The NWS of today and tomorrow was built on a 150-year-old foundation of science and service. Over time, advances in science, technology, and engineering have accelerated our understanding of the natural world, continually allowing us to better predict weather, water, and climate events. As the needs of society have changed, so has NOAAs NWS. However, the mission remains the same: save lives, protect property, and enhance the nation’s economy. From the very beginning, this has been the agency’s fundamental focus.

In conjunction with the exhibition, “Treasures of NOAA’s Ark”, Chris Strong, Warning Coordination Meteorologist with NOAA’s National Weather Service (NWS), will talk about the history of weather forecasting and how it has evolved to meet today’s needs in a little more than a century. What started as a new science with little skill and many unknowns became a highly sophisticated enterprise that saves lives and helps keep citizens informed of looming weather disasters. Chris will talk about forecasting today and the tools available from the National Weather Service, available to all in the Baltimore/Washington metro area, to help keep you and your family safe and informed.

Chris Strong is the Warning Coordination Meteorologist (WCM) for the National Weather Service Baltimore/Washington Forecast Office located in Sterling, Virginia. His forecast office serves all of Maryland west of the Chesapeake Bay as well as Cecil County in Maryland, northern and northwestern Virginia, eastern West Virginia, and the District of Columbia. As WCM he is in charge of outreach and networking for his office, and ensuring the National Weather Service's programs, forecasts, and warnings are effectively used by the government, the media, and the public at large.

This pre-recorded Facebook Premier program will be broadcast on the NMUSN Facebook page. If anyone has any problems accessing the museum's Facebook page, or if you have a question for the speaker, please send an email to David Barker at david.a.barker16.civ@us.navy.mil.


Chris Strong, National Weather Service (NWS)

Chris Strong, National Weather Service (NWS)