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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
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WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060
Photo # NH 84571: Curtiss F9C-2, with landing gear removed, in flight near USS Macon, October 1934

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY AIRCRAFT -- 1922-1962 DESIGNATION SYSTEM --

Curtiss F9C "Sparrowhawk" Fighters --
Part II: F9C-2s in Operation with Airships


This page features all the views we have of Curtiss F9C-2 fighters operating with airships.

For more views of F9C aircraft, see:

  • Curtiss F9C "Sparrowhawk" Fighters.


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

    Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

    Photo #: 80-G-441979

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter

    (Bureau # 9057), piloted by Lieutenant D. Ward Harrigan, USN

    Hanging from the trapeze of USS Macon (ZRS-5) during flight operations in 1933.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 104KB; 740 x 620 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

     
    Photo #: NH 77427

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter


    About to hook onto the aircraft trapeze of USS Akron (ZRS-4), circa 1932-1933.
    Note the configuration of Akron's trapeze, which had been modified from its original arrangement in mid-1932.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 67KB; 740 x 590 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 77433

    USS Macon (ZRS-5)


    One of the airship's Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighters hooking on to her trapeze, during flight operations near Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California, in 1934. Photographed from inside Macon's hangar.
    The plane's pilot was Lieutenant Harold B. Miller, USN.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 63KB; 420 x 765 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 80773

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter

    (Bureau # 9059)

    Inside the airplane hangar of USS Akron (ZRS-4), 1932.
    Part of the airplane handling system is visible above the plane.
    Another "Sparrowhawk", in flight, is partially visible through the airship's hangar opening, at the bottom of the view.

    Courtesy of Richard K. Smith, author of the book "The Airships Akron & Macon", 1974.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 104KB; 740 x 585 pixels

     
    Photo #: 80-G-441983

    USS Macon (ZRS-5)


    Conducts initial operations with her Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" aircraft, over New Egypt, New Jersey, 7 July 1933.
    The two planes, visible below the airship, were piloted by Lieutenant D. Ward Harrigan and Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Frederick N. Kivette.

    Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

    Online Image: 78KB; 740 x 615 pixels

    Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

     
    Photo #: NH 84571

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter
    ,
    with its landing gear removed for airship operations

    Maneuvers near USS Macon (ZRS-5), while being filmed by Fox "Movietone News" cameras on 12 October 1934.
    The plane's pilot was Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Frederick N. Kivette, USN.

    Courtesy of Richard K. Smith, author of the book "The Airships Akron & Macon", 1974.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 88KB; 610 x 675 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 77434

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter
    ,
    with its landing gear removed

    Operating at sea with USS Macon (ZRS-5), probably circa 12 October 1934.
    This image is a frame from a motion picture film, taken from Macon.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 52KB; 740 x 520 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 77435

    Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighter
    ,
    with its landing gear removed

    Hooking on to the trapeze of USS Macon (ZRS-5), probably circa 12 October 1934.
    This image is a frame from a motion picture film, taken from Macon's control car.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 65KB; 740 x 590 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 77436

    USS Macon (ZRS-5)


    Two of the airship's Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighters practice a simultaneous drop from her trapeze and perch, during flight operations near Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California, probably circa 12 October 1934.
    This image is a frame from a motion picture film, taken from Macon's lower fin, looking forward.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 72KB; 740 x 565 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 77437

    USS Macon (ZRS-5)


    Two of the airship's Curtiss F9C-2 "Sparrowhawk" fighters attached to her trapeze (left) and perch, during flight operations near Naval Air Station Moffett Field, California, 12 October 1934.
    This image is a frame from a motion picture film, taken from an airplane flying alongside Macon.
    The planes' pilots were Lieutenant Harold B. Miller (plane on the trapeze) and Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Frederick N. Kivette (plane on the perch).
    Both planes have their wheel landing gear removed, as was generally the practice when they operated from Macon after 19 July 1934.

    Courtesy of Harold B. Miller, 1973.

    U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

    Online Image: 49KB; 740 x 580 pixels

     

    For more views of F9C aircraft, see:

  • Curtiss F9C "Sparrowhawk" Fighters.


    If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."


    Return to Naval Historical Center home page.

    Page made 13 October 2002