sale of goods, procurement of military and naval supplies, British Army and Navy operations, equipment of American warships and privateers, activities of American privateers, prize cases, and preparations for the Penobscot expedition (see entry 556). There are some records of Thomas Shaw, Nathaniel's brother, particularly after Nathaniel's death in 1782 when Thomas served as executor of his estate. These records consist of microfilm made about 1930 from originals in the Yale University Library.

549. Letters Received by the Committee of Safety of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, March-May 1775.
Dec. 1, 1914. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically. At the beginning of the volume is a list of cities and towns from which letters were received.

These negative photostats were made in December 1914 from the original volume in the Massachusetts Revolutionary Archives. There are letters from select men and committees of Massachusetts towns, the Rhode Island Legislature, and such prominent individuals as John Hancock and Timothy Pickering, primarily concerning requests for troops, boats, and supplies for protection against the British and persons recommended for military appointments.

550. Correspondence of Esek Hopkins, Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy, Oct. 1775-Oct. 1777.
n.d. 3 vols. 3 in.

The first two volumes are divided into letters received, letters sent, and miscellaneous papers. Thereunder they are arranged for the most part chronologically. A typed name and subject index in the first volume covers both volumes. The third volume, arranged for the most part chronologically, contains letters, reports, and orders sent that overlap with and partially duplicate those in the second volume. It also has a typed name and subject index.

The photostatic copies made from originals in the Rhode Island Historical Society. Included is correspondence with the Continental Congress, state governors, commanders of Continental vessels, and other naval officers. The miscellaneous papers include accounts, naval signals, and court-martial proceedings.

551. Journal of the Privy Council of Virginia, July-Dec. 1776 ("Virginia Journal of the General Assembly").
ca. 1914-ca. 1915. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are missing pages throughout the volume.

The photostatic copy was prepared about 1914-15 and consists of daily entries documenting the daily proceedings of the Privy Council, also known as the Council of State. Actions of the council were principally orders that warrants be issued for pay of military and naval personnel and that military and naval supplies be purchased. There are a few copies of instructions to military and naval officers and receipts for issuances of permits to persons and vessels for the export of goods.

552. Minutes of the Massachusetts Board of War, Nov. 1776-July 1781.
ca. 1914-ca. 1915. 5 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the first four volumes.

The photostatic copies, prepared during 1914-15, document daily proceedings of the board and consist mainly of orders issued by the board concerning purchases and delivery of military supplies, orders that accounts be paid, and orders that specify the rates of pay of carpenters, blacksmiths, armorers, and other artisans.

553. Summaries of Prize Cases Brought in the Massachusetts Middle District Maritime Court, Jan. 1777-Apr. 1780.
1915. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Name index to vessels in middle of volume.

The series consists of summaries of cases brought by owners, officers, and crews of vessels that captured prize vessels and cargo belonging to subjects of Great Britain. The summaries include the following information: the date on which the "libel" or grievance was brought, the name of the plaintiffs and the nature of their grievance, the relief being sought (usually the condemnation and sale of the prize vessel or cargo), the verdict of the jury, and the decree granted by the judge.

These summaries were copied in April 1915 from volume 159 of the Maritime Manuscripts (Prize Cases) in the Massachusetts Revolutionary Archives at the Boston State House. No summaries are included for the year 1778.

554. Order Book of Josiah Fletcher, Adjutant of Col. John Jacobs First Massachusetts State Foot Regiment ("Cavendish Regiment"), May-Dec. 1778.
ca. 1914-ca. 1915. 1 in. 1 vol.

Arranged in two sections by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

This photostatic copy was made about 1914-15 from an original at one time in the custody of the Redwood Library of Newport, RI. The first and main part of the volume consists of general, brigade, and regimental orders issued during the period May-December 1778 at various locations in Rhode Island and Massachusetts. They relate to troop movements, erection of gun batteries, patrols by American "watch boats," appointment of officers of the day, and the issuance of supplies. The second part of the volume contains mainly regimental returns for the period May-December 1778, which include the names of officers and men in each company.

555. Lists of Prize Shares of Seamen Who Served on the BonHomme Richard, Pallas, and Vengeance in 1779.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

There are two lists. One is for Americans and persons of various nationalities who served on the Bonhomme Richard and some of those who served on the other two vessels. It is arranged by vessel and thereunder by rank. The second is only for French seamen who served on the Bonhomme Richard; it is arranged by rank. There is a typed name index.

The photostatic copies were made from manuscript copies in the Library of Congress signed by John Paul Jones, who attested that he had the originals. The lists, written in French in 1785, indicate the amount of prize money due each officer and crew member.

556. Massachusetts Records Pertaining to the Penobscot Expedition, July-December 1779.
Feb. 1915. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged in three parts by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

This photostatic copy of a volume of the Massachusetts Revolutionary Archives, made in February 1915, consists, mainly of "Orders of Council respecting the Penobscot Expedition," July 1-August 26, 1779; copies of general orders certified by the expedition's adjutant general, Jeremiah Hill, July 21-August 13, 1779; and depositions of participating military and naval officers concerning the military and naval operations made before a court of inquiry into the causes of the failure of the expedition against British forces in Maine. Among the depositions are those of Capt. Dudley Saltonstall of the Continental Navy and Lt. Col. Paul Revere, in charge of the expedition's artillery.

557. Letters Sent by Robert Morris as Agent of Marine, 1781-84.
n.d. 2 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a typewritten name and subject index in each volume and an introduction prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library in the first volume.

These are photostatic copies from originals at the U.S. Naval Academy. During the period covered by these letters Morris was both Agent of Marine and Superintendent of Finance; but the letters relate primarily to his duties as Agent of Marine, such as fitting out of ships, settling claims and accounts, selling ships too expensive to operate during peacetime, and raising money to support the Navy. Addressees include Navy agents, shipbuilders, merchants, tax receivers, state governors, U.S. ministers and consuls to foreign countries, and foreign bankers.

558. Chart of U.S. Movements in the Mediterranean, 1804-5.
n.d. 4 items.

These are manuscript and photostatic copies of a chart showing movements of U.S. naval ships in the Mediterranean, September 1804-May 1805 given to the Office of Naval Records and Library by the Library of Congress in August 1939.

Records Acquired From Other Executive Departments, 1794-1903

War Department Records

559. Letters Sent by the War Department Relating to Naval Matters.
Jan. 3, 1794-June 14, 1798. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume contains a manuscript name and subject index prepared contemporaneously with the records and a typewritten name and subject index prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library. There are a few letters dated earlier than 1794.

Included are letters from the Secretary of War to Navy agents, naval constructors, superintendents (captains) of frigates being constructed, the Secretary of the Treasury, other officials, and others concerning such subjects as designs and models for frigates, constructing and equipping them, procurement of labor and equipment, estimates of cost, and selection and appointment of officials. These letters have been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M739, Letters Sent by the War Department Relating to Naval Matters, January 3, 1794-June 14, 1798. For other letters sent by the Secretary of War concerning naval matters, see entries 4 and 535.

560. Ledger of Accounts for Supplies and Equipment at Navy Yards.
Dec. 1794-Mar. 1800. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by type of account.

Some of the accounts show the amounts and kinds of supplies and equipment received and issued for individual clerks and constructors at the navy yards at Portsmouth (NH), Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Portsmouth (VA). There are also "General Accounts of Naval Stores," arranged alphabetically by initial letter of item being accounted for.

561. Returns for Supplies Issued and Received at Navy Yards.
Dec. 31, 1794-Jan. 20, 1801. 1 in. 1 vol.

Arranged chronologically.

The monthly statements identify the recipient and the issuer, quantities and types of supplies or equipment issued, and the dates of transactions.

562. Letters Sent by the War Department to Superintendent of Military Stores Samuel Hodgon and Military Storekeeper John Harris Concerning Naval Supplies and Equipment.
May 13, 1795-July 26, 1798. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume contains a typewritten name and subject index and a chronologically arranged register prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library.

Most of the letters sent by Secretaries of War Timothy Pickering and James McHenry gave orders to deliver sheet copper, lead, cloth, nails, guns, and uniform clothing for the Marine guard and other items to the yards at which frigates were under construction.

563. Register of Estimated Requirements for Military Supplies.
Jan. 1796-Feb. 1805. 1 vol. 1 1/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. Indexed.

The register was kept by Samuel Hodgdon and William Irvine at the U.S. Arsenal, Philadelphia.

564. Receipt Book of John Harris, Storekeeper of Military Supplies, Philadelphia.
Aug. 1796-Apr. 1799. 4 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volumes contain autograph signatures of persons receiving supplies.

565. Daybook of Military and Naval Supplies Received and Delivered at Philadelphia.
Jan. 1797-May 1801. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

566. Ledger of Military and Naval Supplies Received and Delivered at Philadelphia and of Clothing Received.
Jan. 1797-May 1801 and Jan. 1826-Sept. 1831. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by types of supplies.

567. Letters Sent by the Office of the Purveyor of Public Supplies.
May 1800-June1802. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index in the back of the volume.

568. Summaries and Copies of Orders Received by the Office of the Purveyor of Public Supplies ("Memorandum Book").
Jan. 1801-May 1808. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

569. Receipt Book of Robert Jones, Storekeeper of Military Supplies.
May 1801-Feb. 1802. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

570. Register of Receipts and Disbursements of Powder for Military and Naval Use.
July 1805-June 1814. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged in two parts. One side of the volume ("Military Side") was used by the Military Storekeeper at Philadelphia; the other ("Naval Side"), by the Naval Storekeeper at Philadelphia.

Treasury Department Records

571. Registers of Pay Officers Who Executed Bonds.
Mar. 1809-Oct. 1865. 2 vols. 3 in.

The first volume, started by the Second Comptroller and transferred to the Fourth Auditor in 1854, covers the period March 1809-October 1865 and is arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname and thereunder chronologically. The second volume, which partially duplicates the first, covers the period July 1861-October 1865 and is arranged by initial letter of surname, thereunder by rank, and thereunder chronologically.

Entries in both volumes include date of bond, name of officer, office or rank (purser, naval storekeeper, navy agent, navy pension agent, or Navy or Marine Corps paymaster or assistant paymaster), names of sureties, and the amount of the bond.

572. Notes on Fiscal Matters Affecting the Navy.
ca. 1850-ca. 1864. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by subject. There are name and subject indexes in the volumes. Included are references to documents dated as early as 1819.

This compilation by two clerks in the Second Comptroller's Office apparently was used for reference when reviewing accounts. It includes extracts of and references to official correspondence; notes on decisions made by the Second Comptroller, acts of Congress, and Navy regulations; and copies of office rules. Among the subjects dealt with are pensions, pension agents, teamsters, retained pay, servants, furloughs, bounties, recruits, and the Mexican War.

573. Register of Letters Sent From the Warrant Desk.
July 1, 1853-Dec. 1861. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries include the date of the letter, addressee, sometimes address, and a brief summary of its content. Money appropriated for the Navy Department was disbursed by warrant from the Secretary of the Treasury to the Treasurer.

State Department Records

574. Indexes to Correspondence Concerning Applications For Letters of Marque, 1812-15.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by type of index.

The volume contains an index arranged alphabetically by state, an index to initial letter of names of vessels and an index to initial letters of names of owners, masters, and others named in the first five volumes of correspondence described in entry 575. The index does not appear to be complete.

575. Correspondence Concerning Applications Received by Customs Collectors for Letters of Marque and Reprisal.
1812-15. 6 vols. 2 ft.

Divided into three groupings, two of which are arranged for the most part in rough alphabetical order by name of customs district. The third, which may consist of letters missed in the original binding, has no alphabetical sequence, but most letters for one district are together.

The first alphabetical grouping (two volumes) consists chiefly of letters from applicants and abstracts of commissions issued. The second grouping includes letters from the collectors to the Secretary of State referring applications that they were not authorized to approve, transmitting abstracts, reporting that no commissions had been issued, and requesting blank forms. There are some copies of letters sent by the Secretary to the collectors. The last volume has the same kinds of documents as the first five.

576. Lists of Enemy Aliens, New York City.
Mar.-July 1813. 1 vol. 1/2 in

There are two lists: one is arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname, and thereunder chronologically; the other is arranged chronologically. The year is not stated, but it seems probable that they were prepared in 1813.

The first list is identified as being of alien enemies reported by the U.S. marshal at New York City. Entries give permit number, name of alien, height, complexion, color of hair and eyes, place of residence, occupation, date, and name of person recommending the alien. The second list is of enemy aliens removed from New York City. Entries give name; height and age; color of skin, eyes, and hair; date removed; and place to which transferred. This volume may originally have been part of the "War of 1812 Papers" of the Department of State.

577. Register of Persons Considered for Removal From the Atlantic Coast.
May-July 1813. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname and thereunder chronologically by date of order.

A note on the front cover states that the volume lists persons "whose requests for indulgence were granted or rejected. They were not suspects but persons who were removed from the coast because of their nativity, etc." If the indulgence was rejected, the person had to leave the Atlantic coast. If it was granted, sometimes he could remain where he was. At other times he had to move some distance. There is no indication of who issued the orders or compiled the register. Entries give persons name and residence, notation of action taken on indulgence, date of order, place to which removed if applicable, and remarks, which usually include reason for removal or granting of indulgence. The volume may originally have been part of the "War of 1812 Papers" of the Department of State.

Records Acquired From Foreign Sources, 1775-1915

578. Rough Draft of a Biography of Adm. Sir George Byng for the Period 1691-1702.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

This draft of unknown authorship is an incomplete biography of George Byng (later Viscount Torrington) that was received by the Navy Department Library on August 22, 1889. It covers the period during which Byng served as a captain in the British Navy under Adm. Edward Russell.

579. "Collection of Autographs, Letters, and Miscellany Pertaining to the British Navy, 1719-1849."
n.d. 1 vol. 4 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order with gaps. There is a typewritten name index.

This volume, resembling a scrapbook, was presented to the Navy Department Library in 1898. It is composed of letters and other documents signed by personnel of the British Navy and Admiralty that were collected for their signatures rather than for their subject content.

580. Newspapers, 1733-1936.
n.d. 8 in.

Divided into four groups: English and Irish newspapers, 1733-1811; U.S. newspapers, 1773 and 1800-50; U.S. newspapers, 1855-1936; and mostly Pacific Ocean newspapers, 1869-99.

These newspapers, most of which contain articles on important national or international events involving or having an effect on the U.S. Navy, were presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library by naval officers. The largest group is the English and Irish newspapers, which includes copies of the Dublin Journal, the St. James Chronicle, the London Packet, and the Hibernian Journal. Other newspapers include the Washington Evening Star, the National Intelligence, Harpers Weekly, the Fiji Times, Freedom (Manila), and the Hong Kong Telegraph.

581. Logs of British Vessels.
Dec. 1775-Mar. 1899. 25 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically by earliest date of log or logs for a vessel. Individual logs are arranged chronologically.

Included are original logs and copies of logs or parts of logs for HMS Liverpool, 1775-76; Roebuck, 1776; Fowey, 1776; Orpheus, 1776; Kingfisher, 1776; Ceres, 1797-98; Calypso, 1799-1800; Furieuse, 1812; Duke of Montrose, 1813; Wolfe, 1813; Magicienne, 1817-19; Surprise, 1817-19; Pevensey, 1864; Sophia, 1862; Lucilene, 1893-98; and the Arctic voyages of Capt. William Scoresby, Sr., 1786-1822. They primarily give data on weather conditions, wind direction, course steered, and speed of ship. The Scoresby logs were kept during 14 voyages to the Arctic around Spitsbergen and Greenland.

582. Copies of Selkirk Family Correspondence and Other Records Concerning Raid of John Paul Jones on St. Mary's Isle, Scotland, 1778-1791.
1904-5. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, with gaps. There is a table of contents.

These typewritten copies were received by the Secretary of the Navy in 1905 from a naval attaché in London, who in turn had received them from Capt. John Hope, grandson of the Earl of Selkirk. They consists chiefly of correspondence of Earl and Lady Selkirk with each other, relatives, the British Postmaster General, and John Paul Jones. They relate to Jones's raids on St. Mary's Isle and on Whitehaven, England, on April 23, 1778, and the battle between the Ranger and the British warship Drake the next day. There are also copies of contemporary newspaper accounts of Jones's activities, an inventory of plate taken from the Selkirk home, and extracts from the log of the Ranger, April 23-May 8, 1778. At the beginning of the volume are Navy Department correspondence concerning the acquisition of these records and notes concerning the genealogy of the Selkirk family and the identity of correspondents.

583. Letters Sent by the British Navy Board.
Nov. 23, 1784-June 15,1790. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

This letter book, presented to the Navy Department in 1904, contains letters sent on behalf of the Navy Board (Commissioners of the Navy) by the board' secretary to pursers, carpenters, naval storekeepers, clerks of navy yards and of officers, naval officers, collectors of customs, merchants, and other private individuals. Most of the letters concern the payment of wages and bounties, settlement of accounts by naval personnel, requests for leave and transfers, and the procurement of supplies for naval installations.

584. Documents ("Pieces Justificatives") Pertaining to the Service of John Paul Jones in the Russian Navy, 1788-89.
n.d. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically and numbered in sequence.

These negative photostats of documents written in French appear to have been part of Jones's journal of his Russian service. They consists mainly of copies and abstracts of correspondence between Jones, Prince Potemkin, Prince Nassau-Siegen, and Russian military and naval officers concerning Jones's service as a Russian rear admiral of a Black Sea command during the war between Russia and Turkey in 1788. Also included are copies of orders issued to Jones and sworn declarations concerning his conduct made by naval officers serving under him. The copies were made for the Navy Department Library from papers loaned by Charles T. Gallagher and later deposited in the library of the Masonic Temple in Boston.

585. Orders and Other Records of Capt. Frank Sotheron of the Royal Navy.
Mar. 6, 1793-Jan. 1824. 4 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by time period, and thereunder by type of record.

These volumes were received by the Navy Department in 1888. There are two volumes of orders covering 1793-97 and 1797-99, respectively. In the order books, incoming orders start at the beginning of the volume and continue toward the middle. Orders issued by Captain Sotheron start at the last page of the volume and continue toward the middle of the volume, upside down. Most of the incoming orders were from his squadron commander. There is an account book listing expenses and monies paid. There are also sailing directions compiled by various British naval officers addressed to Captain Sotheron. The directions and soundings are for Monaco, the coast of Italy and the islands of Sicily and Sardinia, 1806.

Captain Sotheron's ship mistakenly fired on the American ship Aurora during the Quasi-War with France.

586. Customs Clearance Permit Issued at Antigua, British West Indies, for the Schooner Dolphin.
Mar. 4, 1796. 1 item.

This permit was acquired from the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts historical collection at the library of the Naval Supply Command in 1969.

587. Records Concerning Prize Case of Horatio Lord Nelson.
1801-2. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by type of document. There is a typed table of contents.

Included are a brief for the plaintiff; memorials of Lord Keith, the Earl of St. Vincent, and Nelson; opinions handed down in the case; and supplementary documents containing notes and summaries. Nelson brought the case against Prize Agent Benjamin Tucker to obtain the senior officer's proceeds of the Spanish prizes El Thetis and Santa Brigida. Conflicting claims were made by the Earl of St. Vincent and Lord Keith.

588. Registers of American and French Prisoners of War Held by the British at Halifax, Barbados, and Jamaica.
Nov. 1805-Mar. 1815. 3 vols. 4 in.

Entries are arranged by location and thereunder by date of imprisonment and numbered in order.

These registers were presented to the Navy Department Library in 1904. For Halifax for the period before the War of 1812, there are entries for French prisoners taken from French prizes. Only American prisoners during the War of 1812 are entered in the registers for Barbados and Jamaica. Entries include number of prisoner, ship by which captured, date and location of capture, name and type of prize vessel, name of prisoner, rank, date and vessel from which received, and information concerning circumstances of leaving prison (death, discharge, exchange, or escape).

589. Notebook of Heinrich Christian Schumacher.
ca. 1809-ca. 1811. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by type of information.

The volume, copied in French and German, contains excerpts from publications and summaries of Professor Schumacher's readings about mathematics and astronomy. The German mathematician and astronomy professor gave the volume to one of his students, a Dr. Sonntag, who accompanied Dr. Elisha Kane as an astronomer on the Arctic expedition of 1853-55. Sonntag made notes in the volume on thermometer and barometer readings taken in the Arctic. It was presented to the Navy Department Library by Dr. H. C. Yarrow in March 1903.

590. Copy of Register of U.S. Prisoners of War Held at Quebec, 1813-15.
1923. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically by date of imprisonment and numbered in order.

This typewritten copy was prepared from the original in the National Archives of Canada. The copying was done under the auspices of the National Society of United States Daughters of 1812, and the volume was presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1923. It is similar in content to the registers described in entry 587, but it also includes information concerning the prisoners' place of birth, age, height, weight, complexion, color of hair and eyes, distinguishing marks or wounds, and supplies and clothing furnished.

591. War of 1812 British Naval Manuscripts Copied for Capt. Alfred T. Mahan.
n.d. 6 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged in rough order by a combination of subject and chronology, with gaps. There is a table of contents in each volume.

These manuscripts (except possibly the Canadian volume) were presented to the Navy Department Library by Captain Mahan in September 1905. Apparently those in five volumes were copied from originals in the British Public Record Office and in the other, in the Canadian National Archives. Included are letters, reports, orders, proceedings of courts-martial, and other records relating mostly to the war of 1812, particularly the British expedition against New Orleans and courts-martial held on British vessels on Lake Erie and Lake Champlain.

592. Scientific Journal of Sir William Burroughs.
Apr. 1816-Oct. 1818. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. This journal of Burroughs, a judge of the Supreme Court of Bengal, consists of his notes on astronomical observations, experimentations, and calculations. It was presented to the Hartwell Library in March 1857 by Adm. Smyth Lee and was later given to the Navy Department Library.

593. Miscellaneous Records.
1831-1915. 2 vols. 6 in.

There are reports in French on chain devices to prevent recoil of capstan developed in the French Navy, 1831 (1 vol.); an English translation of an excerpt on "public international maritime law" from the Marine Almanach of Poland, 1900 (1 vol.); and target reports and instructions in German for uses of various mechanisms on the Austrian battleship Zrinyi, 1911-15.

594. Logs of the German Merchant Vessel Rhaetia.
1882-98. 22 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by type of log and thereunder chronologically.

There are an engine log, April 1883-May 1884; navigation and engine logs, May 1889-May 1898, with gaps; and a volume ("Dampfkessel-Concessions-Urkunde"), in which is recorded data on engine boilers, 1882-92. Sometimes there are rough logs that cover the same time periods as the final logs. The Rhaetia was purchased by the U.S. Navy in 1898 and became the USS Cassius, which was later sold to the Army to become the transport Sumner.

595. Report on Results of Danish Tests of Armor Plated Target.
Apr. 30, 1883. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

There is a table of contents.

English translation of a report on tests conducted by the Ordnance Select Committee on the island of Amager, March 16-20, 1883. It consists of a narrative description of the tests, tables, and drawings. It was sent to State Department by the U.S. Consulate at Copenhagen in May and received by the Navy Department Library in August 1883.

596. Combined Crew Lists and Cruising Reports of Spanish Commercial Vessels.
1887-98. 10 vols. 8 in.

Arranged by name of vessel. There are lists and reports written in Spanish for the Ventura, 1887-98; Paz, 1891-98; Isabel, 1892-98; Dichosa, 1894-98; Guadalupe, 1894-98; Julia, 1896-98; Paquete de Arecibo, 1896-98; Joven Clara, 1897-98; Beatriz, 1897-98; and Aquidillana, 1897-98. Most of the vessels were of Puerto Rican registry.

Each volume is divided into two parts. The entries in the first part, which is the crew list, include enlistee's name, place of birth, age, nature of services, date of enlistment, and date of landing after each cruise. The entries in the second part, the cruising report, usually include dates of arrival and departure of the vessel at each port entered. Port officials often stamped the reports.

597. Compilation of Acts, Decisions, Orders, and Circular Letters of the Augustinian Province of San Nicolas de Tolentino, Philippine Islands.
Aug. 1887-May 1897. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

This volume, written in Spanish, was transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1926.

598. Logs of the Spanish Naval Cruiser Cristobal Colon.
Jun. 13, 1897-July 3, 1898. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. One volume has entries for even days; the other, for odd days.

The ship was on a voyage from Genoa to Cuba. The Cristobal Colon was destroyed in the Battle of Santiago, July 3, 1898.

599. Log of the Spanish Naval Transport Manila.
July 11, 1897-Apr. 25, 1898. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The Manila was captured at Cavite on May 1, 1898.

600. Legal and Fiscal Records of the Provincial Government at Puerto Princesa, Philippine Islands.
Dec. 1898-Apr. 1901. 7 vols. 7 in.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder chronologically.

Puerto Princesa was the seat of the government for the province of Paragua (now Palawan) and later Calamiane and Paragua. The records include proceedings, December 1898-October 1900; acts, official letters, and circulars, May 1899-March 1901; and a cashbook, registers, a census of taxpayers, and a list concerning receipts and disbursements, July 1899-April 1901. The records, all in Spanish, are for the period just after the United States took possession of the Philippine Islands from Spain.

601. Deck Log of the German Merchant Vessel Nicaria.
Jan. 28, 1907-Jan. 19, 1908. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The Nicaria was seized by the U.S. Government at Southport, NC, on May 8, 1917. It was transferred to the Navy the following month and commissioned as the Pensacola on October 8, 1917. This log was found behind an old desk on the Pensacola in December 1924. For other logs of seized vessels, see entry 296.

602. Excerpts From the War Diary of the German Submarine U-20, Apr. 30-May 13, 1915.
1924. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are photostatic copies of pages of the original log in the War Archives of the German Navy and an English translation that were presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1924. Included are a few copies of maps. The U-20 attacked and sank the Lusitania on May 7, 1915.

Records Acquired From Private Sources in the United States, 1775-1908

Correspondence

603. Letter books of U.S. Naval Officers, March 1778-July 1908.
1798-1930. 437 vols. 47 ft.

Arranged by officer or by command, ship, or station in chronological order by date of earliest letter. Thereunder for the most part arranged chronologically, but sometimes there is first a breakdown by type of record or class of correspondent.

This series contains collections of originals and fair, press, and typewritten copies and also some photostatic copies of letters sent and received by naval officers of all ranks and a small number of Marine Corps officers. Included are some general orders and other directives issued and received by these officers. Many of the letter books were received from the officers themselves or members of their families. Some were donated by officers who purchased them from private dealers, and some were reproduced from letters in private and public collections.

Some of the letters, particularly those exchanged with the Secretary of the Navy and the chiefs of bureaus, relate to administrative and logistical matters such as orders, transfers, promotions, retirements, appointments to boards, pay, leave, and supplies, equipment, repairs, fuel, and crews for vessels. Some letters to the Secretary by officers commanding squadrons fill gaps in the letters described in entry 48 and other series in this record group. The letters to officials of the civil and military branches of foreign governments as well as with U.S. consular and diplomatic representatives in foreign nations and the Secretary of the Navy frequently discuss relations with other countries. Some of the letters are semiofficial, such as operational reports from commanding officers of ships to their squadron commanders. There is a particularly large number of such letters for the Civil War period, some of which were selected for possible inclusion in the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion (Washington, DC : 1894-1922). Letters sent and received by naval officers during, before, and following exploring expeditions are also part of this series. Also included are letters of a more personal nature to family members, friends within and outside the Navy, and public officials. For example, Lt. Cmdr. C. R. Perry Rodgers' letter book includes correspondence exchanged with James Fenimore Cooper about writing naval history.

An alphabetical and chronological list of names of officers' letter books giving years covered and subseries number is in Appendix N.

604. Letter Book of Chief Naval Constructor Samuels Humphries.
Feb. 1838-Sept. 1838. 1 vol. 1 in.

Divided into correspondence and minutes of the Board of Navy Commissioners maintained by Humphries. The correspondence is in rough chronological order; the minutes are arranged chronologically.

Most of the correspondence is with other naval constructors. For more complete records, see the journal of the board (entry 309) and the correspondence described in entries 315 and 322.

605. Copies of Records Relating to an Appeal in the Case of Como. Edwin W. Moore, Texas Navy.
1843. 1 vol. 1 in.

There is a typewritten name and subject index.

The records consist primarily of a photostatic copy of the 203-page appeal made by Moore at Galveston. The original was in the possession of the University of Texas in 1935 when this copy was made. Included with the appeal are copies of letters exchanged between Moore, commanding the Texas Navy, and the Texas Department of War and Navy; correspondence of Moore with officials of Yucatan; and letters and proclamations of President Sam Houston. Moore was charged with treason against the Texas Government and with illegal receipt of money from the Government of Yucatan.

606. Records of Lts. Thornton A. Jenkins and Richard Bache Relating to European Lighthouses.
June 2, 1845-Jan. 1846. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part by country.

Jenkins and Bache were detailed to inspect lighthouses in Europe and report their findings to the Secretary of the Treasury. Included are copies of the instructions of the Secretary of the Treasury, a letter of introduction from the Secretary of State, correspondence with officials in charge of lighthouses, completed questionnaires, tables, pamphlets, and illustrations. The volume was presented to the Navy Department Library by Rear Adm. Thornton A. Jenkins.

607. Press Copies of Letters Sent by Gordon M. Newton.
Sept. 2, 1858-Aug. 23, 1866. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a partial subject index.

The writer appears to have been a merchant in New York City. Most of the letters are dated 1859-60 and they are addressed to C. P. Knapp at Pensacola. They concern shipments of timber to New York, the demand in that city for certain types of timber and the asking prices, and shipments of other cargo from Newton to Knapp. There are no letters addressed to Knapp after October 1860. This volume was once part of the papers of Capt. Ebenezer Farrand, Confederate States Navy.

Logs, Journals, and Related Records

608. Logs and Journals Kept by U.S. Naval Officers, March 1776-June 1908.
1789-1938. 249 vols. 24 ft.

Arranged by officer, chronologically by date of earliest log or journal entry. There are name and subject indexes prepared by the Office of Naval Records and Library in some of the volumes.

A relatively small number of these records are copies or extracts of official ships' logs kept during cruises. Many of these were kept by midshipmen who had to submit them to a senior officer for inspection; they contain hourly recordings of the ship's speed, course steered, wind direction, barometric and temperature readings, and remarks concerning events of the day. There are also "rough logs with this type of information. Most of the volumes, however, sometimes called logs and sometimes journals, include instead information concerning the experiences, activities, and observations of the writers both at sea and in port and are more accurately described as journals or diaries. Some were maintained during naval expeditions; others provide detailed accounts of the fighting during important naval battles; and still others provide vivid descriptions of manners and customs of foreign populations with whom the writers came into contact. Activities of the writers between cruises are sometimes accounted for in the entries. Poetry, sketches, maps, charts, notes, newspaper clippings, photographs and other items inserted or copied in the volumes further indicate the personal nature of these logs and journals. Most of the logs and journals were kept by commissioned naval officers; a small number were kept by warrant officers, petty officers, and enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps. Many were kept by a single officer and not always on a daily basis. An index to names of vessels for which there are records giving years covered and subseries number is found in Appendix L. For a complete listing, see Appendix M.

609. Logs and Journals of American Privateers and State Navy and Merchant Vessels.
Oct. 1776-Oct. 1867. 11 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically by initial date of log or journal.

Some of the logs are originals; others are photostatic or typed copies. There are logs or journals or extracts for the following vessels: Massachusetts privateer schooner Active, October-December 1776; Massachusetts privateer schooner Charming Sally, November 1776-October 1778, with gaps; privateer Hazard or privateer Revenge, July-September 1778; South Carolina frigate South Carolina, August 1781-January 1782 and April-May 1782; privateer Hague, September 1782-February 1783; frigate Alliance, June 1787-September 1788; an unidentified vessel, August-October 1787 and June-July 1788; privateer schooner of war Nonsuch, July-November 1812; privateer Polly, December 1812-July 1813; private armed brigantine Saratoga, July-November 1812; American bark Tacony, October 1862-June 1863; and schooner Mabel, July-October 1867.

610. Summary Journals and Notes of Moses Hillard, Merchant, on Atlantic, Arctic, and Pacific Voyages.
Apr. 1801-June 1835. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a table of contents.

The entries apparently were made by Hillard upon his return from various voyages. They consist mostly of itineraries, comments on weather conditions, sailing directions, and remarks on trade conditions. In the middle of the volume is a list of voyages taken by Hillard during the years 1796-1807 for which he made no journal entries.

611. Notes and Compilations of U.S. Naval Officers.
1813-1900. 19 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. These officers' personal notebooks and other compilations were donated by family members and other private individuals. They include accounts of naval engagements, sailing directions, journals of voyages, transcripts of lectures, poetry, regulations, procedures for naval courts and boards, accounts, and notes on a variety of subjects. There are volumes for Capt. Arthur Sinclair, 1813-14; Lt. Charles Gauntt, ca. 1818-34; Lt. George S. Blake, 1822-ca. 1831; Lt. Samuel W. LeCompte, ca. 1832; Lt. Joel Abbott, 1832; Comdr. Matthew C. Perry, ca. 1831 and ca. 1833 (2 volumes); Lt. Gabriel Galt Williamson, ca. 1844-54; Engineer Richard C. Potts, 1850-61 (2 volumes); Chaplain Fitch W. Taylor, ca. 1854 (2 volumes); Chaplain David Howard Tribou, June 1864; Capt. George C. Remey, ca. 1889 (2 volumes); Lt. Nathan Sargent, 1897-1900 (2 volumes); Surgeon Edward Cutbush, n.d,; "Description of sights" (anonymous); and a "common place book" (anonymous).

612. Journal of Thomas D. Anderson, U.S. Consul at Tunis.
Aug. 2, 1815-Dec. 31, 1817. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the journal consists of remarks concerning places visited and amounts spent, particularly for presents given to Tunisian rulers and their servants.

613. Extracts of the Journal of Rear Adm. William T. Sampson.
Apr. 21, 1898-May 14, 1898. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically in a binder.

This is a copy taken from the official journal. It appears to have been annotated for printing. Rear Adm. William T. Sampson commanded the North Atlantic Squadron. Mrs. Sampson presented the extracts to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1921.

Registers and Lists

614. List of French Prisoners of War.
ca. 1799. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of prisoner.

Entries usually give only the prisoner's name, but sometimes his rank, vessel, or other information are indicated. Inserted are comments on French prisoners landed on St. Thomas and CuraÁao and at Wilmington, NC, and a list of officers, seamen, and passengers taken prisoner on the schooner Bonaparte. A notation shows, "Captain Tingey had papers delivered to him."

615. Register of British Prisoners of War, 1812-15.
n.d. 3 vols. 3 in.

Entries are arranged by initial letter of surname of prisoner. When insufficient space was allotted for a letter of the alphabet in the first volume, entries were continued in the back of the volume and then, if necessary, in the second volume.

Entries include date of capture or of report, name and rank of prisoner, place where held, vessel from which taken, place of capture, name of captor, and date and circumstances of release. Some prisoners were paroled or released without imprisonment.

616. Register of Expenses Incurred by American Prisoners of War in England.
1812-14. 1 vol. 1/8 in.

The booklet includes four lists. Entries on each list are arranged chronologically.

The register contains a list of sailors and marines who mailed letters home from prisons in England showing their name, date of letter, and amount of postage used. A second list is of naval officers who mailed letters to the United States. This list includes the officers' name, rank, postage amount and destination of letter such as Norfolk or "Hagers-town." A third list contains expenses for medicines and shows the name of the surgeon who dispensed the medicine and the name of the prison where the medicine was used. A fourth list includes the names of British individuals and companies, presumably suppliers for the prisons. There are also some expenses for carriage trips on the list.

617. Register of American and British Prisoners of War Received on the U.S. Cartel Brig Analoston.
May 1, 1813-July 21, 1815. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically by date prisoner was received.

The register was compiled by Captain's Clerk Charles Deblois. The entries usually give name and rank of prisoner, vessel on which captured, date delivered to the Analoston, and sometimes information concerning release and other data.

618. List of Outfits and Stores for the USS Roanoke.
ca. 1858. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Arranged according to rank of officer for which stores and outfits were intended.

619. Lists of Officers Assigned to U.S. Naval Vessels.
ca. 1861. 1 vol. 2 in.

One of the lists is arranged by name of vessel; the other, by rank of officer.

620. Registers and Lists of Officers of the Mississippi Squadron.
Aug. 1861-Aug. 1865. 9 vols. 1 ft.

There are five volumes of lists of officers arranged alphabetically by name of vessel, and thereunder chronologically. These volumes have a index to names of ships and a index to names of engineers. There is no index to officers of other ranks. These volumes are marked "S. P. Lee Papers" (Acting Rear Adm. Samuel Phillips Lee) and are donated papers. Except for these notations, they are similar to the official lists of officers in entry 74. The other volumes are registers of volunteer officers arranged by rank.

The information given in entries varies but often includes name and rank of officer, date assigned to ship, date of commission or warrant, states of birth and citizenship, date of birth and dates of actions and occurrences. The lists include clerks, volunteer officers, Regular Navy officers, and U.S. Marine Corps officers. Some descriptive information about vessels and entries for officers in other squadrons are included. One volume is a register of officers granted leave.

621. Miscellaneous Registers and Lists Pertaining to Vessels and Officers of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
1863-65. 10 vols. 8 in.

Arranged by name of vessel or chronologically.

There are four volumes and an unbound notebook of registers and lists of vessels and officers of the squadron, arranged by name of vessel, usually alphabetically and indexed by name of vessel; two volumes of chronological registers of volunteer officers promoted, detached, and reporting for duty; a list of the number and caliber of guns on the vessels of the squadron ("battery book"), indexed by name of vessel; and a two-volume register of vessels boarded off Fortress Monroe, for the most part by the Young Rover, arranged chronologically. Some of the volumes have notations indicating they were "S. P. Lee's papers."

622. Register of Vessels Boarded by the USS Princess Royal.
Dec. 7, 1864-Apr. 1, 1865. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically by date of boarding.

Entries give date and place of boarding, home port of vessel, name of owner and of captain, class, port from which embarked, destination, tonnage, cargo, nation of registry ("papers"), number of crew members, and remarks. The Princess Royal was based at Galveston, TX, during this period. The volume was donated to the Office of Naval Records in 1935 by Charles Taylor of the Boston Globe.

623. Register of Correspondence of the Commander of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, Acting Rear Adm. William Radford.
May 25, 1865-Oct. 10, 1865. 2 vols. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volumes register letters and orders sent and received by Acting Rear Adm. William Radford. Entries give date of letter or order or of its receipt, summary of its contents, name or position of addressee or writer, Radford's location that day, and sometimes other information.

624. Register of Letters Sent and Forwarded by the Atlantic Coast Squadron.
May-Nov. 1866. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. Identified as "No. 3," but no other registers have been found. The inside cover has a notation, "papers of the Portsmouth Navy Yard."

Entries include date and time sent, place from which sent, summary of contents, and name of addressee. Most of the letters were sent from Port Royal, Charleston, or Hampton Roads.

625. Miscellaneous Registers Kept by Rear Adm. Charles H. Davis of the South Atlantic Squadron.
1867-69. 17 vols. 1 ft.

Entries within each register are arranged chronologically.

There are registers of letters forwarded (3 volumes), reports forwarded (2 volumes), surveys held (2 volumes), requisitions made (3 volumes), orders issued to officers (2 volumes), signals made (1 volume), bills for purchases, repairs, and other expenses (1 volume), monthly reports of vessels boarded by officers of the squadron (1 volume), monthly reports of condition, distribution, and employment of vessels (1 volume), and officers and vessels (1 volume).

626. Miscellaneous Registers Kept by the Asiatic Squadron.
Apr. 1875-Nov. 1877. 5 vols. 5 in.

Registers arranged by type of information recorded, and entries within registers arranged chronologically.

The following registers are included in the series.

Register of officers of the Asiatic Fleet. Jan. 1870-June 1872. 1 vol.

Entries include the officer's name, rank, and date of commission (warrant or appointment); vessel to which assigned and the date; date detached and where ordered; and remarks. In the back of the volume is a list of the staff of the squadron commander and lists of the officers of the Flagship Colorado and other squadron vessels.

Register of letters received and forwarded. Apr. 1875-Nov. 1877. 1 vol.

Entries include the date on which the letter was received, the names of the writer and addressee, a summary of the letter's contents, and the date on which it was forwarded.

Register of reports forwarded. June 1875-Mar. 1877. 1 vol.

Entries provide the same type of information included for letters received and forwarded.

Register of surveys held. July 1875-Nov. 1877. 1 vol.

Entries include the name of the officer conducting the survey, a description of the article surveyed, the name of the vessel on which located, the name of the officer requesting the survey, and results.

Register of orders issued to officers. Aug. 1875-Jan. 1877. 1 vol.

Entries indicate when, where, and to whom the order was issued and include a brief summary of the order's contents.

627. Register of Movements, U.S. Naval Force on Asiatic Station.
Jan. 1900-Feb. 1902. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by vessel, and thereunder chronologically.

Entries give dates of arrival and departure from each port visited.

Fiscal Records

628. Account Books of U.S. Naval Vessels and of the Arctic Expedition, 1777-1879.
1812-ca. 1924. 32 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged by vessel with the records for the Arctic expedition at the end.

These are chiefly registers of supplies received and used (expended). Also included are registers of expenditures, accounts for individual officers and crew members, a cashbook, and requisitions. There are records for the Lexington, 1777, including a roster and portions of the log (photostatic copies); Argus, Macedonian, Congress, and Baltimore, 1812-20 (chiefly accounts for individuals kept by Purser Henry Denison); Independence, 1815-17 and 1837-38; Constitution, 1824-30; Brandywine, 1825-29; Peacock, 1829-31; Constellation, 1829-31; Macedonian, 1837-38; Lexington, 1827-28 and 1837-39; Ontario, 1837-39; Vincennes, 1838-42; Cyane, 1841-46; Marion, 1842-43; Columbus, 1842-44; Metacomet (renamed Pulaski), 1858-62; Brooklyn, 1859-61; and Arctic expedition, 1878-79.

629. Ledger of the Continental Ship Confederacy.
June 1780-Mar. 1781. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by account and thereunder chronologically. There is a typewritten name index.

Most of the accounts are for pay to Navy and Marine officers and enlisted men. According to a typewritten note, this volume was found at Princeton University in 1930 and presented to the Navy Department.

630. Records of Daniel D. Broohead, U.S. Navy Agent at Boston.
1821-52. 25 ft.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

The records consist chiefly of receipts, but there are also bills, 1822-52; contracts, 1826-28; extracts, returns, and statements of contracts, 1827-38; requisitions, 1821 and 1830-37; letters received, 1830-37; and miscellaneous fiscal records, 1823-52.

631. Fiscal Records of Paymaster George A. Lyon.
July 1861-Dec. 1881. 4 ft.

Arranged by type of record.

Included are payroll vouchers for the Washington Navy Yard and Naval Station, May 1881-January 1882, and orders issued by higher commands relating to the pay of officers, enlisted personnel, and civilians (including appointments and transfers), July 1861-December 1863, September 1871-September 1874, and April-December 1881, with gaps. Fiscal records for the USS Michigan, November 1871-September 1874; the USS Tuscumbia, March-December 1883; and the USS Worcester, February 1871-March 1874, include statements of accounts, vouchers, orders, and receipts. These records were acquired in 1969 from the historical collection of the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts held at the library of the Naval Supply Systems Command.

632. List of Supplies Furnished the USS Marion at Mare Island Navy Yard.
May 1891-June 1891. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by department of the yard from which furnished.

The list includes medical supplies, clothing, tools, and guns.

Other Records

633. Signal Books.
ca. 1813-June 1865. 10 vols. 9 in.

There are guides to signals and maneuvers prepared by Como. Charles Morris, ca. 1813 and ca. 1827 (6 vols.); signal book of the Pacific Exploring Expedition, 1838-39; rough signal log of the USS Columbus, 1845-47; signal log of the USS New Hampshire, December 1864-June 1865; and undated index to signal words prepared for an unidentified squadron.

634. Notes on Ships' Dimensions and Other Subjects.
n.d. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by subject. One volume has a subject index.

These notes apparently were prepared sometime during the first half of the 19th century by officers of the U.S. Navy. One volume contains mostly information on dimensions of ships and docks, some of which is in tabular form. The other volume has notes on these subjects as well as on winds, blocks, rigging, anchors, spars, foreign ports, guns, gunpowder, lights, and other subjects. There are also verses of poetry and scriptures.

635. Watch, Quarter, and Station Bills of U.S. Naval Vessels.
1829-96. 17 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged by vessel.

Brought together are bills listing the duties assigned to each officer and crew member (sometimes by name and sometimes just by position) for the following vessels (some of the years given may be only approximations); Constellation, 1829, with a volume of internal rules and regulations, ca. 1825-30; Columbus (internal rules and regulations and a manual, "The Excellent Gunnery"), 1846; Brandywine, 1847; Wabash, 1861-62; Pittsburgh, 1862; Constellation, 1862-63; Miami (2 vols.), 1863-64; Susquehanna, 1864; Canandaigua, 1865-66; Sabine, 1869-70; California, 1870-73; and Castine, 1894-96. There are also volumes containing undated watch, station, and quarter bills for a typical first-class screw steamer, first-class sloop, and third-class sloop.

636. Directives.
1861-68. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order.

This compilation of general orders and circulars issued by the Navy Department, South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, North Pacific Squadron, and Bureau of Ordnance was presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library in October 1946 by J.F.R. Scott of Wynnewood, PA.

637. Abstracts of Charges and Sentences of General Courts-Martial in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.
Oct. 1864-May 1865. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

Abstracts give date(s) and place of trial, name of defendant, charges, plea, finding, and, when applicable, sentence imposed and place of confinement.

638. Conduct Books for Enlisted Men on USS Nipsic and USS St. Mary.
1871-73. 2 vols. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of enlistee.

Entries include such information as age, birthplace, complexion, color of hair and eyes, term of enlistment, offenses, and punishments.

639. "Memoir Upon the Lighting, Beaconage, and Buoyage of the Coasts of France."
1871. 1 vol. 3 in.

The "memoir" was written by Leonce Reynaud, Inspector General of Bridges and Roads and Director of the Lighting and Buoy Service of France, in 1864 and translated by Rear Adm. Thornton A. Jenkins in 1871. It was deposited by the Light-House Board in the Library of Congress and transferred to the Navy Department Library on September 15, 1913.

640. Report on the Coast Fortifications of England.
May 1873. 1 vol. 2 in.

This report was prepared in Berlin in 1873 by a German engineer officer who was ordered to England in August 1872. It was translated from German into English by U.S. Navy officer Lt. Edward Very in May 1873. Accompanying the report are illustrative drawings and tables. The report relates particularly to the use of iron armor and is more about types of facilities and materials used and experiment conducted than the inspection of individual fortifications.

641. Situation Reports, Squadron of Evolution.
Dec. 7, 1889-May, 25, 1892. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For each vessel attached to the squadron for each day are given the number absent, number sick, amount of coal on hand, amount of coal used during the previous day, latitude and longitude or place, and sometimes remarks.

642. Proceedings of the First and Second International Peace Conferences Held at The Hague.
May 18, 1899-Oct. 18, 1907. 5 in.

Arranged in two subseries for the first conference held March 18-July 29, 1899, and the second, June 15-October 18, 1907.

For the first conference, the proceedings are divided into four parts in two binders; each part has a table of contents. Part I has the proceedings of the full conference with annexes. Part II has the proceedings of the First Committee and its subcommittees. Part III has the proceedings of the Second Committee and its subcommittees. Part IV has the proceedings of the Third Committee and of the Committee of Examination with annexes.

For the second conference, there is only one binder with a table of contents. It contains the proceedings of the Second Committee and its subcommittees with appendixes. Apparently, there are at least two (possibly four) missing parts.

643. Courts-Martial Orders, U.S. Naval Force on Asiatic Station.
Apr. 28, 1900-Feb. 26, 1902. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Clippings of orders giving findings, sentences, and review decisions, pasted in a volume sometimes with handwritten annotations.

Records Relating to the Confederate States Navy, 1861-65

The first efforts made by the Navy Department to collect records for publication pertaining to Union and Confederate naval operations during the Civil War were undertaken by the Bureau of Navigation in 1881. After the establishment of the Office of Library and Naval War Records in the Bureau of Navigation, this work was continued. An appropriation was authorized by an act of July 7, 1884 (23 Stat. 159, 185) to pay the salaries of one clerk and two copyists to assist in the compilation of the "Naval Records of the War of the Rebellion."

The first five volumes of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Navies in the War of the Rebellion, published during 1895-97, contained a scarce amount of material of Confederate origin. Because of this, an agent, former Confederate naval officer Hardin B. Littlepage, was hired in 1889 to obtain documents in private and institutional custody pertaining to the Confederate Navy during the Civil War. Littlepage was successful in interesting former Confederate naval officers and other officials or members of their families, the Confederate Museum in Richmond, VA, and other depositories and historical societies to donate or lend for copying documents pertaining to Confederate naval activity during the Civil War (see entries 530 and 540). Some of the documents donated along with the copies prepared from borrowed materials bear the stamp "C.N.W.R." indicating that they were selected for possible inclusion in the Official Records. They became a permanent part of the Naval Records Collection along with other records obtained from departments of the executive branch. In 1909 the Treasury Department transmitted to the Office of Library and Naval War Records some of the records in its custody relating to Confederate naval officers and personnel. Also received from the same department were some of the official records of the Confederate States Treasury pertaining to the Confederate Navy. In 1930 the Office of Naval Records and Library received more than 600 papers from the War Department relating to Confederate naval and Marine Corps personnel including muster rolls and payrolls. In 1934 documents pertaining to naval inventions were received from the same department. Other Confederate Navy payrolls and the "Confederate Vessel Papers" remain in the War Department's collection in Record Group 109.

Most of the official records of the Confederate States Navy Department were destroyed by fire or pillage in the War Department building in Richmond in 1865. Some of the records were taken south by train during the evacuation of Richmond and deposited at the Charlotte Navy Yard. They were later apparently destroyed to prevent their falling into Union hands. Still other naval records were among captured Confederate War Department records taken north to Washington or were carried off by Confederate naval officers fleeing from captured shore establishments and vessels.

Many of the unbound papers received from former officers and depositories were placed in the Area and Subject Files of the Naval Records Collection (see entries 501 and 503). The bound volumes and other unbound records in the collection consist primarily of vessel logs, journals, muster rolls and payrolls, and paymasters' records. Although fragmentary, they compose one of the largest records collections pertaining to the Confederate States Navy.

Confederate States Navy Department

A Navy Department was authorized by the provisions of an act passed by the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America on February 21, 1861. The Secretary of the Navy was given control over the Department under the direct control of the President of the Confederate Government. An act of March 16, 1861, designated four offices within the Navy Department: Orders and Detail, responsible for personnel and legal matters and materiel; Ordnance and Hydrography, responsible for the supply of guns and ammunition and navigational information and equipment to the service and for the naval school aboard the CSS Patrick Henry; Provisions and Clothing, responsible for procurement and distribution of food for the service and uniforms for enlisted men and for fiscal matters; and Medicine and Surgery, responsible for the health of the Navy and the supervision of the hospitals and medical officers. Until the summer of 1863, when a Chief Constructor and Engineer in Chief were appointed by the Confederate Secretary of the Navy, responsibility for the construction, repair, and maintenance of ships was placed in the Office of Ordnance and Hydrography.

The ranks assigned to officers of the Confederate Navy were similar to those used in the U.S. Navy. The Secretary not only directed the issuance of orders and details for service but also signed operational orders and details for service and operational orders of an important nature.

The act of March 16, 1861, also created a Marine Corps directly under the Secretary of the Navy, to protect ships and stations from external attack or internal mutiny, and to launch small-scale amphibious attacks. The officer appointed commandant of the corps issued orders concerning the corps to naval officers in the Secretary's name.

Correspondence

644. Letters Sent by Lt. (Later Comdr.) Joseph N. Barney.
Dec. 5,1861-Apr. 4, 1863. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters for December 5, 1861-July 31, 1862, and February 4-April 21, 1863. An incomplete register is in the back of the volume.

Barney commanded the CSS Jamestown, December 1861-May 1862; was stationed at the naval encampment at Drewry's Bluff, VA, June-July 1862; and commanded the CSS Harriet Lane in Galveston Bay, February-April 1863. Included are letters to the Secretary of the Confederate States Navy, the Office of Orders, the Bureau of Ordnance, and to other officers and enlisted men concerning supplies and ordnance and terms of enlistment and accounts of naval personnel under his command.

645. Correspondence and Fiscal Records of Thomas R. Ware, Confederate States Navy Paymaster, Mobile, AL.
June 1862-Mar. 1865. 3 vols. and loose records. 5 ft.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically. There are some records for Ware's earlier service with the U.S. Navy.

There are bound press copies of letters sent and unbound letters and telegrams received. Correspondents include the Secretary of the Confederate States Navy, the First Auditor of the Confederate States Treasury, other paymasters and assistant paymasters at shore stations and aboard ships, shipbuilders, and Confederate Army and Navy officers. Principal subjects dealt with are procurement of supplies needed by the Navy, execution of contracts, and expenditures. With the letters received are correspondence and financial records of Charles J. Helm, Confederate States agent at Havana, Cuba, concerning stores shipped to Mobile through the blockade during 1863-64.

Fiscal records include ledgers, cashbooks, abstracts of expenditures, receipts (including those for repairing and equipping the CSS Florida), requisitions, invoices, vouchers, shipping tickets, and contracts for building ironclad vessels and torpedoes. The volumes were presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library by the Ware family in 1929. In 1939 the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park received the unbound records from the National Bank of Fredericksburg. The park transferred them to the National Archives in 1965.

646. Letters Sent by the Naval Gun Foundry and Ordnance Works at Selma, AL.
June 1862-Mar. 1865. 6 vols. 1 ft.

Individual volumes arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period September-December 19, 1862. There are name indexes in most volumes.

Press copies except for the first volume, June-August 1862. The first volume includes a register in the back with reports of guns shipped, list of powder on hand and various accounts. Most of the letters were sent successively by Confederate States Agent Colin J. McRae, June 1862-February 1863; Maj. N. R. Chambliss, Confederate States Navy, February-June 1863; and Comdt. Catesby Ap R. Jones, June 1863-March 1865. Included are letters to the Secretary of Confederate States Navy, the Bureau of Ordnance, commandants of naval stations, other Confederate Army and Navy officers; iron manufactures and other industrial and business firms, and private citizens. They concern primarily the manufacture and distribution of guns and ammunition and the purchase and delivery of materials needed for manufacture.

Colin J. McRae owned the gun foundry until the Confederate Government purchased it in 1863. It was then operated jointly by the Army and Navy until June 1863, when control was assumed by the Navy and Comdr. Catesby Ap R. Jones became commandant. When Union forces captured the foundry and ordnance works on April 2, 1865, Jones escaped with these records and the register described in entry 673.

647. Letters Sent by Jonathan H. Carter.
Feb. 1, 1863-Apr. 30, 1865. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are a few letters dated 1867. There is a name index.

For the period February-November 1863, when Carter served as commandant of the naval station at Shreveport, there are letters to the Secretary of Confederate States Navy, to other Navy and Army officers, and to private contractors concerning the progress of construction of gunboats and the need for materials and skilled labor. Beginning in November 1863, Carter was commanding officer of the Naval Defenses of Western Louisiana, commanding the CSS Missouri. There are letters to private shipowners asking their assistance in arming the Missouri, to the Chief of Staff of the Confederate States Army concerning the transfer of Army enlistees to the Navy and volunteers for the Missouri, and to other Army officers concerning personnel matters. The 1867 letters are of a personal nature. Some notes and accounts have been copied in the back of the volume.

648. Letters Received at the Confederate States Depository, Nashville, TN.
Apr. 1, 1863-Aug. 10, 1864. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. The volume is labeled "-," but no other volume has been found.

Most of the letters were received by Depository James G. Ramsay from the Confederate States Treasurer and Secretary of the Treasury. They informed Ramsay of shipments of money en route to Knoxville, transmitted drafts to be credited to officers' accounts, and instructed him in procedures to be followed. The volume in which these letters are inserted contains part of a summary of the 1840 decennial census.

Muster Rolls, Payrolls, Shipping Articles, and Pay Records

649. Name Index to Shipping Articles, 1861-65.
n.d. 1 binder. 1/2 in.

This typed index is available on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library, roll 173.

650. Shipping Articles of Naval Enlisted Personnel.
May 1861-Feb. 1865. 1 vol. 4 in.

Arranged by recruiting station or vessel. For each station or ship, the shipping article includes a statement by which the enlistee agreed to enlist in the Confederate States Navy, to be assigned to vessels, and to obey laws and regulations. In return the recruiting officer agreed that the enlistee would receive the stated wages and bounty. Entries for individual recruits give date of shipment, signature or mark, name written by recruiting officer, signature of witness, rating, monthly wages, and, when applicable, wages advanced, bounty paid, and signature of surety for advanced wages and bounty. The shipping articles are reproduced on NARA Microfilm Publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library, roll 173.

651. Muster Rolls, Payrolls, and Related Records of Confederate Vessels.
May 1861-Mar. 1865. 1 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel, thereunder by type of record, and thereunder chronologically.

Also included are receipt rolls, registers and payrolls of allotments descriptive lists and returns of officers and crews, lists of clothing needed and issued, mess bills, and other types of lists containing the names of naval personnel on board vessels. Some rolls include officers and enlisted men; some, only officers; and some, only the names of personnel transferred from one vessel to another. The information in these rolls is similar to that in muster rolls and payrolls of U.S. Navy vessels (see entry 68). There are rolls for some vessels with those for shore establishments (see entry 670), and there are also rolls in the Subject File for the Confederate States Navy under the designation "NA" (see entry 503). For a list of vessels, see Appendix O.

652. Payrolls of Civilian Employees at Confederate Shore Establishments.
May 1861-Dec. 1864. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of shore establishment, thereunder sometimes by occupation, and thereunder chronologically.

Also included are some pay and receipt rolls; pay, receipt and muster rolls; and individual accounts. The information in the payrolls is similar to that for civilian personnel of the U.S. Navy (see entry 70).

653. Muster Rolls, Payrolls, and Related Records for Naval and Marine Corps Personnel at Confederate Shore Establishments.
June 1861-Feb. 1865. 7 vols. and unbound records. 2 ft.

Arranged by format of records (volumes or loose) and thereunder alphabetically by name of station.

The volumes are identified as being for Charleston Station and Fleet, Mobile and Jackson Stations, New Orleans Station and Fleet, North Carolina Station, Richmond Station and James River Squadron, Savannah Station and Fleet, and Wilmington Station, Marine Corps, and Miscellaneous. The rolls in bound volumes are reproduced on NARA Microfilm publication T829, Miscellaneous Records of the Office of Naval Records and Library, rolls 165-172.

Included are muster rolls, pay and receipt rolls, registers of allotments and station bills. The information in the rolls is similar to that in muster rolls and payrolls for U.S. naval personnel at shore establishments (see entry 81). There are other rolls in the Subject File for the Confederate Navy under the designation "NA" (see entry 503).

654. Register of Allotments of Confederate States Navy and Marine Corps Officers and Enlisted Men.
June 1861-Nov. 1864. 1 vol. 1 in.

Divided into officers and enlisted men and thereunder arranged roughly chronologically by date of first payment.

Entries include name of officer or enlisted man, rank or rating, person by whom registered, date of first payment, monthly sum allotted, number of months to be paid, name of vessel to which attached, place where and person to whom payable, and remarks that sometimes indicate when allotments were to be stopped. The person receiving allotments was usually a woman, probably the wife or mother of the officer or enlisted man.

655. Muster Rolls, Payrolls, and Related Records for Marine Detachments of the Confederate States Navy.
July 1861-Dec. 1864. 4 in.

Arranged by company, location, or vessel; thereunder by type of roll; and thereunder chronologically.

There are muster rolls, payrolls, receipt rolls for clothing and other articles issued, and other records for Companies A,-,C, and E and for marines stationed at Richmond, on the CSS Savannah, and at other places and other vessels.

656. Register of Allotments of Officers and Enlisted Men of the Confederate States Navy.
Aug. 1861-Oct. 1864. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname. The volume is labeled "Auditor's Book No.2."

Entries provide name of recipient, rank, vessel to which assigned, person by whom registered, date of first payment, number of months for payments to be made, name of person designated to receive the payment, place where payable, amount of monthly allotment, and sometimes remarks. The volume appears to have mostly the same names as the registers described in entry 664 and may relate to the Savannah River Squadron.

657. Ledger For Payments to Navy and Marine Corps Personnel at the Naval Station at Savannah, GA.
Nov.1862-Sept. 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged in rough order by rank or rating of payee; persons who arrived after the ledger was started appear to have been entered wherever there was space. There is a name index.

Entries, for both officers and enlisted men, include date, amounts of money paid in clothing, small stores, and cash, and the signature of a witness.

658. Pay and Receipt Book for CSS Georgia.
Oct. 1862-Aug. 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part by rank or rating of payee.

These accounts for individuals show amounts paid in money, clothing, small stores, and hospital expenses; total pay including allowances for undrawn rations and grog; and the signature of a witness.

Logs, Journals, and Diaries

659. Logs of Confederate Privateers.
June-Nov. 1861. 5 vols. 5 in.

Arranged by vessel. Entries in the logs are arranged chronologically.

There are logs for the Jeff Davis, Beaufort, Gordon, Dixie, and Sallie. The logs include weather data, speed and sailing information, ships sighted or contacted and activities of the crew. Most of the logs are handwritten in preprinted log pages, with columns for weather and sailing information on the left side and space for remarks on the right side of the volume.

660. Logs and Journals of Confederate States Navy Vessels and of Battery Brooke.
Aug. 1861-Apr. 1865. 7 vols. 7 in.

Arranged by vessel.

There are logs or journals or abstracts for the following: Ellis, August 1861-February 1862; Florida, August 1862-May 1863; Cornubia, September-November 1863; Florida, January-September 1864; Tennessee, February-July 1864; Chickamauga, September 1864-March 1865; and Battery Brooke on the James River, October 1864-April 1865.

661. Diary of Midshipman John A. Wilson, Confederate States Navy.
1861-62. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries arranged chronologically.

For a part of the period covered, John A. Wilson was serving on board the CSS Arkansas. The greater part of the diary covers his activities following the destruction of the Arkansas on August 8, 1862, including his activities in the area of Drewry's Bluff, and his travels through Louisiana and Mississippi.

662. Diary Kept by Rear Adm. Raphael Semmes During his Arrest and Confinement, Dec. 1865-Mar. 1866.
n.d. 1/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The typewritten copy was prepared by the Office of Naval War Records. It covers the period of Semmes' arrest in Mobile on December 15, 1865; transportation to Washington, DC; and imprisonment awaiting a trial that was never held. There are also copies of two letters concerning his imprisonment.

Fiscal Records

663. Certifications of Naval Accounts by the First Auditor, Confederate States Treasury Department.
May 15, 1861-Aug. 10, 1864. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index.

The volumes contain copies of certifications that the Auditor had examined and adjusted the accounts with determinations of the amounts due from or owed to the Confederate Government. The certifications were sent with the statements and vouchers of Navy paymasters and other officials to the Comptroller of the Treasury for his decision. The volume apparently was transferred along with other records of the Confederate First Auditor to the Office of Naval Records and Library.

664. Steward's Returns of Food Supplies Used on Vessels of the Savannah River Squadron.
Aug. 1861-Dec. 1864. 3 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by vessel and thereunder chronologically.

The weekly returns are printed on forms on which have been entered the number of men subsisted each day and the quantities of various kinds of food used (provisions expended) with totals for the week. Discharges, transfers, detachments, desertions, and arrival of men are sometimes noted. There are returns for the Savannah, May 1862-May 1863; Oconee, May-June 1863; Isondiga, January-May 1863 and April 1863-December 1864; Resolute, August 1861-April 1862 and December 1862-June 1863; Firefly, March-April 1863; Gunboat No. 1, April-May 1862; and Georgia, October 1862-May 1864.

665. Register of Money, Clothing, and Small Stores Issued by the Confederate Navy Paymaster.
Nov. 1861-Feb. 1862. 2 vols. 3 in.

The volumes are labeled as "Confederate Paymaster's Accounts." Each has similar records for the same accounts for individuals arranged by assigned account number.

Entries in each volume show total amount paid and amounts paid in clothing, small stores, and money. The receipt book also has the signature or mark of the recipient and the signature of a witness.

666. Account Book For Supplies Issued to CSS Raleigh.
1861. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by class of issuance.

There are invoices and registers for clothing, small stores, contingent items, and food (provisions) received at the Norfolk Navy Yard for the CSS Raleigh. The registers provide a daily record of issuances broken down by specific types of items, with the names of persons to whom issuances were made.

667. Account Books of Provisions and Small Stores Received, Expended, and Condemned at Savannah, GA (principally relating to CSS Savannah).
1861-63. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged by type of provision (food, clothing, personal items), then chronologically by date of receipt, date expended, or date condemned. The volumes overlap in coverage. The first volume covers August 1861-February 1863; the second volume covers June 1861-May 1863.

The account book shows the date the item was received, expended, or condemned; name of person or category of persons receiving or using the item; and quantity of the provision. The items include meat, grog, cloth for uniforms, blankets, coats, razors, and scissors. There are a few references to women who were hired to sew uniforms.

668. Register of Letters, Accounts, and Other Documents Received by an Unnamed Financial Office.
Feb. 25, 1862-July 19, 1864. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically by date of receipt. There is a name index.

Entries include name, rank or position, and sometimes address of person who sent the document; date on which it was received and sometimes date of document; and subject of document or description of enclosures.

669. Records of Issuances of Supplies at Savannah, GA.
Nov. 1862-Dec. 1864. 2 vols. 1 in.

One volume contains copies of invoices for the issuance of provisions, clothing, small stores, and contingent articles to the following vessels of the Savannah Squadron: Georgia, November 1862-December 1864; Savannah, November 1862-June 1863; and Isondiga, December 1862-October 1864. The volume is arranged by vessel, thereunder by type of issuance, and thereunder chronologically. There is also a general invoice for fresh provisions. The second volume, labeled as an "account book," has entries for many of the same issuances of provisions, clothing, and small stores to the Georgia and Isondiga beginning in October 1863. It also has entries for amounts "expended." It is arranged by type of issuance and thereunder by vessel and has a tabular format with columns for specific types of items.

670. Register of Requisitions Received.
Apr. 13, 1864-Mar. 29, 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence. There is a name index.

Information includes date of requisition; name of paymaster, navy agent, or other official submitting it; the appropriations on which drawn; and the amounts for the individual items and total amount of invoice. There are also some entries for naval accounts reported to the Comptroller of the Treasury in 1862. The volumes appears to have been part of the records of the Confederate First Auditor of the Treasury that were transferred by the U.S. Treasury to the Office of Naval Records and Library.

Confederate Army Records

671. Surrendered Confederate Army Muster Rolls.
April 28, 1862. 1 in.

Arranged by regiment, Captain Lartigan's Louisiana Volunteers, Company C, F and K, 1st Louisiana Artillery, Company B, 20th Louisiana Volunteers and Company C, Regular Confederate Army.

The men listed on these muster rolls surrendered to Comdr. David D. Porter's Mortar Flotilla at Fort St. Philip, LA, on April 28, 1862. At the top of the standard Confederate muster roll, there is a parole added, promising not to engage in war against Federal forces. The rolls give the names of officers and enlisted men, their rank and signature.

672. Lists of Slaves Received to Work on Fortifications, Charleston, SC.
Aug. 1862-Sept. 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

There are lists covering the period August 1, 1862-July 1, 1863, arranged by location or officer receiving the slaves. Entries give date of receipt, sometimes district, number of slaves, and date of discharge. Then there are two lists, each arranged chronologically, for July-August (labeled "extra call") and July-September 1863. Entries include date of receipt, names of slaveholders, first names of slaves, and total number of slaves received from each slave holder. Included are some notes concerning slaves who ran away from the fortifications. There are a few entries for January-June 1864. The lists are in a volume originally used for abstracts of disbursements for the survey of the harbor of Georgetown, SC, 1852-54. It was prepared by the Confederate Engineer Office, Charleston.

673. Signal Message Book at Confederate Fort Holmes, NC.
May-Dec. 1864. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the messages appear to have been received or sent by Col. John J. Hedrick, C.S.A., commander of Fort Holmes. The messages were recorded by Pvt. William H. Hartman, Confederate Signal Corps. Many signals relate to sightings of vessels, enemy or friendly. Others are requests for vessels and for transport of men or other assistance. There are some references to the blockade runner Ella set on fire by the Union Navy near Ft. Holmes on December 6, 1864. During the engagement with Ella, the Union Navy fired upon Colonel Hedrick's home.

Other Records

674. Register of Naval Guns Manufactured at Selma.
July 1863-Jan. 1865. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by gun number.

For each gun, there are test data, measurements, information about the furnace and character of the metal. There is a drawing of an experimental six pounder gun.

[END]

Published: Fri Dec 01 10:08:01 EST 2017