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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- PEOPLE -- UNITED STATES --

Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN, (1813-1891)

David Dixon Porter was born at Chester, Pennsylvania, on 8 June 1813, the son of Commodore David Porter (1780-1843). His naval career began as a midshipman in 1829, and included service in the peacetime cruising Navy, the Mexican War and the U.S. Civil War.

The latter conflict saw him rapidly rise from the rank of Lieutenant to Rear Admiral. In 1862, he was in charge of the Mortar Flotilla during the campaign to capture New Orleans and the lower Mississippi River. He took command of the Mississippi Squadron in October 1862 and led it through the active phase of the Western Rivers campaigns. Rear Admiral Porter spent the last several months of the Civil War in command of the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

Following the War, Porter was promoted to Vice Admiral in 1866 and served as Superintendant of the Naval Academy. He became the Navy's senior officer, with the rank of Admiral in 1870, and remained an influential figure in naval affairs until his death on 13 February 1891.

Five U.S. Navy ships have been named in honor of David Dixon Porter and his father, Commodore David Porter, including: Porter (TB-6), Porter (DD-59), Porter (DD-356), Porter (DD-800) and Porter (DDG-78).

This page features photographs of David Dixon Porter.

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the Online Library's digital images, see "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 61922

Commander David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


Photographed in 1861-62.
The original is a carte de visite print, published by E. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York, "from a photographic negative from Brady's National Portrait Gallery".

Donation of Captain A.L. Clifton, USN(MC), 1939.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 76KB; 465 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 47205

Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


Photographed circa 1864.
The original is a carte de visite print.

Collection of Surgeon Herman P. Babcock, USN(MC), donated by his son, George R. Babcock, 1939.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 75KB; 465 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 47394

Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


Photographed circa 1864, probably by the Brady Studio.
Note Brady negative number ("B-4480") in the lower left.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 80KB; 590 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 64903

Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


Photographed circa 1864.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 60KB; 545 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 91416

Rear Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN,

Commander, North Atlantic Blockading Squadron.

On the main deck of his flagship, USS Malvern, circa 1864, leaning on a slide carriage-mounted heavy 12-pounder Dahlgren smooth-bore howitzer.
Photographed by Alexander Gardner.
The original is an albumen silver print.
This photograph was used as the basis for an engraving published in Harper's Weekly, 21 January 1865.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 100KB; 565 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 47204

Vice Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


Photographed circa the later 1860s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 61KB; 475 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 91415

Admiral David Dixon Porter, USN (1813-1891)


In Full Dress uniform, after he became the Navy's ranking officer in 1870.
Photographed by the Brady Studio.

Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Donated by Mr. Levin C. Handy, who worked in the Brady Studio circa the 1870s.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 92KB; 590 x 765 pixels

 

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6 November 1998