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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Titania (AK-55, later AKA-13), 1942-1961

USS Titania, a 13,910-ton Arcturus class cargo ship built at Kearny, New Jersey, was commissioned in May 1942. After operating along the U.S. East Coast, she participated in the North Africa invasion in November 1942 and transferred to the Pacific a month later. In February 1943, while supporting the final stages of the Guadalcanal campaign, she was redesignated AKA-13. During the rest of the Pacific War, in addition to steaming thousands of miles on general cargo transportation missions, Titania took part in the invasions of Bougainville, Guam, Leyte, Lingayen Gulf, Tarakan, Brunei Bay and Balikpapan.

After the end of World War II, Titania remained active transporting cargo between the United States and destinations in the Pacific. In Japan when war began in June 1950, she was soon busy supporting U.S. forces in Korea, work that lasted until the conflict ended in July 1953. Titania continued her Pacific logistics service until she decommissioned in July 1955. She was stricken from the Navy list in July 1961.

This page features views of USS Titania (AKA-13).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than this digital image, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: USMC 86251

USS Titania (AKA-13)


At Pavuvu, Russell Islands, 28 April 1944, after bringing veterans of the Cape Gloucester Campaign to a rest camp.
USS Aquarius (AKA-16) is on Titania's far side. LCVPs in the left foreground are from USS Wayne (APA-54).
Photographed by Fitzgerald.

U.S. Marine Corps Photograph.

Online Image: 58KB; 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 
Photo #: USMC 86265

USS Aquarius (AKA-16)
(left) and
USS Titania (AKA-13)

At Pavuvu, Russell Islands, 28 April 1944, after bringing veterans of the Cape Gloucester Campaign to a rest camp.
LCPs in the foreground, from USS Wayne (APA-54), are being used as water taxiis.
Photographed by Fitzgerald.
Note SC-2 radar antenna mounted atop Aquarius' forward kingposts.

U.S. Marine Corps Photograph.

Online Image: 99KB; 600 x 765 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 
Photo #: 80-G-433793

USS Titania (AKA-13)


In Wonsan Harbor, North Korea, circa 10-13 September 1951, seen from USS Floyd B. Parks (DD-884), which is coming alongside to take on fuel.
Photographed by AFAN E.A. McDade.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 108KB; 740 x 610 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 


While the Naval Historical Center has no other views of USS Titania, the National Archives appears to hold several more, including those described below:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections. DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.".


  • Photo #: 80-G-10718
    USS Titania (AK-55). Starboard broadside aerial view, taken by NAS Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 16 September 1942.

  • Photo #: 428-N-1044332
    USS Titania (AKA-13). Port bow surface view, taken circa 1945-46.

  • Photo #: 80-G-422263
    USS Titania (AKA-13). Starboard bow surface view, taken while the ship was underway off Wonsan, Korea, 12 October 1950.


    Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.

     

    The images described above are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections. DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.".


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    16 May 1999