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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Photo # NH 43115:  USS Stockton at Queenstown, Ireland, circa 1918

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73, later DD-73), 1917-1940

USS Stockton, a 1125-ton Caldwell class destroyer, was built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Commissioned in late November 1917, she soon crossed the Atlantic to join the U.S. Navy anti-submarine forces based at Queenstown, Ireland. For the rest of World War I Stockton escorted convoys and performed patrol duties in the vicinity of the British isles. At the end of March 1918 she took part in an engagement with a German U-Boat, but the action ended without significant damage to either side.

Stockton returned to the United States following the November 1918 Armistice. In May 1919, during the trans-Atlantic flight of the NC-4 aircraft, she was stationed on plane guard duty west of the Azores. The destroyer's active service continued until June 1922, when she was decommissioned and placed in reserve at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Following eighteen years in "red lead row", Stockton was brought back to commissioned status in mid-August 1940. However, her U.S. Navy career lasted only long enough for a transit to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where she was placed out of commission and transferred to Great Britain later in August. Renamed Ludlow, she served in the Royal Navy until about 1943, when she was beached for use as an aircraft target.

USS Stockton was named in honor of Captain Robert F. Stockton (1795-1866), an important figure in the 19th Century Navy and in contemporary politics.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have related to USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73, later DD-73).

For other views concerning this ship, see:

  • USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73, later DD-73) -- On Board Views.


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

    Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

    Photo #: NH 43115

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    In Queenstown harbor, Ireland, circa 1918.
    Note her pattern camouflage.

    Donation of Captain H.A. Baldridge, USN (Retired), who was the ship's first Commanding Officer.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 78KB; 740 x 605 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 61709

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    Moored alongside another destroyer in a British harbor, circa 1918.
    Note her pattern camouflage.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 52KB; 740 x 535 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 100403

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    In British waters, circa 1918, while painted in pattern camouflage.

    Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1985.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 64KB; 740 x 510 pixels

    Note:
    This photo is not very sharp.

     
    Photo #: NH 41978

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    Operating at sea in 1918.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 79KB; 740 x 535 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 2233-KN (Color)

    "A Critical Situation"

    Screened color print of an oil painting by Burnell Poole. It depicts USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73) narrowly averting a collision with a large troopship she was escorting in thick weather during 1918.

    Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Collection, Washington, D.C.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 101KB; 740 x 525 pixels

    NOTE:
    At the time of this writing (October 2004) the original painting was in poor condition and awaiting restoration.

     
    Photo #: NH 63214

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    At anchor, circa 1919-1922.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 71KB; 740 x 600 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 104236

    USS Stockton
    (Destroyer # 73)

    Collision damage to the ship's bow, 1918.
    The original image is printed on post card stock.

    Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2006.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 70KB; 740 x 470 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 95792

    Trans-Atlantic Flight of the "NC" Aircraft, May 1919


    Diagram of the third leg of the flight of the NC-1, NC-3 and NC-4 aircraft, between Trepassy Bay, Newfoundland, and the Azores, during 16 May to 20 May 1919. It also shows the positions of the 21 U.S. Navy destroyers stationed along the way.
    Printed by the Matthews-Northrup Works, Buffalo, New York.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 109KB; 900 x 605 pixels

     


    The following photograph shows a destroyer that MAY be USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73):

    Photo #: NH 100436

    U.S. Navy Destroyer


    Painted in what appears to be Mackay "low visibility" camouflage, during World War I.
    This is probably USS Conner (Destroyer # 72), which wore similar camouflage, but might possibly be her sister ship, USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73).

    Courtesy of Ted Stone, 1985.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 54KB; 740 x 425 pixels

     

    For other views concerning this ship, see:

  • USS Stockton (Destroyer # 73, later DD-73) -- On Board Views.


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


    Return to Naval Historical Center home page.

    Page made 7 October 2004
    New image added 11 December 2006