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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060
Photo # NH 1226:  USCGC Tampa (ex-Miami) in harbor, prior to World War I

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- SHIPS of the UNITED STATES COAST GUARD, REVENUE CUTTER SERVICE and LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE --

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Tampa (1912-1918).
Named Miami until 1916.

The 1181-ton Revenue Cutter Miami was built at Newport News, Virginia. Commissioned in August 1912, she operated in the Atlantic for her entire career. Among her activities were ice patrol duty in the north Atlantic and derelict patrol work out of the Azores. She became USCGC Miami in January 1915, when the U.S. Coast Guard was created by the merger of the Revenue Cutter and Lifesaving Services, and was renamed Tampa at the beginning of February 1916.

When the United States entered World War I in April 1917, Tampa was transferred to Navy control. She began service in the European war zone in late October 1917, with escort of convoys between Gibraltar and the British isles as her primary assignment. During the evening of 26 September 1918, after shepherding a convoy to the Irish Sea, Tampa was steaming through the Bristol Channel when she was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine UB-91. All those on board, 115 crew members and 16 passengers, were killed. This was the greatest combat-related loss of life suffered by the U.S. Naval forces during the First World War.

This page features the only views we have concerning USCGC Tampa (1912-1918), which was named Miami until 1916.


If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 1226

USCGC Tampa
(Coast Guard Cutter, 1912)

Photographed in harbor, prior to World War I.
Completed in 1912 as the U.S. Revenue Cutter Miami, this ship was renamed Tampa in February 1916. On 26 September 1918, while operating in the English Channel, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine UB-91. All 131 persons on board Tampa were lost with her, the largest loss of life on any U.S. combat vessel during the First World War.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 82KB; 740 x 570 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 41869

USCGC Tampa
(Coast Guard Cutter, 1912)

Boat plate found 14 April 1924 on the beach at Rest Bay, Porthcawl, England. It is the only recovered part of USCGC Tampa, which was lost with all hands when she was torpedoed by the German Submarine UB-91 on 26 September 1918 in the Bristol Channel. With the exception of USS Cyclops, this was the the largest loss of life suffered by U.S. Naval forces in any incident of the the First World War.

Photograph received from the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, March 1931.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 85KB; 615 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 90278

USCGC Tampa and USCGC Seneca memorial plaque


This table, photographed following World War I, was dedicated to the memory of the 115 officers and men of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Tampa who lost their lives when she was sunk on 26 September 1918, and to the memory of the eleven officers and men of the Coast Guard Cutter Seneca who were lost while attempting to salvage the British S.S. Wellington on 17 September 1918.

Collection of Vice Admiral Thomas T. Craven, USN. Courtesy of Lieutenant Rodman DeKay, Jr., USNR (Retired), 1979.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 154KB; 525 x 765 pixels

 


If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


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Page made 27 November 2005