Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004), 1917-1919 -- Part II.

This page features more images related to USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004).

For additional views concerning this ship, see:

Photo #: Photo #: NH 93941

USS Kaiser Wilhelm II (ID # 3004)

Fitting out for Navy service at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, in August 1917. This ship was soon renamed Agamemnon.
Note the large tent in the foreground, with several 110-foot submarine chasers under construction behind it.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 65KB; 740 x 380 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 93859

U.S. Navy Troop Transports at sea, 10 November 1917

These ships, steaming in convoy from New York City to Brest, France, are (from left to right): USS Mount Vernon (ID # 4508), USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004) and USS Von Steuben (ID # 3017).
Note the damage to Von Steuben's bow, the result of a collision with Agamemnon on the previous day.

Courtesy of Paul Silverstone, 1982.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 77KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 57480

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004)

Arrives in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, circa late 1918 or the first part of 1919, returning the U.S. Army's 102nd Infantry from Europe. She is being welcomed by submarine chasers and other vessels of the First Naval District.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 69KB; 740 x 435 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 57479

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004)

Arrives in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, circa late 1918 or the first part of 1919, returning the U.S. Army's 102nd Infantry from Europe.
USS SC-287 is at left.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 86KB; 740 x 460 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 57481

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004)

Arrives in Boston Harbor, Massachusetts, circa late 1918 or the first part of 1919, while returning the U.S. Army's 102nd Infantry from Europe. She is being escorted by ships and craft of the First Naval District. A submarine chaser is in the center foreground, and USS Machigonne (SP-1043) is at left, wearing a large welcoming sign.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 86KB; 740 x 435 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 57743

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004)

Design sheet for the ship's port side camouflage pattern, circa 1918.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 39KB; 740 x 400 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 57744

USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004)

Design sheet for the ship's starboard side camouflage pattern, circa 1918. It also shows her bow-on aspect.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 54KB; 740 x 395 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 82951

"The Original U.S. Troop Transports"

Chart compiled 16 August 1919, showing the number of trans-Atlantic "turn arounds" and their average duration for thirty seven U.S. Navy troop transports employed during and immediately after World War I.

Collection of the USS Pocahontas Reunion Association, 1974.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 157KB; 690 x 655 pixels

Click here to rotate chart 90 degrees clockwise

 


S.S. Kaiser Wilhelm II (later USS Agamemnon) is probably seen (distantly) in right center of the following photograph:

Photo #: NH 54700

German Passenger Liners and Freighters

Interned at their piers at Hoboken, New Jersey, on 4 April 1917, two days before the United States declared war on Germany. In the foreground is the stern of a U.S. Navy destroyer, which is keeping watch on the ships.
The piers are those of the Hamburg-America Line (left center) and the North German Lloyd Line (right center). The large ship at left is S.S. Vaterland (later USS Leviathan). The four-funneled liner in right center is probably S.S. Kaiser Wilhelm II (later USS Agamemnon).
Note the 3"/50 gun on the destroyer's after deck.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 80KB; 740 x 565 pixels

 


USS Kaiser Wilhelm II (soon renamed Agamemnon) is seen in the background, or to the side, in the following photographs of other ships:

Photo #: NH 94205

USS Prinzess Irene (with two relatively short funnels)

Fitting out for transport service, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, New York, circa August 1917. This ship became USS Pocahontas (later receiving ID # 3044) on 1 September 1917.
The ship with four taller smokestacks, immediately beyond Prinzess Irene, is USS Kaiser Wilhelm II, which became USS Agamemnon (later receiving ID # 3004) on 1 September 1917.

U.S. Naval History & Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 42KB; 740 x 400 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 53777

S.S. George Washington (ex-German Passenger Liner, 1908)

At the New York Navy Yard in the Summer of 1917, while fitting out for U.S. Navy service. She was placed in commission as USS George Washington (ID # 3018) in September.
The ship partially visible at right (seen bow-on) is Kaiser Wilhelm II, which soon became USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004).

U.S. Naval History &; Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 86KB; 740 x 575 pixels

 


USS Agamemnon is seen in the background of the following photograph of another ship:

Photo #: NH 103942

USS Panaman (ID # 3299)

Halftone reproduction of a photograph showing the ship in port in 1919, while she was serving as a troop transport. Location is probably Hoboken, New Jersey. Ship in the background, partially visible on the opposite side of the pier, is USS Agamemnon (ID # 3004).
This image was published in 1919 as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views of and on board Panaman.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2006.

U.S. Naval History &; Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 59KB; 740 x 505 pixels

 

For additional views concerning this ship, see:


For higher resolution images see: Obtaining Photographic Reproductions

To the best of our knowledge, the pictures referenced here are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.



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