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Photo # NH 99084:  Trawler W.T. James prior to World War I

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS W.T. James (SP-429), 1917-1919.
Also known as James.
Originally the Steam Trawler W.T. James (1912)

W.T. James, a 267 gross ton "Menhadden fisherman" type steam trawler, was built at Wilmington, Delaware, in 1912, and operated out of Virginia over the next five years. She was taken over by the Navy in May 1917 for World War I service, converted for warlike duties and commissioned in August 1917. Under the terms of General Order # 314, issued in late July 1917, her name was officially shortened to James, but her original name, W.T. James, also continued in use, at least informally. After crossing the Atlantic in late August and September, by way of the Azores, she began convoy escort operations off France.

Later in 1917, James was refitted for minesweeping. Based at Lorient, she spent the rest of the First World War I, and the early months of the post-war era, in a constant effort to clear German submarine-laid mines, and also performed convoy and patrol duties until the 11 November 1918 Armistice removed the threat of direct submarine attack. On 27 April 1919, while en route back to the United States, she encountered heavy weather and began taking on water. An attempt to tow her back to Brest was unsuccessful and, after all of her crewmen were taken off, USS James sank off the French coast on the morning of 28 April.

This page features all the views we have related to USS W.T. James (SP-429) and to the civilian fishing vessel W.T. James.


If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 99084

W.T. James
(American Steam Trawler, 1912)

Halftone reproduction, printed on a postal card, of a photograph probably taken when this "Menhadden fisherman" type steam trawler was completed in 1912.
She was USS W.T. James (SP-429) in 1917-1919.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 97KB; 740 x 490 pixels

High-Resolution Image:
A large (4990 x 3113 pixels, 500 dpi) TIF format digital image of this photograph is available as Photo # NH 99084 (TIF).
CAUTION! -- This is a very large
(11.4 MEGABYTE) file. Download times may be lengthy!

 
Photo #: NH 44901

"Menhaden Fisherman" type of converted minesweepers


Moored at Lorient, France, in 1918.
These ships are identified as USS Anderton (SP-530), USS Lewes (SP-383) and USS James (SP-429). Anderton is the middle ship, with her smokestack immediately behind her pilothouse.
The ships were originally named Raymond J. Anderton, City of Lewes and W.T. James. A Navy Department general order in July 1917 ordered section patrol (SP) boat names shortened to surnames only.
Note the racks, holding two depth charges each, mounted on two of these minesweepers, and the numeral "9" on the stern of the ship on the right.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 88KB; 740 x 440 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 44900

"Menhaden Fisherman" type of converted minesweepers


Off Lorient, France, probably during a review of U.S. and French ships on 29 November 1918.
Four of these ships are identified as USS Hubbard (SP-416) USS Anderton (SP-530), USS Lewes (SP-383) and USS James (SP-429). Hubbard is in the foreground, wearing the number "8". Anderton is the third ship from the front (only partially visible), with her smokestack immediately behind her pilothouse.
The ships were originally named B.H.B. Hubbard, Raymond J. Anderton, City of Lewes and W.T. James. A Navy Department general order in July 1917 ordered section patrol (SP) boat names shortened to surnames only.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 57KB; 740 x 495 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 53596

"Menhaden Fisherman" type converted minesweepers


During a review of U.S. and French ships in Lorient harbor, France, 29 November 1918.
The ship at left is USS Hubbard (SP-416). USS Anderton (SP-530) is in the center, with her smokestack immediately behind her pilothouse. Probably also present are USS Lewes (SP-383) and USS James (SP-429).
The ships were originally named B.H.B. Hubbard, Raymond J. Anderton, City of Lewes and W.T. James. A Navy Department general order in July 1917 ordered section patrol (SP) boat names shortened to surnames only.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 65KB; 740 x 410 pixels

 


If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


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Page made 3 November 2002
Link changed 17 April 2004