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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Lindsey (DM-32, originally DD-771, later MMD-32), 1944-1972

USS Lindsey, a 2200-ton Robert H. Smith class light minelayer, was built at San Pedro, California. Begun as a destroyer (designated DD-771), she was converted to a minelayer while still under construction and was commissioned in August 1944. Following shakedown, Lindsey joined the fleet operating in the western Pacific. In February 1945, she provided gunfire support in support of the Iwo Jima invasion.

During the Okinawa campaign, on 12 April, Lindsey was hit by two Kamikaze planes, suffering damage that killed nearly sixty crewmembers and destroyed her bow. She was able to reach Guam, where temporary repairs in May-July 1945 made her seaworthy enough to return to the United States for permanent restoration. In May 1946, soon after that work was finished, Lindsey decommissioned. Assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, and redesignated MMD-32 in 1969, she remained "in mothballs" until stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in October 1970. USS Lindsey was expended as a target off the Virginia coast in May 1972.

USS Lindsey was named in honor of Lieutenant Commander Eugene E. Lindsey, who was killed in action on 4 June 1942, while leading Torpedo Squadron Six during the Battle of Midway.

This page features all the views we have of USS Lindsey.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than this digital image, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: 80-G-330108

USS Lindsey (DM-32)


View of extensive damage to the ship's forward hull and superstructure, received when she was struck by two Kamikaze planes off Okinawa on 12 April 1945. The photograph was taken at Kerama Retto anchorage on 14 April.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 105KB; 740 x 625 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 
Photo #: 80-G-344369

USS Lindsey (DM-32)


Crew of one of the ship's port forward 20mm guns pose by their weapon, at Guam, circa 16 June 1945. They had stuck to their post until knocked off their feet by the force of a second explosion, when Lindsey was struck by two Kamikaze planes off Okinawa on 12 April 1945. Note severely damaged plating in the vicinity.
The men are (left to right):
CM3c Edwin K. Kayden;
GM3c Balanor Easebio;
Y2c Chester F. Fluharty;
S1c Fred M. Gorges;
S1c Robert F. Zelenka.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 114KB; 590 x 765 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 


While the Naval Historical Center has no other views of USS Lindsey, the National Archives appears to hold several more, including those described below:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections. DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.".


  • Photo #: 80-G-248133
    USS Lindsey (DM-32), starboard broadside aerial view of the ship underway off the U.S. West Coast, 6 September 1944. The ship is in pattern camouflage. Photograph taken from a blimp of squadron ZP-31.

  • Photo #: 80-G-344361
    USS Lindsey (DM-32), port broadside surface view, taken at Apra Harbor, Guam, circa early July 1945, after temporary battle damage repairs. The ship's damaged bow has been cut off back to the front of the pilothouse and a new "snub" bow fitted.

  • Photo #: 80-G-344362
    USS Lindsey (DM-32), starboard bow surface view, taken at Apra Harbor, Guam, circa early July 1945, while being removed from drydock after temporary battle damage repairs. This view, which is nearly bow-on with the camera only slightly to starboard, provides a fairly close-up view of the ship's temporary "snub" bow.


    Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.

     

    The images described above are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections. DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions.".


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    17 May 1999