Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

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Sioux City (LCS-11)

The first U.S. Navy ship named for the city in Iowa.

(LCS-11: displacement 3,450; length 387.6'; beam 57.7'; draft 14.1'; speed 40+ knots; complement 45+ augmentees that can include an aviation detachment, maritime security mission package, and a Coast Guard law enforcement detachment; armament 1 Mk 110 57 millimeter gun, RIM-116 Rolling Airframe Missile (RAM), 2 Mk 44 30 millimeter Bushmaster II guns, and 4 .50 caliber machine guns; aircraft 1 Sikorsky MH-60R/S Seahawk and 1 Northrop Grumman MQ-8B Fire Scout; class Freedom

Sioux City (LCS-11) was laid down on 19 February 2014 at Marinette, Wisc., by Marinette Marine Corp. (Lockheed Martin), the keel authenticated by Mrs. Mary Winnefeld, the ship’s sponsor and wife of Adm. James A. Winnefeld Jr., Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; was launched on 30 January 2016; completed her acceptance trials in the waters of Lake Michigan (20–24 May 2018); and was accepted by the Navy on 22 August 2018.


The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Mary Winnefeld (second from left), and distinguished guests shield their eyes while a shipyard worker welds her initials into Sioux City’s keel during the authentication ceremony at Marinette, Wisc., 19 February 2014. “I’m both honored and delighted to be back in my home state of Wisconsin as the sponsor of the future USS Sioux City,” Winnefeld said. “It’s been a real privilege to meet the great Americans who are building this versatile ship, and I thank them in advance for their quality work. I look forward to meeting her crew soon, being part of her family, and bringing our ship to life when she’s commissioned.” (Unattributed Lockheed Martin Photograph 4200, donated to the Navy, Department of Defense)
Caption: The ship’s sponsor, Mrs. Mary Winnefeld (second from left), and distinguished guests shield their eyes while a shipyard worker welds her initials into Sioux City’s keel during the authentication ceremony at Marinette, Wisc., 19 February 2014. “I’m both honored and delighted to be back in my home state of Wisconsin as the sponsor of the future USS Sioux City,” Winnefeld said. “It’s been a real privilege to meet the great Americans who are building this versatile ship, and I thank them in advance for their quality work. I look forward to meeting her crew soon, being part of her family, and bringing our ship to life when she’s commissioned.” (Unattributed Lockheed Martin Photograph 4200, donated to the Navy, Department of Defense)

Sioux City is designed so that her crew can change out the mission package to reflect the operational circumstances. In addition, the ship can: accelerate from 0 to 40+ knots in less than two minutes; decelerate from 40+ to 0 knots in approximately three ship lengths; and move directly sideways at 1 knot. 

Detailed history pending. 

Mark L. Evans
28 August 2018

Published: Tue Aug 28 10:51:10 EDT 2018