Naval History and Heritage Command

Naval History and Heritage Command

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Bataan II (LHD-5)

1997–


Image related to Bataan
Caption: USS Bataan (LHD 5)

The second U.S. Navy ship to carry this historic name, honoring the Independence-class small fleet carrier (CVL-29) -- commissioned on 17 November 1943 and decommissioned on 9 April 1954 -- that earned five battle stars in World War II and seven battle stars in the Korean War. The first Bataan commemorated the defense of the Bataan Peninsula in the Philippines (December 1941-April 1942) by Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and Filipino forces.

The name memorializes the valiant resistance of American and Filipino troops on the Bataan Peninsula in the dawning days of World War II. Fighting on the Philippine islands of Luzon and Corregidor began just ten short hours after the raid on Pearl Harbor. After weeks of Japanese air raids and beach landings on the north of Luzon, Gen. Douglas A. MacArthur, USA, ordered withdrawal from the fortified north to the narrow jungle peninsula on 23 December 1941. There, combined Army, Navy, Marine Corps, and American-trained Filipino forces oppose Japanese forces until 16 April 1942. Corregidor fell shortly after on 6 May 1942.

Tens of thousands of Americans and Filipinos died either in battle or during the unconscionable “Bataan Death March.” The 65 mile forced march of prisoners, accompanied by great privation and cruelty, claimed the lives of more than 21,000 prisoners in less than a week. Those who survived the march faced starvation and disease on board “hell ships” during transportation, and later in prison camps, until the Japanese surrendered in 1945.

II

(LHD-5: displacement 28,078 (light) 41,684 (full); length 847'; beam 106'; draft 28' ; speed 20+ knots; complement 1,204; troop capacity 1,687 (184 surge); armament 2 RAM launchers; 2 NATO Sea Sparrow launchers; 3 20mm Phalanx CIWS mounts; 4 .50 caliber machine guns; 4 25 mm Mk 38 machine guns; aircraft: 12 CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters; 4 CH-53E Sea Stallion helicopters; 6 AV-8B Harrier attack aircraft; 3 UH-1N Huey helicopters; 4 AH-1W Super Cobra helicopter (planned capability to embark MV-22 Osprey VTOL tilt-rotors) and F-35B Joint Strike Fighters (JSF) STOVL aircraft). landing/attack craft 3 Landing Craft, Air Cushion (LCAC) or 2 Landing Craft, Utility (LCU); class Wasp)

The second Bataan (LHD-4) was laid down on 22 June 1994 at Ingalls Industries Inc., Shipyard, Pascagoula, Miss.; launched on 15 March 1996; sponsored by Mrs. Linda Mundy, wife of Gen. Carl E. Mundy Jr., USMC, 30th Commandant of the Marine Corps; and commissioned at Pascagoula, Miss., on 30 September 1997, Capt. Craig W. Wilson in command.


Image related to Bataan
Caption: Ship Insignia

Shield

Azure, a pale Gules fimbriated Argent between twelve bamboo spear points chevronwise six and six and overall a seahorse Or. Dark blue and gold are the traditionally Navy colors and reflect the sea and excellent. Red denotes courage and sacrifice, white is for integrity. The seahorse is the symbol of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor. The red pale commemorates the 70 mile Bataan Death March. The spears form a wedge underscoring amphibious assault and deployment of men and cargo ashore as well as combat readiness while highlighting the USS Bataan's 12 battle stars. Bamboo alludes to the tropics and the Pacific Theater where the first Bataan served; during the Death March the sides of the road were lined with angled bamboo spear points.

Crest

From a wreath Argent and Azure, a mount Sable superimposed by a stylized sun Or bearing a mullet of the first encircled in base by a vol of the second, all within an arc of seven mullets of the fourth, two, three and two. The wings represent aviation and the heritage of the ship. The gold stars are for the seven battle stars earned in Korea, while the five points of the central star are for World War II battle stars. The black mount suggests the mountainous terrain of Korea; the sun is adapted from the Philippine state arms.

Seal

The coat of arms in full color as in the blazon, all upon a white background and enclosed within a dark blue oval border edged on the outside with a gold rope and bearing the inscription "USS BATAAN" at top and "LHD 5" in base all gold.

Supporters

A United States Navy and a Marine Corps Officer's sword saltirewise points down Proper. The swords, one a U.S. Navy cutlass and the other a U.S. Marine mameluke, are crossed to denote cooperation and teamwork as well as the combined combat mission of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps.

Motto

A scroll Azure doubled and inscribed "COURAGE COMMITMENT HONOR" Argent.

Bataan- Linda Mundy- sponsor
Linda Mundy, Bataan, ship sponsor. (Ingalls Shipbuilding photograph donated to U.S. Navy)
Bataan- Christening
Mrs. Mundy christens Bataan, 15 March 1996. (Ingalls Shipbuilding photograph donated to U.S. Navy).

On 29 June 2001, Capt. John B. Strott was relieved as Bataan's third Commanding Officer by Capt. Martin R. Allard in a ceremony aboard the ship moored in Norfolk, Va.

In the aftermath of the al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in the morning of 11 September 2001, Bataan recalled personnel from leave and even though the ship was in the midst of maintenance, the ship was underway in support of Operation Noble Eagle within 11 hours of receipt of sortie orders in support of Operation Noble Eagle for a potential support role in response to the attacks. Bataan was recalled after four days and returned to homeport. On 17 September 2001, Bataan embarked elements of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) (MEU/SOC) in Norfolk, Va. On 19 September the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) deployed to the Mediterranean Sea on its scheduled six-month deployment. On 20 September she embarked the remaining elements of the 26th MEU (SOC) in Morehead City, N.C.  On 1 October Bataan chopped from Second Fleet to the Sixth Fleet. From 10 through 25 October Bataan participated in Exercise Bright Star, the Fifth Fleet-sponsored multi-national coalition exercise. Bataan supported the 26th MEU movement ashore via air and surface and continued to support those operations throughout the duration of the exercise. Bataan engaged in amphibious training demonstrations and embarked Egyptian forces providing valuable training for the coalition and the ARG/Marine Expeditionary Unit assets. During the Albanian National Training Continuum from 1 through 11 November, the ARG/MEU team conducted valuable Special Mission training that honed crucial special operations skills to be employed in Operation Enduring Freedom. Key to exercise success was the embarkation and engagement of the entire executive cabinet of the Albanian government including the President, Prime Minister and the United States Ambassador to Albania. The engagement may pay dividends in the future for naval training using the resources available in Albania. On 14 November Bataan transited the Suez Canal, and on 15 November chopped to Commander, Fifth Fleet. She later arrived on station ready for duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In the course of operations Bataan launched combat sorties into Afghanistan and sent troops ashore in support of Combined Task Force 58 and Bataan assumed duties and responsibilities as Task Force 58.3 on 21 November 2001. On December 10, 2001, while operating in the Arabian Sea in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Bataan received the flag that had been draped on the Federal Building in New York City. The New York City Emergency Rescue Squad, in conjunction with the Marine

Corps' New York City's Recruiting Office, sent the flag to Bataan to be given to the Marines of the 26th MEU who were currently embarked. On 11 December the sailors and marines on board Bataan hoisted this flag and played taps and observed a moment of silence to honor those who died in the attack. The flag was taken ashore by the 26th MEU and flown in Kandahar, Afghanistan. On 12 December Bataan received the “Ground Zero” flag from Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). This flag was originally flown by the three New York City Firefighters in the rubble that was once the World Trade Center twin towers. Once again Bataan held a flag-raising ceremony to honor this flag and all those who perished on 11 September.

Bataan’s mission is to provide horizontal and vertical support for the movement of troops, cargo and vehicles ashore. She was also the first ship designed and built from the keel up with accommodations for female sailors and Marines. The ship carried out her first major overseas deployment (20 September 1999–15 March 2000), and while operating in the Mediterranean participated in Exercises Bright Star, Noble Shirley, and Infinite Moonlight. She then (1 July–28 Aug 2000) completed a Restricted Availability at Norfolk, and that October conducted MV-22 Osprey operations. On 28 May 2001, the ship embarked an entire squadron of AV-8B Harrier IIs from Marine Attack Squadron (VMA) 223 to conduct intense shipboard training. On 29 June 2001, Capt. John B. Strott was relieved as Bataan's third Commanding Officer by Capt. Martin R. Allard in a ceremony on board the ship moored in Norfolk, Va.

In the aftermath of the al-Qaeda attacks on the United States in the morning of 11 September 2001, Bataan recalled personnel from leave and even though the ship was in the midst of maintenance, the ship was underway in support of Operation Noble Eagle within 11 hours of receipt of sortie orders in support of Operation Noble Eagle for a potential support role in response to the attacks. Bataan was recalled after four days and returned to homeport. On 17 September 2001, Bataan embarked elements of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) (MEU/SOC) in Norfolk, Va. On 19 September the Bataan Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) deployed to the Mediterranean Sea on its scheduled six-month deployment. On 20 September she embarked the remaining elements of the 26th MEU(SOC) in Morehead City, N.C.  On 1 October Bataan chopped from Second Fleet to the Sixth Fleet. From 10 through 25 October Bataan participated in Exercise Bright Star, the Fifth Fleet-sponsored multi-national coalition exercise. Bataan supported the 26th MEU movement ashore via air and surface and continued to support those operations throughout the duration of the exercise. Bataan engaged in amphibious training demonstrations and embarked Egyptian forces providing valuable training for the coalition and the ARG/Marine Expeditionary Unit assets. During the Albanian National Training Continuum from 1 through 11 November, the ARG/MEU team conducted valuable Special Mission training that honed crucial special operations skills to be employed in Operation Enduring Freedom. Key to exercise success was the embarkation and engagement of the entire executive cabinet of the Albanian government including the President, Prime Minister and the United States Ambassador to Albania. The engagement may pay dividends in the future for naval training using the resources available in Albania. On 14 November Bataan transited the Suez Canal, and on 15 November chopped to Commander, Fifth Fleet. She later arrived on station ready for duty in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In the course of operations Bataan launched combat sorties into Afghanistan and sent troops ashore in support of Combined Task Force 58 and Bataan assumed duties and responsibilities as Task Force 58.3 on 21 November 2001. On December 10, 2001, while operating in the Arabian Sea in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, Bataan received the flag that had been draped on the Federal Building in New York City. The New York City Emergency Rescue Squad, in conjunction with the Marine

Corps' New York City's Recruiting Office, sent the flag to Bataan to be given to the Marines of the 26th MEU who were currently embarked. On 11 December the sailors and marines on board Bataan hoisted this flag and played taps and observed a moment of silence to honor those who died in the attack. The flag was taken ashore by the 26th MEU and flown in Kandahar, Afghanistan. On 12 December Bataan received the “Ground Zero” flag from Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). This flag was originally flown by the three New York City Firefighters in the rubble that was once the World Trade Center twin towers. Once again Bataan held a flag-raising ceremony to honor this flag and all those who perished on 11 September.

Bataan- missile during live fire exercise-29Mar2001-010329-N-6610T-503
A Rolling Airframe Missile is launched from Bataan after locking onto its target during a live fire missile exercise, 29 March 2001. (Photographer's Mate Airman John Taucher, U.S. Navy Photograph 010329-N-6610T-503, Navy.mil Photos).
Bataan- Marines night fire on flight deck-7Dec2001-011207-N-2383B-504
While deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, marines of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) conduct a small arms live-fire exercise on Bataan’s flight deck. (Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, U.S. Navy Photograph 011207-N-2383B-504, Navy.mil Photos).
Bataan- Marines move to choppers for deployment-12Dec2001-011212-N-2383B-511
Marines of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable) on board Bataan head for their helicopters for deployment to the war zone, 12 December 2001 (Chief Photographers Mate Johnny Bivera, U.S. Navy Photograph 011212-N-2383B-511, Navy.mil Photos).

From 1 January through 20 April 2002 Bataan continued to support Commander, Fifth Fleet (COMFIFTHFLEET) and Commander, Task Force 58 in assaults on Taliban/al-Qaeda forces deep inside Afghanistan. Command elements aboard Bataan during Operation Enduring Freedom included Commander Amphibious Squadron Eight, Tactical Air Squadron Twenty-one, Naval Special Warfare Task Unit, Naval Beach Group Two, Assault Craft Unit Four, Helicopter Squadron Six, Fleet Surgical Team Four, Explosive Ordnance Detachment, Mobile Unit Two, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (Special Operations Capable), Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 365 (Reinforced), and Marine Battalion Landing Team 3/6. After being detached on 8 March, Bataan transited the Red Sea and entered the Mediterranean Sea and returned to Naval Station Norfolk, Va. on 20 April 2002. She completed a Planned Maintenance Availability at Norfolk Naval Shipyard at Portsmouth (8 June–8 October).

From 7 through 11 January 2003 Bataan conducted an ammunition onload at Naval Weapons Station Earle, N.J. On 11 January the ship received her deployment order. On 12 January she embarked 1,000 marines at Naval Station Norfolk. From 12 January through 16 January Bataan embarked additional marines at Onslow Bay, N.C. The ship began her Atlantic transit on 17 January. From 3 February through 10 March Bataan conducted operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom this included transiting the Suez Canal on 4 February and offloading marines at Kuwait Naval Base from 16 to 20 February. From 10 March through 19 March Bataan conducted operations in support of Operation Enduring Force. From 20 March through 31 May Bataan conducted operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Bataan supported COMFIFTHFLEET and Commander Task Force 51 in the destruction of elite Republican Guard troops deep inside Iraq.

During Iraqi Freedom the ship operated exclusively as an AV-8B Harrier II platform with 26 AV-8Bs on board, dubbed the first “Harrier Carrier”. The deployment included 797 combat sorties of more than 1,400 combat hours. On 20 April Bataan, along with Boxer (LHD-4), Bonhomme Richard (LHD-6), Kearsarge (LHD-3), Saipan (LHA-2), and Tarawa (LHA-1) operated with 26 other ships of Task Force 51 in the northern Arabian Gulf—.

Command elements onboard Bataan during Operation Iraqi Freedom included Tactical Air Control Squadron Twenty-one, Detachment Two; Naval Beach Group Two, Detachment 1; Assault Craft Unit Four, Detachment 1, Helicopter Support Squadron Six, Detachment; and Explosive Ordnance Disposal Detachment, Mobile Unit Two. Bataan had elements of Task Force Tarawa embarked from 12 January through 24 June. On 1 June Bataan transited the Suez Canal en route to a return to her homeport at Norfolk, Va. Bataan conducted an offload at Onslow Bay, N.C. and then returned to Norfolk on 25 June.

She provided shipboard testing support for the MV-22 Osprey program (17–24 November 2003). The testing was the final flight deck stability test before the V-22 was scheduled to go into production. Bataan responded to an unscheduled deployment order (a surge deployment) and deployed to the Arabian Gulf in support of Iraqi Freedom II (19 January–31 March 2004). During this deployment she provided Marine support from the Second Marine Expeditionary Force as well as equipment and ammunition. She then (May–October 2004) accomplished an extensive six-month maintenance availability at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, including a dry dock period. Bataan served as flagship during PANAMAX 2005 exercises with forces from Argentina, Chile, Columbia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Honduras, Panama, and Peru in August 2005. On 4 April 2007, while underway in the Persian Gulf, Gen. James T. Conway, the Commandant of the Marine Corps visited the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU) on board Bataan.

Bataan- Conway speaks to Marines and crew-4Apr2007-070404-N-1512O-253
Gen. Conway addresses marines and sailors on board Bataan, 4 April 2007. (Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Stephen Oleksiak, U.S. Navy Photograph 070404-N-1512O-253, Navy.mil Photos).

On 22 August 2007 Flt. Adm. Vladamir Vasilyevich Masorin, Commander in Chief, Russian Federation Navy, paid a visit to Bataan for a tour while the ship was pierside at Naval Station Norfolk. Masorin’s visit was just one stop on his tour of various naval bases along the East Coast. Vice Adm. Evan M. Chanik, Commander, U.S. Second Fleet and Capt. Rick Snyder, Bataan’s commanding officer, hosted Masorin and his staff to show the ship’s capabilities. The tour took Russia's top naval officer through different areas of the ship and included the ship's well deck, upper vehicle stowage, hangar bay, and bridge.

Bataan- Admiral Masorin visit 22Aug2007-070822-N-8154G-039
Chief Hull Maintenance Technician Neil Pierce shows fire-fighting equipment to Adm. Vladimir Masorin and his staff during a visit on board Bataan. Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jeremy L. Grisham U.S. Navy Photograph 070822-N-8154G-039, Navy.mil Photos).

On 12 January 2010 a 7.0 magnitude earthquake rocked Haiti. In response the Navy dispatched four ships as part of Operation Unified Response, Bataan and the dock landing ships Fort McHenry (LSD-43), Carter Hall (LSD-50), and Gunston Hall (LSD-44) along with embarked elements of the 22nd MEU on 14 January. On 18 January Navy and Marine Corps aircraft began flying reconnaissance and assessment flights as the ships approached the coast. All arrived off Port-au-Prince later in the day. The amphibious relief mission also included detachments from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron 22, Helicopter Mine Countermeasure Squadron 15, Tactical Air Control Squadron 21, Fleet Surgical Team 8, Assault Craft Unit 4, and Beachmaster Unit 2. The Humanitarian Assistance Coordination Center (HACC) was established on board Bataan. The HACC was modeled after the Joint Force Humanitarian Assistance Coordination Center, which was comprised of multinational elements ashore.

On 26 January Bataan received patients medically evacuated from Haiti by air cushion landing craft. On 27 January Bataan successfully completed a replenishment-at-sea with Military Sealift Command-manned Sacagawea (T-AKE 2) receiving approximately 170 pallets to support Operation Unified Response. On 19 February, in the midst of relief operations, there was the conduct of a change of command ceremony which saw Capt. Steve Kohler relieve Capt. Samuel Howard as the ship’s commanding officer. With her relief mission to Haiti completed Bataan returned to Norfolk on 3 April. On 11 December Lt. Col. Hugh Mudford, a British Royal Marine officer, and Lt. Cmdr. George Pastoor, a Royal Navy Netherlands officer embarked on Bataan at the commencement of Bold Alligator 2011 to observe and contribute to the exercise and to help provide a seamless transition into future combined operations. Bold Alligator 2011was the first installment of regularly scheduled, large amphibious exercises with 29 participating commands, including eight ships, 14 Expeditionary Strike Group/2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade reporting units and seven training centers. Exercise Bold Alligator ended on 16 December.

On 14 January 2012 Bataan hosted French aviators and engineers interested in the capabilities of the MV-22 Osprey. The French aviators and aircraft specialists flew out to Bataan while the ship was transiting the Strait of Bonifacio in order to inspect the Ospreys of Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron 263 (VMM-263), and to see how they are operated and maintained onboard an amphibious ship.

On 8 February 2014 the Bataan ARG, consisting of Bataan, amphibious transport dock ship Mesa Verde (LPD-19), and amphibious dock landing ship Gunston Hall (LSD-44), with the embarked 22nd MEU departed Norfolk, Va. on a scheduled deployment.  The ARG arrived in the Sixth Fleet area of responsibility on 16 February. Later on 15 March the ARG transited the Suez Canal and entered the Fifth Fleet area of responsibility. On 31 August Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel ordered the ARG to extend its deployment for an additional 21 days to assure a continuous ARG/MEU presence in the Arabian Gulf and uninterrupted support for potential taskings. This extension provided time for Bataan’s relief, Makin Island (LHD-8) and the embarked 11th MEU to arrive on station for a "face-to-face" turnover before Bataan departed. When relieved by Makin Island, Bataan began her transit to her homeport and transited the Suez Canal on 2 October.  Bataan arrived in Kusadasi, Turkey for a scheduled port visit on 4 October and then called at Naples. Bataan served as the platform for a reception hosted by Adm. Mark Ferguson, commander, U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, for local Naples distinguished guests and U.S. Embassy officials on 11 October. The ship departed Naples on 14 October. The 22nd MEU returned to Camp Lejeune, N.C. on 28 October while the remainder of the Bataan ARG returned to Naval Station Norfolk, Va. and Joint Expeditionary Base Little Creek-Fort Story, Va. on 31 October.

Bataan-returning home-31Oct2014-141031-N-JW440-179
Engineman Fireman Vincent Dalessandro reunites with his wife and his newborn twin infants at Norfolk, Va. after a nine month deployment on board Bataan., 31 October 2014. (Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Rawad Madanat, U.S. Navy photo 141031-N-JW440-179. Navy.mil Photos).

Home Port Assignments

Dates

Norfolk, Va. (Little Creek)

September 1997

 

Commanding Officers

Date Assumed Command

Capt. Craig W. Wilson

20 September 1997

Capt. David C. Taylor

10 July 1998

Capt .John B. Strott

22 December 1999

Capt. Martin R. Allard

29 June 2001

Capt. Earle S. Yerger

28 November 2002

Capt. Nora W. Tyson

22 February 2004

Changes in armament and major systems (Weapons and radar/sonar equipment):

New AN/SPS-73 navigation radar installed in the latter part of 2002.

Major Overseas Deployments (or deployments away from home port for more than 2 months)

Date of Departure

Return Date

Detachments On Board

Area of Operation

 

20 September 1999

15 March 2000

HMM-261 (R)

 

Med/IO

 

17 September 2001

20 April 2002

HMM-365 (R)

 

Med/IO

1 January 2003

25 June 2003

HMH-464 (R) *

 

Med/IO

 

19 January 2004

31 March 2004

HMM-261, HMLA-167 Detachment

Med/IO

 

* Bataan deployed with a portion of HMH-464 embarked, including VMA-542. After arrival in the Arabian Gulf in February, HMH-464 consolidated on board Kearsarge (LHD-3) and VMA-223 joined VMA-542 on board Bataan.

Unit Awards Received

Dates

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal

19 January 2000 – 18 February 2000

Navy Unit Commendation

15 November 2001 – 22 March 2002

Navy Unit Commendation

20 March 2003 – 31 May 2003

Meritorious Unit Commendation

1 Jan 1999 – 10 September 2001

Navy Battle (E)

 

1 January 2000 – 31 December 2000

Navy Battle (E)

1 January 2001 – 31 December 2001

Navy Battle (E)

1 January 2004 – 31 December 2004

Other Sources:

Bataan (LHD-5) Web Site, www.bataan.navy.mil

Volume I Part A & B DANFS

Unit Awards Listing, https://awards.navy.mil

Bataan naming/sponsor file

Naval Aviation News magazine July-August 2004 and July-August 2005 “Year In Review.”

Navy News story NNS031123-02 "Bataan Serves as Temporary Osprey Nest, 24 November 2003"

Navy News story NNS041109-14, "USS Bataan Completes Sea Trials, 10 November 2004"

CNO Daily Briefs for 1999 and 2000

Commander Amphibious Group 2 Command History Reports for 1997 and 1998

Updated (at the time of writing) Awards, Citations, and Campaign Ribbons

Navy Unit Commendation (2)
Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation

Navy Battle "E" Ribbon (5)

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal
National Defense Service Medal

Southwest Asia Service Medal

War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal (5)

Detailed history pending.

Christopher B. Havern Sr.

9 November 2015

Published:Wed Feb 17 13:56:47 EST 2016