PEOPLE--UNITED STATES

Rear Admiral Herbert E. Schonland, USN (Retired), (1900-1984)

Herbert Emery Schonland was born on 7 September 1900 in Portland, Maine. Appointed from that state to the Naval Academy, he graduated as an Ensign in June 1925. Reporting to USS Utah for sea duty, he later transferred to USS Lawrence. In June 1928, he was promoted to Lieutenant Junior Grade and subsequently served in the submarine tenders Camden and Bushnell. Following instruction at the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island in 1932-1934, Schonland was assigned to USS Milwaukee while also serving as Torpedo Repair Officer of Cruiser Division Three, Battle Force. Transferring to USS Argonne in July 1935, he was promoted to Lieutenant in May 1936. In June 1937 he became an instructor at the Naval Training Station, Newport, Rhode Island. In June 1939, Lieutenant Schonland was assigned to the heavy cruiser San Francisco, in which he served for more than four years. He was promoted to Lieutenant Commander in July 1941 and to Commander in August 1942.

Schonland's ship played an important role during the first three months of the long and difficult fight for Guadalcanal. In the bloody 13 November 1942 night action in Iron Bottom Sound, she was flagship of Rear Admiral Daniel J. Callaghan's U.S. Navy task force. While battling a greatly superior Japanese force that included two battleships, San Francisco was badly damaged by enemy gunfire. Rear Admiral Callaghan and the ship's Captain, Cassin Young, were among those killed, leaving Commander Schonland as senior surviving officer. Though command thereby devolved on him, he was already engaged in vital damage control efforts. Recognizing that Lieutenant Commander Bruce McCandless was skillfully conning the cruiser, Schonland remained at his post below, where his efforts were critical to saving the ship. For his "extreme heroism and courage"on this occasion, he was awarded the Medal of Honor.

When San Francisco was repaired and returned to combat service in 1943, Commander Schonland served as her Executive Officer. In the fall of that year, he was assigned to staff duty with the Naval Training School, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and, early in 1944, he became a damage control instructor at the Naval Training School, San Francisco, California. Schonland was promoted to Captain in August 1944, with the rank backdated to August 1943. Retiring from active service at the beginning of 1947, he was promoted to Rear Admiral on the retired list in recognition of his distinguished combat record. Herbert E. Schonland died on 13 November 1984 and is buried at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia.

This page features the only images we have concerning Herbert E. Schonland.

Photo #: NH 106452

Lieutenant Junior Grade Herbert E. Schonland, USN


Photograph taken circa 1928-1936.
Schonland was awarded the Medal of Honor for "extreme heroism and courage" while serving as the Damage Control Officer of USS San Francisco (CA-38) during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 13 November 1942. He was a Commander at that time.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command

Online Image: 45KB; 580 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 106452-A

Lieutenant Junior Grade Herbert E. Schonland, USN


Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken circa 1928-1936, copied from the official publication "Medal of Honor, 1861-1949, The Navy", page 255.
Herbert E. Schonland was awarded the Medal of Honor for "extreme heroism and courage"while serving as the Damage Control Officer of USS San Francisco (CA-38) during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 13 November 1942. He was a Commander at that time.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph

Online Image: 47KB; 600 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: 80-G-40031

Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN,
(center)
(Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas)

On board USS San Francisco (CA-38) to visit the two senior ship's officers who had survived the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, 12-13 November 1942. Photographed at Pearl Harbor, while San Francisco was en route to California for battle damage repairs.
On the left is Commander Herbert E. Schonland, USN, who assumed command after the ship's Captain was killed and led damage control efforts.
On the right is Lieutenant Commander Bruce McCandless, USN, the ship's Communications Officer, who took over the conn and subsequently navigated San Francisco to safety.
Both Schonland and McCandless received the Medal of Honor for their actions during and immediately after the battle.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 61KB; 740 x 585 pixel

Reproductions may be available at National Archives.

 
Photo #: NH 106307

Commander Herbert E. Schonland, USN
(left)
and
Commander Bruce McCandless, USN,

Photographed circa December 1942, after their ship, USS San Francisco (CA-38), returned to the United States from the Pacific war zone.
They were the ship's senior surviving officers when San Francisco was badly damaged in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal on 12-13 November 1942. Both were awarded the Medal of Honor for their heroism during and immediately following that action, in which McCandless conned the ship after her Captain and other senior officers were killed, while Schonland directed damage control efforts.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Navy History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 39KB; 580 x 765 pixels

 


Medal of Honor citation of Commander Herbert E. Schonland, USN (as printed in the official publication "Medal of Honor, 1861-1949, The Navy", page 255):

"For extreme heroism and courage above and beyond the call of duty as Damage Control Officer of the U.S.S. San Francisco in action against greatly superior enemy forces in the battle off Savo Island, 12-13 November 1942. In the same violent night engagement in which all of his superior officers were killed or wounded, Lieutenant Commander Schonland was fighting valiantly to free the San Francisco of large quantities of water flooding the second deck compartments through numerous shell holes caused by enemy fire. Upon being informed that he was commanding officer, he ascertained that the conning of the ship was being efficiently handled, then directed the officer who had taken over that task to continue while he himself resumed the vitally important work of maintaining the stability of the ship. In water waist deep, he carried on his efforts in darkness illuminated only by hand lanterns until water in flooded compartments had been drained or pumped off and watertight integrity had again been restored to the San Francisco. His great personal valor and gallant devotion to duty at great peril to his own life were instrumental in bringing his ship back to port under her own power, saved to fight again in the service of her country. "


For higher resolution images see: Obtaining Photographic Reproductions

To the best of our knowledge, the pictures referenced here are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.





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