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watch" at night.  This may prove irksome, but he is allowed to regain his lost sleep the next day.  Then there is homesickness, which is a very painful experience, but the necessity of his enduring it will make a man of him, and teach him to brace himself for hard knocks later in life.  As to sea-sickness, well, many millionaires frequently pay large sums on "ocean greyhounds" for that experience, and most blue-jackets must endure it at first, but they soon get their "sea-legs."

NAVY FOOD

     Disgruntled and discharged enlisted men have circulated disparaging reports concerning food served on ships of the Navy.  These reports are, in most instances, without foundation and are actuated by malice.  All food served on board a man-o'-war is carefully inspected and prepared under the close supervision of the commissary officer.  The character of the food changes somewhat with the seasons of the year, and in certain climates it has the careful scrutiny of the senior medical officer.

     Here are a few bills-of-fare served to men on board United States Navy vessels, taken at random.

The Galley
of a
Man-o'-War

SUNDAY
Breakfast
Baked Pork and Beans, Bread, Butter, Coffee.

Dinner
Roast Veal or Roast Beef and Gravy
Stewed Tomatoes, Mashed Potatoes,
Bread, Butter, Coffee.

Supper
Bologna Sausage, Cheese, Potato Salad,
Bread, Butter, Tea.

MONDAY
Breakfast
Ham Omelette, Potatoes,
Bread, Butter, Coffee.

Dinner
Pea Soup, Boiled Ham, Potatoes,
Bread, Butter, Coffee.

Supper
Fresh Meat Pie, Fried Potatoes, Fresh Fruit,
Bread, Butter, Tea.

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