Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1), 1902-1920

USS Bainbridge, a 420-ton destroyer that was the first of her class, and the first ship classified as a destroyer by the U.S. Navy, was built at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Commissioned in November 1902, she remained in reserve status until February 1903 and then operated with the North Atlantic Fleet. In December 1903 Bainbridge left the United States on a long voyage to the Philippines. Accompanied by four of her sister destroyers, she steamed across the Atlantic, transited the Mediterranean, passed through the Suez Canal and crossed the Indian Ocean, arriving at Cavite, near Manila, in April 1904. She served in the Far East for the next thirteen years, mainly in the Philippine Islands and along the China coast.

Bainbridge left Asian waters in August 1917 to reinforce the U.S. Navy's battle against the German U-Boats in the eastern Atlantic. Between September 1917 and mid-1918 the destroyer operated in the vicinity of Gibraltar, escorting convoys and conducting patrols. She steamed across the Atlantic to Charleston, South Carolina, in July 1918 and spent the rest of World War I, and the early post-war months, serving along the U.S. East Coast. Decommissioned at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in July 1919, USS Bainbridge was sold for scrapping in early January 1920.

USS Bainbridge was named in honor of Commodore William Bainbridge (1774-1833), one of the leading figures of the early 19th Century U.S. Navy.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have related to USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1).

For other images related to USS Bainbridge, see:

Photo #: 19-N-13135

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

Fitting out at the Neafie & Levy Ship & Engine Building Company shipyard, circa June-November 1902.
USS Denver (Cruiser # 14) is at right, also fitting out.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 100KB; 600 x 765 pixels

Reproductions may also be available through the National Archives.

 
Photo #: NH 69702

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

Underway in Subic Bay, Philippines, about sixty miles up the coast from Manila, 1915. She was returning from outside Subic Bay, where she had been participating in target practice.
Photographed by Seaman Arthur B. Furnas, who was stationed on board USS Yorktown (Gunboat # 1), Flagship of the Asiatic Fleet.

Courtesy of Arthur B. Furnas, 1969.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 78KB; 740 x 600 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 68868

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

Steaming in Subic Bay, Philippines, about sixty miles up the coast from Manila, 1915. She was returning from outside Subic Bay, where she had been participating in target practice.
Photographed by Seaman Arthur B. Furnas, who was stationed on board USS Yorktown (Gunboat # 1), Flagship of the Asiatic Fleet.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 61KB; 740 x 595 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 88544

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

In an Asiatic port, circa 1915-1916.

Collection of C.A. Shively, 1978.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 51KB; 740 x 440 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 88545

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

Moored in Asiatic waters, circa 1915-1916.

Collection of C.A. Shively, 1978.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 43KB; 740 x 470 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 88587

Asiatic Fleet warships off Chefoo, China, circa 1914-1916

Ships present are (from left to right):
USS Galveston (Cruiser # 17);
USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1); and
USS Saratoga (Armored Cruiser # 2).

Collection of C.A. Shively, 1978.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 117KB; 740 x 560 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 88559

Olongapo Naval Station, Philippines

View of the waterfront, circa 1914-1916.
Ships present are (from left to right):
USS Monadnock (Monitor # 3);
USS Monterey (Monitor # 6);
USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1);
USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5);
USS Pampanga (1899-1928); and
USS Piscataqua (1898-1931).

Collection of C.A. Shively, 1978.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 71KB; 740 x 455 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 56311

USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1)

At sea, bound from Gibraltar to Charleston, South Carolina, in July 1918.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Fred C. Iverson, 1957.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 88KB; 740 x 490 pixels

 


The following photograph shows a ship that MAY be USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1):

Photo #: NH 54426

Bainbridge Class Destroyer

Coaling from the beach in the Philippine Islands.
This destroyer is either USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1), USS Barry (Destroyer # 2) or USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 3).
The donor's original caption, which incorrectly identifies the ship as USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5), reads: "...coaling from the beach near Zamboanga, P.I., 1916. Mooring lines are tied to old stock anchors on the beach. The coal was carried aboard in baskets on a pole by two natives. This was Pocahontas coal from West. Va. The rest of the Asiatic Fleet used Japanese coal."

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Fred Iverson collection.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 82KB; 740 x 495 pixels

 

For other images related to USS Bainbridge, see:


For higher resolution images see: Obtaining Photographic Reproductions

To the best of our knowledge, the pictures referenced here are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.



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