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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Adams (DM-27, later MMD-27), 1944-1971

USS Adams, a 2200-ton Robert H. Smith class light minelayer, was built at Bath, Maine. Originally intended to be a destroyer (designated DD-739), she was converted to a minelayer while still under construction and was commissioned in October 1944. Following an Atlantic shakedown, she went to the Pacific by the end of the year. In March and April 1945, USS Adams participated in the Okinawa campaign. She was targeted several times by Kamikaze attacks and was seriously damaged by one on 1 April, necessitating a return to the United States for repairs. When these were completed early in July 1945, Adams returned to the Western Pacific, where she remained until April 1946. She was decommissioned at San Diego, California, in December 1946. Redesignated MMD-27 in 1955, USS Adams remained in the reserve fleet until sold for scrapping in December 1971.

USS Adams was named in honor of Lieutenant Samuel Adams, USN, a hero of the Battle of Midway.

This page features all our views of USS Adams.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the Online Library's digital images, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 77371

USS Adams (DM-27)


Off San Francisco, California, 2 May 1945.

Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1971.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 72KB; 740 x 595 pixels

 
Photo #: 19-N-86927

USS Adams (DM-27)


Off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, in late June 1945, following repair of Kamikaze damage.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Online Image: 59KB; 740 x 500 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the
National Archives photographic reproduction system.

 


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11 May 1999