Naval History and Heritage Command

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Jackson (LCS-6)

2016–

The first U.S. Navy ship named for the capital city of Mississippi. 

(LCS-6: displacement 3,104; length 418'; beam 104'; draft 14'; speed 40+ knots; complement 40; armament 1 Mk 110 57 millimeter gun, 1 RIM-116 SeaRAM (Rolling Airframe Missile) system, 2 Mk 44 Bushmaster II 30 millimeter chain guns, and 4 .50 caliber machine guns; aircraft 2 Sikorsky MH-60R/S Seahawks and 1 Northrop Grumman MQ-8A Fire Scout; class Freedom

Jackson (LCS-6) was laid down on 18 October 2012 at Mobile, Ala., by Austal USA; launched on 14 December 2013; sponsored by Dr. Katherine H. Cochran, daughter of Senator William T. Cochran of Miss.; delivered on 11 August 2015 at Austal’s Mobile shipyard; and commissioned on 5 December 2015, Cmdr. Allen D. Adkins (LCS Crew 203) in command.

Seal

Shield

Dark blue and gold are the colors traditionally associated with the Navy, representing the sea and excellence. The elongated pentagon shape denotes protection to the nation. Green refers to hope for all MIAs and POWs. The landmass represents the State of Mississippi and displays the cross, disc, and star of the flag of its capital city, Jackson. The ship’s namesake city was named for Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States. The dueling pistols allude to the historic contest between Jackson and Charles Dickinson on 30 May 1806 – in which Dickinson shot and wounded Jackson but the latter killed Dickinson -- and illustrate the rapid firepower capability of the ship. The silver border signifies the magnification of the ship’s network, agility and stealthy surface combatant capability to defeat anti-access and asymmetric threats in the littorals.

The crossed Navy chief petty officer’s cutlass and Navy officer’s sword represent cooperation and teamwork among the crewmembers. The ship image symbolizes Jackson as she plows through the waves, denoting her speed, flexible mission, modular space, and shallow draft.

The motto, Victoribus Spolia, translated as “To the Victors, the Spoils,” is a term derived during the Presidency of Andrew Jackson, reforming the government system to support his goals for the nation.

Seal

The coat of arms as blazoned in full color on a light blue oval, signifying the Pearl River in Jackson, Mississippi, edged dark blue surmounting a white oval, edged with a gold roped border and bearing the name “USS JACKSON” at top and “LCS 6” at base, in dark blue letters.

Jackson displays a sleek profile as the ship slices cleanly through the waves in an artist’s rendering of how she will appear, released on 4 October 2001. (Jay M. Chu, U.S. Navy Image 111006-N-DX698-002, Navy NewsStand.
Jackson displays a sleek profile as the ship slices cleanly through the waves in an artist’s rendering of how she will appear, released on 4 October 2001. (Jay M. Chu, U.S. Navy Image 111006-N-DX698-002, Navy NewsStand.
The ship completes the first of three scheduled full ship shock trials in the Atlantic Ocean, 10 June 2016. The shock trials are designed to demonstrate her ability to withstand the effects of nearby underwater explosions and retain required capability. Jackson is currently ported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for required inspections and preparation for the second full ship shock trial, scheduled for later in June. (U.S. Navy photograph, Naval Sea Systems Command).
The ship completes the first of three scheduled full ship shock trials in the Atlantic Ocean, 10 June 2016. The shock trials are designed to demonstrate her ability to withstand the effects of nearby underwater explosions and retain required capability. Jackson is currently ported at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for required inspections and preparation for the second full ship shock trial, scheduled for later in June. (U.S. Navy photograph, Naval Sea Systems Command).

Detailed history pending. 

Mark L. Evans
5 February 2018

Published: Mon Feb 05 14:20:34 EST 2018