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Cheyenne IV (SSN-773)

1996–

The fourth U.S. Navy ship named for the capital of Wyoming. The first Cheyenne, converted commercial tug Bristol, served only briefly in 1898. The second Cheyenne was commissioned as Wyoming (Monitor No. 10) on 8 December 1902. On 1 January 1909, she was renamed Cheyenne, reclassified to BM-10 on 17 July 1920, and served (with some interruptions) from 1902–1937. Cheyenne, a light cruiser (CL-86), was renamed Vicksburg on 26 November 1942 prior to launching. The name Cheyenne was assigned to another light cruiser (CL-117), but the contract was canceled on 12 August 1945. The third Cheyenne, therefore, cargo ship Middlesex Victory, was acquired on 24 July 1945 and steamed with four different shipping lines until renamed Wyoming by the Maritime Administration on 28 February 1961. The Military Sea Transportation Service (later Military Sealift Command) accepted her into service from the States Steamship Co., on 29 December 1962. In February 1963, she was renamed Cheyenne (T-AG-174), and served from 1945–1973.

IV

(SSN-773: displacement 6,927; length 362'; beam 33'; draft 31'; speed 25 knots; complement 110; armament 12 Vertical Launch System (VLS) tubes for UGM-109 Tomahawk submarine-launched cruise missiles and UGM-84 Harpoon submarine launched anti-ship missiles, and four torpedo tubes for Mk 48 Advanced Capability (ADCAP) torpedoes; class Los Angeles)

The fourth Cheyenne (SSN-773) was laid down on 6 July 1992 at Newport News, Va., by Newport News Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co.; launched on 16 April 1995; sponsored by Mrs. Ann Simpson, wife of Senator Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming; and was commissioned on 13 September 1996, Cmdr. Peter H. Ozimik in command.

Cheyenne, Cmdr. Charles J. Doty in command, deployed for Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom, and on 21 and 22 March 2003 she joined 29 other U.S. and British ships and submarines that fired BGM/UGM-109 Tomahawk Land Attack Missiles (TLAMs) against Iraqi military targets. Cheyenne fired additional TLAMs on 25 and 26 March. Doty subsequently received the Bronze Star for his command of the submarine during those battles. “I am truly honored to receive the Bronze Star,” Doty said. “It really belongs to the crew. They showed extraordinary effort and never faltered.”

“U.S. Navy and the submarine force performed superbly during Operation Iraqi Freedom,” Rear Adm. Joseph A. Walsh, Commander Submarine Group 2, summarized. “Twelve U.S. submarines and two British submarines launched nearly one-third of the 800 missiles during the conflict.”

Cheyenne IV (SSN-773) 1996-030424-N-3228G-010
Cheyenne passes the USS Arizona Memorial as she returns victoriously from Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom to Naval Station Pearl Harbor, Hi., after nearly nine months at sea, 24 April 2003. (Photographer's Mate 1st Class William R. Goodwin, U.S. Navy Photograph 030424-N-3228G-010, Navy NewsStand)
Cheyenne IV (SSN-773) 1996-030424-N-5376G-023
Sailors man the sail as the brightly bedecked submarine returns to Pearl Harbor, 24 April 2003. (Photographer’s Mate Airman Benjamin D. Glass, U.S. Navy Photograph 030424-N-5376G-023, Navy NewsStand)
Cheyenne IV (SSN-773) 1996-030424-N-5376G-047
A crewman greets his daughter after going ashore from Cheyenne, 24 April 2003. (Photographer’s Mate Airman Benjamin D. Glass, U.S. Navy Photograph 030424-N-5376G-047, Navy NewsStand)
Cheyenne IV (SSN-773) 1996-130614-N-DB801-106
Cheyenne returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after completing a deployment to the Western Pacific, 14 June 2013. She is designed to seek and destroy enemy submarines and surface ships; project power ashore with TLAMs and Special Operation Forces; carry out intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions; support battle group operations, and engage in mine warfare. (Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Steven Khor, U.S. Navy Photograph 130614-N-DB801-106, Navy NewsStand)

Detailed history under construction.

Mark L. Evans

5 October 2015

Published: Wed Oct 07 08:06:34 EDT 2015