World War II Newsmaps (posters) in the Navy Department Library


This is Ann…She Drinks Blood

Image of Newsmap - "This is Ann.....she drinks blood," side 1.

Side 1:
NEWSMAP
Monday, November 8, 1943
Week of October 28 to November 4
217th Week of the War
99th Week of US Participation,
Volume II No. 29

THE WAR FRONTS
1. Russia
2. Italy
3. Air Offensive
4. Southwest Pacific
5. Burma

Image of Newsmap - "This is Ann.....she drinks blood," side 2.

Side 2:

THIS IS ANN…..she drinks blood!

Her full name is Anopheles Mosquito and she’s dying to meet you. Her trade is dishing out MALARIA! If you’ll take a look at the map below you can see where she hangs out.

She can knock you flat so you’re no good to your country, your outfit or yourself. You’ve got the dope, the nets and stuff to lick her if you will USE IT.

Use a little horse sense and you can lick Ann. Get sloppy and careless about her and she’ll bat you down just as surely as a bomb, a bullet or a shell.


Dig! or Die! – Fox Holes

Image of Newsmap - "Dig!..or Die! Fox Holes," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP (for the Armed Forces, Prepared and Distributed by Army Orientation Course, Special Services Division Army Service Forces, War Department…Prepared from public sources of information.)

Monday, April 26, 1943
Week of April 16 to April 23
189th Week of the War
71st Week of U.S. Participation
Volume 2, No. 1

THE WAR FRONTS
1. TUNISIA
2. RAID ON JAPAN
3. SOUTHWEST PACIFIC
4. ITALY
5. AIR OFFENSIVE
6. RUSSIA
ALEUTIANS

Image of Newsmap - "Dig!..or Die! Fox Holes," side 2.

Side 2:

DIG!..OR DIE!

FOX HOLES

Tunisia has taught that your life depends on digging in – soon enough and deep enough – with whatever tools you may have at hand. Foxholes protect you effectively from gunfire and mechanized attack and give you a chance to throw some lead yourself.

To prevent detection, the foxhole should be blended with the nearby terrain by weaving a lid of sticks and covering it with leaves, grass, or dirt. Where there is no brush, use your shelterhalf as a cover to break up the dark shadow the hole makes.

A BULLET WILL PENETRATE 30 INCHES OF LOOSE SOIL

Loose soil form the foxhole will not protect you from enemy gunfire. Soil should be removed, if possible, but may be packed into a low, solid parapet.

A PRONE SHELTER IS NO PROTECTION AGAINST THE CRUSHING ACTION OF TANKS. It is protection from small-arms fire, bomb and artillery fragments. You can dig it easily and sleep in it, but should deepen it into a foxhole as soon as possible.


“A Mournful Melody” (“A Dud Dood It Again – And Watch Out for Booby Traps”)

Image of Newsmap - "A Mournful Melody," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, October 4, 1943
Week of September 23 to September 30
212th Week of the War
94th Week of US Participation
Volume II, No. 24

THE WAR FRONTS
1. Italy
2. Corsica
3. Russia
4. New Georgia
5. Gilbert Is.
6. Ellice Is.
7. New Guinea
8. Western Europe

Image of Newsmap - "A Mournful Melody," side 2.

Side 2:

A MOURNFUL MELODY
A DUD DOOD IT AGAIN

While strollin’ thru the woods one day in the merry, merry month of May
I was taken by surprise when an object met my eyes
and then what ya know! A sooveneer.
Now let me see – I could make a nice lamp or –hm-mm
KA-POW!
And all this happened while strolling thru the woods one day.

Note: A dud is any part of an unexploded projectile.

A dud is not necessarily a complete shell. Often only the fuze is found. Use extreme caution when you find an object resembling any part of a shell.

Mark its location, report it, and LEAVE IT ALONE!

AND WATCH OUT FOR BOOBY TRAPS!


ABANDON SHIP!

Image of Newsmap - "Abandon Ship!," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, July 5, 1943
Week of June 24 to July 1
199th Week of the War
81st Week of U.S. Participation
Volume II, No. 11

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. Western Europe
2. Russia
3. Southwest Pacific
4. Meditteranean

Image of Newsmap - "Abandon Ship!," side 2.

Side 2:

ABANDON SHIP!

Of the millions of men going overseas very few will ever experience a torpedoing or any other situation in which they may need to abandon ship. But for those few, the general rules of behavior given here can be as important as a life preserver is to a drowning man.

All transports carry enough modern unsinkable lifesaving equipment to take care of everyone on the ship. Lifeboats and rafts will float indefinitely when properly handled and they carry enough food and water to last far longer than the average time men usually spend on them. There have been stories of men floating several weeks before being picked up but these have been unusual and in practically all cases happened when the ships or planes traveled alone. Troop ships move under convoy. Thus it is not likely that anyone will have to stay in a lifeboat or raft very long.

LEARN THESE SIMPLE RULES – THEY MAKE SENSE
1. The Master of the ship and his officers have spent years at sea. They are best able to issue orders to crews of lifeboats. Keep your head. Keep quiet. Obey their orders at once.
2. Always dress warmly. Sleep in your clothes. Exposure to sun and cold are some of the greatest dangers faced by men who have been forced to spend long periods in small boats.
3. At all times of the day or night keep your life preserver and a full canteen of water with you. Crushing a kapok life preserver together makes it lose buoyancy but this can be regained by fluffing it up as you would do to a pillow.
4. The order to “Abandon Ship” does not mean that you should leave the ship. It means you should go to your “Abandon Ship” station to which you are assigned when you come on board.
5. Jumping overboard is one of the most dangerous things you can do. If you are wearing a cork or balsa wood life preserver it can break your neck when you hit the water, or you may be caught in the ship’s turning propellers.
6. Nets, ladders and ropes hang over the sides of ships at all “Abandon Ship” stations. Use them to board lifeboats or rafts or to get into the water. Get away from the ship fast.
7. You should act on your own only after the order “every man for himself” has been given, even in extreme emergency. If you must jump, go fee first, clinch your life preserver tight to your body with your arms. Put your hands under your chin to hold the preserver down to lessen the shock when you hit the water.
8. Keep clear of the ship’s side. Lifeboats and rafts are unsinkable but both may turn over if not handled properly. Don’t get caught between the ship and lifeboat or you may be crushed.
9. When getting into a lifeboat or raft be sure your feet are on the bottom boards. Sit down at once and keep the greatest weight in the center of the boat to keep it from tipping.
10. Set a good example. You know that your actions will influence others, so keep cool and use common sense. Follow the directions of the person whose job it is to get you through in safety.



JAP AIRCRAFT

Image of Newsmap - "Jap Aircraft," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, August 16, 1943
Week of August 5 to June 12
205th Week of the War
87th Week of US Participation
Volume II, No. 17

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. Russia
2. Sicily
3. Italy
4. New Georgia
5. Germany

Image of Newsmap - "Jap Aircraft," side 2.

Side 2:

JAP AIRCRAFT

Code names are used to identify Jap aircraft because their manufacturers use the same model (or year of Japanese calendar) number for different planes. Key to the code is that fighters are boys, bombers are girls, and transports begin with the letter T.

[Top left to bottom right]
“Zeke” – Single Seater Flighter, Mitsubishi 00
“Rufe” – Single Seater Fighter Float Plane, Mitsubishi 00
“Hap” – Single Seater Fighter, Mitsubishi 00 MK-2
“Oscar” – Single Seater Fighter, Nakajima 01 and Pienchuan 01
“Dave” – Reconnaissance Fighter, Nakajima 95
“Pete” – Reconnaissance Fighter Float Plane, Sasebo 00
“Nate” – Single Seater Fighter, Nakajima 97, (Also Mitsubishi)
“Claude” – Single Seater Fighter, Mitsubishi 96
“Val” – Dive Bomber, Aichi 99
“Ida” – Light Bomber, Mitsubishi 98
“Kate” – Torpedo Bomber, Nakajima 97 (Also Mitsubishi)
“Sonia” – Light Reconnaissance Bomber, Mitsubishi 98
“Lily” – Medium bomber, Probably Kawanashi 99
“Mary” – Light Bomber, Kawasaki 97
“Sally” – Medium Bomber, Mitsubishi 97
“Nell” – Medium Bomber, Mitsubishi 96
“Betty” – Long Range Bomber, Mitsubishi 01
“Mavis” – Patrol Bomber, Kawanashi 97
“Topsy” – Transport, Mitsubishi MC 20



THE MAKING OF A US BLUEJACKET

Image of Newsmap - "The Making of a US Bluejacket," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, June 14, 1943
Week of June 3 to June 10
196th Week of the War
78th Week of U.S. Participation
Volume II, No. 8

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. Plans
2. Russia
3. Italy
4. Far East
5. Southwest Pacific
6. Argentina

Image of Newsmap - "The Making of a US Bluejacket," side 2.

Side 2:

THE MAKING OF A US BLUEJACKET

In its basic elements the training of a Bluejacket is the same as for men of the other branches of our Armed Forces. All are outfitted. All are toughened physically and mentally. All are practiced in discipline. All undergo the process that changes them from everyday civilians to the two-fisted fighters, able and willing to prove that men who live in freedom can protect that normal right.

Each service develops these qualities in terms of its own needs and in the Navy, of course, that means ships and everything that goes with them. Upon graduation from the training station some men go to the fleet at once. Others go on to further and more specialized training in accordance with their ability and the order of Navy needs. All eventually take their places in the complicated and efficient organization that protects the sea lanes for the United Nationals on all the oceans of the world.

The pictures below were taken at recruit camp. They show some of the more important steps in the moulding of our Navy’s fighting men.

1. Coming on Board.
2. “Civies” Gone.
3. Individual Fitting.
4. Stowing Gear.
5. “Shots.”
6. Chow.
7. Toughening Up.
8. Small Arms
9. “Dress Right – DRESS!”
10. Target Practice.
11. In the Swim.
12. Volley Ball.
13. Tattoo.
14. Small Boats.
15. Clove Hitch.
16. Aptitude Test.
17. Heaving the Lead.
18. Semaphore.
19. Learning from Models.
20. Gun Crew.
21. Taking the Wheel.
22. Ready to Go.
23. Advanced School.
24. Going to Sea.



GAS

Image of Newsmap - "Gas," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, March 29, 1943
Week of March 19 to March 26
185th Week of the War
67th Week of US Participation
Volume I, No. 49

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. Tunisia
2. Air Offensive
3. Submarines
4. Southwest Pacific
5. Russia
6. China

Image of Newsmap - "Gas," side 2.

Side 2:

GAS
Every soldier, if he expects to live and fight another day, must be able to identify gases. The following pictures were prepared by the Armored Force Replacement Training Center to assist in instructing such identification.

Granny smelled geranium,
Started feeling kinda bum,
Thought she had a garden blight,
What she’d found was LEWISITE!

Never take a chance, my friend,
If some garlic’s in the wind
Don’t think Mussolini’s passed –
Man – you’re being MUSTARD gassed!

Apple blossoms lend their smell
To the sadness of farewell,
It’s O.K. if you feel blue,
But TEAR GAS starts you sobbing too.

Father was pleased that Sunday morn
To note the aroma of fresh cut corn –
Cried little Willie – turning gree –
Grab your mask, Pop – that’s PHOSGENE!

Said the flypaper to the fly –
“You look sick enough to die –
That ain’t flit you’ve chanced to sniff
It’s CLORPICRIN one small whiff”



GERMAN NAVY UNIFORMS and INSIGNIA

Image of Newsmap - "German Navy Uniforms & Insignia," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, March 8, 1943
Week of February 26 to March 5
182nd Week of the War
64th Week of US Participation
Volume I, No. 46

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. New Guinea
2. Solomons
3. Submarines
4. Tunisia
5. Russia
6. Western Europe

Image of Newsmap - "German Navy Uniforms & Insignia," side 2.

Side 2:

GERMAN NAVY UNIFORMS and INSIGNIA



SECRET WEAPONS
are the little drops of information that you could give away!


Image of Newsmap - "Secret Weapons," side 1.

Side 1:

NEWSMAP
Monday, June 7, 1943
Week of May 27 to June 3
195th Week of the War
77th Week of US Participation
Volume II, No. 7

THE WAR FRONTS:
1. China
2. Air Offensive
3. Aleutians
4. Russia
5. North Africa
6. Southwest Pacific

Image of Newsmap - "Secret Weapons," side 2.

Side 2:

SECRET WEAPONS
are the little drops of information that you could give away!

Conceit
Most men will “hand out a line” to impress a woman. When you hand out yours be sure it isn’t a military secret. Be sure the line doesn’t make a noose that fits around Uncle Sam’s neck.

Faith
Personal secrets are yours to share with whom you please. Those that belong to the Armed Forces are not. The more people who know a secret, the less chance there is of its ever being kept.

Enthusiasm
Everyone interested in his job finds it hard not to talk about it. When you’re about to go into action it’s even more difficult. That is when you are “easy pickings” for the clever enemy operative.

Ignorance
Enemy agents do not go around looking like old-style movie villains and vamps. They are hard-working, meticulous investigators who can put bits of information together wherever ignorant people drop them.