The Diary of Michael Shiner
Relating to the History
of the
Washington Navy Yard
1813-1869.

Transcribed With
Introduction and Notes
by John G. Sharp
(12 October 2007, revised October 2013).

Shiner Diary

Preface
The Education of Michael Shiner
Notes on this Transcription
Acknowledgements
Bibliography
Diary of Michael Shiner
Note
Source of Manuscript

Preface

Reflecting on his hard won freedom, he once stated empahtically, "the only master I have now is the Constitution," and when asked to describe himself, he answered, "I am a laboring man in the paint-shop in the Washington navy-yard." 1 Today Michael G. Shiner is famous for his diary chronicling events at the Washington Navy Yard and the District of Columbia from 1813 to 1869. Among the diary's better known passages are Michael Shiner's accounts of the War of 1812, the 1833 abduction of his family by slave dealers and the strike of 1835. In Michael Shiner's lifetime (1805-1880) few if any of his acquaintances or family knew of his diary. It is only within the last few decades that scholars and historians have begun to examine the manuscript more closely. The Michael Shiner manuscript was acquired by the Library of Congress sometime after 1905 (the exact date and provenance is uncertain). Except for the more celebrated passages mentioned above there is no complete transcription of Michael Shiner's diary. What follows is an effort to place Michael Shiner before a wider audience by providing a complete transcription of his manuscript.

Born in 1805, Shiner grew up near Piscataway, Maryland on land belonging to the Pumphrey family. His early life was closely bound to the property and fortunes of the brothers William Pumphrey Jr. (1761-1827) and James Pumphrey (1765-1832). Both men were Maryland famers and slaveholders. William Pumphrey Jr., owned a mid-size farm “Poor Man’s Industry” in Piscataway which he operated with enslaved labor and where the young Shiner probably lived and worked as a young boy. James Pumphrey owned property in Prince Georges County but resided in the District of Columbia. From his early Diary entries, young Michael probably spent the majority of his youth working in the District of Columbia. (Clark, Edythe Maxey William Pumphrey of Prince George's County, Maryland, and his descendants. Anundsen: 1992.)

About 1828 Shiner married Phillis, surname unknown. Phillis and Michael would have had the opportunity to meet regularly since Michael worked in the District nearby. Phillis was born in 1808 and James Pumphrey purchased her in Virginia in 1817. For economic reasons Michael and Phillis’s respective masters most likely countenanced their living together near the Navy Yard. (District of Columbia Archives, Recorder of Deeds Office, James Pumphrey, Liber AP No. 40, dated 9 October 1817, p. 28.)

Slaveholders typically gave consent to marriage since any children born of such union were the slaveholder’s property. Despite Shiner’s extreme reticence regarding his private life, we know something of his family from other sources. The young couple had the following children: Ann, born 1829, Harriet, born 1830, Mary Ann born 1833, Joseph, born 1836, Sarah, born 1838 and Isaac M., born 1845. The Shiner’s were active in the Ebenezer Methodist Church where Michael and Phillis took part in church adult classes then open to free and enslaved blacks.

Like many slaveholders William Pumphrey rented his young bondsmen to the new navy yard. Indeed the first surviving naval document specifically mentioning Michael Shiner is the “Muster Book of the U.S. Navy in Ordinary at the Navy Yard Washington City, from 1 January to 31 December, 1826.” On this muster roll Shiner is recorded as “Ordinary Seaman” with the notation that he was first entered on the Ordinary rolls on 1 July 1826.

In the early nineteenth century shipyard, the Ordinary was where naval ships were held in reserve, or for later need. Typically these older vessels had seen hard service abroad and were awaiting restoration, but due to the small naval appropriations of the era, repairs were not possible. Ships in Ordinary normally had minimal crews comprised of semi-retired or disabled sailors who stayed aboard to ensure that the vessels remained in usable condition, provided security, kept the bilge pump running, and ensured the lines were secure. Here enslaved African Americans worked as seamen, cooks, servants or laborers. The enslaved assigned to the Ordinary, performed many of the most unpleasant and onerous jobs. For example, the Washington Navy Yard Station Log records for the week of 15 January 1827, the Ordinary were assigned to scrape the hull of the ship Potomac, move timber from the saw mill, and help suppress a large fire at Alexandria. Positions in the Ordinary were attractive to District slaveholders, because the workers’ wages were paid directly to the owners or their agents, the payments were regular, and most importantly the Navy Yard ensured day to day supervision and security. Slaveholders had to provide clothes and quarters. One concession Navy made was to include enslaved workers in the emergency medical care provided on the Yard. (W. Jones to Dr. Edward Cutbush, 23 May1813 RG45 NARA.)

William Pumphrey became ill in the summer of 1827 and died in August of that year. Prior to his death he made a will leaving everything to his wife Mary and their children. In this will Pumphrey wrote that all his slaves, including Michael Shiner, were to be sold as “term slaves”, each for a specified period of time, and afterwards manumitted:

“My slaves to be sold for a term of years this winter my debts to pay (to wit) Nell, aged about 37 to serve for the term of two years; Michael, aged about 22 to serve fifteen years; Thomas, aged about 16 to serve twenty; Henry, aged about 10 to serve twenty six; Cornelius aged about 8 to serve twenty two; Warren aged about 6 to serve twenty four years; Leath aged about 4 to serve twenty four; Charlotte aged about 2 years to serve twenty six.” (Prince Georges County Register of Wills, William Pumphrey, 12 August 1827, Liber TT #1 folio 423)

Following William Pumphrey’s death his slaves were sold as term slaves, by his son Lloyd to various buyers. Each slave mentioned was to serve for the designated term of year and then freed. William’s actual motivation in drafting this provision to change his bondsmen from slaves for life to term slaves may have arisen from his Methodist principles or simply the need to secure greater economic benefit for his estate. Clearly, most term slaves spent the majority of their productive years working in bondage.

On September 8, 1828, Thomas Howard, Clerk of the Yard, purchased Shiner from the Pumphrey estate. The final estate inventory reflects this sale as, “Negro Michael sold to Thos. Howard for cash $250.00.” (Prince Georges County Register of Wills (Inventories) William Pumphrey Liber TT 7, Folio 218.)

Howard paid a high price but certainly knew the young man’s value. Howard would recoup his investment many times for in his position he oversaw the keeping and scheduling of all labor free and enslaved. This unique position gave him ample opportunity to observe and assess Shiner’s character and work record. Shiner was healthy and in the prime of life and Howard ensured he was steadily and profitably employed. For Shiner his sale to Thomas Howard meant he would remain in the District with Phillis, continue to work at the Navy Yard, and had attained the prospect of his freedom.

Four years later on December 4, 1832, Thomas Howard died and his last will stipulated:

“having purchased a Negro Man named Michael Shiner for the term of fifteen years only, and having promised to manumit and set him free at the expiration of eight years, if he conducted himself worthy of such a privilege, it is my will and desire and I hereby set free and manumit the said Michael Shiner, at the expiration of Eight years from the date of said purchase.” (Archives of the District of Columbia District of Columbia, Orphans Court (Probate) Court, Records Group 2, Records of the Superior Court, Will of Thomas Howard, 1832 Box 11.)

Fortunately for Shiner, Howard’s executors would faithfully comply with this provision. Despite Shiner’s prospective manumission his diary entries for 1833 reflect the continuing danger and precariousness of life for an enslaved family. Slaveholder James Pumphrey’s death on 3 March 1833 placed Phillis and the children in grave jeopardy. Shiner’s brief and heart felt record is all he ever relates regarding Phillis or his family. His Diary recounts his wife and the children “wher snacht away from me and sold” on the street of Washington by slave dealers and confined to their jail in Alexandria.

James Pumphrey’s death was the catalyst for he died intestate and to pay debts, his family needed to raise cash quickly. His oldest son Levi Pumphrey, was appointed administrator. Levi then purchased Phillis and two of her children on 27 April 1832 for $295. (Probate Court, Estate Records Group 2, Records of the Superior Court, Inventory of James Pumphrey 11 April 1832, O.S. 1559.)

Levi’s purchase was apparently the result of an agreement to sell Phillis and her children to the notorious firm of John Armfield and Isaac Franklin. Perhaps as a middleman, Levi hoped to gain a quick profit from these two slave dealers since the firm constantly advertised their ability to pay top price and their need for ever larger numbers of bondsmen in the expanding Southern market. Their advertisement appeared in the Daily National Intelligencer 14 July 1832:

CASH IN MARKET

We wish to purchase one hundred and fifty likely Negroes of both sexes from 12 to 25 years of age, field hands; also mechanics of every description. Persons wishing to sell would do well to give us a call, as we are determined to give higher prices for slaves than any purchaser who is now, or may hereafter come into this market.

All communication promptly attended to. We can at all-time be found at our residence, West end of Duke Street, Alexandria, D.C.

FRANKLIN & ARMFIELD

A price was quickly set for Phillis and her children. Luckily, after a few harrowing weeks, Shiner was able, with intervention and assistance of wealthy and powerful connections, to gain the release of Phillis and the children from Alexandria Jail and to secure their manumission. Here and elsewhere Shiner’s winning personality and ability to form lasting connections with wealthy and influential people gave him the protection of powerful patrons.

Now free, the Shiner’s quickly prospered. The U.S. Census for the District of Columbia dated 1 June 1840, reflects Michael Shiner and his family enumerated as a "free colored.” As a freeman he worked steadily as a painter at the Navy Yard, was able to save money and provide for his family. Phillis Shiner died sometime prior to 1849. The 1850 District of Columbia U.S. census lists Michael Shiner as living in Ward 6 and as a free black man, aged 46. The family was listed as: Jane 19 years (second wife), Sarah 12, Isaac 5, and Braxton 6 months. Michael Shiner continued to work at the Washington Navy Yard until sometime after 1870. In his later years Shiner became a prosperous businessman, took an active role in Republican Party politics, and was a leader in the black community. He died January 17, 1880, at the age of 75 during an outbreak of smallpox.

Michael Shiner begins his diary in 1813, the year of the British invasion of North America. We know from other evidence that in 1813, he was only eight or nine years old. Because of this, what we have for this first section of his manuscript is an important narrative memoir in which Michael Shiner recollects the important events he had witnessed in his youth, but wrote down many years later. What Michael Shiner wrote in "his book" was apparently simply for his own remembrance. In his Diary, Michael Shiner concentrates primarily on the public events in his life along with some limited but important personal incidents.

Many of Michael Shiner's observations can be compared with other contemporary records and in each case they ring genuine; from his description of the gleam of British soldiers' bayonets to his recounting of painful conversations with such people as "Mrs. Reid" (see August 1814). Some of his early passages do strongly suggest that they were later reworked to provide additional detail, for example, the lengthy descriptions of the District of Columbia militia units, the colors of the soldier's uniforms and the names of their unit members. His recounting of the launches of the U.S.S. Columbus and the U.S.S. Saint Louis (see his entries for the years 1819, page 17 and 1828, page 27) imply that this part of his manuscript was finished as late as 1867. Some information in the diary, including militia unit members' names, could only have been listed after the events had been recorded. On these and similar occasions Michael Shiner appears to have read and incorporated contemporary newspaper accounts, such as those found in the Washington Intelligencer for some events (e.g. U.S. Mexican War 1846-1848 and the Civil War 1861-1865).

After describing the British troop withdrawal at the conclusion of the War of 1812, Michael Shiner goes on to other entries chronicling the daily routine at the Washington Navy Yard. In these entries he provides illuminating and important details of early working conditions and social attitudes at Washington Navy Yard toward slaves and freeman. The Shiner diary also allows modern readers glimpses of evolving military/civilian relationships and the struggles of early federal workers for better pay and conditions of employment.

The Diary entries provide a valuable account of the volatility of the early District of Columbia, especially the crucial events of the year 1835. Here within the Diary we have an important and unique account of the Washington Navy Yard labor strike which sadly and rapidly morphed into the "Snow Storm" of 1835 (see page 60). This was a bitter race riot that required the active intervention of President Andrew Jackson and a strong contingent of U.S. Marines to finally bring it under control.

Occasionally to relieve the pressure and pain of his everyday existence Michael Shiner, like many ship yard workers, drank too much and when he did (December 24-5, 1828 [pages 30-32], June 17, 1831 [pages 41-44], and September 6, 1835 [page 66]), he records some very close calls with law enforcement (pages 30-32) and some angry white workers. As a result of these near catastrophes, he took the temperance pledge. On December 4, 1836 (page 74), he gave up liquor for good. Michael Shiner's diary includes vivid descriptions of other perils early shipyard workers endured. In one particular harrowing incident on February 20, 1829 (page 35) while working in a small boat he fell overboard and nearly drowned in the icy cold waters of the Potomac River and, as a result, later came close to freezing to death as he and his colleagues desperately searched for a fire. In other passages he shifts perspective and casts a careful eye to the heavens where he records notable celestial events such as total eclipses of the sun on February 12, 1831 (page 40) and the Denali Comet of 1858 (page 168).

Lastly, what the manuscript conveys best is Michael Shiner's genuine love of the Washington Navy Yard, his city and his country; all of this is evident throughout his manuscript (See particularly his entry for June 1, 1861, on page 178). After his death, the diary came into the possession of the Library of Congress (circa 1905) . Inside the manuscript, its donor annotated it with the following tribute which nicely captures the man and his work: "This book is a very valuable book and is very interesting. It is worthy of perusal. The author Michael Shiner was a Patriot may he rest in peace." (Michael Shiner manuscript postscript undated n.p.)

The Education of Michael Shiner

Michael Shiner's primary purpose in writing his diary appears to have been his strong desire to record the public events of his time. Recording those events that he wanted to preserve, Shiner seems to have little need to say anything about his life prior to his first entries in 1813. With only a few exceptions he writes very little about his state of mind, immediate family, marriage, children, other family members or his finances. From the manuscript we have no references to how he became literate.

As an antebellum freeman Shiner chose to closely guard his family safety, and privacy. To avoid suspicion, Shiner chose to keep his literacy a secret and avoid possible confrontations with whites. The Slave Code for District of Columbia in force during much of Michael Shiner's lifetime did not make teaching slaves to read and write illegal, but both District of Columbia custom and practice strongly discouraged such actions.

How did Michael Shiner learn to read and write? Fortunately we have two important clues: the first is an 1870 Department of Education of the District of Columbia Special Report. This official report and history of the District public school system relates (with remarkable candor for its time) the segregated history of education in early Washington, D.C. The report is quite clear that due to the race laws of the antebellum era, the only schools that most African Americans could legally enter were church Sunday schools. The report then goes on to list Michael Shiner as an actual example of one of the many individuals who learned to read and write in this manner:

"The Sabbath School among the colored people in those times differed from the institution as organized among whites as it embraced young and old and most of the time was given not to studying of the Bible but to learning to read. It was the only school which for a time they were allowed to enter.

First Presbyterian Church of Washington at the foot of Capitol Hill opened a Sunday school for colored people in 1826 which held regular meetings every Sunday evening for years and in it many men women and children learned their alphabet and to read the bible. Michael Shiner one of the most remarkable colored men of the District who remembers almost everything that occurred at the Navy Yard during his service of some 60 years there is of this number."2

Second, it is clear from the report that Michael Shiner was by 1870 a well known and respected figure. While he learned to read and write through the church Sunday school programs, he may have had further occasions to gain literacy in the Washington Navy Yard itself. The above-quoted report relates that Michael Tabb, a white teacher with abolitionist leanings, kept a small school at the Yard where "he taught in the afternoons under a large tree and large numbers of colored children attended this school." The report goes on to describe how Sailing Master Dove's wife, Margaret Dove, helped teach at this school and that one of her pupils was Alexander Hays. Like Michael Shiner, Alexander Hays, went on to eventually purchase his own freedom and to become a leader in the black community. In this tightly knit community, Michael Shiner and Alexander Hays almost certainly knew each other and most likely their mutual acquaintance was formed at the Washington Navy Yard. In his diary, Michael Shiner, notes Sailing Master Dove on a number of occasions and apparently held him in high regard, although far from certain, it is indeed possible, that Michael Shiner may well have spent what free time he could in lessons with Michael Tabb and Margaret Dove.

The Context of the Michael Shiner Diary: Slavery and

the Organizational Structure of the Washington Navy Yard 1820 -1865

Michael Shiner's diary depicts a world which while similar to ours in many surface aspects was vastly different. That our national past "is another country" is today readily accepted and has become something of a cliché, yet it must be stressed that for much of the first century and a half of the Washington Navy Yard's existence those who worked in its shops and offices lived in an environment that was often dramatically dissimilar to our present. Throughout much of the fifty-six years covered in Michael Shiner's manuscript for the thousands of laborers and mechanics who toiled at the Washington Navy Yard, poverty and financial insecurity were not vague conditions. Slavery was a legal institution, and the majority of the adult population of Washington D.C. had only limited or no political rights. In the Shiner Diary we gain a window on the values and attitudes of his era. In the Diary, we see reflected the conflict of beliefs and ideas by citizens of the District of Columbia, some whom advocated strict social hierarchy, racial subordination and deference to one's "betters," while mechanics and workers, white and black, free and enslaved, sought a more inclusive and just society.

The early Washington Navy Yard reflected the larger stratified society. At the very pinnacle of the Washington Navy Yard heirarchy was the Commandant (e.g., men like Commodores Thomas Tingey and Isaac Hull). Directly below the Commandant was another senior officer who acted much like a modern executive officer. This officer provided the workforce with day-to-day direction through implementing orders and insuring that the Commandant's wishes were carried out. During most of this period that officer was a senior First Lieutenant, although in some instances a naval Captain (e.g., John Cassin) performed similar duties.

From its rough beginnings in 1799, Washington Navy Yard civilians far outnumbered military members and for much of this period, there was only a small cadre of naval officers permanently assigned to the Yard at any one time. Some officers such as Marmaduke Dove (Sailing Master) or David Eaton (Boatswain) were assigned for long periods because they possessed special technical skills critical to the manufacture of early sailing vessels.

While the Washington Navy Yard Commandant in theory exercised almost unlimited authority over all matters related to naval officers, enlisted personnel, and the civilian workforce, in practice there were both institutional and customary checks on his decision making. At the top of heirarchy governing the civilian workforce were the yard clerks. Their jobs were primarily administrative in nature. A clerk such as Thomas Howard (Michael Shiner's master from 1828), who was the Chief Clerk, was near the very top of Washington Navy Yard civilian hierarchy and was paid a fixed or annual salary. As Chief Clerk, Thomas Howard had considerable responsibility in a position which bears little relation to our modern clerical employees. Thomas Howard was responsible for the Washington Navy Yard's official correspondence, the conduct and recording of the daily musters, and the review of all official outgoing correspondence. Most importantly Howard and other clerks often acted for the Commandant on budget, contracting, and administrative issues; here they exercised wide discretion within their particular domains. Thomas Howard's steady salary rather than per diem wage meant he enjoyed a modicum of financial security and access to a wider social sphere than the mechanics and laborers. The clerks could often afford to rent or own a house, keep horses, employ servants, and in some cases own slaves. The 1830 census for the District of Columbia reflects that Thomas Howard owned his home, supported a large family, and owned four other slaves in addition to Michael Shiner.

A further distinction between naval yard clerks such as Thomas Howard and the Washington Navy Yard mechanics and laborers was political. The early District of Columbia's municipal charter narrowly defined voters as white male property owners. This effectively excluded almost all white mechanics and laborers, all blacks and all women. This limited form of white male suffrage would continue until 1848, with black males remaining effectively excluded from the franchise until after the Civil War and women until the passage of 19th amendment in 1920.

The next tier in the civilian hierarchy (below the Chief Clerk) were the Master Mechanics. Each trade had a Master Mechanic. These individuals were recognized experts in their specialty and usually had many years of trade experience. Master Mechanics often supervised large numbers of employees. Men such as Benjamin King (Master Blacksmith) or Phillip Inch (Master Painter and Michael Shiner's day-to-day supervisor) controlled large numbers of employees. Within each Washington Navy Yard shop it was the Master Mechanic who gave overall work direction through the Quarterman and lead man to the tradesman. Most importantly Master Mechanics had the power to hire and dismiss mechanics and laborers.

Next in order of importance came the Quarterman (leader of several work crews) then the lead man (or crew leader). Next came the trade mechanics. Mechanics were skilled tradesman who had successfully completed a five or six year trade apprenticeship in their field. Each trade had trainees or apprentices who were young workers in training. Each apprentice signed a binding legal agreement to return designated service in exchange for being taught his trade. Laborers were below the mechanics and were unskilled men who performed heavy but necessary work, such as digging, pile driving, and pulling or hauling of ships and ship parts.

From the nation's founding, slavery was an integral and legally recognized part of the new United States and slaves made up a significant but generally unacknowledged part of the Washington Navy Yard's antebellum workforce. At the Washington Navy Yard most African-Americans (free and enslaved) were confined to unpleasant less skilled work (e.g. caulking or working in the anchor shop). White mechanics and laborers frequently resented and feared their African-American co-workers and were especially apprehensive of those enslaved; many saw this population as a direct threat to their livelihood (Washington Navy Yard Blacksmith's petition of 1812).3 Michael Shiner's diary entries give us occasional glimpses of slavery's casual brutality, a brutality to which even the most trusted slaves (such as Commodore Thomas Tingey's young footman) could be subjected to when after his late arrival he was disciplined with a "starter" (see 1828, page 27). The Shiner Diary starkly reveals the sudden and terrible events that could break a black family, as when Michael Shiner's wife Phillis and their three young children were abducted by slave dealers and placed in a notorious slave pen in Alexandria, VA. They were taken off the public streets, just a few blocks from the navy yard (see page 53 entry for 5 June 1833).

At the Washington Naval Yard, white workers as well as free and enslaved African-Americans worked together for the most part in uneasy tension. Michael Shiner's diary entries capture this anxiety especially in the dramatic events of the 1830's where he describes his own precarious survival. In times of apparent and real danger or political upheaval such as the "Snow Storm," many of the District of Columbia's white workers resorted to violence and riot to intimidate enslaved and free African-Americans. (See Michael Shiner's account of the events of 1835-1836, on pages on 57-75, and his account of the election of 1857, on page 156.) The daily reality of this oppression is also reflected in Shiner's diary as he recounts his often perilous journeys to and from work.

Many of the Yard's early leaders, both military officers and senior civilians, owned slaves and benefited directly from their labor. Some of these leaders such as the Washington Navy Yard's first and second Commandants, Thomas Tingey and Isaac Hull, used their slaves as household servants, while other employees of a more entrepreneurial disposition like Naval Constructor Josiah Fox, Master Blacksmith Benjamin King, and Chief Clerk Thomas Howard had their slaves leased directly to the Navy.

While by the 1830's Naval Regulations prohibited officers from holding slaves except as servants, custom deemed otherwise. A report from Commandant Isaac Hull to the Board of Naval Commissioners gives some sense of how the issues of slavery were construed:

"I have understood from Captain Shubrick that when you were last in the Navy Yard you enquired of him whether Slaves belonging to Officers were employed at the Yard and at the same time informed him there was a positive order against employing Slaves belonging to Officers. I have caused a search to be made but can not find any such order either by circular or by letter receipted for this yard and I have found all the Slaves now in the yard and many others that I discharged since I took the Command here I took it for granted they were employed by Special Permission and that permission given because white men could not be found to work in the Anchor Shop. I now have the honor to forward a list of all the Slaves now employed in the Yard. Those belonging to the ordinary might be discharged and White Men or free Blacks taken to fill their places but I fear we could not find a set of men White or Black or men even Slaves belonging to poor people outside the yard to do the work the men now do in the Anchor Shops. The competent mechanics have long known them and I have no cause to complain on the contrary I consider them the hardest working men in the yard and as they understand their work they can do much more work in a day than new hands could and I should suppose it would require many weeks if not months to get a gang of hands for the Anchor Shop to do the work that is now done."4

In a previous report Hull had listed a total of 13 slaves employed at the Washington Navy Yard.5 Hull's list does not include slaves of masters such as Thomas Howard and Benjamin King who had leased their slaves to work at the Washington Navy Yard and allowed them a portion of their wages for their own personal use.

After his 1840 manumission, Shiner, as a freeman, was able to exercise some autonomy and freedom in his personnal life, though like other African Americans, the District's Black Codes, gave him only limited control over crucial aspects of his existence. Despite the District of Columbia's severe restrictions on freeman, the everyday racial prejudice and limited opportunities, the diary entries continued to reflect his profound religious faith, essential optimism and his hope for a more just future. Today his privately recorded thoughts and reflections are precious legacy that allows us a window through which we can catch glimpses of his world.

Notes on this transcription

The holographic folio manuscript that is the Michael Shiner Diary, is now located in the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division. The Shiner manuscript contains 186 numbered pages. Pages 1-119 are in Michael Shiner's unique script. The handwriting from the middle of page 119 to page 179 appears in a different hand, perhaps in the more polished style of Michael Shiner's grandson, Louis Alexander. There is some internal evidence that Louis Alexander took charge of preparing the manuscript for the purpose of selling it some years after Michael Shiner's death. Pages 180-186 of the manuscript once again resume in Michael Shiner's singular script. In addition to the transcribed diary entries Louis Alexander prepared eight more pages for a chronological index with the corresponding manuscript page numbers. These page numbers, recorded by Louis Alexander, no longer strictly correspond to the pagination of the Diary because of an apparent oversight at page 157 and as a result there are now two page 157's; each different. Additionally, there are seven unnumbered pages that were pasted into the folio by Michael Shiner or his grandson. They are: the two unnumbered pages between pages 52 and 53, one unnumbered page between pages 87 and 88, one unnumbered page between pages 99 and 100, two unnumbered pages between pages 105 and 106 and one unnumbered page between pages 109 and 110. For the most part, Michael Shiner tried to keep his recollections in chronological order. However, for some of the earlier years (especially the 1820's), he placed material clearly in different locations on the same page apparently simply because he had run out of room.

While Michael Shiner had little or no formal education beyond that described above and at times his handwriting (particularly in the early sections) can be difficult to decipher, he could write a vigorous colorful prose. His spelling, grammar, punctuation and capitalization are very much his own. Modern readers can see his pronunciation reflected in his spelling, which appears to be based on phonetics. I have done my best to transcribe his entries as he wrote them. Michael Shiner kept his recollections in a small shop note book and to save space divided some of his pages (14-33) into two sections with a vertical line running down the middle of the page. When making entries on some occasions, Michael Shiner, wrote using alternate left-to-right and right-to-left lines or what philologists like to refer to as boustrophedon.

His method of writing presents significant challenges to transcribe, since Michael Shiner rarely if ever used punctuation or paragraphs and some of his sentences are not always linked to his adjoining column. In transcribing all passages from the manuscript I have striven to adhere as closely as possible to the original in spelling, capitalization, punctuation, and abbreviation, including the retention of dashes and underlining found in the original. Words and passages that were crossed out in the diary are transcribed either as overstrikes or in notes. When a spelling is so unusual as to be misleading or confusing the correct spelling immediately follows the misspelled word in square brackets or is discussed in an endnote.

The names of ships and certain individuals recorded in the Diary are italicized and are linked, where possible, to other Naval Historical Center records pertaining to that vessel or person. Lastly I have added some notes to help readers identify some of the personalities and incidents mentioned.

A color photo of the original manuscript can be seen at the Library of Congress website.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

In the course of transcribing this manuscript for publication, I have incurred many debts of gratitude to numerous individuals and institutions. First I owe a special thanks and appreciation to Dr. Edward Marolda, Senior Historian and Dr. Regina Akers, Archivist both of the Naval Historical Center. Dr. Marolda's excellent work: The Washington Navy Yard an Illustrated History (Naval Historical Center, Washington, DC, 1999) which included Dr. Akers' article, An African American's Reflections first introduced me to Michael Shiner.

Mr. Glenn E. Helm, Director of the Navy Library, took a generous interest in this project and made the resources of that wonderful institution available. My thanks to him and his hospitable staff for letting me make digital images of rare naval documents; this made my trip from California to the Navy Yard a pleasure. Patrick Clancey, Naval Historical Center volunteer, has lent this project his superb technical expertise, valuable insights and organizing ability. Ms. Gail Munro, Head of the Navy Art Collection, Navy Museum, Washington Navy Yard generously contributed the information for the notes on Michael Shiner's 1822 visit to the 4th Street Ebenezer Methodist Church, the Reverend Yelveton T. Payton and Methodist church practices. The expertise of A. Davis Elliott of the Navy Department Library and library volunteer Nancy Hopkins was essential in preparing this online edition.

My thanks once again go to my former boss and mentor Dr. Vincent Vaccaro, now Senior Civilian Personnel Advisor, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, Department of the Navy, for his early support, sage advice, help and encouragement in this project. Thanks again to Mr. Stephen Payton my former colleague (no relation to the Reverend Payton) at the Washington Navy Yard who assisted me with some of the early research on Michael Shiner.

My thanks to the staff of two great conservatories of knowledge in Stockton, California: The Cesar Chavez Central Library and The University of the Pacific, Holt Memorial Library. Over the last two years I have made extensive use of their wonderful book collections and their old but still functioning microfilm readers. Thanks to the efforts of their respective staff, these old machines have been preserved allowing the microfilm of Michael Shiner's Diary to be transcribed for the Naval Historical Center's web site.

Mr. Wayne Hinton of Genealogytrails.com kindly helped edit an earlier version of extracts from Michael Shiner which was posted on his District of Columbia web site. I also want to thank the Library of Congress, Manuscript Division staff who were exceptionally accommodating in making it possible for me to obtain the microfilm of the Michael Shiner manuscript used in this transcription and for answering my questions regarding the manuscript history and provenance. My thanks also to Dr. Joseph E. Bisson, San Joaquin Delta College for his magnificent class in U.S. History that provided me numerous insights into the political and racial issues of the 19th century.

My thanks to Congressional Cemetery which is the final resting place of many early Washington Navy Yard military and civilian employees who's names are recorded in Michael Shiner's Diary. The Cemetery website http://www.congressionalcemetery.org/ is superb and simply one of the best tools for research on Washington Navy Yard and District of Columbia.

My particular thanks must go to Mr. Charles W. Johnson of the National Archives and Records Administration, Washington D.C., as he has done on many previous occasions; he once again graciously gave me his valuable time and unrivaled knowledge of the incredible NARA archival resources. Essential as well to the preparation of this transcription of Michael Shiner's Dairy were the wonderful staff at the Martin Luther King Library, Washingtoniana Division, Washington, DC. I want to thank MLK Library Archivist Mr. Ryan Semmes for his knowledge and kindness in answering my many questions and the help of his superb staff in locating documents relating to the probate of Michael Shiner's estate.

My deepest gratitude belongs to my wife and dearest friend Gene Kerr Sharp who has endured the pleasures pains and privileges of being so long in Michael Shiner's company.

John G. Sharp
Stockton California
Columbus Day 2007


Bibliography

Below are books on the District of Columbia, Washington Navy Yard and/or slavery that I found useful in researching the Michael Shiner Diary:

Adams, John Quincy. The Diaries of John Quincy Adams: A Digital Collection. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2004. [Digital edition available at http://www.masshist.org/jqadiaries.].

Ambrose, Kevin, Henry, Dan & Weiss, Andy. Washington Weather: The Weather Sourcebook for the D.C. Area. Fairfax, VA: Historical Enterprises, 2002.

Crawford, Michael J., Christine F. Hughes, Charles E. Brodine, Jr., and Carolyn M. Stallings, eds. The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary History. Vol. 3. Washington, DC: Naval Historical Center, 2002.

Diggs, Sr., Lewis S., ed. Baltimore City Directory for 1835/1836. Baltimore, MD: R.J. Matchett, 1835. [Available online at Africa Geneas.com.].

District of Columbia Department of Education. Special Report of the Commissioner of Education on the Condition of Public Schools in the District of Columbia, submitted to the Senate, June 6, 1868, and to the House, with Additions June 13, 1870. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1870.

Dudley, William S., et al. eds. The Naval War of 1812: A Documentary History. Vol. 2. Washington, DC: Naval Historical Center, 1992.

Green, Constance McLaughlin. The Secret City: A History of Race Relations in the Nation's Capital. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1967.

____. Washington: A History of the Capital 1800 -1950. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1962.

Hibben, Henry B. Navy Yard Washington: History From Organization, 1799, to the Present Day. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1899. [online at http://www.history.navy.mil/library/online/wny_history.htm].

Howe, Daniel Walker. What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America 1815 - 1848. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2007.

Latrobe, Benjamin H.. Papers of Benjamin Henry Latrobe. Vols. 1-3. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1984-1988.

Maloney, Linda M. The Captain from Connecticut: The Life and Naval Times of Isaac Hull. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986. [Maloney's discussion of the strike and riot of 1835 is by far the most coherent of the all the accounts of this remarkable and fateful year.].

Marolda, Edward. The Washington Navy Yard: An Illustrated History. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1999.

Morley, Jefferson. "The Snow Riot." Washington Post ( February 6, 2005): W14.

Peck, Taylor. Round Shot to Rockets: A History of the Washington Navy Yard and the Naval Gun Factory. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1949.

Report of Committees of the House of Representatives for the Second Session of the Forty - Second Congress. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1872): 471-473.

Sharp, John G. History of the Washington Navy Yard Civilian Workforce 1799-1962. Stockton, CA: Vindolanda Press, 2005. [This volume has full bibliography for most of the works cited in the preface. [Available online at http://www.history.navy.mil/books/sharp/Washington Navy Yard_History.pdf. Further information on the life of Michael Shiner has been assembled by John G. Sharp and is available online at http://genealogytrails.com/washdc/shiner.html.].

The Slave Code of the District of Columbia 1860 [Available online from the Library of Congress at http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/sthtml/stpres02.html.]

Tremian, Mary. Slavery in the District of Columbia: The Policy of Congress and the Struggle for Abolition. New York: G.B. Putnam’s Sons, 1898.

The Washington Directory Showing the Name, Occupation, and Residence, of Each Head of a Family & Person in Business, Together With Other Useful Information. Washington, DC: S.A. Elliot, 1827.


The Diary of Michael Shiner: The early history of Washington, DC, Dating from 1813 to 1865

Table of Contents

Date 1813 Page 1 Fire and Hose Companies Organized
" " 1813 " " " 1 War of 1812
" " 1814 " " " 3 About the War of 1812
" " 1816 " " " 15 Hard Winters in Washington DC
" " 1819 " " " 17 Very Hard Winters in Washington DC
" " 1819 " " " 17 United States Ship Columbus Launches
" " 1825 " " " 17 United States Frigate Launched (Brandy Wine)
" " 1826 " " " 18 Big Fire in Alexandria Va
" " 1826 " " " 18 Merchant Ship Virginia Launched in Alexandria
" " 1827 " " " 21 United States Sloop of War St. Louis Keel was Laid
" " 1827 " " " 23 President John Quincy Adams boards a Sloop of War in Georgetown DC
" " 1828 " " " 34 The Lighters Launched at the Washington Navy Yard
" " 1829 " " " 36 The United States Marine Barracks (Burnt down)
" " 1829 " " " 38 Died Commodore Thomas Tingey, Commander of the Washington Navy Yard
" " 1829 " " " 38 Commodore Isaac Hull took Command of the Wash.
" " 1831 " " " 40 The darkest eclipse in Wash. DC
" " 1832 " " " 48 The United States Schooner Experiment Launched at the Wash. Navy Yard, Built by Winslow
" " 1832 " " " 48 President Andrew Jackson and his cabinet at the Navy Yard
" " 1832 " " " 49 Colery (colera) in Washington City
" " 1832 " " " 50 General Scott, returns from the Indian War in the South
" " 1832 " " " 50 The Launching of the United States Revenue Cutter Jackson
" " 1833 " " " 51 Andrew Jackson on his way to Richmond to lay a cornerstone met with a accident.
" " 1833 " " " 55 Metor fell from the elements and frighten the people very much
" " 1835 " " " 57 A turn out of the militia in Wash. DC
" " 1835 " " " 59 The first strike in Washington DC and Andrew Jackson called out every soldier in Washington
" " 1835 " " " 64 Cars started for between Baltimore and Washington
" " 1835 " " " 65 Stealing Copper from the Washington Navy Yard
" " 1835 " " " 70 Commodore Isaac Hull Leaves the Washington Navy Yard
" " 1836 " " " 71 The Launching of the United States Frigate Columbia
" " 1836 " " " 72 Commodore Daniel Patterson and Captain Joseph Smoot takes command of Navy Yard
" " 1836 " " " 72 Major General Santa Anna Mexican General was taken pisoner
" " 1836 " " " 73 Trouble with Indians In the south
" " 1836 " " " 74 The Battle of North Pont was celebrated in Washington DC
" " 1836 " " " 74 The United States post office was Burnt down
" " 1836 " " " 75 The 4th of March Martin Van Buren is President the second time
" " 1838 " " " 76 The United States Marine from their Fight in Florida
" " 1839 " " " 77 The Death of Commodore Daniel Paterson in the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1839 " " " 77 Ten Hours in the Federal Buildings
" " 1840 " " " 78 Death of Commodore Isaac Chancey (Chauncey)
" " 1841 " " " 79 Death of Commodore Thomas Holddig (Holdup) Stevens in Wash. Navy Yard
" " 1841 " " " 79 Died in the White house Major General Wm. Henry Harrison
" " 1841 " " " 80 Death of Major General Alexander Mc Comb Commander in Chief of the U.S. Army
" " 1843 " " " 82 Death of Commodore Isaac Hull
" " 1844 " " " 83 Sad Accident on Board Frigate Princeton
" " 1844 " " " 84 The Launching of the United States Sloop of War St. Mary's
" " 1845 " " " 86 The National Theater burnt down on the 5th of March 1845
" " 1845 " " " 86 The Mexican Minister demands his past port
" " 1845 " " " 86 The United States iron steamer Water Witch was launched the 26th day of March on Thursday
" " 1845 " " " 87 Death of Major General Andrew Jackson Ex. President of U. States
" " 1846 " " " 89 Dedicated the Odd Fellow Hall on 7th St. N.W.
" " 1846 " " " 90 The Battle of Harrington Hotel on Capitol hill
" " 1846 " " " 92 Commander Charles Macaulay took Command of the Wash. Navy Yard in September
" " 1846 " " " 94 The launching of the United States Steamer Frigate Union
" " 1847 " " " 96 Celebrating the Mexican War in this City the Whole City was slit up
" " 1847 " " " 97 Some facts about the Mexican War
" " 1848 " " " 101 Death of Ex President John Quincy Adams
" " 1848 " " " 101 Laying the Corner Stone of the Washington Monument
" " 1849 " " " 103 Death of James Polk ex President of the U.S.
" " 1849 " " " 104 Commodore Henry E. Ballard took Command of the Wash. Navy Yard, the 1st of Oct
" " 1849 " " " 104 The Arrival of the English Sloop a Minster of War Vacar with Lord Bullwer from England
" " 1850 " " " 105 Death of ex senator John C. Calhoun
" " 1850 " " " 105 Death of Major General Zackary Taylor at the white house
" " 1851 " " " 107 Corner Stone was laid at the Capital in July
" " 1851 " " " 109 The Library of Congress was burnt in July
" " 1852 " " " 112 The President and his Cabnit visited the Wash. Navy Yard
" " 1852 " " " 113 Death of Henry Clay A Senator
" " 1852 " " " 115 Commodore Charles Morgan took Command of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1852 " " " 116 Death of Daniel Webster
" " 1853 " " " 118 Death of Commodore Charles Morgan in Wash Navy Yard
" " 1853 " " " 121 The President Franklin Pierce visited the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1854 " " " 132 The Nebraska Bull Passed
" " 1855 " " " 135 Captain French Forrest took Command of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1855 " " " 136 The Launching of the U.S. Steam frigate Minnesota on the 10th day of Dec
" " 1856 " " " 165 Commodore Lavallette took Command of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1857 " " " 152 The National Theatre burnt down
" " 1857 " " " 156 Election takes place in Wash
" " 1858 " " " 165 Lord Napier and the British Secretary at the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1858 " " " 165 Commodore J. Rudd took Command of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1859 " " " 171 Commodore Buchanan took Command of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1859 " " " 172 Launching of the United States Steamer Anacosta [Anacostia]
" " 1860 " " " 175 Dedication of the Washington Statue
" " 1860 " " " 176 Arrival of the Jappanees at the Washington Navy Yard
" " 1861 " " " 178 Justice Clark Administers the Oath of Allegiance to the Mechanics of the Wash Navy Yard
" " 1861 " " " 178 The Emancipation of the District of Columbia
" " 1865 " " " 184 President Lincoln was down at the Wash Navy Yard on good Friday the 14th 1865 with his Wife
" " 1865 " " " 186 Michael Shiner Saw eleven Presidents take there seat and some Presidents twice (the end)

1       B       1813

ther was a Horse Company organised in this City of Washington by Captin lower Caul well Docter Edward Clark Belong to it and James Freind Formly a Baker on the Hill thomas renols formly a tarvin keper at the eastern Branch Bridge on pensylvan avenu James kely formly kept a redervus on the navy yard hill 6 a Baker use to to Belonge to this company by name of Burns formly use to Have a Bake house South of the long row and a Brother in law of lawer george Water stone all those a bove named gentelman use to Belong that Company organise in 1809 by Captin thomas Carley a young man by the name of Spanagle his father John Canon Was a Black smith formly kept a Black Smith shop south of the Congress Burial ground 7 rigments of infertry by Captain thomas carbrly ther was a Company of feild artilery organnised at the same time by Captin Samuel Burch and thomas Howard and thomas Warfield and louyd pumphrey 8 and Joseph Bro[wn] formerly a police of the 5Ward Isaac phillips use to Belonge to it his Mother formerly kept a little shop Below the captol all those above named gentleman use to Belong to it

A mmelitia [militia] Company organnised by captin thomas Huse formly kept a store on pennsylvania avenu ner the Centre Market elisha phumphery uto belong to it John Moody use to Belonge to it9

Shiner Diary Page 1

--1--

2       1813

a company Wher organise at the same time by captin Joseph lassen on the navy yard hill wm lasky Belong to it Henry adams Belong to it

A Rifle Company Wher organised the Same time by Captin Wiliam Doughty Henry Aukward belong to it James Roads belong to it the Dress of this Rifle company war green ankeen [nankeen] yelin fringin and the caps Was made of Wild bear skin When i was a smal Boy those captins use to attend to ther drill all day and drill the men the best part of the night as for Colnal Daughrty he was like a bildear

captin stalls [Stull's]company of george town was orgernised in 1813 [they wore] Blu ankeen and red fringin and Was a sruead an and Well organises company and Well drilled in them days they wher active as cats

A Nother company Wher orgernise at the same time by captin Wiliam Moore ason in law of old captin nailer the father of lutenant colnal Henry nailer

lutenant elaxdraiar Mc comik sr Belong to Burchis artilry company and Mr James young Brother in law of Mr eledrania Mc comik lutenant shedrick Davis belong to Rushes artilry company in 1813 and 1814

--2--

3       1814

[First three lines of this page crossed out and illegible.]

the early part of augst 1814 the British armmy landing at Benedick under the command of genral ross Was assailed by the american armmy under the command of genral Winder ther they had several light ingagement and the same time the British Where hererass [harassed] by comerder Barnny and under comerder Barnnys command Wher the united Staets Merrines and sailers and colnal samul Miler then the american army fell back on a [illegible-garrison?] cauld charls branch in prince george is county in the State of Maryland betwen uper Marl Borough and the Wood yard on Monday the 22 day of august [1814] they had a -Nother Batle at Charlsis branch and in the 23 day of august 1814 on tusday the american armmy under the command of genral Winder fell back on the long old fields prince george county and genral Winder had all the fence pull down and form a line to figt the Bitish and instead of [the] Bitish Armmy advancin up to the american armmy at the long olde fields on the 23 of august 1814 tusday some of our owne people pilot them form betwee senter Will and the Wood yard round towards Blades Barge [Bladensburg, MD] then on the 23 of August 1814 on tusday the american Armmy under the command of genral Winder Wher orderd in to the city of Washington by the honable Mr James Madoson president of the united strets and the honable secatary of War Mr John arm strong

page 3

--3--

4       1814

and the 23 day of august on tusday night the american armmy laid on ther arms and Biv o uactin [bivouact in] for that night then next Morning on the 24 day of august 1814 on Wensday Between 3 and 4 oclock in the Morning they Burnt the eastern branch Bridge That Where done to prevent the British from crossing for feare they should reverse ther March and then they Went forth and burnt the sloop of War on the stocks and one or 2 other vessels and all those orders that Was carid out Wher giv in by the president of the united Staets the honable James Madason and the honable Secatary of the Navy Mr [William] Jones at sun rise the same morning two men came in on horse back from the direction of Blades Barge bringing news the British armmy wher advancin over the Baldes Barge Bridge and this news reaching the american camp aroused the spirit of the americans to force ther march in douB Ble quick time to asail the British at Bladens Barge Bridge gest as the amierin cun armmy got two Blades Barge the British army Wher Jest advancin doWn rossis hill and a Bout 2 hours after the american army left the City of Washington under the comMand of genral Winder comerder Barnny [Commander Joshua Barney] commandr Jo though his skill forced his March all night on the 29 of august 1814 on tusday though Mary land and arired at Washington and landid his men in 2 hours [illegible] the american armmy had left Washington

page 4

--4--

5       1814

he lanid his Men betwein Noth east and South east of Washington Navy yard Which at that day Where caled the ferry Which those days goes by the Name of the olde ferry Wharf 10 and after he landid his men he takeing up his line of March for Bladens Burge in Marching across those comern to the last ward of the capitol and they Weher 2 Blood red flags Wher discoverd By the people in the 5 Ward ishal never forget the remarks that Where Mode that day the lord have Mercy on us then the British comes now and it Where hard to convince some of them but What they Were the British Arm my but olde Mr Wiliam phumphry told them that it wher comerder Barny still11 Still Mrs Betsy Brown the Wife of Mr Joseph Brown Miss keithy Brown a sister of Mr Joseph Brown wher ringing and twisting and screaming holing the lord What is to becom of us all at that time Commander Barnny had cross East Capital Street he hoisted the American Flag then some of them didn't believe but some of them wher the British Armmy and about an hour and half after Comerder Barney left the City of Washington for Blades Barge We heard a roar cannonading and Militry and that time commder Barnny had placed his selve in a posintiose Which Wher at pring [spring] Which to this day is cauled Barnis spring then the orders wher givin for the american armmy to retreat and at that this time they Wher hove in con fusion and fled in every direction still Commerder Barney held his posion Wher the British colums wher orderd to advance a cross Blades Barge Bridge wher they met with grape and canister for Commder Barney orderd a show er of balls from the Marines as fast as the colums Would advance the bridge drove back in disorder then at last the columns Wher

page 5

--5--

6       1814

orderd to advance a cross the Water and in that time it Wher understod that genral Ross said the lord What has this Mon broght us to and at that time comerder Barnny Wher Working fearful havoc annorent [among] them and at that time comerder Barny hors Wher shot from under him and he Where Woundid and also colnal Samul Miler Wounid and at this time aBritish oficer stept up with rord at comeder Barnny we hav caught you at last drawing hi sord a cross the Back of his neck But you too good a man to kill and at that time the americans had fled in confusion and they had [illegible-ceased?] firing at Blades Barge and At that time the Americans wher flying trough the City comerder Barnney were taken prisoner and colnal samul Miler then the British Armmy taken up ther line of march for Washington wher a numbesr of the British soldiers felled in their ranks on the way to Washington from Blades Barge12 by the loss of blood Between the eastern toll gate and Blades Barge the British solders fell in holes to the right and left and still the British armmy continued the march on Washington Jest as We saw the armmy coming above the toll gate in Washington We heard the tread of British army feet Master left a colard man and wher ourselve with a olde lady By the name of Mrs reid on capitol hill then as son as we got a sight of British armmy raising that hill they looked like flames of fier all red coats and the stoks of ther guns painted with red ver Milon [vermillion] and the iron work shind like a spanish dollar the colard man near Mrs reid saw this and My selve and the colard Man started and ran and i started to ran two and ole

page 6

--6--

7       1814

Mrs reid caught hold of Me Wher are you runig to you niger you What do you recon the Brtish Wants With such a niger as you and at this time John had run and hid his selve in a bake oven that Wher owne by a Man named Burns the British armmy Still continued ther March on towards the capitol ontill they got against a large Brick house on Capitol Hill fronting Mary land avenu and frontting 2 Street formly oned By Judge Suel of Mary land and Wher ocepied formly the Judge and his famly every Session of Congress This house now sets to the North east of the united Steates Senate and as the British army aproach that house under the commamd of genral Ross and his aids his horse Wher shot from under him in a twinkale of the eye house Wher sorouned By British armmy and search all through up stairs and down stairs in search of the Man that shot the horse from under genral but no Man was found after they found that they coud couldent find the Man they put a slow Match to the house and then stood off a sertin ditance and forong [firing?] those congreve Rocket13 those Rocket burnt until the came to the explosion part they Made the rafters fly east and West and then they 4 March on farther to a hotel Below this house to the east Ward of the united states senate there they found amunition and guns and this house was Wer formerly ocupied By a gentleman by the name of Mr tumbelson he kept a large bording house for Members of congress and for other gentleman and forth and burnt that down they Wher a scothman kept a store on east capitol and alaxandria Mc cormack sr kept a store in the same square Which at that time Wher a lutenant in Captin Buches artilry Company the goods Wher taken out By the British and distributed among any one Would receive them

page 7

--7--

8       1814

Mr Mc comack had a verry larg store of grocerys of all kinds of dry goods and lickurs of all kinds and great Manny of his goods had disapeard out of Washington i dont believe he get manny of them but this Scotch man store wasnt interfered With it was suposed at that time he was very officious and Was sopose that he escorted genral Ross and his oficers into the united states senate and house of representative this was done Before it was set on fire then after they had been in the senate and the house of representatives this was done befor it wher set on feir then they Went forth that night and burnt the capital and the presidents house and all the other public Buildings and perused all the city of Washington over the 25 of Augst 1814 on thursday who shal for get that day of the awful storms Which raidge for a long time without interruption it thunared lightent haild and rained it taking some olde houses up from there foundations and brining them down and the British Armmy stood as if they were unmovable never went in shelter what ever no redy shelter for them selves but on the 20 day augst 1814 on friday the British armmy wher taking ther last round in the city of Washington and puting on a great Many airs as they formly do in anny other contry When they get a foot holde smoking of others segars and throing them about then threw some down a Well where there wher some powder throed down ther by the american people and they wher many of them landid into by some of ther carbins wher bloed overpin out and some over in Tur key bay creek some in front of the arsenal and genral Ross came to the conclusion that it wher time to vacate the city What they didnt lose by explosion a great Manny of them run a Way the British Armmy left the city of Washington under command of genral ross the 26 day of august 1814 on friday night

page 8

--8--

9       1814

that Night iBelieve the Whels - Wher Mufeld [wheels were muffled] and the horeis feet [horses' feet] for they Went a way so easy that you scaresly could hear them the amer american armmy that Wher commanded by genral Winder Who had takeing up ther quarters after the siege at Bladens Barge on 24 day of august 1814 on Wens day at Montgumry cortrt house in the staete of Mary land they came to the City of Washington the 27 day of august 1814 on Satuday night laid on ther arms all that night and Biv o acted [bivoacted] for the night and a sunday Moring on the 28 day of august 1814 the armmy operation as soone pracical and Wher sent down to indian head [Indian Head, MD] comerderr rogers and comerder porter filled chanal up With old logs and stretch a chain a cross the river the american armmy had form a line on Mary land shore and virginia shore and as the Brit ish ships of War Draft douwn the american pored into them on Both sids the British throld ther shot and shell starbard [starboard-right] and larbard [larboard, old name for port or left] the siege for a While rage With great fury on the 29 day of august 1814 Monday the siege endit and the flag ship cauled the sea horse Which was admiral Cog Burns [Admiral Sir George Cockburn] flag ship led the Way Which she have her [g]ums starbbard and larbard When the smoke cleared away every vessel Wher gone but they Wher Bidild like a sieve befor they did leave the commander of the British squadron in 1814 that came up to the potomac river didnt act no Ways like a gentelman Wher ever he landid for the Worst of hetheans wouldent of acted anny More heatheanly then he did he Behave verry villany tretcherous at hamton virginia by letting his saillors and Merrines lose at hamton to do as they please

page 9

--9--

10       1814

then on the same day the 29 of august 1814 after the A siege at indian head the British forces sailed for Baltimor With the intension of an invasion But got sadly disapointed thank god then on the 30 august 1814 on tusday then united staets armmy that Wher Reinforced By the troops from virginia taken up ther line of March from Washington in Double quick time under the comand of Major genral Winder and the March Wher forced speedly With out delay ontil they arived in Baltimore and the Bayones[?] of the Baltimorens wher fille with joy at the arival of the troops from ther sister staetes and gest arived in time to antisipate in assailin the British foe the British coumanced operation throing ther rumes and rackets and all other combustical stuff thank god this whre all in vain for Major genral Smith of Mary land and Major genral Winder and the comander at fort Mc henry was Dertermernt not to be Rafled to the British commanders no[w] they were not at Washington and the siege continued with vigor this sieg at Baltimor Betwen the american forces and the British forces it were Drizlin and rainin on 29 day of August 1814 on Monday and it Wher Drislin and rainin on the the 31 day of august 1814 on wensday and the wind continued to the eastward and Drislin and rainin on the 1 day of septemBer 1814 on thursday so it continued beter then a hold Weak and for several days and nights you could here the guns distently from fort Mc Henry and the British Ships of War We herd them from Baltimor to Washington so the siege continued untel the 12 of september on Monday and on the 12 of september on Monday the seige endid and the British Ships of War and the armmy Wher Drove Back in Disorder and they Wher glad to get away

Page 10

--10--

11       1814

then we never herd from the British no More in Washing ton untel genral Jackson at New orleans in the state of louisianer the British commence With ther Daring Move Ments in cariaing oft various things and very ner doing as they pleased Which at sopoesed a great Many of our people trafic with them and it was distinly [distinctly] understood that the Honable Major genal andrew jackson wher not there When this proceedce wher going on and all this wher done about the last part of December 1814 and When the honable Major genrl andrew Jackson arived at the City of New orleanse in the last part of December 1814 he found City in an awful condition the people Wher moveing out and Making no effort What ever to Defend the city the genral found that such effort was exhaustin he ameditely Made a Recouisition on the governer of the staete of louisianer for to be enterd into servis ameatly to prvent the invasion of the British armmy into the City of new orleans as the genrals request of the govner Wher not gratified speedly he takein responibility of the legislators power in his owne hands and com mence heaveing up intrenchments and Directing Batriys in posion that Would flank the emermy right or left or front and he place the City under Marshal law for none go out he evry Man to a Man com to his Work all that Wher able to carry a Misket or sword or a pistol or that could help to carry drag a canon or shove the Wheel or use a pick axe or shovel he paid no Respect to persons for eMad evry Man com that could com at that time it Wher verry luckly and sucesful after all particales the short time that [he] had been ther

Page 11

--11--

12       1815

and in the Mean time he Wher fortafiing the City the ladys of all Classes came to him in great Distress ringing and twisting ther hands What should they do for protecion the genral reply Was to them go to your home My prety fair Maids for if they get to you they Will have to Walk over my dead Boddy in the erl ly part of January 1815 the sieg Com menced By the arm my of the united states under the Command of the honable Major genral andrew jackson against the British arm my under the command of sir lord pacinham [Major General Sir Edward Michael Pakenham] and the sieg contined ontil the 8 day of January 1815 on sunday the British armmy Wher Drove back time after time with great Slaughter the british armmy left field in posession of the Honable Major genral andrew Jackson and the united states armmy on the 8 day of January 1815 on Sunday But they [the British] Wher permitid on the 9 day of January on Mon day to search for ther oficers that wher killed on the field of Battle they Wher permited by a flag of truce and the British armmy that wher sent to take new or leans they wher pickt men they had faced Walls of fier al through urope Never Wher noune to flinch from the Mouth of the canon or point of the Baynet or the sword they Wher under the command of Sire lord Welington and it wher no use time after time the colmns of the Brit ish arm my advance to the american fier But it was all in vain for sire lord pack in ham on coverd himselve and led one thoussand men in person and he Wher killed instantly and the British columns Melted befor the american Bateries

page 12

--12--

13       [1815]

the treaty of peace Wher made at the city of gent [Ghent] after the Battle of New or leans [on the] 8 day January 1815 peace reach the City of Washington betwen the goverments on the 22 of February 1815 on Wens day

ice commence erlly in november 1814 and a continued freesing until the Middle of March 1815 and 1815 January 14 they haul Wood a cross the eastern branch by Wagon loads with six horses and they Wher a deseas went through County cauld the swell toung that kill the horse it apeared that they Wher no cure for it they couldent get anny thing down the throat they dropt down dead most every wher and at last the people caught this disease and they wher very few of them that caught it got over it but they Wher a old Docter lady that liv in prince georges county the state of Mary land by the name of Mrs Darry and al she attendid to she wher successful in cureing for she wher verry attentive and tracterble for She highly rectermendid by the phersisiansners [parishioners?] of prince georges county the state of Mary land and particerly by olde Docter hodges of prince georges county the state of Mary land and all Mrs Darrys Medirins [medicines] Wher made princilble out of erBs [herbs] and 1816 wher a hard Winter for they Wher three black spots in the sun afte the Winter closed the sun become to as red as blood ther Wher a frost evry night the hold sumer the Wher no corn Made scarrly aBout in different section of the country it Where all Whitherd up 15

      1815

page 13

--13--

14       [1815]

the honable James Monroe take in his seat the 4 of March 1817 on Tuesday the Honable John quincy adams takin his seat the 4 of March 1825 The Honable John quincy adams taking his seat the 4 of March 1823 monday The Honable genral andrew Jackson take his seat the 4 of March 1829 on Wensday the Honable Major genral andrew Jackson taking his seat the 2nd time the forth of March 1833 on monday and snow on the ground the honable Martin van Buren Then taken his Seat the forth of March 1837 on Satuday sluich and snow on the ground the Major genral the Honable Wm henry harrison takeing his Seat the 4 of March 1841 on Thursday the Honable colnal James K polk take his Seat the 4 of March 1845 on tueday rainny and dr lin the Honable Major genral Zackerries [Zachary] Taylor taken his Seat the 5th of March 1849 on

Monday the Honable Brigader genral Franklin pierce Taken his Seat the 4th of March 1853 on friday and Snowd a little and rain a little the Honable James Buckhanan taken his Seat the forth of March 1857 on Wens day a Beautiful

The Honable James Monroe president of the united States left his Seat on the 4th of March 1823 friday the Honable John quincey adams president of the united States left his Seat on the 4 of March 1829 on Wens day the Honable Major genral andrew Jackson left his Seat the 4 of March 1837 on Sataday the Honable Martin van Burren president of the united States left his Seat on Thursday the honbale John Tyler presidnet of the united States left his Seat on the 4th of March 1845 on tueday the Honable James k polk left his Seat the 4of March 1849 on Monday the Honable Milard fillmore president of the united States left

his seat the 4th of March 1853 on friday the Hon Brigadier genral Franklin pierce left his Seat the 4 of March 1857 on Wensday and a Beatiful day

page 14

--14--

15

1816 a Hard Winter

1817 a Hard Winter and

1818 a Hard Winter and

1819 a pretty Hard

Winter twoand in

1820 a Hard Winter and

1821 a Hard Winter and

1822 a Hard Winter and

1823 a Hard Winter and

1824 a Hard Winter and

1825 a Hard Winter and

1826 a Hard Winter and

1827 a Hard Winter and

1828 a Hard Winter and

1829 a Hard Winter and

1830 a Hard Winter and

1831 a Hard Winter and

1832 a Hard Winter and

1833 a Hard Winter and

1834 a Hard Winter and

1835 a Hard Winter and

1836 a Hard Winter and

1837 was a beatiful fall for they never gatherd in ther garden stuff in the District of Columbia until nearly cristmas and the 1 part of 38 it commence With a snow and sleek so the Winter of 38 Was a cold Dreary Winter for never shal for get it for i Was coming a long by the engine house in the fifth Ward and They Wher aan olde lady coming up the Hill wards the church

1821 the Reverance Mr payton16 a Methodis preacher Wer sent in charge of the Ebenezer church by the Methadis Confrence in the Six Ward and i Believe he was the greates Methodis preachers that ever ask a nickel for his Walk and Conversation proved he caried the love of god in his heart and all his cry to his fellow man Was to repent and turn to god it made no difference What kind of a man he War he made no distinc sion for he died tryunphpant by the [grace?] of god for the Worst sinners in the City of Washington at that time like him when Mr payton aproach them With the Word of the lord they would Be as calm as a lamb and so should be the Walks of every minister of the gospel no Matter what Denomanation he is

page 15

--15--

16

for no foller of the lord and Saver Jesus Christ orght not to be ingage in annything that are sinful or dangeros in the sight of god for god is a Jest god for he noes the screts of all men hearts and he is the searcher and regulator of all men for the last sermen i herd Mr payton preac Was in the eben neiser [Ebenezer] Church the 21 day of December 1821 at a Wattch Meetin for i came nine or ten miles to hear him preach for I never forget it for that verry Night it snowed and me goin back Home Next morning the snow had fell to the depth of six inches and better the bottoms of my shoes came off nearly and i had to go home Bare footed nearly and this Was the 1 day of Janauary 1822

and she ask me to take hold of her hand and at that time they was a tremendou sleik on the ground and i Made evry efert to get her up the hill so We our lady and My selv both slip and Way We Went over and over like a Barrel and people Wer all looking at us so That i Jest Merly Then Time to help the old up and i then i sneak oft and Was glad to get

of 1839 a Hard Winter 1840 a Hard Winter 1841 a Hard Winter 1842 a Hard Winter 1843 a Moderate Winter and Janurery the splenderes January That i ever seen the hold Month like a indian sumer a White forst evry night and were in the Middle of the day for you to Work With your coat off and the Winter dident commence unitl the 1th of feuary and March paid up for the hold of it for they Was snow fell the 16 of March 1843 Moore then a knee deap in some places on thursday a hard Winter 44

page 16

--16--

17

1844 a Hard Winter

1845 a Hard Winter

1846 a Hard Winter

1847 a Hard Winter

1848 a Hard Winter

1849 a Hard Winter

1850 a Hard Winter

1851 a Hard Winter

1852 a Hard Winter

1853 a Hard Winter

1854 a Hard Winter

1855 a Hard Winter

1856 a Hard Winter

1857 a Hard Winter

1858 verry little snow But Wet and cold Winter But not much snow

1819

the united States Ship Columbus 74 Constructed and built by Colnal Wiliam Doughty and launch on the 4 of march 1819 on monday at Washington navy yard the united States Ship Columbus 74 forty 8 years old united States frigate potomac [Potomac] first Class built by Colonal Wiliam Doughty and launch 1821 frigate potomack 46 years old

1821

1825

the united States frigate Branday Wine [Brandy Wine] Wher launch the 16 day of june 1825 on thursday at Washington navy yard and constructed and Built by Colnal Wiliam Dougthy17 and Wher fited out expresly to carry genral layet [LaFayette] home to france comader Charls Morris had command of her first lieutenant of the Branday Wine Was lieutenant gregry sail master elisha peck the united States frigate Bran day Wine 42 years old they commence heaving out at Washington navy yard the united State frigate congress [Congress] 36 gun ship 3rd class on the 27 of March 1826 on Monday to examine res [rust] and to put new keil on her copering [coppering] of her they Wher fitting her out for some station but the Macedonia [Macedonian] takeing her place

      1821

page 17

--17--

When they commence heaving out commodor thomas tinsay [Thomas Tingey] Wher present captain Walter Booth Wher present first lieutenant thomas crale Wher present sailing master Mama duke Dove colnal Wiliam Doughty wher present Master builder James owner Wher present Boatswain Daived eaton Wher present Benjamen king sr18 quaterman quaterman Joseph herbert quarterman george grant quaterman Wiliam aik oun

      1827

fier Broke out in the alxdrania in the state of virginia on the 17 of January 1827 on Wensday and the Disspatch came from alxdrania on the 18 day of January 1827 on thursday to the people of Washington early in the moring cauling on them to com down speedily [to] assist in putting the fier out

1826

launching of a new Merchant Ship at alxdrania her name was virginia the 24th day of December 1826 on saturday

and orders came from the navy Department the same moring from Honable secatary of the navy samul southard to the commanding officer of the Washinton navy yard comerder thomas tingey to send every Mercanic and labors and engines out of the yard and every man that were Wher able to travel and orders Wher obeied promptly by comander tin say and the men Wher dispatched in Double quick time and the people of Washington and george town Went hand to hand to assist them in putting fiers out the mecanics Wanted

page 18

--18--

19       1827

to put the engines over By the shears and take them down on the ice but Captin Walter Booth stop them and taken a round over the long Bridge19 by horse and hand they [had] one engine in the yard now that broke down 2 Befor We got ther and they wher no time DeladeWhat ever for the oficers caried us in a half canter and a dog trot Comerder thomas Tinray [Thomas Tingey] Commandeid Washington Navy yard Went Down to alexdrania that day Captin Walter Booth sectiond in command went Down to alxdrania that day colal archable henderson Went down that day Which wher a commander of the united Staets Merines Core Lieutenant Henry R Tyler caried down that day a Detachment of the united States Merines down to alex drania (He) carid them Down in Double quick time Purser Mr timothy Wind Went down to alexanria that day Colnal Wiliam Doughty the naval contractor went Down that day the master Builder James owner sr went Down and sailing master edward Barry went down that day Boats swain David eaton Went down that day to alexdranina and Mr William Speedon went down that day which at that time was clerk to Mr Wind the purser all the Master Workmen and Mechanics and Laborers of all classes went down that day a circumstance accrued between sailing master edward Barry and a colled man by the name thomas pen ton [penton] didnt conduct himseve so Well When we wher a coming home and Mr Barry gave him a repramand and it apears that tom pen gave him some insolents and Mr Barry when got home he reported him to captin Booth friday the 19 day of January 182720

page 19

--19--

20       1827

We all hands of the ordernary men Wher cauledup in to the rigin loft to giv an acount of our selves captin Booth Wher present in the loft first lieutenant thomas crab and Sailing master edwar Barry who had prefered the charge against thomas pen captin Booth sais now thomas pen you are brought befor me for usin abusive and insultin language to an officer of this yard what have you got to say for your selve captin thee had kein a ben drinkin and if the said anything to Mr Barry out of the Way they are sorry for it and if thou pleases and if Mr Barry pleases to excuse the will never do so no more sire dont you no the danger of givin insolence to an officer Well tell the captin if thou please excuse me this time never do so no more sire Mr Barry reply i will excuse him this time captin now Thomas pen i will let you oft as Mr Barry has excuse you Now captin and Mr Barry the[y] is ten thousand times oblige to thou for letin [him] off captin Booth and first lieutenant crab sail Master edward Barry Boatswain David eaton turned their backs and laught and told Tom to go on now and behave your selves and never struck him a crack When pen got up to the ordernary house among the men are sais Tom pen by the powers of Mol kely didnt the(y) tell thou if ever thou let the[e] get into quaker sistom that thou would never Wip the[e] so Tom pen got clear of the cats [cat of nine tails] that day by talkin quaker to captin Booth and the rest of the oficers Whil captin Booth was as fine a oficer as ever steps his foot on a ship deck for i never heard captin Booth use profane word the most word he ever use to use

page 20

--20--

21       1827

was by george for captin booth was a perfect gentelman for he wher the one that adopted those rigin screw in heavin frigate Congress out in 1826 he often use to speak of a quicker plan in runin up the rigin wit the screw the time they were done by scraping the frigate Congress on one side they would have righ ther up and set the rigin on the other side and in them days the shoe wer turned into dead eye then lanerds [lanyards] were received through each eye and then each shard had a louft block with tails imitatin a stoper and those tails wer made fast a round a shard a round above then lowerd that wher raised into the dead eye that cornectid in the chains the hook of the Double block that way rigin in them days wher set up captin Booth said at that time they could be a quicker way to addopted to set up the rigin So captin Booth wher the first inventor of those rigin screws which a gang of rigin be set up in half the time that it use to be set up shrods or stays The united states sloop of war St Louis was the first to carry those rigin screws and she carried them on her miesent [mizzen] shrouds 21 both starbord [starboard, i.e., the righthand side of a ship] and loarboard [larboard] that was in place of the dead eye Which to this day goes by the name of Booth riggin screws22 Which i believe is intirer sacerfactry to the navy Department The united staets ship sloop of war St. Loius her keil wher laid in the uper ship house the 12 day of febuary 1827 on monday one cedar tree planted in washington navt yard one apple tree planted by Micial Shiner

page 21

--21--

22       1827

in front of the boatswain house the 17 day of March 1827 on satuday and the Boatswain said to me those trees Will not live and my reply was to the Boatswain ser those trees will be here when you and me ar dead and gone the 4 of July 1828 on friday Comerder Tinssys [Tingey] gig Wher orderd to be ready to carry up above georgetown for to take the Honable John quincy adams president of the united States a shore the Coxswain of the comerder gig was John M green thomas payne Henry over John Williams John Thompson Basil Brown and Michial Shiner crew was compose of colerd man except the coaxman the boat crew wher Dress in full uneform and that moring colnal henderson Barge was got ready and Wher mandit with ten Merrines and 1 Sargeant Who wher caxsmen of the boat and those boats wher got ready by run sire i never shall forget it as long as i live in the morning at sun rise while us wher all down at the boat the salute was fierd they Wher a dog that use to follow the century a bout he hadent bein long in the yard he come from the contry and the Marine uste to feed him and every time the centry would relieve he would relieve too the century was down ther wher we wher geting the boat ready and the dog wher there two and interfering the salute the first gun that wher feird way went the dog and for every leap he made he hollord and he never stop till got out side the yard and we never seen more and first leiuenant kelly and sailing master edward Barry

page 22

--22--

23       1828

they ask Mr green What was the Matter With that dog Mr green anserd and said the dog was frighting at the salute that wher fired at that time the 2 boats all ready to go up above georgetown and the comerders gig Wher fited out expresly for we take the Honable Mr John qunicy adams a shore up above georgetown and at that down came captin Thomas holdup stevens in company with lieutenant colonel charles broom of the united States Marine corps first lieutenant kely said the gig was all ready sire captin stevens said Broom come get in with me colnal Broom answered and said i beg to be excuse i want to exercise my Boys this moring Colnal Broom got in his Barge and told them up oars and stand by to let fall let fall shov oft give way good morning captin never mind said Captin Stephens to colnal Broom i will be long side of you to sectly that right sais colnal Broom i want to give your colerd Boys a sweat this morning colnal Broom started about fifteen minits Before captin stephens started The reason that colnal Broom started before Captin stephens was the captin was waiting for a message from commodore Tingey after the captain received the message he asks Mr green if all wher right Mr green sais yes sire then Mr green sais up oars my lads shove off let fall giv way captain steiphens sais give way my lads let us go in search of colonel Broom then we over took colnal Broom at the arsenal and we wher about to pass him along the captin sais fair you well Broom and colnal Broom sais hold on stephens and run along side and take in passenger captin stephens sais ease your larboard oars pull your starb

page 23

--23--

24       1828

ard oars until the gig got along side of the colnals barge then we taking the colnal on the board of the gig after then colnal got on board captin stephens sais give way my lads mind you my brave fellers they are a parcel of boats in the potomac to day and i want to see what you can do for them at that time there wher five hundred boats in the river and none of them could hold a light when we got to the arsenal the potomac river wher darkend with boats before us and behind us we look down the river and seen some boats coming and they look they scarily touch the water but they wher coming and at that time we had pass some the fastes rowing in alexandria they wher no boat in the river that day that day out the five hundred that could beat the comerders gig when we got up to george town Jest as we got ther the president came down in his carrige in company with the Honable secretary of war Major genral Miller and the Honable secretary of the Navy Samuel l southard23 and the rest of his cabinet and a great many other distinguished gentelman then they went on bord of the surprise steam boat and at last we hadent the pleasure of taken the president ashore in the gig the steam boat started in full paced up the river Mr green his orders to follow the steam boat up the river then we followed the steam boat and kept along sid of her until we got to the very landing place and the steam boat run so close that they shoved the gang way out and

page 24

--24--

25       1828

the preident walk ashore and all his cabnet all the other Distinich gentelmen and ladys and went up to the verry spot and they wher great masses of people wher there that day and several volunteer companies and plenty of everything [to] eat and drink and the Honable Mr John Qunicy adams presiident of the united states pulled oft his coat and takein hold of the spade as if he was going to set in for a days work and went right in to it and that the beginning of the chesapeake and ohio cannal24 and then the hold of the posesion [procession] Retired and after the posesion retired then we then we had the pleisure of tring the strenth of the surprise steam Boat the ohter row boats that went up with us and we run pass all the boats we got down to george town ten minits befor the steam boat then we had wait until that steam boat with captin thomas hold up stephens then when that steam boat arived then we takin the captin in the gig and the lieutenant Colnal charles Broom of the united states Marine corps and we started from george town and landed the Captins orders wher to Mr green gave My complements to Mr John kely which at that time wher first lieutenant of Washington navy yard to giv all those boys liberty that wher in the gig to day

page 25

--25--

26       1828

for they have cunducted them selvs verry well to day when we embark from the stone house to the yard and after we got to the yard and put the gig away then Mr kely pass us all out and then we went to on capitol Hill and had a good frolic to our selves and ther we remained until run down at the same time we wer at a restaurant on capitol Hill kept by a colerd man by the name of george lee formly by a slave to old mr water stone and set free by mr water stone the father of lawyer mr George water stone this coller man that i have referenc to kept all kinds of liqurs he had one kind of liquer wer caled spark fier one called the rear and tair and Tom Cat and one caled the panter on of the Drinks caled the run from the gun then ther wher one kind called warmherin liqure and he had one called Didnt now wher you wer so we drank of those diferent kinds of liquer until we got squrananerd [separated?] from each other as for my part When i found my selve on the next moring on the 5 day July 1828 on satuday near the congress burin ground [Congressional Cemetery] i wher layin by yoke of oxin and well guarded by killdes and wip poor wills and wher some fifteen minits befor i knowd wher i wher and when i came to my selve i found my selvf without anny hat and wanerd away to the navy yard then and got very near the navy yard came a cross a collard yong man and he said are you drunkin

page 26

--26--

[27]       1828

soiler and i kept a sidelin up to the fellow until i got hold of him and they wher mud hole close by i seised hold of the felol and we had small tussel for a while and i throd the felow into the mud hole then i stagerd oft about my business and went into the yard then as i got under the arkcade i met comerders tingey's coachman a collerd man by the name of sam reid he said are you got sober yet and i sais to him you blak vilian and i hauld oft and knock him down and the sentry run in betwein us and parted us and reported us and reported me to the first lieutenant of the yard and the same time they wher a lad comerder tinsay foot man25 had been cuting some of his shines at the house on the 4 and they taking him down to the rigin loft that it give him a starting and they wher going to give me starting two but captin steiphens excused me and first leutant kelly sailing master Edward Barry so that ended the fourth of July 1828 on friday26 launching of the united states sloop of war st louis at Washington navy yard built and constructed by colnal William Doughty on the 16 day of august 1828 on saturday i shall never forget that day the Honable John quincy adams came down that day and his cabnet and the naval commissioner and comerder John rogers27 at that time wher preident of the

The Saint Louis is 39 years old

page 27

--27--

28       1828

of naval Board of commisners they had got all ready for the launching and Colnal Doughty inform comerder tinssay and captin steiphens and first lieutenant kelly that they wher all ready now sire for seting up Colnal Doughty gave orders to Mr owner to set up the and at that time they all Classes of people ther to witness the launching of the sloop of war and the thrid time they set up shores wher all turn a drift sawed away in two then takein the batter rams and gave her one or two Raps with that and it didnt mover her and they batter ram her a Dozen times and still it coulent move her comerder Rodgers ask Mr owner what was the Matter with her Mr owner said i done no what the Matter with her sire but we will try and find out at that time the comerder had got aBoard the ship himselve by two man rops [ropes] on the loarboard gang way he look all up and down the ship he put on one of the old time man of war looks and vinegar counternance and then went to the waist [middle] of the vessel on the larboard side and look over the gunnels [gunwhales or side of the boat] and requested of the first lieutenant Kelly who wher first lieutenant of the Washington Navy yard to send all the men a board the ship that can be spaird and as they came a Board and as they Wher coming aBoard the comerder sais Come abord My brave fellow and after all the men got a Board the Comerder sias take your selves aft on

page 28

--28--

29       1828

the qaurter Deck and lay aft my brave fellows lay aft colnal Doughty is the way all clear ther colnal Doughty to comerder Rogers sais all cleare sier comerder Rogers sais to the men stand by my Brave fellows to shake yourselves shake your selves My brave fellows and dance her down for she must go down an one or two shouts of [off] went the vessel as she wher going oft comerder rogers look over the side of her and told the Secatary of the navy and some More gentelman that wher standing ther that i believe she wher hung sire and so she wher hung they wher a ro bin [ribbing?] nail some how or nother acadetntially wher drove through the launchin ways and got in the slip that wher baecause of retaining the vessel on the stocks she would have bein launch sooner if it hadnt been for that Dinner wher givin on board the united states sloop of war st louis by captin John D Sloat and his oficers at washington navy yard the 18 day of December 1828 on thursday at that time the st louis wher hauld around by the North gable end of the lower ship house her stern wher hauld right a though of the united states frigat congress a thirty six gun ship then the Congress laid down stern of the lower ship house her stern between south and south east and she wher made a receiving ship while they wher fitting out the St louis crew

page 29

--29--

30       1828

the united states sloop of war st louis embark from the Washington Navy yard in command of captin John D Sloat and his oficers on the 20 day of December 1828 on satuday a steam boat towed her out by the name of long Branch and she dropt down below alexdrania She laid of and on from sosher blaif from the 20 December 1828 on satuday until 22 day of December 1828 on Monday on the 21 day of December 1828 on Sunday we had takein Mr David eaton the Boat swain of the Washington Navy yard and sargent andrew Marks and Mrs Marks and Mrs Jones the sister of Mrs Marks on board of the united states sloop of War St louis we eat a fine Diner on board the ship the united states sloop of War st louis embark from the bluff Alexdrania on the 22 day of December 1828 on Monday her Destination was for the pacific ocean and i have never seen her since the 21 of December on wensday Mr Eaton taking the launch from the Washington navy yard and taking the light sails of the st louis up in the launch to the long bridge and put them on the steam boat potomac to send them to Norfolk for the united states sloop of war st louis after we came back from the long bridge we got us a pass from captin thommas holdup steivens i got a pass to pass and repass from the 24 day of December 1828 until the 31 day of December

page 30

--30--

31       1828

1828 on the 24 day of December 1828 after getting this pass from captin steiphens i came out of the yard with the intention of going over to my masters which wher thommas horard sr [Thomas Howard Sr] which at that time he wher clerk of washington navy yard as i wher going over home i came across a parsel of boys and i had a couple pounds of pouder in my pocket and i wher going to carry it down the country to have som sport amonst the youngsters the boys sorounded me with fier crackers and i Had cristmas in me two they made a great noise for a while and i wher right in senter of them and you May Depend on it the lit me up torch light fashion for a while with the fier crackers they wasnot a fighting but they wher nineteen or twenty boys aroun me and in the mean time while we wherin our sport they came along a Justice of the peace by the name of Mr Clemont huit he said you scamp what are you doing here to me he hauld of and struck me and i hauld off and struck him again but if i had of know at that time he wher a Justice of the peace i never would have offer to raise my hand to him i have often regreted it although they wher nothing turned out serious between us. fo it wher Mr huit duty as an officer to stop all quarals and all gatherrings in the streets and at that time they run me up in an alley cauled smack alley on niger hill28 and i kept them all out of the alley until my Master came when Master tom my came up he sais Mike you scamp what is the matter with you Do you know who i am Yes sire Master Tom my i said He sais com along and go with me yes sais i Master Tom my i will with you any Wher and then he takein hold of me and takein me to the Navy yard gate

page 31

--31--

32       1828

and at this time they wher a Bout 2 hundred men and Boys together and after they got me Down to the gate it wher some time befor they could get in side i cutting up my Monky shines and at that time adguant [Adjutant] Henry R tyler that is now wher first Lieutenant at the gate at that time of the Merrines after they got in to the gourd house they put me into the cells and put me in Double irons hand and foot and then they kept me until the 25 day of December 1828 on thursday between 4 and 5 oclock in the morning when Master Tom my came and takein me out and carried Me Douwn home as we Wher going along Master tom my ask Me did i know i had done i er answered him and told him i didn't know exactly what i had done well sais he you have struck Mr huit the Justice of peace well sire if i did i am verry sorry for it and after he takein me home he gave me my breakfast and gave me some mony and told me for the lords sake to go Dowwn in the country and see your friends and behave your selvs and don't drink any more Wiskey i started from home on Cristmas Day on the 25 of December 1828 on thursday and i never stop until i arived in piscataway and i got in company with a colerd man By the name of patrick Butler and Both of us hapend at a tavern in Piscataway which at that time was kept by a colard man name George Butler We got to drinking freely of egg nog and we got pretty high then we retired from there to Mr louis Rowman farm and ther they wher great plesieure sein on that farm on Cristmas day at night as of December 1828 i never injoyed my selve better in all my life we Dance all night then on the 26 on friday between 12 and 1 o clock

page32

--32--

33       1828

Mr Rowman actid verry kind with me and he let his men put me across the piscataway creek29 in His boat and when i started leaving his farm Mr Rowman himselves did not want me to come away after they landed me at fort Washington no soniner then i landed on the Warf they wher a passel of soilgers on the warf and i dress sailer fashion blu frock shirt and Blu Trousers and blue round a Bout and red vest tarpolon hat hell loe Jack wher did you com from i told them i came from Washington Navy yard som of them i dont believ that this fellow is a run away from the st louis i had terible affray with them on the warf anny how i got them oft me som How or Nother and in the Mean time the affray wher i heard a corple say step up and tel the Major that they are a Black felow Down here cuting up shines and i believe he is run from the united States sloop of War st louis and this time i had i had got away from them and i had got up to an old lady house that set a little North west from the fort [She] verry fine white old lady by the name of Mrs Norffolk the house that Mrs Norfolk lived in were built by a man named of [illegible] brother-in-law to the one that built fort Washington and fort Monroe i were in Mrs Norfolk's and then came soldgers at the Door ask Mrs Norfolk didnt they a collard man caul ther Mrs Norfolk said no and i had bein a teling Mrs Norfolk about the fray and it apeard that these Men want to kick up a row with me anny how and i didn't stay but a verry little after that and i bid Mrs Norl folk fare well as sais she they are a wild set of men her now Mike for the Major haves a heaps of Trouble with them at that time fort Washington was commanded by Major Mason united States armmy major mason and his companys were order[d] ther from the east port

page 33

--33--

34       1828

1824 and the companys at fort Washington wher orderd to east port in 1824 under the command of Captin thomas Childs of the united states armmy after leaving fort Washington the 26 day of December 1828 on friday i had to go all long the shore of swan creek for to get out of those fellows for they were after me like hawks and i never stop until i reach Washington but i Didnt go in the yard that night i stop at mans house by the name of Mr Jesse Morison near the navy yard and Ship carpternter by trade and a finer family of White people that ever live on the hill and on the 27 of December 1828 on saturday and i reported my selve in the yard to the officers

the 31 day of December 1828 on Wensday we bering the lighters from the Washington Navy yard and landed at General Vernesis warf on 18street to Move first luitenant Wm Ramsey [to] that Washington Navy yard Which Wher at that time wher the first lieutenant he live on pennsilvanerner [avenue] a little above the War Department house siting back some distance from the avenu and this ended the proceeding of 1828

      1828

The 1 day of January 1829 on thurs day the last levve [levée] that Wher givin by the Honable ex preident Mr John qunicy adams and on that day lieutenant Ramsey gave us a pass to go to a young colerd Mans fueral that died near the navy yard gate by the name of John Brion after the burial wher over i Wher standing near the Navy yard gate and captin Steiveins had bein up to the preidents levve and Basil Brown was a Driving of his carrige he look out of his carrige sais Bassil aint that Mike Bassil sais yes sire the Captin caulled me30

page 34

--34--

[35]       1829

he sais com to me sire walk your selve in the yard sire i gave you permission the other day to go down in the country to see your friends and you went over on the other Hill and kicked up a row with the Magistrate and you shal not go out of the yard for 6 Month then my libity was stopt from the first day of January 1829 on Thursday until the 25 of January 1829 on Sunday 29 January 1829 on Thursday Mr James Smith a riger by trade at that time Wher part of the Washington Navy yard were sent down to alexandria on that with the Jolly boat31 for to get varous articlues for the oficers and 3 or 4 of the ordonary men went down with him and the ice Wher Jest a breaking up in the river and among those articles that wher got for the oficers they was a Half of pilot bread that belong to commerder [Commodore Tingey] tinsay Mr Smith sais Mike take that barrel and Carried it forard so as to give your Selves Room to row so i Takein hold of the barrel and went backward to passies it forward bein That the the gunels [gunwhales] of the Jolly boat Wher very shallo the Hops [hoops] slips off the Barrel and over Board i went the barrel of bread still Remained in the boat [there] was ice floating on the river and i went down the third time and the kind providence of god i came up evry time right by the boat and the last time i came up John thomson grab me by the top of the head and i scird hold of the boat i was so over Joyed when i got in the boat thank god Mike shiner aint ground yet thom pen was seting aft an although in the boat told mr smith by the power of Moll kelly Mike shiner over Board after we got all the things fick in the boat said Mr Smith sais now Boys ar you all ready well mike come in here and get something to Drink and mr smith Takein Me into the team [steam] Boat tavern that was kept by a man named Steaurt

page 35

--35--

[36-unnumbered page]

[later] in the boat now and warmin our selves after we got in the boat we rowed up from alexandria in foety nine Minites and i had Jest Belong to mr Horord Sr [ Thomas Howard Sr] one year that day

the Senter [sentry?] house of the united States Merine Barracks at Washington Burned down on the 20 day of febauary 1829 on friday snow on the ground all the officers except commerder tinsay [Commodore Thomas Tingey] and he were laiding very ill at the time and all the Master Work men and Mercanic and labours of the Washington Navy yard at the fier captin thomas holdup stevens was at the fier first lieutenant wm Ramsey sr that wher the first lieutenant of the washington navy yard at that time Mr timothy Wind purser of the washington navy yard was ther sailing master edward Barry was ther boatswain David eaton was ther Mr george Marshal gunner was ther and Mr Selvylder Caolineer [Salvadore Catalano] 32 which at that time belonged to ordnance was ther

we went out to the fier at that time a little before the bell rang for twelve and stayed at the garrison until between 1 and 2 oclock in the night and the coldest night i ever felt in my life the hose were led from the garrison to reservoir at the market house it were so cold that the hose freeze up they formed lines in different sections passed the water with a bucket to the fier they worked like men ther were a little Disturbance ocurd betwein a fier[men] from te city and Samuel Brigs a fiermen of the an a casta [Anacostia River] But that was soon setled by captin Wm easby interfering Which at that time were Master Boat Builder of the Washington Navy yard that Wher a Hard Winter they wasnt 2 cord of Wood on the commmercial Warf they wasnt no Wood in the navy yard [ illegible] and they were not ten ton of coal in the yard they wher condem frome War

page 36

--36--

37

Which laid near the iron foundry that is now and they had to chip oft that to fier the engines With about 1 oclock that Night we came in the yard and it wher so cold that our feet Wher Wet and stif that we didnt know hardly Wither we Wher Walking on the ground or no and after we came in we went down to the cook house they was not as Much fier in the kook house as you could hold in your two hands We look in our chest and tinder box and the flint and [s]truck a light and we look a round out doors to sie if we could find any thing to make a fier we couldnt find any thing out doors and the snow was banked up all around the house We Came in and they Wher a long bench seting befor the fier place they was man laing on it by the name of James Sims we found that we could not get any wood and we roled him off and he fell off on the floor likin a log Drunk and half frozen together we takes a axe and split the bench up and we made a fier out of this bench and warmed and dried our feet After we warm and dried our feet the man who was laing on the bench he got up and then he want to fight us he put me in the mind of a snake but we cooled him oft the Senter House at the time when it caught on fier Wher ocupied by lutenant Colnal Charles Broome of the united States Merrine Cor and his family on the 21 of febuary 1829 on saturday we Wher outside gatherin up the Hose and getting the things in the yard

it snowed on the 22 of of Febuary 1829 on Sunday

page 37


38       1829

Died in Command of the Washington navy yard Comerder thomas tinsy on the 23 day of febuary 1829 on Monday and snow on the ground and a fine officer he was and a gentelman

Comerderr isaac Hull takeing comMand of the Washington Navy yard the 11 day of april 1829 on Saturday33 When comerderr hull taking command of the Washington navy yard he found it in an awful condition in holes and gullys and piles of timber laing about the yard all that square in front of the first lutenants quaters and 2 lieutenants and the Docter it Was nothing but yellow clay and that square in front of the comerders quarters was in the same condition and all the guns piled up on the left hand side of the road as you go into the gate from the flag staff clear down to the comerders ofice that were at that time the comerder laid all those places aft in the squares and had them fence it in the square Wher the paint shop is now where all cultivated and all this square where the ordnance shop is and the brass gun foundry and the shell house and laboratory and the rocket house and the water ran all along there When comerder Hull came to the yard he had to timber sheds built the mould loft built and all is laid as comerder Hull laid it off The water run jest back of the comerders ofice that is now and all the dock at the uper ship house were caving in and wharfs caving in all those wharfs were extended out were done by comerder hull except that piece done by captin William S Sango Sivil engeneer of the Washington navy yard When all this Work Wher going on and he Wher filling up and Building some of those days sais he this yard will be full of buildings34

page 38

--38--

39       1829

the day that comerder Hull taken command of the Washington Navy yard they Wher a seamen by the name of Wells one of the Crew of the St louis that had bein missin ever since the 19 of December 1828 on friday and it Was surposed that he run a way and they never could here anny thing from him until the 4 day of april 1829 and he came up at the north west Corner of the lower Ship house he came up right under the frigate congress laorboard Bow it was sersposed that he went to go a shore that night before the St louis went a way and got hung under the Chain cable Wells wher a Welchmen by birth and they wher a inqust [inquest] held over him and he was bured in the potters field

lieutenant Wiliam Ramsey sr left Washington navy yard the 20 of March 1830 on Wensday sailing Master edward Barry Died in Washington navy yard on the 2 day of May 1830 on Sunday Boatswain David eaton was struck with a toung of a carry log in Washington navy yard on the 11 day of May 1830 on tuesday struck him right across the small of the back they wher an old man had hold of the toung by the name of thosn pen they had the log touning and he Couldnt hold the toung

1831

page 39

--39--

40       1831

the Darkes eclips that ever i saw was in 1831 the 12 of febuary on saturday35 it lasted from half past 11 oclock until Half past 3 oclock it was so dark at diner our [hour] in Washington navy yard that we Had to light the candles to see how to eat in each ordnance room at that time Mr houard [Mr. Thomas Howard Sr] could hardly see how to coal the [illegible] i never shall forget a remark that a painter made he said to Mr houard that you ought to have a candle now to caul the coal the painters name was Wiliam prince was a gerneymen [journeymen] painter painting the water casks for the united states frigate potommac which was fitting out at the Washington navy yard that time they wher painting them out in the upper ship house Phillip inch Master Painter John giptson [Gibson] gerneymen painter Wiliam keith gerneymen painter edward Bevan gerneymen painter and Wiliam prince gerneymen painter and at that time the United States frigate potomac was fitted out expressly for to go on to peru and Chile to Chastise the Desprodadoes [Desperadoes] the deparado wher committed on the American Merchant Ships by the Malays genral Jackson determined to chastise them and bring them to an honrable term That duty was assined [assigned] to commerder John F. Downes and takein command of the united States frigate potomac that were fitted out at washington navy yard in 1831 The united States frigate potomac embarked from the under the command of Comerder John Downes and his first lieutenant edsum Shubrick and the remainer of the oficers and crew on the 30 day of may 1831 on Monday and she came in front of the united States assnal [United States Arsenal] at washington

page 40

--40--

41       1831

and She remaind ther from the 30 of may oft and on until the 15 day of June 1831 on Wensday [when] the united States frigate potomac left her Moorines [moorings] in front of the united States arsenal under the command of comerder John Downes i have never heard of the Malays robbing or Murdering any of the American vessels or crew after that

3 united states schooners imbark from washington navy yard one wher commanded by lieutenant Wiliam P pearssy one wher commanded by lieutenant carry Seldon Jr the son of the late Major Seldon sr formrly Wher naval Store keeper at the washington navy yard and the third schooner was commanded by lieutenant kennedy i don't know wether Mr pearssy was senior officer or Mr kenady they imbark on the 17 of June 1831 on friday i shal never forget that day Mr inch sent me out that day in a battor with some canvass hose to them vessels Jest as the vessels were getting ready to go away and i put the hose on Board the vessel and i got so drunk when started to come a shore instead of coming to the yard the Boat drifted down towards the popplars point poor lieutenant Seldon made the men lower one of his boats down to bring me back to the yard they brought me back to the yard and i was completely i went a round the ordeinary house and there was a lader laing ther [ladder laying] by ordernary Basil Brown 36 Wher the Cook of the ordernary at that time he sugested to me and i Bet you cant take this loder on your

page 41

--41--

42       1831

neck and go round the yard and Bellow like a Bull i sais to Bassil stop i want to carry some light wood over to the Navy Store first i taken a piece of the beam of a frigate and i taken it out of that bottom where the camBuse [camboose]36a shop is no at that time it wher caul rotten row i takein the piece of Beam and carry it over to the navy store and throw it down in the store at that time Mr James adams Wher naval store Clerk at washington navy yard and he said then What the matter With old Mike he has Bein Wher the Sun Shines hot after i came out of the store i went over to ordanary and got my ladder ten feet long and then i went a long by the Captins house and every Step i made i went like a wild varment and when i made i went towards the gate i change my voice to a Whip poor will and at that the painters Wher painting the Docters House i went to the Docters gate and tried to get in to the Docters gate and tried with the ladder around my neck i found that i couldn t get in that away i taking the ladder off of my neck and left outside and i met Mr inch at the door sais he what is the mater Mike and i made one yel caught hold of the door and but a hanel out the door and Mr inch sias i believe me mike going crazy and they were a collerd man in the house of the [name] of Jim Sims he told Jim to catch hold of me and i Clinch him and i flung him Clear down in the basement and at that time the porches belong to those quarters wher separate

page 42

--42--

[43]       1831

by this time the bell rang for twelve and i had got out side of the Docters and had my lad der a round my neck and i started from the Docters house down the yard and as i came to a long by the flag staf and i met first lieutenant Joseph Crooss Second lieutenant Cook and the Master work man and Merchanics they all were going out to diner and the next men i met wher my master Mr hourard [Howard] and at that time wher Clerk of the yard he caught holde of the ladder and sais this fellow got the devil in him he has had the devil im him for 3 weeks he hung on to the lad der and i carried him from the flag staf clear a round to the orderna ry house and when i was going along with the lad der i hardly felt that he had hold of the lad der and we got around to the ordanary house Mr houard got tried at me and they wher a kick rug broom setting up by the ordernary house37 Mr hourard taking hold of this broom he stuck me over the face and eyes with it and sais you out dacious [audacious] scamp what do you mean i jump at him38 and made a yell he struck me with the broom over the face and eyes and in them days it was cauled a snout and grouter and by this time captin Aulick came along and he Cauled to me to come him ask me what was the matter with me. i told him that i was drunk sire captin Aulick told me to step to the gate with the Merrines until i got sober i told captin Aulick he was a officer and he had eagle buttons on and i jump down in the dust on my hands and feet rap my head into the dust Made one yell and captin

page 43

--43--

44       1831

Aulick sais I believe the fellow is crazy any how and at that time the relieve was coming up and captin aulick cauld the merines and itold him that i didnt want to go with the merines and i woutent go with them and the corpral of the guard By the name of lee a irish man by birth he takeing hold of me Corpral lee and me and his gun Both fell to the ground and we Broke our holds and got up the merines of the guards had me by the hands and feet and lee got so mad that he stuck his Baynet in my left shoulder and commerder Hull was standing at the corner of the ofices and told them not to hurt him and take me along carefully and at last Mr [Marmaduke] Dove the Sailin master had to take me up to the guard house they ironed me Hand and Foot and put me in the cels some of the Mehcanic lost ther diner that day it was a complete JuBerlee and nex moring on the 18 they Brought me out before captin aulic they wher 2 sargeant and 2 private Brought me out and Captin aulick ask me what was the matter with me yester day i told him that i was drunk Sire Well what do you think ought to be done with you anny thing that captin the officers choses to do with me you went a holering aBout the yard yesterday like a crazy fillow dont let me heare anny more of it Shiner he said Mr Dove dont let Shiner have anny moor grog to day and Captin told me go and report your selve to Mr inch Master painter for duty the oficers where kind too they never stop my libity when i youster get tight i Merly done it to have fun i never done

page 44

--44--

45       1831

it to hav anny ill feeling against anny man white or black and on the 18 of January 1831 on saturday comerder Hull and captin aulick39 and first lieutenant Joseph Cross and second lieutenant Cook a son in law of Mr James owner sr formely Master Ship Builder of the Washington Navy yardand Sailing Master Marma Duke Dove that time of teh Washington Navy yard the comerder and these oficers granted me my liberty again and as i wher going home that eveing Before i got to my Masters house i saw one of the children and it came up to me then he letf me and Ran back to the hous sais he grand Mother Mikes is a Coming and all way i was going towards the hous i said com home com home come home and Jest as i got Righ a gainst the door My olde Mistess Wher Standing in the doore with a Stick in her hand and She had 3 good Raps at Me sais She owe you nigger villian come home is it now i wonder wher he got that at that some others new thing that nigger Brougt a Bout here ow red eyed nigger look at his eyes is red as a cock tairapin you niger you i am not a fraid of yous sais she for Thommas and Nancy spiles every nigger they have this lady was the Mother of Master Tommy howard Sr Master Thommas houward and Mrs nancy houward they wher as finer a Misteress and Master that ever wher born may the lord Bless them and i hope they are at Rest and may the lord grant that i may see them [illegable] in peac40

page 45

--45--

46       1831

the 16th day of December 1831on friday night the wind Blow from the north west with out intermission it Bloed So that night that the winder blinds got lose from ther buckkles and they Shatered six or seven large lights larg light of glass twelv by 18 ½ on the seventeen of December 1831 on Saturday the wind continu to Blow and it came with a huricane and in puffs the Bell rang as usual at Sun rise on the 17 after all the fiers wher made comerder Hull had them all put out and they were no work in the yard that day Comerder Hull had the yard closed that day for feer of fiers takein place commerder hull had 3 or 4 larg holes cut in the River and the engines putout in case fier Should take place Right Below comerders ofice that is how those preparations Wher made there by comerder Hull so they wher no person worked in the washington navy yard But Mr Phillip P inch and my Selve held the ladder while mr inch put those larg light of glass in. It was cold er nuf that day to freese anny thing that fell particlar anny things like water

page 46

--46--

47       1832

The Death of James pumphrey Sr the 3 day of march 1832 on Saturday in washington died in washington Sargent Major alexandria forrest the 11 day of March 1832 on Sunday Sargent Major forrest a on commissiond oficer beloning to the Staff and the Sargent Major wher burid on the 12 day of march 1832 on Monday and Jest as the burin Started they Came up an awful hail Storm and it hail nearly 20 minues wout [without] intermis sion i never shal for get it as as i live for mr thomas nokes and my Selve were in the paint Shop in washington navy yard on that day and the rest of the painters Wher Working up at the larbertary and when the hail can it appeard like it Struck the Ship house first and i said Mr nokes lord What is that and a few minutes after that Between the paint shop and the Riggin loft you could go and Spade the hail up by the Spade full some of it was as larg as a small hen egg on wher it had a fair play at the houses it made the glass fly particular those houses that hadent anny blinds or Shades to them

page 47

--47--

48       1832

in 1832 was a great Tuberlle [Trouble] with the painterr after the Hail Storm

the united States Schooner experiment wher launched in washington navy yard in the uper ship house the 14 of March 1832 on wensday and built by a old gentelman by the name of Winslow from new york She wher built without knees and her Seames wher caulkd with poplar Wedges and White lead and cotton then she wher fitted out at the yard. The officers that wher attached to her wher captin Wiliam Mervine and first Lieutenant Franklin Buckhannan and other surboarderate oficers the guner of the schooner experiment wher mr John martin Received his appointment from the Honable Major genral Andrew Jackson preident of the united States the 31 day of march 1832 on the day befor she sailed from the yard She wher visited by the Hon Major genral Andrew Jackson preident of the united States and his cabnet and difrent Senorters and Reprantative from difrent States the honable levi wood Berry [Levi Woodbury] Wher Sectertary of the Navy at that time and he wher a Honable and accomplished gentelman for he issued a proclamation in 1831 [illegible] to the navy

page 48

--48--

49       1832

that all the seamen that wher on ships of war and the Merrines and all that wher in ordanary chose to stop ther grog that the goverment would alow them six 6 cents per day for it in aBout the Middle of april 1832 the united States schooner experiment Sail from washington navy yard and hadent retired [?] Many days Befor she had to return again and get fitted out with knees and beams

the time the colery broke out in about June and July august and September 1832 it Raged in the City of washington and evry day they wher twelve or 13 carried out to they graves a day and that wher small number to what died in diferent parts of the cuntry a day the sun rised and set Red prineerpally all that year out and two Black Spots could Be discovered disstint in the Sun about the size of a dollar i Believe that where a token of the deseas i never shal forget Docter Boyd the last part of august 1832 in the washington navy yard had a firm Sollid peace of fresh beef he had it run up to the flag sSaff at night and next morning when it were hauld down it wher Black and green and that convince the people that deseas wher in the air41

page 49

--49--

50       1832

i never shal forget in october 1832 genral Scott arived home from the idian War to new york he hadnt bein long in new york befor he was orderard By the Honable Major genral Andrew Jackson president of the united States then after he arrived in Washington to received his orders from the president to go down to South Carolinene without delay the instruction that he received from the president honorab Carried out to the saisfactory to the government and the people without the lost of life and may the lord grant that south Caroliner and all the other states Cling to one another with the assistance of the Almighty god42 launching of the united States Revernu Cutter Jackson the 29 day of november 1832 on Thursday and Built at the washington navy yard by the Constructor Colnal Wiliam doughty and built in the upper Ship house The death of Mr Thomas howard Sr Died the 5 of December 1832 on Wensday in Washington formly clerk of the washington navy yard

page 50

--50--

1833

the united states Revennu cuter Jackson Sailed from washington Navy yard the 5 day of January 1833 on monday under the command captin Sands the united States Treasury ofice Burnt down the 31 day of march 1833 between twelve and one oclock on Saturday an awful fier it gave such a light that you could see the paper flying in the air from the Building

The united States Revinner Marion Sailed from Washington Navy Yard under the command of captin Jones the 1 day of april 1833 on monday

A disturbance occured Between the Hon Major genral Andrew Jackson president of the united States and mr Randolph on Board of a Steam Boat at alaxandria virginia the 6 day of may 1833 on monday general Jackson didnt mind that he wher his way to Richmond to lay a conner Stone he wher accompanied by some of his cabinet and lieutenant colnal Charles Broom of the Merrines

page 51

--51--

52       1833

and captin Wiliam Ramsey of the united states navy the genral Said the scondrel let me cane him and they wher after mr Randolph but they couldnt catch him a great excitement prevailin alexandria and Washington that morning but nevertheless the genral pursuit his way down to Richmand like a man as he wher and states man and gentelman and Soldger and as as greatest one that ever step ther foot in the field and thank god allmighty above all he wouldnt let one article of the federal constitution be trampled under foot if he knew it he wher as honest upright man as ever lived he paid no respect to persons while ever they done Right

the 5 day of June 1833 on wensday my Wife and Childdren philis Shiner [Phillis Shiner] wher sold to couple of gentelman Mr Franklin and mr John armfield and wher caried down to alexandria on the Six day of June 1833 on Thursday the 7 day of June 1833 on friday i went to alexandria 3 times in one day over the long Bridge and i wher in great distress But never the less with the assistance of god i got My Wife and Childdren Clear

page 52

--52--

they wher a Sad acident occured in Washington navy yard to germmen man by the name of Slake in Deck of the upper Ship House wher they whor Driving piles slake wher orderd to shove the pile out the poor fellow wher a green hand and in stead of him shovin it oft with something else he takein his head to push it oft and his head wher caught in between the plains and pile and his head wher takein right oft of his shoulders on the 18 day of June 1839 on tuesday in all those days that passed and gone the pile driving wher superindend by the Master Joiner when this accident ocured comodore Isaac Hull wher present and Captain John h. Aulick and first lieutenant Joseph Hull and Sailin Master Maramaduke Dove Boat swain David eaton

page 52.1

--[52.1]--

and mr thomas lindle that wher Master Joiner of washington navy yard wher present at that time and Mr John Smoot Sr quaterman to mr lindle wher presnt at that time

page 52.2

--[52.2]--

53       1833

i am under ten thousand oblagation to the Hon major genral Ham lin for his kindness to me and my Wife and Children43 on the 7 day of June 1833 on friday the General laid a Detachment44 on my Wife and 3 childdren at mr armfield Jail and takein them from ther and put them in the county Jail of alexandria to wait action of the court and my wife and childdren Reemained in the county Jail in alexandria from the 7 of June 1833 until the eleven of June 1833 on Tusday and the Same day Mr levy pumphrey exacuted papers and Manermited them free the papers wher exacuted at the City Hall in washington she [Phillis Shiner ] came up from alexandria on the 12 day of June 1833 on wensday and i am allso under oblagations to Mr Steil and Mrs Steil for ther kindness to my Wife and Childdren while they wher in the Jail and may the allmighty Bless them they gave me such a Race at that time that all the people that wher acquainted with the affair in alexandria wher sorry for me and appeard to be wiling to Relieve me of my disstress45

page 53

--53--

54       1833

i am under Great oblagation to Comodore isaac Hull for the time my Wife wher Sold to george he had command of the washington navy yard foer his kindness to me and allso to Captain John H Aulic46 for his kindness to when my wife were Sold to george and allso to captain Joseph Hull for his kindness to me at that time he wher first lieutenant of the washington navy yard and also under the same obligation to Major Cary Seldon who wher Naval Store Keepper and allso to Mr. John etheridge which at that time was Comodores clerk and allso to David eaton Boat swain

all those above name gentelman all of them wher wiling to help me out my my disstresses in a honest up right way when my Wife and Childdren wher snacht away from me and sold on the 5 day of June 1833 on wensday from near West alley between 7 and eighth st east May the lord Bless them all i shal never forget them

page 54

--54--

55       1833

Mr John Judge a irish man by Birth Received his orders from the navy Department on the 18 day of october 1833 at washington navy yard on Thursday that his serrices wher no more Required Mr Judge wher Master of the Machinery and patend makein

Mr Wiliam ellis engineer Takein charge of the Machinery and engine of the washington navy yard the 17 of October 1833 on friday and wher master of his Business when he came to the Navy yard they wasnt But one engine and before Mr ellis left he constructed some engine in Washington Navy yard that are hard to Beat Ther are two engines in the washington Navy yard that are in the Copper Rolling Mill that wher Built by Mr. William ellis and the engine over to the ordnance Shop47

The Metors fell from the elements the 12 of November 1833 on Thursday in washington it frightened the people half to Death48

page 55

--55--

56       1834

Starting of a large no 1 engin and all the machinery the 28 day of october 1834 on thursday She caried all the machinery that wher atached to her eight saws wher a going and two trip hammers one after another and all the Machinery throughout the Building. she carried it with the greates of ease i believe she would of carried as much again if it had wher started and all of the machinery by mr Bush and Co comodore Isaac Hull wher present and captain John galico and first lieutenant William J Belt and Sailin Master Mamaduke dove and boat swain David eaton and mr Bash and Co and mr William ellis wher present the engin and the Machinery proved entirely sacisfactory to the Department and to commodore Hull and his oficers After that mr wiliam ellis Started from that time improved the yard in Machinery at Washington navy yard

The Death of thomas lindle in washington the ninth day of November 1834 on Sunday at that time wher Master Joinner of the washington navy yard

page 56

--56--

57       1835

Joseph C pagget a Ship Carpenter by trade fell From the larbard side of united States frigate Columbia in washington navy yard he [fell] off the stage that led into one spare Deck ports and he never stop untel he Reached the Slip poor fellow he hollered manfully on the 11 day of may 1835 on Monday moring at sun Rise mr pagget never came out no untel august and he is a smart tractable man as anny you can scare up in washington or out of washington49

they wher a great turn out of the Merlicia [Militia] in washington on the 27 day of June 1835 on saturday they wher the Ragedis white people that ever i saw in my life and they uniforms was of old rags and them that wher officer they aplelts wher of cowes hoofs and they had Drums and fifes and they had clare inets ther Drums wher composed of olde tin pans and olde pots and all kinds of olde sheet iron and they fluts clare inets and fifes and bugles wher composed of Rams horn and oyster horns

page 57

--57--

58       1835

and they Marched all trough the City that day Befor the day wher spent they started to pay a visit to the presidents Mansion But the Hon Major genral Andrew Jackson not bein in favor of tramplin The law down under ther feet the gates wher closed on them and the genral wouldnt receive them then they Taken up they line of March on the presidents Mansion to the Navy yard to pay comodore Hull a visit and the Comodore had the gates Closed on Them They Marched a round on the Hill until a hour or two befor Sun then of the perrade they gatherd up near the navy yard gate at a Tav ern on 8 st kept by the name of Mr John Free and ther it ended with a fight it was so gooder man and gooder Boy Richard allen belong to it and Noble Clemons Thomas Parker and Mr John Rainbow and great manny Moore of them and i forget ther names and at that time they had commenced Rebuilding the Columbia friggte and at that time great many strange carpenters here from difrent parts of the country

page 58

--58--

59      1835

the 28 day of July 1835 Tuesday they wher a great excitement prevailed in the washington navy yard a Bout some Compersision [compression] pins that wher forged in the Black Smith Shop they were a great many of them missin and they couldent give no account what became of them and they were orders given for them to keep a look out and to Deteced the person that were caught takein them and they caught the man at Dinner hour and he got outside of the gate before the sargent could catch him. i never shall forget the Sargent of the guard that day were sargent Denison But they were a united States warrent issued for the man and that night they caught the man and Brought him over and put him in Jail at that time they Wher rebuilding the Columbia frigate and the next day after this affair comodore Hull issued a [order] that no Mechanics or labores should not eat there Dinners in anny of those shops in Dinener hour and that time they were ship carpinters here from diferent parts of the country at work on the collumbia [Columbia] frigate and they got insilted at the ordes that50

page 59

--59--

60       1835

Commodore Hull ishsared and evry one of them struck and said they wouldnt work anny moore and at the same time they wher collered man from Baltirmoore by the name of isral Jones a caulker by Trade he was the foman Caulker51 of those Colerded Caulkers and they wher fifteen or twenty of them here at that time Caulkin on the Col lumbia and the Carpinters made all of them knock oft two them and i the height of this excitement they were a Rumor flying around about a colered man by the name of Snow about a expression he had made about the Mechanics wifes god kowes wether he said those things or not and at that time snow kept a Restaurant on the Corner of six street and pennsilvanian west in the cellar and at the time all the Mechanics of classes gathered into snows Restaurant and broke him up Root and Branch and they were after snow but he flew for his life and that night after they had broke snow up they threatened to come to the navy yard after commodore Hull

But they didnt come that night and the nex day commodore Hull Received orders from the navy department from the Hon secretary of the navy Mr levy wood bury to fortify the yard52

page 60

--60--

61       1835

in such a provision to protect all the government property Therin and him selve at Risk of all hazards and the yard were as well fortified as anny place i ever saw less then not time it were in a fighting condition by commodore Hull i dont believe they were going to be trouble to the yard they done it to tantalize commodore Hull in all this excitement the 7 of August 1835 on friday it was reported that Mrs Doctor Thornton young Mulat to man said that he was going to knock his Mistress in the head with axe and he were arrested and put in the Jail still the mob raged with great vigor and as fast as they were arrested they were lodged in Jail on the 8 day of August 1835 on saturday the mob surrounded the Jail and swear they would pull the Jail down and the Constable makin threats they said their objects was to get Mrs Thortons Mullateto man52a out and to hang him with out Judge or juror and evry effort was made by the Marshal of the District and the united States District Artoneny lawer Frances key Sr and the Hon53

page 61

--61--

62       1835

Wiliam A Bradly that wher Mayo[r] of washington at that time evry efert wher made by the oficers to preserve peace and harmony among these men but all of it appeard in vain and they wher not surfichient Milertary force to guard the Jail and orders came down from the navy department to lieut Colnal Henderson that were at that time lieutenant colnal of the Merrine Core by the Hon Seceritary of the Navy levy Wood Berry to send a Detachment of united States Merrines without Delay to the guard the united States Jail in washington and lieutenant Colnal henderson complied speedly the Merines went up to the Jail on 8 august 1835 on Saturday and they done ther duty without faction or fav or. When this great excitement Commence the Hon Major genral Andrew Jackson that wher president of the united States that time Wher absent from the City and When it got in it height the general arrived home and after he arrived home he sent a Messenge to those gentelmen Merchanics to know what was the Matter with them

page 62

--62--

63       1835

and if they wher anny thing he could do for them in an Hon [honorable] way to promote ther happiness he would do so some of repliyed to the genral that the negros had made diferent threats what they could do the general reply was to them by ertern nal god in this City there wher a Jail and a court and if those negros had violated anny law what ever they shal be tried by the court and punish serverly and gentelmen if you have in anny disposion to Rebelment to let me know it and i will lend you a hand in it and the general prevailed on all the oficers of the armmy and the navy to stand watch and watch and all the good citizens to preserve the law By the eternnal god the law must be preserved and shal be preserve at the [illegible] of Hazerds captain Wiliam Ramsay Sr united States navy wher on the Padrole and various other oficers of the armmy and navy the good Citizens of washington in a couple of weeks they had the City of washington as quite as a Church and the laws wher all respected and evry thing went on quietely

page 63

--63--

64    1835

on the 12 day of august 1835 on wensday night those gangs had nearly expired but they gather in the 6 ward made a great cheering and the century [sentry?] that wher on the wall at the navy yard gave the Report to commodore Hull that those men wher coming and evry man were at his post in the yard from the Roll of the drum but those fellows Jest done it for to tanti lise comanodore hull they hadent no notion of comint to the yard and at that time in washington navy yard there wher 2 92 pound Canonade wher placed at the flag staff and ther Muzels right out the gate and charged heavily with grape and canister and if they had of Run compeled to discharge loads out of these they would of tore garison trects all to pieces and all houses out But thank god god every thing wher settled peaceBlelly without that and after this flurry they still continued working on the Columbia frigate

on the 25 day of august 1835 on tuesday the Cars started for the first time from washington to Baltimore and hold passel [of] people went and the councilman and the alldermen went free pasage to Baltimoore and back

page 64

--64--

65       1835

among those posingers whe sailing master Mamaduke Dove of the united States navy

after all this mob wher over the Wife of the men that wher coght with the Copper in the washington navy yard she went to the Hon Major geeral andrew Jackson that were president of the united States at that time Crying with Tears in her eyes to the genral asking him Couldnt he Release her Husband from the Jail and he wher in the Jail and hadent had his trial yet and the generals Reply was to the woman to go home my good Womman and make your selve easy your hus band hadnt had his trial yet i have no demands over him yet for he is to be tried by 12 men and if he convicted and found guilty and then he falls in my hands and i will carry in the one door and bring him out the other an the man was wher convicted and found guilty and convicted sentence by the Judge and that tru hearted Honoble Major general andrew Jackson complied with his promise that he made to that poor Womman for the man were turned loose and went to his famly

page 65

--65--

66       1835

on the 6 of September 1835 on Sunday they wher one half of us ran out of the yard we belonge to the ordinary at that time by 1 lieutenant William J Bell who wher 1 lieutenant of the washington navy yard at that time and then we hadn't had rain out of the yard before for 3 Weeks and better and as i where going i cauled at the guard house and i Borrowed a Dollar from a Merrine and his name wher Wheeler and he wher a watch maker by Trade now sais he dont get drunk Mike as you have repented in the yard so long you may get tight and i said know sir i want to let you know you may depend i got as tight as i could get pretty near and i got so Wild on Capitol Hill they jumped on me and i had to fight my way down until i got to the Catholic Church and when i got there all the people where going in the Church and i Made noise and holle like a hound and me and Mr van Horsix came out after me sais com Shiner go a way from here you are a bad fellow i got down on my hands and knees and poored up the gravel and told mr van horse six that i

page 66

--66--

67       1835

wasent going to hurt him then i made a noise like a Cat before i left and i told mr van horse no if could lay dead spirits he couldent lay live one then he told me go off you Scamp you drunk and i went off verry quitely after he told me But after i came to my [illegible] senses i were sorry i came by the Church But nevertheless after i left the Church i fell in contact with some fellows and they want to take me anny how and i fought my way trough them Clear down on the navy yard. Hill and when i got down on the hill they doubled teamd on me down at forerest conner they pelted me with stones and brick bats and some them bounce off of me as some as i lined with the injin Rubber and i fought my way up as far as Mr nokes ally in front of the center house they had to caul out the Merrines to help Take me they Takin Tho and this Shot at me from [illegible] house and the ball Crazed some wher by the Censer [Sentry] house but they takein me that night and put me in

page 67

--67--

68       1835

The lock up house and they had put some drunking wom man in ther and i Broke out of the lockup house then let the olde wom man out then they Sur roundered me with their forces that night and put me back again and Mr Bury wher police oficer of the 6 ward and i wher Brought out next morning on the 7 of September 1835 on monday and brought before mr James Marshal54 Madistrate and mr. Marshal came out of his doore with to try the case in the street and i ask mr Marshal where was his ofice and mr Marshal then [said] it was the United States case and he wouldnt try it that it must be Retried by Docter Clark then the case where brought up for Witness they had to the lockup house again and kept me in the lockup until sun down then they tried the case and Doctor Clark sais gentelman you all have appeared against this colord man and i dont see a scratch of pin on anny of you

page 68

--68--

69       1835

now gentelmen Who are going to pay this man master for beating him up with Brick Bats55 and Stones Docter Clark said iam not going to be Humbug [?] in this way anny longer for i will give this man up to commodore Hull Mr Bury take mike in the yard and give him up to the commodore and this was after sun down and Bury police oficer takein in me in the yard and giv me up to first lieutenant William J. Belt and Bury said Mr Belt here Shiner sire the squire has sent him to the yard sire and lieutenant Belt said oh Shiner you have bein wher the sun shines a lot again go along Shiner down to the orenary house On the 8 day of September i went to my Work in the paint Shop on Tuesday and Captain galico Came by the Riggin loft and Cauled to mr inch Master painter and told him to send that Shiner out ther and when i came out Befor the captain which sais the Captain i let you out on libity sunday and you went fighting all over the City then the captain ask me was i fighting told yes sire i fought all i know how for they wher fighting me

page 69

--69--

70       1835

I will sais he go long to your work sire if you hadent of told me the truth i was going to lick you sire and dont let here anny more of it sire When i youster g drink liker i never Trouble anny person what ever without they would get after me and tantalise me and ploug me and when i found that anny Boddy want to impose on me i all ways reiddy then for Battle and i wher allways submission to a oficer cival or Milatary

Com modore Isaac Hull and his family left washington navy yard the 2 day of october 1835 on friday he gave his command up to captin John galigo [Gallagher]56 commodore Hull com manded washington navy yard 6 years and 6 Months and when he first came to the yard it was in a awful condition commodore Hull wher a industres [illegible] oficer and a scoialable gentelmen for his work at washington navy yard proved his skill and industoana for and may the lord Bless Com modore Hull and i hope he is at rest from his labour

page 70

--70--

71       1836

Died in washington City on the 18 day of January 1836 tuesday Mr timothy Wind formly a purser of the united States navy at that time wher purser of Washington navy yard

launching of the united States frigate Columbia at washington navy yard on the ninth day of March 1836 on Wensday and wher Built and Constructed By Colnal Wiliam Doughty Sr and mr James owner Sr Master Builder

The Hon Major genral andrew Jackson president of the united states at that time wher present and the Hon Martin van Buran vice president of the united States Wher present and a great manny of the Senators and Repesentatives that hadnt gone home wher present and Captain John galigo wher present and 1[st] liet Wiliam J Belt lieut Wm P pearsey wher present and Sailing Master Marmaduke Dove wher present and Boat swain David Eaton wher present and when she was launch she got Stuck in Mud and they had to Roll her and it was some time befor they could get the ship long side of the Wharf

page 71

--71--

72       1836

and She Wher got in Betwein 10 and 11 o clock that night and by half past Twelve o clock she was at her Moorenes handsomely

Commodore Daniel paterson and captain Joseph smoot takein com mond of the washington navy yard on the 26 day of march 1836 on Saturday

Major general Santa aner the Mexican general in Texas wher takein prisner by the Hon Major general Sam Houston the 21 of april 1836 on thursday then he wher conveyed sceretly from Texas to Washington by the Hon Major general Sam houston and conducted by him to the precident House and intriduced to the Hon Major General Andrew Jackson president of the united States at that time and the Declarin Texes indipendance from Mexico While he wher here in Washington and he may thank his almighty for his life Bein preserved and all so he never ought to forget general Houston for his kindness to him and he ought to never forget the Hon Major general andrew Jackson

page 72

--72--

73       1836

Brigader general archaBal Henderson and his oficers and the united States Merines under his command takin ther line of March from the Merines BarRacks at washington on the 1 day of June 1836 on Wensday and Caulded By the diferent garrisons of the Marines to take all that wher fit for duty the united State Merines was to cooperate with the United States Armmy in the idian [Indian] war all throuh the Southern States wher the idians wher troublesome and down about george [Georgia] and east Florida Tempo Bay and Major general Winfield Scott idian war 1836 and Brevet Major general Edmund penelton goine and Brevet Manot general Jessup Wher in it and a great many other officers of the armmy and they had a terible siege with them that year And may the almighty with his kind Wisdom enable the American people to keep ther armmy and navy together for they are no getting along With out it in the cuntry or out of the cuntry and May the united States Flag Continue to Wave with the assistance of the allmighty god

page 73

--73--

74       1836

the 12 of September 1836 on Monday the Battle of North point wher celebrate in Washington By the Baltimorins and by diferent companys and Rigiments and the volinteers companys of washington and the troops wher Commanded on that day by Major general Alexandria Mc Con[nell] of the united States arm my and adugent general Rodger Jones of the united States armmy and lieut Coln Robert Wainright of the united States Merine Core and it wher a Betiful day and it wher a great parrade that day

The 10 of october 1836 on Monday a Detachment of united States Merines left the Merine garison at washington under the Command of captain Mc Cauly of the Merines Core for the united States liner or Battle Ship North Caroliner at gosport navy yard Wher com manded by Commodore Henry E. Ballard57

on the 4 day of December 1836 on Sunday i never have had a drop of licqer in my Mouth Since that time of no kind

The united States general post ofice Burnt down in washington the 15 of December 1836 on Thursday

page 74

--74--

[75]       1837

the 4 of March 1837 on Saturday When the Hon Martin van Buren Came in the Capitol square at the North gate to Be sworn in and the Hon Magor general andrew Jackson was with him and the Hon Colnal Richard M. Johnson vice precident amoung them wher the Hon Levi Wood Berry and as those gentelmen came in at the North gate the Croud Rush in after them and i wher with them and Jest as those gentelmen got out Car ridge and wher entering the steps of the portico a nother crowd come in at the South gate and i wher right in between the two Crouds and couldent get on any further and after the Hon Mr van Buren wher sworn in the Hon Major General Andrew Jackson Addressed the people as follows felow citizens of the united States Senators and house of Representatives fore you well all though some of you difers in political opinions But with the assistance of the Devine providence that has held us To gather for so long a period up to the present age still will hold us to gather if we Will do right.

general Henderson returned home from the idian [Indian war] in 1837

page 75

--75--

76       1838

The united States Merines Returned home from the florida war in 1838 to washington under the Com mand of Major Wiliam Dulaney when they came home you could not tell wether they wher indians or white men they were Sun Burnt and Completely exausted

The united Steamer Fulton arived at washington navy yard under the Command of Commodore Skiner

1838

they Wher a great drought in the City of Washing[ton] we had a smart of rain in May and in June they wher but little Rain and in July it wher Hot and dry and evry thing on the earth sufering for vegertation and no Rain in august the ground wher so Hot that the heat would exstend trough the Souls of your Shoes particerlar thin Souls and we hadent anny [rain] untel the Middele of September of 1838 The drought didnt onely [stop?] washington it existened in diferent Section of the counttry i have So Much in my head that i dident gave the dates of this

page 76

--76--

77       1838

The Death of commodore Daniel patterson58 in washington navy yard the 25 of august 1839 on Sunday and wher Buired the 28 day of august 1839 on Wensday

Commodore thomas holdup Steiphens takein Com mand of washington Navy yard in 1839

The Working class of people of the united States Machanic and laboures ought to never forget the Hon ex president Van Buran for the Ten hour sistom for when they youster have to work in the Hot Broiling sun from sun to sun when they wher Building the Treasure ofice before he gave the time from six to 6 the laborer youster have to go ther and get the bricks and Mortar up on the scaf fold befor the Masons come untel the president ishurd a proclamation that all the Mechanics and laborous that wher employed By the day By the federal government should Work the ten hour Sistom from six to six i think and May the lord Bless Mr. Van Buran it seims like they have forgot Mr van Buran name it ought to be Recorded in evry Working Man heart59

page 77

--77--

78       1840

Died in Washington commodore Isaac chaney the 27 day of Janaury 1840 on Monday he wher president of the Naval Board of Commissioners at the time they wher no seperrad Burears like they are now the commodore wher Buried on the 30 day of January 1840 on Thursday They wher Six companys of united States Marines out that day under the command Major levy Twiggs of the united States Marine Corps They wher snow and Slouch on the ground and they wher several volunteer companays out that day but the Marines takein the Right they wher no picking of ther Way that day the Major led them Right through a great manne oficers of the armmy and navy attend the funeral that day and adjuant Park Howel of the Marine Core wher one of the paul Bearers that day and adjuant general Roger jones of united States Armmy wher then

Died in washington navy yard Boatswain David eaton of the united States navy on the 22 day of Febuary 1840 on Saturday and wher as great seaman as ever stept his foot on a ships Deck he knew evry particalel [particular?] aBout ship from truck head down to the kelson

page 78

--78--

79       1841

The Death of commodore Thomas Holdup stevins in washington navy yard the 20 day of January 1841 on Wensday

Died in Washington in the presidents Mansion the Hon Major general Wm Henery Harrison ex president of the united States the 4 of april 1841 on Sunday The Hon old veteran wher buried on the 7 of april 1841 on Weds day and agreat prosession it wher the united States flying artilry wher here on that day commanded by Major Samuel Ring gold of the united states armmy and six company of united States Marines commaned by Magor levy twiggs and various other volenteer company from the District of Columbio and Diferent section of the cun try and the hole of them wher under the Com mand of Major general alexander Mc Comb of the united States armmy

The Remaines of the Hon Majo gen Wm henry Harrison Wher takein from washington By Brigadier general archaBal henderson of the united States Marine Corps Wher takein on the 20 day of June 1841 on Saturday sargeant Mundel went with the general sargent Marks and sargeant greigs to his Resident in ohio

page 79

--79--

80       1841

The Death of Major general alexander Mc Comb com mander in Chief of the united states arm my on the 25 day of June 1841 on Thursday and he wher Buried on the 27 day of june 1841 on Saturday the united States Flying artilry under the command of Major Samuel Ring gold of the united States armmy and wher in the procession that day and six Companys of the united states Marines under the Command of Major levy Twiggs of the Marine Corps and al the volunteer companys of the District and the Diferent parts of the Cuntry adjuant general Rodger Jones United armmy Command the Troops that day Magor general Mc Comb wher both gentelman and Soilger

Captain Jacop Bright of the Marin Riffle Company of the 6 ward wher killed By the explosion of a shell in washington navy yard and at that Time he Master of the armory he wher killed on the 1 of September 1841 on Monday he left his Wife and Children after diner and never sein them no moore in life But may the lord grant that his Soul is at rest

page 80

--80--

81       1842

The death of Thom mas Barry a gunerin the united states navy and David Davis they wher killed in washington navy yard by the explosion of a shell on the 27 day of June 1842 on Monday they wher three Men within ten Months killed in washington navy yard may the allmighty grant that ther souls are at rest for we are all neglectful of the things that are most [needfull?] for our souls welfare for when we part from each other for our daily occupation we dont know weather we will ever Return in life again Mr thomas Barry that Wer a guner in the united States Navy Resined in 1826 and went to South America and went thir with commodore Porter and after the Hon John Quincy adams administration wher out commodore Porter came home to the united states and were sent as Minister by the Honorable Major general andrew Jackson to Constantinople and the commodore Died ther and Mr Barry came home in time and Received his warrant again in the united states navy By the influance of commodore John Rogers and Commodore Charles Morris Mr Barry was a professor of Fier Works

page 81

--81--

82       1843

The Death of commodore isaac Hull Died in Philadelphia on the 13 day of Febuary 1843 on Monday he Died in the Com mand of the home squardron

it Commenced Snowing on the 16 day of March 1843 on thursday and snowed allday the 17 day of March on Friday 1843 and about sun down it cleared off and it snowed in those 2 day without intermission

the 2 steam frigates that belong to the united States navy the Missiourer [Misssouri] and Missiasipa [Mississippi] arrived a the united States arsnal at washington on the 18 day of March 1843 on Saturday and came up to the Washington Navy yard the 20 day of March 1843 on monday

The united States sloop of war St Marys was put on the stocks at washington navy yard in 1843 between april and May

The united States iron steamer Water witch60a wher put on the stocks at washington navy yard between april and May The Works wher suspended in Washington Navy Yard the 13 of october on tusday 1843

page 82

--82--

83       1844

Phillip Pinch Master painter of the washington navy yard died 28 day of January 1844 on Sunday in Washington60

A distressing affaire takein place on board of the united States Steamer frigate princeton61 By the exsplosion of a a wraught iron cannon that was imvented by Commodore Stockton and killed several gentelmen and the names wher the Hon Judge upshur wher killed and the Hon Mr gilmor was killed and the Hon Mr Maxwell wher killed and commodore Brady Cannon and a Colerd young man wher killed The Hon Colnel John Tyler ex president of the united States wher on Board that day Members of the Congress and various genteleman and ladies wher on Board that day and Commodore John Haluck and other officers wher on Board that day this hapened on the 28 day of February 1844 on Wensday on that day Mr gustavus Higdon and My Selve wher up on ninth st west and a singalar Mark appeared in the elements and it Ran from the north west and from the north west and divided the sky between south

page 83

--83--

84       1844

east and north east isaid to Mr higdon come62 here and look at this singular Mark across the elements and Mr Higdoncame and said inever saw any thing like that Befor sais i to him The lor hav Mercy on us something Shurly going to happened and that eveng that sad affair accured and the lord have Mercy on them and i hope that ther souls are at Rest

The launching of the united States Sloop war St Marys at washington navy yard by the Constructor Conel Charles Broady assistant Builder Mr Sydney D porter and Mr Bengamin King Quarterman and Mr John Smith Quartemanon the 24 day of october on Thursday and the Hon Conel John Tyler the president of the united States wher present and all his Cabinet wher present. Commodore John H Aulick present Captain J G Sanders present 1st Lieut Pinkey present sailing Master Charles Morris was present Boatswain W'm Watters wher present Washington Bright gunner wher present and Citizens of all Classes wher ther that day 24 day of october 1844 on thursday and they wher Dinner given that day to the Mechanicks by Mr Richard Harrington

page 84

--84--

85       1844

The united States Sloop of War Saint Marys [St. Mary's] emBarked from washington navy yard on the 13 day of Decenber 1844 on friday under the Command of Captain John G. Sanders and first lietenant Canady and his other sub Bordinate officers and Crewe and a finer ship as ever floated on the Water She ran every thing down in the Gulf of Mexico in the time of the Mexican War and when she had all her crew and ballast on board and stores she appeared on the Water as if she hadn't anything in her Colnel Charles Broady the Constructor and Mr Sydney D. porter deserve great credit for the Moddel of that ship they have been as finer ship Buildt at washington navy yard as ever wher in the Built in the Country for they are kept in Commission longer The united States Sloop of war St Marys 17 years

page 85

--85--

86       1845

[First two lines crossed out]

The Majority of Both houses of Congress united States Senate and Representatives enexation of the Texas on the first day of March 1845 on saturday

The National Theareter Burnt down on the 5 day of March 1845 on Wensday

The Mexican Minister Demond Pass port the 6 day of March 1845 on thursday

The united States iron Steamer water Witch [1] Wher launch in washington navy yard the 20 day of March 1845 on Thursday Commodore John H Aulick wher present and Captain Aloious Doorening wher present on that day and first lt Boil wher present and Sailing Master Charles Moris wher present and Boat swain Wm Watter. Befor the vessel cleared her selve she stop and they had to get purchasing out on the StarBoard63 and lar Board Sides befor they could get her oft

The united States Slop of War St Marys embarked from gosport Navy Yard with sealed orders in april 1845

page 86

--86--

87       1845

The Death of the Hon Major general Andrew Jackson ex president of the u s the 21 day of June 1845 on Sunday at his Resident in tennessee The Hon Major general andrew Jackson is gone and his voice are heard no moore on earth But his name still lives in the heart of the American people his spirit has takein it flight it has gone to the one that first gave it and now i trust he is setting on the Right hand of god Reaping his reward

general Taylor Received his orders in July 1845 from the president of the united states the Hon Colnel James K. polk and from the Hon W'm L Marcy Secretary of War to take up his line of march to corpus Cristi and they reached ther Destination about first of august 1845 on friday and he remained ther

page 87

--87--

      1846

A explosion takein place in the Washington navy yard in the larbertary [laboratory] on the 12 day of Febuary 1846 on Thursday and killed a young man By the name of Dalas

Com modore John H Aulic left washington navy yard on the 21 day of febuary 1846 on Saturday

Commodore Shubrick takein command of the washington navy yard on 26 of February 1846 on Thursday

that morning when the explosion takein place at the larbertary i hadent left ther moore then fifteen Minuts and i Jest Merly saved my distance and had Bein ther twice that Morning and youster verry often go to the furnace to warm my selve

page 87.1

--[87.1]--

88       1846

until the 11 of March 1846 Saturday he received his orders on the 11 of March 1846 on Wensday general Taylor pursuant to orders left Corpus Cristi for Riogrand with a armmy of a three thousand effictive Rank and file general Taylor arived the Riogrand the 28 day of March 1846 on Saturd Colonel Cross who had Been Missed from the camp on 11 April 1846 wher found on the 21 day of april 1846 on Tuesday Mired in the Chaparral general Taylor despacth an express with a requisition on the governors of Texas and louisiana for five thousand volunteers

General Taylor left point isabel the 7 of May 1846 on Thursday and fought the Battle of palo alto on the 5 day of May 1846 on Friday the Second Battle wher fought at Resaca De la palma by general Taylor and his officers and the united States armmy on the 9 day of May 1846 Saturday

A explosion takeing place in the Washington Navy yard in one of the Rocket houses at the South end of the larBertary on the 9 day of May 1846 on Saturday

page 88

--88--

89       1846

general Taylors Disspatch from the seat of war in Merico arived at the Department in washington on the 23 day of May 1846 on Saturday and great Rejoicing wher amoung the american people that the good old war hawk had cleared his way through so handsomely.

They Dedicated the new ioo fellow Hall [Odd Fellows Hall] in washington on Senrenth [Seventh] [s]treet West on Monday 25 day of mat 1846 in Monday and a splendid procession they wher that day and i heard some of the splendid speaking that day and singing as ever i heard in my life and the Mechanics of all the Branches wher out that day and everything went on peaceful and quite.

The volenteers from the Baltimore that wher for Mexico under the Command of Colnel Watson and captain steuart arived in the City of Washington on the 28 of May on Thursday night They Marched Right from the Rail Rroad down to the Marine garrison and ther they takein ther quarters and learnrt the drill

page 89

--89--

90       1846

The Battle of the Harrington Hotel on the navy yard on 8 Street on the 1 day of June 1846 on monday it Commenced with John Loyd and one of the sargeants of the Baltimore Battalion as the Blessed lord woud have it that day was Election day after Dinner all the Mechanics and men of different Classes were out of the yard if they had not Been those Baltimore men would of killed all those Loyds against Mr Adams comes old Mr James Meads caught one fellow and trew him clear across the Street and look around an ask if they wher anny more of them and every one of those fellows that Jumped the garison wall had a stick of wood with them those Navy Yard Men got them all Befor them and moved them and some Women helped to moved them with a volly of stones as they pass along the Mechanics of the 6 ward in washington wher going to give those Batalions a hansome Resepsion But they Behaved so Wild that the people were glad to get rid of them this old gentelman that i have References to Mr. James Meads Sr. was a finer old gentelmen as ever wher Born were kind to everybody but it wouldent do you to fool with him if you did he would make the fier fly out of you

page 90

--90--

91       1846

they got so Bad that the Citizens of Washington had to make complaint to the Hon Wm L Marcy Secretary of war at that time the secretary orderd them to Fort Washington untill there where a vessel Charterd they Marched from the marine Barracks through the Navy yard on there way to fort washington under the command of Colonel Watson the 11 day June 1846 on thursday ther wher so Wild that they hurreid them away from Fort Washington to Mexico and the Washington Battalion went with them

Died in washington in the Six ward on 8 st east Sailing master Marmaduke Duke Dove of the united States navy near the Center house of the Marine Barracks on the 3 of July 1846 on friday as finer old gentelmen oficer as ever wher to Both White and Colered the 5 august general Taylor left Matramoras 1846 Commodore Wm B Shubrick left washington navy yard on the Tenth day of august 1846 on Monday for to take Com mand of the pacific squaron

page 91

--91--

92       1846

commodore Charles Macauley takein command of Washington navy yard the 1 day of September 1846 on tuesday

they Commenced hauling up the united States steamer Frigate orion on the 2 day of September 1846 Wensday and she was as hard a vessel to haul up for that qualiy as ever wher she Broke all the larg purches Block Straps and some of theme told com modore McCauley that they didnt think they could get her up that she was Breaking all of the puerches so Commodore laid to them that Wouldent do that the vessel must come up and they never got her up untel the 12 of September 1846 on Saturday The last prorches that wher Riged for to finish hauling her up first lieut Zackerey Johnson that wher first lieutenant of the washington navy yard at that time had several fathoms of 1 class Frigate chain cable brought forward and strapped the block tempory with the cable and that brought her up and when she wher up they give all the Mechanic and labours ballance part of the day 64

page 92

--92--

93       1846

in Route for Monterey he arived within 2 Miles of Montrey on the 18 of september 1846 on saturday The palace wher caired By the point of a Baynet by six companies of infantry and 2 companys of texans Riflemen under the Command of lieutenant Colenel thomas Childs on the 22 of September 1846 on tuesday all of this command Belong to Brigadier general Wm J Worthes Division He wher ordered By the Commander in Chief Major general Zachrier Taylor to atack the east part of Montrey which wher done with great vigor while the Commander in Chief concentrated the atention of the enemy in front of Montrey the Commander in Chief attacked in front of Monterey the 23 of September 1846 on Wensday and Brigadear general Wm. Butler wher wounded in front of Montrey and Colenel Watson of the Baltimore volenteers wher killed the city of Monterey wher surrened to Magor General Zacherier taylor of the united States armmy by general ampudia the Mexican general on the 24 of September 1846 on thursday

page 93

--93--

[94]

Major General Winfield Scott embarked from the City of New york to the seat of war in Mexico on the 30 day of November 1846 on Monday

launching of the united States Steamer Frigate union on the 5 of December 1846 on Saturday Commodore Charles McCauley wher present and Captain Thomas Alious Dooring wher present and first Lieutenant Zacherrier Johnston wher present and 2 lieutenant Charles poor wher present and Sailing Master Charles Morris wher present

and Boat Swain Wm Waters wher present and Mr John Smith Carpenter and other Carpenters wher present and Mr Joseph pagget and his gang wher present and the ordanary Men wher there and that same eveing she was hauld long side of the warf and then she wher Moored hamsomely.

page 94

--94--

95       1847

Major general Winfield Scott arived on the Riogrand the 1 of February 1847 on friday for to commence operation against the Castel of St San Juan Deorloa and vericruse

The Explosion of the Copper Boiller of the Steam Engine No 1 in washington navy yard the 6 day of Febuary 1847 on Saturday and it Blasted the clothes oft a Mexican that was an apprentice and frightend him so that he left the yard shortly after that

on the 22 of Febuary 1847 on Monday a salute wher fiered in washington navy yard for general washingtons Birth day By Scond lieut Mr Charles poor and he fiered them as quick as you could discharge a musket and that was the day general taylor left Buena vista for Sertiler to strenthen it he wher escorted ther and Back with the Misisppi and kentucky Rigments and the Battle commenced befor his arival on the 23 of February 1847 on tuesday thats the day it end

page 95

--95--

96       1847

The City of very Cuz [Vera Cruz] and Castel in Mexico wher Surrended to Major general Winfield scott and his officers and his men the 27 of March on saturday

the Mexican armmy wher alowed to leave the City of Mexico the Vera Cruz by Major general Scott consent on the conditions on the 29 of March 1847 on Monday

After General Scott left vara Cruz after some forty five or fity Miles he fellin with a trong fortyfied posision planed by General Santa anna name Cerro Gordo when general scott found they wher such a strong posision in his front the 14 of April 1848 on Wensday he turned too and Cut a Road through the Montain for to save his officers and men and on the fifteenth day of april 1847 thursday in the Morning when General Santa ana found him selve general Scott had takein on surprise the Battle of cerro gordo wher ended on the 18 day of April 1847 Sunday it wher said that general scott stood on a pile of shot in person until the Height of cerro wher carried

page 96

--96--

97       1847

launching of the united States iron Steamer Water Witch [2] in Washington navy yard on the 6 day of May 1847 on Thursday Commodore Charles McCauley wher present an Captain Robert B Cunningham wher present and first lieutenant Hillary H. Roads wher present and Sceoned lieut Charles poor wher present and Sailing Master Charles Morris and Boatswain Wm Water present

They wher a Great Aluminations and fier works on the 8 of May 1847 on Saturday takein place in the City of Washington Celelerating the grate Battles that wher fought in Mexico by Major genreral Winfield Scott and Major general Zackariah taylor and ther officers and men and the men that Constructed the feir Works wher named Mr Benjamin Franklin Costern and smarter little fellow as anny you could scare up in the united States and it wher a splendard affaire

page 97

--97--

98       1847

The u s States Armmy arived at publa on the 17 of May 1847 Monday under Major general Winfield Scott and his officers

Briadeer general Franklin pierce forced his March from vera cruz with twenty five hundred men under his command and he arived in publa the first of August 1847 on Sunday in time to Reinforce General Scot Major General Scott

Majoor general Scott takein up his line of March from pulela and his officers and men enroute for the capitol of Mexico on the 7 of August 1847 on Saturday

Majaor general David E. Twiggs started on the 7 of August 1847 on saturday Majaor gideon J pillow left on the 8 of august 1847 on Sunday Major general John A Quitman left on the 9 of august 1847 on Monday and Brigadier general Schields left on the 10 of august 1847 on Tuesday Major general Wm G Worth left on the 11 of august 1847 on Wedsday. Brigadier general Fraklin pierce started on the 12 of august 1847 on Thursday and Major gen george Cadwalader left on the 13 of august 1847 on friday

page 98

--98--

99       1847

all those Divisions wher in Surporting distance of each other and all in the same Month. The Commander in Chief over took them and on the 7 of august 1847 the Commander in Chief left Briadier general Thommas Childs in Com mand of puebla Captain Thorton wher killed on the 18 of august 1847 in front of the City of Mexico 1847 on Wensday. five Battles wher fought on the 20 of august 1847 on Friday by the Americans right under the eye of general Scott Contreras and San antonio and the Hacienda and thetete du point and the Rear of Charubuco and ther wher a flag of truce sent to general Scott on the 21 Soliciting an armstice 1847 on saturday Major general Scott having Becom convinced that the Mexicans wher trifling with him he despatch on the 6 of September 1847 a letter to Santa an na complaining of certain Breaches of the of the armistices and general Scott made preparations to carry the city by assault to this purpose he Began on the 7 of September 1847 on Tuesday

page 99

--99--

      1847

the Battle of Molino del Rey wher fought on the 8 of September 1847 on Wensday by Major general Wm J Worth and Magor general John a quitman an ther officers and men and lieutenant Colonel graham fell that day and lieutenant Colonel Martin Scott fell at Molino del Rey and Major general Worth lost one trird of his men that day but he carried that Work by the point of Bayonet

page 99.1

--[99.1]--

100       1847

Major general scott commenced to ram bart Chapultepac on the 12 of September 1847 on Sunday

Chapultepac wher carried by the point of the americans Baynet By the orders of Major general Scott and Major general John A Quitman and Major general georg Cadwalader on the 13 day of september 1847 on Monday

Major general John A quitman Wher the first to hoist the american flal [flag]on the capitol in Mexico on the 14 of September 1847 on tuesday and after general Scott and his officers and men Made general Santa anna leave the City of Mexico and all that wher with him he thought he would go to the pueola and Route lieutenant Colonel Childs out from ther on the 25 of september 1847 on saturday general santa anna atacked Colonel Childs at publa But colonel childs drove him of in disorder so they didnt gave him no stoping place lieutenant while the american armmy Wher in Mexico they kept him allways Skaird up

page 100

--100--

101       1848

The Hon ex president Mr John quincy adams Died in the united States house of Representative on the 23 of Febuary 1848 on tuesday at half past six oclock at night

The Funeral of the Hon ex president John quincy adams took place the 27 of Febuary 1848 on Saturday

The Treaty of peace wher Ratafied in the united states Senate Between Mexico and the united states in the early part of March 1848

all the Mechanic and laberours of the Washington navy yard volinteer ther selves to carry the corner stone of general Washingtons Monument and they carried from fourteenth Street Bridge and Brigadier General Archabal Henderson of the U S Merrines and they Walked of with it By the tune of hail Columbia and yankee doodle on the 7 of June 1848 on Wensday ther wher it Remains and they had to get the truck out of the Navy Yard and they got it off the Stone Wagon an put it on the truck and walk off with it Hamsomely

page 101

--101--

102       1848

the Coner stone of general Washington Monament wher laid in Washington by the Hon Colonel James K polk ex president of the united States on the forth of July 1848 Tuesday and they wher a great prosesion that day diferent volunteer Company and the united states draggones [dragoons] from Carlile Barracks Pennsylvance 3 or 4 company of them under the command of lietenant Colonel Charles May united states armmy and one battery of flying artillery and several volunteer companies from Alexandria and from diferrent parts of the Country and ex governors of states and territory and sentor and Representative wher present and the Mayo[r] of the city of Washington and aldermen Common Councolmen and the Citizens of Washington and Georgetown and alexandria and it wher a splendrd day evry thing went on peacefully and quite that day an they had a good dissplay of Fier Works that night and the fier Works wher supplied By and old gentelman By the [name] of Mr george Marshal a guner in the united States navy the holl of the Milatary force that wher out that day Wher commanded by Major general John a quitman

page 102

--102--

103       1849

A fier took place on 8 Street east on the 14 of april 1849 on Saturday and the united States Brig Washington embark from Washington Navy yard the 8 day of May 1849 on Tuesday under the Command of lieutenant Wainright

The iron united States Steamer Water witch [2] embark from Washington navy yard the 28 day of May 1849 on Monday under the Command of lieutenant Tolten

Died at his Residence in tenesee the Hon. Colonel James K polk ex president of the united U S on the 15 day of June 1849 on friday as fine a man never was When he came in as president of the united U S he had his hands full for he had oregon and Mexico to contend with and with the assistance of allmighty god he [illegible] left his chair her left erverthing squar and faire Mr polk wher a gentelman and statesman and he followed the steps of the Hon Major general andrew Jackson as Much as anny man i ever saw65

page 103

--103--

104       1849

Commodore henry E Ballard takein command of Washington navy yard the 1 day of october 1849 on Monday.

The Death of Charles Mcclain by the explotion of a gun he wher a gunner in the U S Navy at washington navy yard on the 13 day of November 1849 on tuesday.

the [illegible] arival of the inlish [English] Sloop of War vacar with Sire lord Bullwer a minister from inland arived in front of the arsnal at Washington the 21 day of December 1849 on on Friday

A fier Broke out at philips Welles and Burnt his house down to ashes an 3 of his Children and a man that wher living with them on the 25 day of Decem 1849 on tuesday

The inglish sloop of war vacer left the arsnal in Washington on the 27 day of December 1849 on Thursday for england

page 104

--104--

      1850

on the 16 of Febua 1850 Saturday night A fier takein place in the engineneers office at the Washington yard aBove the old paint shop Joining on to the Rigin Loft and Mr ellis was having a small patened Boiler Made and they had a great [d]eal of soderin work to aBout it and they had A soldering pot seting up Against the wall and the takin place from the heat of the soderin pot terough the plastering a nd caught to the lathes after sun doun all the Mechanics and laberoers wher out of the yard and the Watch man dis covered the smoke Bursting out and the alarm wher givin and the Bell Rung and in less than no time the yard were full of men and Commodore Ballard and all his officers were there to see that every wher there were to see that every thing went on right.

page 105

--105--

270. EYEWITNESS ACOUNT OF LAYING THE CORNERSTONE

Michael Shiner [Diary 1813 -1869], Ma 186 pp folio.

He notes the mechnics and laborers from the Navy Yard volunteered to rescue the cornerstone which had fallen through the canal bridge at 14th Street. The task was accomplished to the tune of "Hail Columbia" and Yankee Doodle." Shiner then describes the laying of the cornerstone on July 4 1848

Journals and Diaries             MSS


[The above unnumbered page was found between pages numbered 105-106 it appears to be a dealer's descriptive catalogue which advertised the sale of Michael Shiner's manucript circa 1905.]

page 105.1

--[105.1]--

105       1850

Died in Washington the Hon ex senator John C Calhoun from south carrolina the 31 day of March 1850 on Sunday

The hauling up of the u s Steamer Water witch [2] in washington navy yard the 28 day of May 1850 on Thursday the Hon Sceratary of the navy Wm Ballard preston wher down that day and Some more of the cabinet commodore Hon E Ballard wher present wher and Captain John B Montgomry and first lieut alfred Taylor and all the other officers of the yard wher present and the Secrtary of the Navy gave them all the Ballance part of the day Both Mechanics and laborers

Died in Washington at the presidents Mansion the Hon Major general Zachrier Taylor prendent of the united States on the 9 of July 1850 on tuesday and he was gentelman and all soilger66

page 105.2

--[105.2]--

106       1850

launching of the united States Steamer Water Witch [3] at washington navy yard on the 20 day of October 1850 on Monday. Commodore henry E Ballard wher present and Captain John B Montgumery and first lieut alfred Taylor and Sailing Master Charles Morris wher present Boatswain Watterson Master Builder Edward foster John Smith Quarterman wher present Mr Joseph pagget Overseer of the yard hands

Hauling up of the united States Steamer Vixon at washington navy yard on Tuesday 19 November 1850

[Three lines crossed out.]

Commodore Henry E Ballard wer present captain John B Montgumery wher presnt and lieutenant Alfred Tayor Sailing Master Charles Morris and Boatswain Wm Watter wher present and Master Builder edward foster and Joseph pagget overseer of the yard hands wher present and that day they had a drum and a fife they played the fife so sweet that day that one of the colered men left capsel bars and went to dancin

page 106

--106--

107       1851

The united States steamer frigate aleghany [Allegheny] left the washington navy yard saturday morne The u s steamer vixen was launched on 8 of march 1851 on saturday at washington navy yard and snow on the ground

it snowed on the 5 day of May 1851 on Monday

The first Brick wher laid for the Coper Rolling Mill in Washington navy yard by Mr Charles Ball on the 12 day of May 1851 on Monday at the north West coner and it wher built by contract by Mr george plant

The Corner Stone of the new Capitol of the United States was laid on 4 of July 1851 on friday by the president of the united states the Hon Millard filmore

The Salem [Note: no reference to a US Navy ship named Salem in DANFS until 1900] went on a excursion from the Washington Navy Yard with the BacaRites on the 13 day of August 1851 on Wensday

page 107

--107--

108       1851

The united States Steamer Water Witch [3] left the washington navy yard on the 10 day of august 1851 on Saturday about half past ten o'clock under the command of Lieut David porter and second in command Sailing Master Charles Morris and 3 Assistance engineere P C Bogardus

Boat swain Wm Waters died in washington navy yard on the 7 of September 1851 on Sunday

The Death of a Son of Sar[geant] Major Mundel67 marine Sam Mundell was shot by man by the name of wells at the Eastern Branch on the 17 day of September 1851 on Wensday wells was tried by the Distrit Court on Friday and wher Sentenced to Be hu[ng] on the 23 day of april 1852 on friday But the president of the u s had Mercy on his poor soul and contermaned the order and sentanced him to the u s penitentiary for life

The death of Com modore louis Warrington in Washington 12 of october 1851 on Sunday

page 108

--108--

109       1851

The Death of Mr Francis Barry Sr formly a check clerk in the washington navy yard he died in washington the 2 day December 1851 on Tuesday

The library of the united states capitol was Burnt on the on the 24 of December 1851 on Wensday and all the engineers and the Mechanics and laborers out of the Navy yard was orderd to the Capitol By order of Captain [Illegible] Powel of the u s navy and all the u s marines was ordered ther By Brigadiar general henerson to assist putting the fier out

The Death of Mr Noble Clemens a painter in Washington the 27 of December 1851 and Mr Clemens Was as finer Man as ever was free hearted and had cordial courtesy to evry Boddy

page 109

--109--

      1852

The first pile that were Drove for the new saw Mill by the Construction of Capt Henry Benin a torpgraphacal engineer of the u s arm my at washington navy yard James phillips Master mason at the north Side of the new Ship house first of February 1852 on tuesday

after that the pile driving were turned over to Mr Joseph paget as usual

page 109.1

--[109.1]--

110       1852

The Aidedecamps of Cosuth came to the Washington Navy Yard on the 3 day of January 1852 on Saturday

general Cossuth and all his officers came down to the washington navy yard the 10 of January 1852 on Saturday and was treated with the greates of respect by the Com modore henry E. Ballard and all his officers68

it snowed on the 5 day of January 1852 on Monday

it snowed on the 16 day of January 1852 on friday

The arival of the Mail Steamer Baltic on the 26 of February 1852 on friday in front of alexandria

The Mail Steamer Baltic left on the 3 day of March 1852 on Wensday

on the 15 day of March 1852 they takein the Water witch and anchored her on monday for to try experiments

page 110

--110--

111       1852

the first pile that were drove in the washington navy yard for the new marine railway69 in the upper ship house by the construction of capt Henry Bennon of the torgraphical engineer Corps of the u s arm my and superintened By Mr Joseph Paget on the 29 day of march 1852 on monday

the first scow load of dirt that were takein from the new mud Machine By the Supentends of Mr Jospeh paget on the 30 of march 1852 on tuesday and was Brought in the Dock Between the lower Ship and The ordinance Shop

lieutenant John a Delran tried experi[ment] on the iron Steamer Water witch [2] at washington navy yard and he fierd into her and sunk her on the 1 day of april 1852 on thursday

laying

laying of the keel of the u s Wooden Steamer Water witch [3] on the 2 day of april 1852 on friday by order of the Constructor Mr Hen h over and Master Builder Mr idward foster at Washington Navy yard

page 111

--111--

112       1852

the president of the united states Hon Millard filmo[more] visited the washington navy yard and his cabinet the 14 day of april 1852 on Wensday and they wher Received cordily By com modore Hen Ballard and his officers and a nautical [?] salute wher fiered

the arrival of the u s steamer vixen at washington navy yard under the command of lieut Smith on the 14 day of april 1852 on Wensday

the first pile that were Drove for the new ordance shop by the Superintenance of mr Joseph paget 24 may 1852 on monday

James Mc cuen had kee cap knack out of place the 25 of may 1852 on tuesday at the washington navy yard

page 112

--112--

113       1852

The first Stone that wer laid for the ornas Shop in the washington navy yard on the 19 day of June 1852 on saturday By the instrucsions of Capt Henry Benam of the Toorgraphical Corps of army engineers and the master Bricklayer Mr cross and the quartermen mr Robert Doyle

The Death of the Hon Mr Henry Clay a Senator of the united states he Died on the 29 of June 1852 on tuesday in washington and he were a gentelman and aa a great statesman as ever step his foot in the Senate for they were nothing came that ever befor the Senate in mr Clays time that were Danarous to the cuntry But what he were Willing to put it down ameiately to Restore peace and harmony to all Both north and south east and West for 1850 they were a great excitement in Both houses of congress and the heaven know what would of Bein the Result then

page 113

--113--

114       1852

if it not of Bein for Mr Clay and others that wished to preserved the uion for he wer tru to his trust

Died in washington adgutant general Rodger Jones of the u s arm my he died on the 15 of July 1852 on thursday and he wer a soilger and a gentelman

Washington navy yard The starting of the Copper Rolling Mill engine by mr Wm Ellis Chief engineer of the Navy Yard on the 18 day of august 1852 on wensday and Com modore Henry E Ballard were present and Capt L M powell wer present that day and and first lut Tilton were present and Mr John Ober were present Mr Wm ellis made great impresion in washington navy yard in regards to Machinery for the engines he made they seirved like they would work they Selves for when he came to the yard in 1833 they wher but one engine in the yard and when he left the yard in 1853 he left 7 engines all in operation

page 114

--114--

115       1852

Washington City the Death of Sargent Major venoran Dolitsey a uncom missiond officer of the u s marine corps a Staff officer he died on the 8 day of october 1852 on friday

Commodore Charles W. Morgan takein command of the washington navy yard on the 12 of october 1852 on tuesday commodore Henry E Ballard and all his officers and master Workmen Received him with grate hounor as usual a salute wher fired for him and Commodore Henry E Ballard give his Command to him that day 12 October 1852 on tuesday70

the united States Wooden Steamer water wiich wher launch by the Construction of Mr Henry Hover and Mr edward Potter and Mr John Smith quarterman on the 21 day of october 1852 on Thursday and Mr Rathes McCuller quarterman and all the yard wher present

page 115

--115--

116       852

The Death of the Hon Daniel Webster The Secretary of State he died the 24 day of october 1852 on Sunday at his Resid[ence] in Massachueusetts

The united States Steamer Frigate Fulton arrived at washington navy yard the 11 of December 1852 on Tuesday

on the 14 of December 1852 on Wensday an order sent down from the Navy Department By the Hon Hon P Kenady the Secretary of the navy For the Mechanics and labour to go to work at Sun Rise and on the morning of 15 the Bell Rang and all The men out at the gate and out of five hundred men there no more then nineteen or twenty men that caried out that order and before twelve o clock that same day an order came down contermaning that order and all the Mechanic and laborers went to work at Ther old usual hour71

page 116

--116--

117       1852

The united States Steamer frigate fulton left washington navy yard on the 19 day of December 1852 on Sunday

The trial of the u s steamer Water witch engine and her Machinery at washington navy yard by William ellis Chief engineer ont on the 29 of December 1852 on Wensday

The Removal of the u s Steamer w ater witch with the Hon John P Kenady Secretary of the navy and Commodore Wm R Shubrick and capt L M powell and commander Thomas Page and chief engen neer Mr Wm ellis and sailing master Charles morris and Boat swain george Wilmuth they went down Below the Fort the 30 day of December 1852 on thursday

page 117

--117--

118       1853

the Arrival of the united States Steam Frigate fulton at washington navy yard the 3 day of January 1853 on Monday

Died in Command of the washington navy yard Commodore Charles W Morgan on the 5 day of January 1853 on wensday at washington navy yard and were Buried on the 6 of Jany 1853 on thursday The Mechanics anserd the Roll in the morning and after diner stoped out and got ready for the fuernal

The Statute of the Hon Major general andrew Jackson ex president of the u s were dedicated in washington city on the 8 day of January 1853 on Saturday and he were as great man as lived and the general had no Respect of persons and were all ways Willing to give Justice to those that Deserved it as far as in his power and evry office he held he wher tru to his country

page 118

--118--

119       1853

The united states steamer Water witch left the washington navy yard on the 14 day of Jany 1853 on friday and Run ground By the u S arsnal at Washing [ton]

The united states steamer fulton left the washington navy yard the 15 day of January on saturday with Hon Wm R King vic president of the united states and his famly

The united states steamer water Witch left the united States arsnal at washington on the 17 day of January 1853 on saturday morning at Half past six oclock

The arrival of the u S Steamer Alleghany in front of the U S arsenal at waShington the 17th of october 1853 on monday and She ran aground there on Tuesday morning the 18th of october 1853 and She got underway for to come up to the navy yard and she got as far as Blagdens wharf and She ran a ground again She never got up to the navy yard until six oclock at night and orders was Sent down to transfer her crew to the Receiving Ship at Norfolk

The u S Steamer Engineer [Note: DANFS states that the Engineer was a tug boat, not a steamer] under the command of Capt olmSted Taken the first Draft of the Alleghany Crew Down to Norfolk in the u S Steame Engineer under the command of Capt olmSted the 3rd day of November 1853 on Thursday

page 119

--119--

120       1853

A visit to the u S Steamer alleghany at the navy yard washington by the Honorable J G Dobbins the Secretary of the navy on the 22ndof october 1853 on Satturday He was received Cordially by Capt H Paulding and Capt. L M Powell and his officers and a formal Salute of the guns was fired allowed to a Secretary of the navy he was Escorted on board the alleghany by Capt. L M Powell and the yards and Rigging all maned and that was done verry handsomely All to one thing They did not man the rigging as fast as I have Formaly Sien them The Death of george J young a Bricklayer a native of Baltimore fell about 30 feet from a Scaffold at the North west Corner of the new ordnance building the 26th day of april 1853 on tuesday The death of Patrick Place a native of Ireland in the rolling of pile he was Jamied between the piles Along Sides of the New Ship house on the 6th day of may 1853 on wensday the death of Charles King72 a boy who was Accidently Shot a son of Sergeant Tansil was shot by Sergeant Luskeys boy by a discharge of a musket the 10th day of may 1853 on tuesday December 12th 1853 the expolsion of the Boiler of the Steam Engine No 1 in the washington navy yard and scalded a apprentice in the machinst in Department by the name of Charles King and he died on the 15th of December 1853 on Tuesday a son of the late martin ring The Second Stack that was built for the New Ordnance Building the first Brick that was laid by Mr J Rose for Mr. george H Plant undertaker on the 21th day november on monday 1853 She was finished and toped off the 14th day of December 1853 on wensday the first pile that was drove for the new Black Smith Shop by Mr W P Sango Civil Engineer and Mr. Joseph Paggett master labour between the new ordnance shop and the mould loft the 10th Day of December 18 1853 on Saturday Commenced laying the tracks of iron for the marine Railway by Capt W P Sango civil engineer and Mr Edward foster master carpenter the 28th day of november 1853 on monday the first Stone that was laid for the new saw mill By Mr W P Sango and Mr James phillips

page 120

--120--

121       1853

Master maSon the 10th of December 1853 on Satturday The Honorable Brigadier general franklin pierce president of the u S paid a visit to washington navy yard the 14th of December 1853 on the next day the u S steamer Vixen left theWashington navy yard and 6th day of march 1853 on Sunday and Sailed Eighty or ninety miles down the river and one of her peipes Bursted and She returned back to the washington navy yard the 7th of march 1853 on monday under the Command of Captain Sands and master C morris and passed midshipman C C Simms and Gunner [Page torn two words illegible] Departure of the u S Steamer Vixen Left the washington navy yard on the 10th of march 1853 on Thursday A serious accident hapened to Mr Joseph padgett overseer of the yard hands in the new ordnance Shop by three boys Skylarking Throwing Stones at each other Struck Mr padgett on the Side and knocked him down Sprawling at bell ring out 12 o'clock one or two of his hands had to lead him home out of the Yard the 9th day of September 1853 on friday the names of the three boys was william Crampton william Smoot and francis gartlin Mr Thomas woodward formily naval Store Keeper came to the washington navy yard the 9th Day of July 1849 on monday and left washington navy yard the 11th of September 1853 on thursday henry GetSandiner died on the 3rd day of November 1853 on Thursday may god bless him and I hope that he is at rest on the 21st novy 1853 on Satturday in trying the pumps to See how they would they would work to pump out the Docks by Mr Wellis Chief Engineer at the Same Time the old Engine house Caught on fire in the twinklin of an eye all the officers of the yard and master workman and foreman and quarterman and fireman and mechanics and labours of all classes was Present and they distinguished the fire and washed the old House as clean as a pin on the 20th of June 1853 on tuesday the engine house of the Dock at the upper Ship House took fire the Second time all the officers of the yard and all the engines was there and all the master workman And all the quarterman mechanics and labours was there

page 121

--121--

122       1851

Mr John Tucker a quarterman to his father Mr James Tucker [three lines are heavily crossed out and illegible] They washed that house that day and the water Swept him away but he stayed and fought the fire until every Spark was out The post stone that Was layed at the upper Ship house by the conStruction engineer M S Rosencrantz civil engineer for the new rail way at the North West gable end of the old Ship house the 13 day of July 1853 on wensdays [by] James phillips master mason The death of Wm J Barry 22 april 1853 on friday a fine and well disposed young man and in the prime of His youth may the lord receive his soul in heaven The Son of the late francis Barry formerly a Chief clerk of the washington Navy yard formrly he was a Clerk in navy Store in washington Thursday the 4th of august 1853 the italians brig antagult arrived At the washington navy with two Statues for the u S Capitol Which they Called in Spanish Edelppike they was Carved in italy for the use of the u S Capitol the pieces of marble for the foundation of the Statutes were hauled by Mr Wm Clarks team eight fine Horses as ever was put in harness on the 9 day of augustus 1853 on Tuesday The first visit of that was paid to the washington navy yard by the honorable Brigadier general franklin Pierce president of the united States and the honorable J C Dobbins Secretary of the navy Commodore H paulding and Captain L M powell and Lieutenant E G Tilton and all the officers received them cordially with a salute to twenty one guns C morris and Lieutenant grayson of the marines M S nobel Chaplin and Thomas woodward naval Store keeper G Herold Chief Clerk to the Store keeper on the 6th of august 1853 on Satturday on the 6th day of July 1853 the first Brick that was layed for the New lodge the odd fellows hall fronting 8th Street west of the marine Barracks on the navy yard by John Rose quarterman73 and G H Plant Master mason on Tuesday on the 4th of July 1853

page 122

--122--

123           1853

There was excurSion of the navy School Children under the inStruction of Mr J H Peak74 Mr william Dixon and Mr S marks [The following two sentences have been crossed out and are not legible] tha I have not the time to mention [illegible] the u s arsenal a Cross the eastern Branch and I have been informed that they had a blessed time of it

The death of George Edwards formily a member of the Marine band and he use to play the Bugle and he was a Splendid Player as ever was heard on the Bugle he was liked by General Henderson he attended him often as the Doctor did and Lieutenant Charles henderson visited him until his death He has left to mourn his lost a wife and three Children Him and his wife use to work industrious to gethr he A industious hard working man the 3rd day of June on Tuesday Captain Hiram Paulding taken Command of the washington navy yard on the 31th day of January 1853 on monday And he was received by Capt L M. Powel and all his officers First Lieutenant E G Tilton Lieutenant J A Dahlgren Sailing master Charles morris and passed midshipman H C Simms and Mr George wilmouth Boatswain. Clerk D mccomb chief clerk Y D Beule and Richard Barry Clerk of the Yard Clerk to the Purser Mr ellis Chief Engineer James Tucker master Black Smith able J davis master plumber and edward foster assistant Constructor BB Curran master Joiner a woodward master Blockmaker and John Peake master painter James A. mcCathran Master gun carriage maker Mr J padgett over Seer of the Yard Hands A salute of Thirteen guns was fired the usual salute The trying of the new patent Boiler of the U.S. Steamer Vixen by W M ellis chief engineer of the washington navy yard under the Command of C w morris Sailing master of the yard on the 9th day of february 1853 on wensday They went nearly 44 miles Down the river the Same Day75

page 123

--123--

124       1853

The montgomery guards under the command of Captain Barton Key76 And the Boon Rifleman under captain M E Bright paid a visit to Baltimore on Monday the 10th of September 1853 Mr william Ellis resigned his Situation he was the Chief engineer of the washington navy yard on Satturday the 10th day of September 1853 Mr Francis Nerhany taken charge of the Navy Store on Thursday 1853 first of September the u S Steamer San francisco [Note: According to DANFS, this was not a Navy ship.] got lost on her way to California with u S Troops on board and amongst the lost was Colnonel washington and major Taylor and his wife on the 24th day of December 1853 on Saturday77 The death of major Bliss Son in law of the later president general Zachaih Taylor The 5th day of august 1853 on friday Mr william Clark teams hauled the first statues that came to the navy yard in the [Italian] brig atarguld for the united States capitol the 11th of august 1853 on Thursday then he hauled the Second the 12th day of august 1853 on friday from the italian Brig at the washington navy yard the Engineer by Captain Olmstead and carried through the united State arsenal to the united States Prision in washington on the 20th day of march 1853 on monday for there mutinous Conduct the Death of Doctor James overstreet a Son Mrr Easby the 29th of February 1853 on Thursday in Sanfrancisco

page 124

--124--

125       1853

on the Second day of may 1853 on monday the united States Marines under the Command of Captain grayson marched over to the Ireland with Lieutenant Henderson and a volunteer company with their subordinate officers to shoot at target for a Silver Cup and Sergeant Hamilton Won the Cup I am highly Delighted to hear the united States marines at these close shootings won the Cup for I place the utmost of Confidence in all the united States officers Both the army and navy of the Soldiers and Sailors for when we are all aSleep at night from our Daily occupations those men are allways on there watch tower in the army rank and file and at Sea on land the new organized volunteer Company of the District of Columbia had a parade and fought a Sham battle on the 19th day of october 1853 on wensday

The arrival of the mail Steamer Eericson off alexandria on the 21st day of february 1853 on monday And She was visted by the President of the united States the honorable Brigadier General franklin Pierce and the honorable Mr everett Secretary of State and the honourable J P kenady Secretary of navy And Commodore morris and commodore Shubrick and Commodore J D Sloat and members of Congress

page 125

--125--

126       Jan 4th 1854

The Starting of the Engine of the new Ordnance Shop on Wensday Constructor Lloyd H Paulding present at the time Captain S M Powell first Lieut. Joseph Lammon and Chief Engineer Henry Hunt Capt W P Sanger Lieut J A Dahlgren was present then. The Engine was moved out side on account of the pounding and making much noise and then she started again on the 25 day of April 1854 Tuesday by Matt Hunt Chief Engineer

U S Steam Frigate Fulton in front of the U. S. Arsenal and Arrived at Washington Navy Yard the 15th day of April 1854 on Wednesday & left the Washington Navy Yard the six day of May 1854 on Saturday under the Command of Capt. J. R. Mitchel The first Brick that was layed for the New Ordnance Brass Foundry on the 14th day of March 1854 at the most easterly corner of the Ordnance Building on Tuesday by Mr. John Rose a foreman of Mr. George Plant under takin the first Brick that was layed for the foundation for the Engine for the new Saw Mill by Mr. James Phillips the master mason the 19th day may 1854 on Friday the second Commence laying of the Bricks for th new saw mill by Mr. James Phillips South West corner of the saw mill the 20th twenty day of May 1854 on Saturday under the Constructor Capt. W. P. Sango

The Raising of the Stem Post of the U.S. Steam Frigate Minnasota at the Washington Navy yard by the Constructor S.M. Powell and Edward Sloan and Sailing master C.W. Morris and boatswain George Wilmot and Mr Brooks quarterman and journey man Ship Carpenters and apprentice Class of Carpenters and Labours on the 22 day of November 1854 on wensday

page 126

--126--

127       (1854)

The first Log of Timber that was Sawed by the Saws of new Saw Mill by Constructor Mr Henry Harris and Mr George Wilson quarterman Engineer Mr Brown on the 24 day of November 1854 on Friday The first piles that was drove for the foundation of the New Trip Hammer for the Anchor Shop to the eastward of the Boiler Shop Southward of the Brass of the machine shop and Setting North west of the Copper railing mill Sitting Eastward of the Boring Mill by Mr W.P. Sango Constructing Engineer and Mr Joseph Padgett Oversee of the yard Hands on the first day of December 1854 on Friday.

The Departure of the U.S. Steamer Frigate Fulton from the Washington Navy yard under the Command of J.R. Mitchell and his officers on the 8th day of December 1854 on Friday

The Starting of the New Saw mill Engine the Saws for good i hope under the Superintendence of Mr. Charles E. Williams the Timber inspector of the washington Navy yard the 11th day of December 1854 on Monday

The Raising of the Rudder part of the U. S. Steam Frigate Minasota [Minnesota] by the Constructor S.M. Pook and Mr Edward Foster and the quarterman and the journey man an the Ship Carpenters and Laborers the 18th day of December 1854 on monday

The first part of the keel for the new Steamer Minasota was raised by W. S. Pook and Mr Edward Foster and the quarterman the first day of November 1854 on wensday

page 127

--127--

128       (1854)

The Last Rafters for the addition new Ship House at the East Gable End were put in place the 24th day of Oct 1854 on Tusday Sailing Master C.W. Morris and Mr George Wilmoth and Mr Joseph Padgett Overseer of the yard Hands was present a joiner by the name of John Keithly fell backwards off that Ship on the 24th day of Oct 1854 on Tuesday

The first Brick that was Layed for new Black Smith Shop by the Constructing Engineer Mr P. S. Sango and mr Phillips master mason on the 30th day of October 1854 on Monday

Raising of the Stern Post of the New Steam Frigate Minnesota at the Washington Navy Yard by the Constructor Mr. S.M. Pook and Mr. Edward Forest and Master C.W. Morris and Mr. George Wilmot the 10th day of November 1854 on Friday.

The first piece of framing for the extension New Ship House was hoisted by the Sailing master C.W. Morris and the boatswain Georg Wilmot the second day of of Oct 1845 on monday B.B. Curran and Luis Maruson quarterman

The first stone that was Layed for the New Black Smith Shop by Capt W.P. Sanger to Eastward of the new Saw Mill James Philips master mason on the (6) six day of Oct 1854 on Friday

The First Rafters that was Hoisted for the Extension of the New Ship House at the East Gable End on the 20th day of Oct 1854 on Saturday by the Orders of First Lieutenant Joseph Lammons and Sailing Master C.W. Morris and Boatswain George Wilmot and B.B. Curran master Joiners and Luis Marcons quarterman and Mr Jos Padgett Overseer of the yard Hands

page 128

--128--

129       (1854)

The first Starting of the new Saw mill Engine on the 29th day of Aug 1854 Henry Hunt and George Wilson and M.R. Bean Engineer George Cunningham quarterman on Tuesday

The First piles that was drove for the addition to the Slip in the New ship House W.P. Sango Civil Engineer of the Washington Navy yard for the New Steam Frigate Minasota and by the Superintendence of Mr Joseph Padgett the Overseer of the yard Hands on the 26th day June 1854 on Monday

The first-commence Laying of the New Steam Frigate Keel by the Constructor Mr. S.M. Pook Mr. Edward Foster Mr. John Smith after they had got the keel dressed out- plain they Closely Examined it by the Constructors and it was in good condem immediately i am only givin a Small Siz the Shop was Commence on the 14th June 1854 on Wensday

The first Stone was Layed for the addition of the Slip by the Constructor Capt. P.S. Sango and James Phillips master mason on the (5)th day of July 1854 on Wensday

The First Commence Framing of the Steam Friget Minsotato [Minnesota] the 14th day of november 1854 on Tuesday by the Orders of the Constructors Mr. S. Pook and Mr. Edward Foster and thir quarterman and Sailing master Morris Mr George Wilmot Boatswain

The first - pile that was drove for the New Saw Mill by the Constructors Capt H. Brenham Topographical Engineer of the U.S. Army Civil Engineers of the Washington Navy yard and James Phillips master mason on the North Side of the New Ship House on the first (1) day of Feb 1854 Friday

page 129

--129--

130       (1854)

The death of Com John Downs of the U.S. Navy died at the Charlestown Navy yard on the 11th day of Aug. 1854 on Friday

The death of Brigadier genl Nathan Touson of the U.S. Army on the 20th day of July 1854 on Thursday he was ages old as ever Lived at Canda duran the War 1812.

The death of Capt. W. Esby on the 28th day of July 1853 on Saturday

The Hon. Brigadier genl. Franklyn Pierce President of the United States payed a visit to the Washington Navy yard and the Hon. J.E. Dobson Secretary of the Navy and the Hon Maj genl. Cass U.S. Senator and genl Pierce Secretary Mr Webster and Several Layde went down in company with them from the Washington Navy Yard on the U.S. Steamer Engineer to visin to old point Comfort the President was onard with the former. Salute of the amount of 21 Guns was received Cordially by Commodore H Paulding and Capt. M. Powell and Joseph Lammon first Lieut and master C.W. Morris all this is in Dress uniform on the 23rd day of June 1854 on Friday

The United States Steamer fulton arrived at the Washington Navy Yard the 3rd of july 1854 on monday under the Command of Captain J R Mitchel

The Death of Mrs Anna Mshon the 4th of December 1854 on Monday She was a daughter of the late Francis Barry Sr

The Sun and the moon fell in Contact with each other on the 26th day of May 1854 on Friday Evening at four o clock and they Was not invisible as we expected

The first day of June 1855 on Friday it rained all day and it rained 2nd day of June 1855 on Satturday and it Commenced Clearing away at. 6 oClock

page 130

--130--

131       (1854)

The Death of George Noble he fell from the stack of the ordnance Brass Gun foundry at the north East of the upper part of the Stack on the 9th day of June 1854 on friday and he died the 10th day of June on Satturday he was a Smart and good conductive young man may the lord Bless him and have mercy on his soul and he was rigger by profession and an English man by Birth and he leaves a wife and two Childness

The Death of Mrs Margaret Little a Sister to Mrs Esby Late Wife of Capt. W. Esby on the 20th day of July 1854 on Thursday

A Sade accident occurrdin washington Navy yard in the iron Foundry in Cassing a large Cylinder for the u. S. Steam Friget Fulton and through Some misfortune or Reastin it Exploded greadly for while althou by the assistance of Kind Providence Mr Bland Stuck to it and his men with great Silvance Commodore H Paulding and his Family was ther all the officers of the yard and there Family awas there thanks to the kind Providence above there was nobody hurt There Capt. J.S. Powell was there first Luant Joseph Lamman Sail master C.W. Morris and Major Williams From the navy yard gate Commanding of the Marines and the officers from Marine Barricks with the Marines all the master workman and quarterman were present and they Fought the Fire with great Courage and the differenc Fire Compys of all Classes of the Dis Columbia was there and assited to Exting the Fire there was about $80 thousand dollars of Government Property was Saved that day that including the pattern and Bouring Mill and it was on the 11th day of Aug. 1859 Friday

page 131

--131--

132       (1854)

The Second Effort was made to Cast a Cylinder for the U.S. steamer Frigit Fulton and it was a total Failor and the Hon J C Dobbin Secretary of the navy Said after that Failar it Should be cast in washington navy yard if he had to Send to Europe to get a man to do it . [One half line is crossed out] on the 12th September 1854 on Tuesday so the Cylinder for the U.S. Steamer Frigit Fulton was Casted by the Superintendence of Mr H Hunt Chief Engineur of the Washington navy yard and mr Bland and mr andrew lenord on the 7. day of october 1854 on a Saturday

The nebraska Bill the bill Passed the united states Senate on the 26th day of may 1854 on friday at 12 oClock at night and one Hundred Guns was fired as a Salute the 26th day of may 1854 on friday those Guns was Brass pieces 12 pounders Boat Howitzer and were cast in the washington navy yard under the instructions of Lieutenant J A Dahlgren

page 132

--132--

133       1855

BenJamin mcCathran78 got his hand Caught under one of the lines of the U S Steamer minaSota in the washington navy yard Between the lower Ship House and the new Block Shop the 9 Day of february 1855 on friday a Son of Mr James McCathran his age was 21 years and six months a Bricklayer by Trade and served his time apprenticeship under Mr. George Plant and died on friday morning at Three oclock the 23rd of february 1855

James Baker a Ship Carpenter a native of Baltimore Fell from the Starboard Side of the Steamer minaSota near the Starboard quarter about 30 feet on the 21 day of february 1853 on wensday in the Washington Navy yard

The first Stone That was Layed for the new Trip hammer by the orders of Captain W.P. Sanger and James Phillips Master mason in the washington navy yard on the 116th day of february on friday 1855

The house of the honorable Colonel Thomas H Benton Caught a fire on the 27th Day of february 1855 on Tuesday and it was ConSumed a Great many valuable papers and Books and it was so Cold that water would Freeze in the hose as fast as they Would pump it they Could have Saved more of the house only for the Scarcity of water.

They finiShed framing of the u S Steame frigate mineSota at the washington navy yard the Constructor S M Pook and mr edward foster and their Quarterman and the last after cant peice of wood was Shiped on the first day of February 1855 on Tuesday on the larboard Side

The death of Mr Robert Mills arChitect of the Public Buildings a native of South Carolina he died at washington the 3rd day of March 1855 on Satturday

page 133

--133--

134       1854

The Casting of a Cylinder of the u S Steamer minaSota by the order of Mr H hunt Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard And Mr W H Bland and andrew leonard quarterman Commodore H Paulding was present and Captain Thomas Petigru and first Lieutenant Joseph Lanman was present and Sailing master G morris and Mr A G Davis maSter Plumber and Mr Joseph Padgett over Seer of the yard Hands and a great many other Spectators and it was Cast HandSomely with out any accident the 3rd day of March 1855 on Satturday 79

The first Stone that was layed for Building of the new Trip hammer by the order of Captain W P Sanger Mr James Philips master mason the Eastward of the Iron Foundry Sitting north of The anchor and machine Shop the 2nd day of april 1855 on monday

Setting Down of the anvil Block by purchase that was Rigged by Sailing master C.W. morris and Mr George wilmoth Boatswain and under the Superintendence of the Captain W.P. Sangor and the Chief engineer Mr henry Hunt and M. George Wilson Foreman and Mr. Joseph Padgett over Seer of the yard hands the 4th day of april on Wensday 1855

First Commenced Laying of pipes for the Gas in the Washington navy yard under the Superintendance of Captain Sanger the Constructing Engineer the 4th day of april 1855 on monday

There was a Couple of gentleman came the washington Navy yard on the 7th day of april 1855 on Satturday With a qurk for a experiment he proceded South of the North West end of the new ordnance Shop then running north of the ordnance Shop Then turning east again north of the rocket Shop

page 134

--134--

135       1855

The new trip hammer was placed in it poSition on the 10th dayof april 1855 on tuesday and it was completed by a young man by the name of Coffee from Philadelphia on the 12 day of april 1855 on thursday

The Commenced Laying of the granite for the new Black Smith Shop on the 20th day of april 1855 on friday By the Constructor W P Sanger Cheif Engineer And James phillips master mason at the south West corner of the old Black Smith Shop

The first Bricks that was Layed for the new BlackSmith Shop by the orders of the Captain W. P. Sanger James phillips master mason the north west Corner of the old Black Smith Shop the 21th Day of april 1855 on thursday

The Staging gave way inside of the united States Steamer Minasota and no person was Seriously hurt thank the Lord on the 28th day of april 1855 on Satturday

Captain French Forrest Taken Command of the washington NavyYard on the 30th day of June 1855 on monday Captain H Paulding and his officers Received him Cordially With the naval Salute and Captain Paulding give up His commnand to him

The first Brick that was Layed for the Engine house that Sets north west of the Copper Rolling mill by order of the Constructor Captain W P Sanger and James phillips master maSon on the 6th day of august 1855 on monday

The Death of Commodore H E Ballard of the united States Navy on the 23rd of may 1855 on wenesday at his residence at annapolis md Bell field

page 135

--135--

136       1855

The united States Steamer frigute minaSota Propeller was Casted in the washington navy yard on the 19th day of october 1855 on Friday Commodore French Forrest was present Captain Thomas Pettigrew Lieutenant Joseph Lanman Lieutenant G B Balch Sailingmaster C E morris Chief Engineer Mr henry Hunt Mr W H Bland and mr A G David master Plumber and mr Andrew Lenord and mr Joseph Padgett and Different master workman

This was not the first Propeler That was Casted in The Washington navy yard But I was under The impression That It was the Largest one the only Consolation That it was Cast HandSomely and no accident

The u S Steam Frigate minasota Propeller was Shiped Before She was Launched on the 23rd day of November 1855 on friday and was unShiped before She was Launched on the 30th day of November 1855 on friday

The u S Steam frigate minaSota was Launched in the Washington navy yard on the first of December 1855 on Satturday The Honorable Brigadier General franklin Pierce President of the united States and the Honorable W S Marcy Secretary of State and the Honorable J C Dobbins Secretary of the navy And the Honorable Jefferson Davis Secretary of the Treasure an Those menand a great number of foreign miniSters Was Present

Com modore Frenc Forrest Commodore C mc Cauley Commodore Joseph Smith Commodore John H Aulick and Captain Joseph Lanman and Lieutenant Thomas J hunter and Lieutenant G Balch and Different officers of the navy was present

page 136

--136--

137       1855

I have Seen Several ships Launched of Diferent classes in the Washington navy yard and have always seen them set up the ship three times before launching The articles that Mr. Pook had was Battering Rams and they was So Powerful that the Ship needed no setting up the third time and it was a beautiful launch as ever I seen in all my life and there was great Preparations made on Board of the united States Steamer allegany for the reception of visitors on the North side of the Ship House the funniest of it was before the Ship was launched the Alleghany hung underneath one of the pile on her larboard side which was never bringing her on her beam end and there was nearly five hundred lady's and gentleman was on her at that time and there was a great Confusion among them for a little while there was a number of men sent on board of the alleghany by Captain Joseph Lanman to relieve the alleghany from the mud after righted her self the whole party was composed and on the opposite side of the alleghany and in the yard generally there was thousands of Spectators to view the launch of the united States Steam Frigate Minasota the united States Steamer Engineer Layed off and on the South side of the New Ship House with the President and his cabinet witnessing the launching of the united States Steam Frigate MinaSota The u S Steamer Engineer Was under the command of the Captain William S Lovell a Son in Law of Major General John R quitman. After the Launch of the minaSota the u S Steamer Engineer came along side of the wharf the south Side of the Ship House near to the Shears and Landed the President and his Cabinet the marines was ordered to the right into line under the command of Captain Robert TanSel and the Boon Rifleman to the left under the command of first lieutenant henry ober and three Splendid Rolls from the Drums and a handsome present of arms from the u S marines and the Boon Rifleman

page 137

--137--

138       1855

Then They proceeded to Commodore French Forrest80 quarters accompanied By the marine Band the President and his Cabinet and members of Congress and Senators and Representatives and officers of Different regiments all of them Partaken of a fine Dinner at the Commodores that day the Chief Constructor of the united States Navy Mr John Lenthal and Mr S m Pook the first Day of December 1855 on Satturday

There was a Little misunderstanding in putting the Ship on the Stocks And They had to Raise the ways Some two feet And a half aft and lower them forward and where She when out She Sprung Some of her Beams and Broke Some of her knees and Thank the kind providence that it was no worse on the first of December 1855 on Satturday

There was a Fine dinner furnished by the Government to the mechanics and Labours of all Classes in the mould Loft in the washington navy yard after the launch of the united States Steamer frigate minasota and they had a Plenty of to eat and they Conducted them Selves well as any Men as I have ever seen in all my life Commodore Forrest French And his officers Deserves the greatest Credit for preparing for the launching of the vessel and for warning all persons to keep out of danger and with the assistance of kind Providence every thing went off beautifully and handsomely on that day an not a soul was hurt and the mechanics that was selected by the Superintend the Dinner was from Different Departments The dinner was furnished by a man out side the navy yard and it was a splendid one And Those mechanics that that was Selected from Different Departments in the navy yard they acted as a committee and conducted the whole affair well in the first of December 1855 on Satturday

page 138

--138--

139       1855

And after the Dinner was over a parcil of Bread and meat An other eatables was Give to me and when I got out Side of the Navy yard and coming up Six Street and I had some on my Shoulder and the Some Grease was running all over my Clothes and I happened to stop for to rest my Self and then was a whole Company of Dogs following me I tried to Drive them Back and they Surrounded me and was about to take me prisoner

But I retreated to my Camp in the Yard in good order one of the U S Steamer minasota boilers was shipped on the 6th day of December 1855 on Tuesday by order of Captain Lanman and First Lieutenant Thomas T hunter and 2nd Lieutenant J D Balch And mr henry hunt Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard and mr Joseph Padgett over Seer of the yard hands

The united States Steamer minasota was hauled along side of the Wharf after her launch the 2nd day of December 1855 on Sunday by orders of Commodore French Forrest and Captain Joseph Lanman and first Lieutenant Thomas t hunter and 2nd Lieutenant J.B. Balch and Mr Joseph M Padgett Over Seer of the yard hands

The first Bricks that was laid for the Shop for the Trip hammer in washington navy yard by orders of Captain W.P. Sanger Civil Engineer and James phillips master mason the 30th day of May 1855 on wensday

The first StoinggerS that was raiSed in the new Black Smith Shop by Mr B.B. Curran master Joiner and Mr Louis mareon quaterman and Rober Teacham quatermen The 31th day of may 1855 on Thursday

The arrival of the united States Light house Cutter at Washington navy yard on the 30th day of may 1855 on wensday

page 139

--139--

140       1855

The Death of Brigadier General Brashaw formly he belong to the united States army and at one time Commanding officrs at fort Monroe He died on the 18th day of may 1855 on friday at Saint Louis

The death of Lieutenant Colonel Samuel miller of the u S Marine Corps he died in Command of the Philadelphia Station the 9th day of December 1855 on Sunday He was great soldier as ever lived for the 24th day of August 1814 on Wednesday I seen him with my own eyes marching to Blades Barge [Bladensburg MD] to meet the enemy like a man and he got wounded and may the Lord Bless him and I hope that his soul is at rest in Heaven for he died with the honour of his Country

The Death of Commodore Charles [illegible] of the united States navy at washington DC on the 24th day of January 1

The Death of mary ann McperSon the 24th day of January 1855 on Satturday and she was a aunt of the first wife of major calkins of the U S marine corp and SHe was a well Disposed Lady in the Principal and respecability may the Lord Bless her

The Death of Major martin vanburen Jr of the u S army the 20th of march 1855 on Tuesday he died in Paris

The Sword of the Honorable major General andrew Jackson was presented to the united States houses of Congress the Senate and the house of reperesentatives The Battle of new orleans the 8th day of January 1815

page 140

--140--

141       1855

on the 19th day of December 1854 on wensday the old veteran offiicers of the war of 1812 from the State of new hampShire Paid a visit to the washington navy yard and was escorted to the yard by the united States marines and the marine Band under the Command of Captain Tan Sel and other young officers of the marine Corps And was Conducted through the Diferent Departments in the yard and then they were escorted to the Commodores quarters by Commodore French Forrest and Captain Joseph Lanman and first Lieutenant Thomas Y Hunter and then was entertained there with the utmost respect and then they Left the Navy yard Captain John A Dahlgren give them a Beautiful Salute by orders of Commodore French Forrest

The Launching of the united States Steam frigate Roanoke at the Gosport [Norfolk] navy yard the 13th day of December 1855 on Thursday I am sorry to say that she met with a serious accident in Launching of her she had such a Sudden Jar that She filled with water soon after She Was Launched

page 141

--141--

142       1856

The arrival of the united States Steamer fulton With her officers and crew at the washington navy yard on the 30th of June 1856 on monday

The arrival of the united States mail Steamer in front of the united States arsenal at washington DC on the 24th day of July 1856 on Thursday and laid There until the 27th day of July 1856 on Sunday And then She Left for new york

page 142

--142--

143       1856

The Death of a young man by the name of JackSon mcCoy A Watchman in the Washington navy yard on board the u S Steam frigate minaSota he fell from the after olive[?] Deck off a Beam head foremast Down in the Kelson about four oClock in the morning the 16th day of January 1856 on monday And died the 19th of January 1856 on Satturday An buried the 20th day of January 1856 on Sunday and the Death of Commodore Charles morris of the united States navy in washington the 27th Day of January 1856 on Sunday

A fire Broke out in the Tank Shops in the washington Navy Yard on the 7th day of February 1856 on Thursday about half past seven o'clock in the morning it was discovered by the watchman by the Name of Lewis the anacotia fire company was There and Exercised all the energy in extinguishing the fire the Columbia Fire Company was present and the PerSeverance fire company was Present and all So the american fire company was present

Commodore French Forrest was present and Captain Joseph Lanman and first Lieutenant Thomas J hunter and 2nd Lieutenant G.B. Balch and Dr Edwards was present And master workman and the quarterman of the yard and the mechanics and Laborers of all classes was present and worked with vigor in trying to extinguish the fire on the 7th day of February 1856 on Thursday.

Com modore French Forrest after the fire was out Gave all the mechanics a half of the day to change their Clothes and dry them Selves on the 7th day of February 1856 on Thursday

Washington navy yard april the 11th on friday 1856 The united sSates Iron Steamer allegany was hauled up on the new marine Railway in fine Style it was the first vessel in that improvement And I under Stand that She is to be the fitted out for a receiving Ship Com modore French Forrest and Captain Joseph Lanman

page 143

--143--

144       1856

And first Lieutenant J hunter and 2nd Lieutenant G. B. Balch And Captain Sango and constructor Mr Pook and the Boatswain Mr Brooks and Mr foster and Mr Joseph Padgett over Seer of the yard hands All was present on that day to take active part in hauling the Ship on the Railway the Beauty of it the trucks of the Cradle was Greesed With marShal music which made the alleghany Ride the Storm Sweetly on the 11th day of april 1856 on friday

The Base Split of the united States Steamer frigat minaSota Was Shiped at washington navy yard the 18th day of april 1856 on wensday Captain Sango Lieut Lanman and first Lieutenant G.B. Balch and the Boatswain was present

The Rudder was Shiped on the united States Steam Frigate minaSota on the 4th Day of april 1856 on friday

A watchman by the name of Thomas Rigsby fell Down the hatchway of the u S Steamer minaSota forward of the Steerage of the Birth Deck and aft of the Ships pumps on Satturday night Between 12 and one oClock on the 29 day of march

The Arrival of the united States Steamer Dispatch at the washington navy yard on the 9th day of april 1856 on wensday

Shiping of the u S Steam frigate minaSota Foremast and Her TouSSel Tree on the 19th day of april 1856 on monday Commodore French Forrest and Capt Joseph Lanman first Lieutenant J hunter 2nd Lieutnant Balch and Constructor mr Pook and assitant Builder mr E foster and Mr Brooks BoatSwain and Mr Joseph Padget over Seer of the yard hand wase present

page 144

--144--

145       1856

The u S Steam frigate minaSota Propeler Shiped in its Proper Position on the 28th day of april on monday 1856

on the 29th day of april 1856 on Tuesday it was tryed with a Jack Screw and made Two or Three Revolutions

The united States Steam frigate mainaSota main mast Was Shiped the 30th day of april on wensday 1856

The Cross Tree and Trussel Tree was put over the head of the main mast on the 2thday of may 1856 on friday Commodore French Forrest and Captain Lanman and first Lieutenant J Hunter and 2nd Lieutenant Balch And Mr Pook the Constructor and Mr Brooks the Boatswain and Mr Edward foster and Mr Joseph Padgett was present

The Starting of the Propeler of the u S Steam frigate mainaSota by Steam on the 2th day of may 1856 on friday by the Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard Mr henry Hunt And Mr michael Bright quarterman and Mr George Cunningham and Mr Benson mckenny quarterman and the Propeler and machinery Worked handSomly

Lauching of the u S Steamer alleghany off the new marineway on the 2rd day of may 1856 on friday and Two men natives of ireland Was thrown from the Cap Stand and was Severely hurt

The mizen mast of the u S Steamer minaSota was put on Board the 6th day of may 1856 on tuesday

and then it was Stoped on the 7th day of may 1856 on wensday

The Death James Barry a Son of Francis Barry Senior he died in washington on the 19th day of June 1856 on Thursday

page 145

--145--

146       1856

The arrival of the u S Steamer water witch at the washington navy yard under the command of Captain Page the 8th Day of may 1856 on Thursday

The Honorable J C Dobbins the Secretary of the navy visited the washington navy yard and Commodore Joeseph Smith And The Chief Engineer mr martin and they was received by Com modore French Forrest and his officers on the 9th Day of may 1856 on friday and he was escorted on Board of the u S Steam frigate MinaSota for the purpose of see in the machinery work on that day

on the 10th day of may 1856 on Satturday the machinery worked the whole day out and was Superintended by the Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard Mr herny hunt

A Nail Cutting machine was Recommended by Mr henry Hunt Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard and Mr Matthew Mcnally and it was approved of by the Department and Commodore French Forrest and his officers and it was tryed on the new Copper Rolling mill and it Proved to be good on the 9th day of may 1856 on friday

They commenced putting the first Standing Riggin on the u S Steam Frigate minasota over her formast the Bolsters on first and then Pennant on the 21th day of may 1856 on wensday

The united State Steamer alleghany was towed away by the u S Steamer Engineer under the Command of Captain Page to Baltimore for to releive the receiving Ship untario [Ontario] on the 26th day of may 1856 on Satturday

All the u S Steam frigate minaSota Spars was made at the washington navy yard by the master Spar maker mr Joseph Lane and I beleive Not a hairs Breath of Being out of way in Propotion and I Believe Was approved of by the Department and mr John Lenthal the Constructor And Mr Pook

page 146

--146--

147       1856

The Last two days Trial of the u S Steam frigate minaSota Machinery on the 10th day of July 1856 on ThurS day

And onthe 11 day of July 1856 on friday and Worked as well as any machinery as I ever saw in my Life Commodore French Forrest and Captain Joseph Lanman And Chief Clerk of the Department and first Lieutenant Johnston and 2nd Lieutenant G.B. Balch adn Chief Enginner of the washington navy yard Mr Henry Hunt and Clerks of the Diferent Departments

And I Believe there was upwards of five hundred Ladys and Gentleman come to visit the united States Steamer minaSota at the washington navy yard on WenSday the 23rd of July 1856

The united States Steam frigate minaSota Built in Washington Navy Yard Embarked for philadelphia on the 28th day of July on Monday 1856 and got a ground on the same day South West of the navy yard and they had one or two of these Small Tug Boats assiting in Trying to get her off and they got her off on Tuesday the 29th of July 1856 And then Taken her in front of the u S arsenal and She Stayed there until the 31thof July on Thursday 1856 and then they Taken her to alexandria and then She moved from there on the first day of august 1856 on friday for Her destination under the command of Captain Engraham and aCompanyed by the u S Steamer Engineer

The arrival of the united States Steamer frigate minaSota at the Philadlphia navy yard on the 4th day of august 1856 on monday under the command of Captain Engraham and his officers It is no manner of use in Saying which is the Best of those Six large war Steamers Because the Sea will Prove the mechanic Fare well minaSota that was built in the washington navy yard I hope that all Six of them may turn out well But I have A Particular Reference to the minaSota Because She was Built

page 147

--147--

148       1856

Right under our eyes it iS not the least doubt But what She Will Roll a Little But it will not be for want of Beamings for She has Beautiful Beamings as any Ship as I ever Seen in my life come a running from any Ports of the word with your Meddies or your Drafts for Mr John Linthal the Chief Constructor of the Navy Department is hard to Beat and mr Pook the constructor and there is another Little man by the name of Mr Edward foster

The 2nd vessel that was hauled up on the marine railway at the Washington navy yard was the united States Steamer water witch on the 4th day of august on monday Commodore Frenc Forrest and Captain Joseph Lanman and first Lieutenant Johnson and 2nd Lieutenant G.B. Balch and Constuctor Mr S M Pook and assistant Builder Edward foster and Capt Sango Civil Engineer and Boatswain Mr Smith and Joseph Padgett over Seer of the yard hands was present

on the 15th day of august 1856 on friday Commodore Lavalette Taken Command of the washington navy yard and he was Received Cordially by Commodore French Forrest an his officers And the master work man

the 2nd vessel That was Launched off the new marine railway at the Washington navy yard was the united States Steamer water witch on the 25th day of September 1856 on Thursday and in Launching The vessel She Suddenly give a Surge and There was a man close by the CapStand by the name of LanSley Breast and the Bars flew out of the Cap Stand and he had Both of his Legs fractured

The arrival of the united States Sloop of war Plymouth At the washington navy yard under the Command of Lieutenant Wymond

The 4th day of october 1856 on Tuesday And on the 4th day of october 1856 on Satturday her Crew was Transfered

page 148

--148--

149       1856

The third vessel That was hauled up to the new marine Railway was the Steam mud machine on the 21th day of october 1856 on Tuesday

And She was launched on the 28th day of november 1856

on friday

And She was hauled up on the 29th day of november 1856

on Satturday

The first Commenced working of the new BlackSmith Shop that was Constructed by Captain william S Sango Civil Engineer At the washington navy yard onthe 26th day of november 1856 on monday and every operation of it proceed Succesfull Captain william Sango Present and Mr James Tucker master Black Smith And Mr John Tucker quarterman Present

The United States houses of Congress Senate and house of Representatives assembled their Selves To gether on the 3rd of December 1856 on monday and Elected a Speaker to the house of Representatives until the 2nd day of febuary 1856 on Satturday it was never know Since it has Been the united States for the house of Representatives to be that Long with a Speaker at Last the Task involved on the Honorable nathan P Banks from massachusesetts

Accident occured at the Honorable major General Lewis Cass Senator of the united States he fell from the east end of the Patent office at Washington DC on the 8th day of february 1856 on friday

The united State houses of the Senate and house of Represenatives adjourned on the firs of august 1856 on monday and they was Called To gether again on the 21st oay of august 1856 on Thursday and They was Called Together by the Honorable Brigadier General Franklin Piercce president of the united States And the Reason they was called Back they had left the most important Business unfinished that was to appropriate money for the army which was Done the 30th day of augist 1856 on Satturday and then Congress adjourned

page 149

--149--

150       1856

The Death of Honorable John M Clatyton Senator of the united States He died at his residence in the State of Delaware on the 8th day of November on Sunday may the Lord Bless him

The Death of the major General J. A Edin at his Residence in Washington DC on the 17th day of November 1856 on monday May the Lord Bless him and I hope that his Soul is at rest

There was a great enthusiam Prevailed inthe united States of America amongst all Classes of People in regards to the Three Candidates that was in the field for President The Honorable James Buchanan and the Honorable Millard Filmore and the Honorable J C Fremont the 4th day of November 1856 on Tuesday

There was a grand Democrat Procession in the City of washington on the 27th day November 1856 on Thursday

The Death of Commodore Bladen Delaney of the united States navy in washington DC on the 26th day of December 1856 on friday He was the Son of the old Colonel Delaney and which I beleive Was an officer under General Washington may the Lord Bless him

TheLaunching of the mud machine off the new marine Railway The first of December 1856 on monday

The Death of Captain william Williams at his Post in the Washington navy yard on the 26th Day of September 1856 on friday He Belonged to the unites States marine Corps

page 150

--150--

151       1857

The Death of Honorable Lieutenant Colonel Preston S Brooks A member of Congress from South Carolina he died at Browns Hotel in washington DC on the 17th day of January 1857 on Thursday

A man by the name James BranSon fell from the Rafter of the South gable end of the forge Shop the 9th day of January 1857 on friday

on the 17th day of January 1857 on Satturday it commenced Snowing It Snowed all day the 18th of January 1857 on Sunday And it Snowed without intermission until the 19th day of January 1857 on Monday and it was cold as I ever felt it in my life In some places I Suppose in Diferent parts of the Country it drifted upwards of 30 feet in Washington City in the valleys and the ditches it drifted about 10 and 12 feet81

page 151

--151--

152       1857

A Fire taken Place in the national Theatre in waShington D C and Burnt Down on the 6th day of February 1857 on friday.

On the 8th day of february 1857 on Sunday the Long Bridge was Carried Away

And on the 9th day of february 1857 on monday the ice was piled up in front of Geesboro upwards of Ten feet Then we had another Freeze and the Potomac and the Eastern Branch was Closed up again on the 14th of february 1857 on friday And She broke up again on Satturday. Gentleman here is Something that I have never Seen about here Before as Ccold as it had Been I Seen with my own eyes the 2nd day of February 1857 on Monday a getting Ice at the north gable End of the Ship house in the Washington navy yard the Ice was eighteen or nineteen inches Thick

They Commenced hauling the u S Steam frigate fulton up on the new marine railway at the washington navy yard on the 7th day of february 1857 on Satturday

Commodore E.A. F. Lavalette Present Capt C.C. Turner first Lieutenant JohnSon Captain W. P. Sango and Lieutenant G. Balch Mr. John Rainbow Carpenter Boatswain Mr george Smith and Mr Pook the Constructor and Mr Edward foster and Mr Joseph Padgett OverSeer of the yard hands was present and Mr. A. G. Davis men present And Mr James philips men was present

Then She was Stoped half way in the Dock Because the Shackle Broke that was Connected to the Cradle then She remained There Then They Taken a great Deal of Coal and iron out of her so as to lighten her up Then they commenced heaving on her The 29th Day of february 1857 on wensday and They Still continued Heaving on her until the 26th Day of february 1857 on Thursday and on the Same day She was hauled up nearly Two Blocks under the Command of Capt Turner

page 152

--152--

153       1857

on the 28th day of february on Satturday 1857 a Sad affair occurred Between two Gentleman in the united States pension office at Washington and the names of the Gentleman was Colonel Lee from Loudon county va. and the other Mr. Hume from alexandria va and it Appears that those Gentleman was at the Presidents on friday night the 27th of february 1857 and Some Difficulty occurred between those Two Gentleman and which it appears on Satturday Mr Hume Called at the pension office where Colonel Lee was and it appears that they come to harsh words with each other then from that to Blows and it ended by Colonel Lee Shooting Mr Hume killing him instantly

The United States Steamer water witch left the washington navy Yard on the 17th day of february 1857 on tuesday under the Command of Capt Lovel

page 153

--153--

154       1857

A Fire Taken Place in the alms house in washington DC and Burnt Down on the 2nd of March 1857 on monday

The honorable James Buchanan Taken his Seat on the fourth of March 1857 on wensday President of the united States and it was Beautiful Clear day and on that Day there was upward of fifteen hundred muSkets out including four Companies of u S Marines under the Command of major Tenett and Capt TanSel Lieutenant Jones Lieutenant Nichelson Lieutenant Reed and the u S flying artillery under the Command of Captain French from Fort mchenry State of maryland and Thousands of People from diferent Sections of the country was here that Day the whole military command Was here under the command of the honorable major General John A quitman of mississippi and they had a great Procession on that day and the groomsman that led the horses that was attached to the cars in the possession was William Key Enoch Simms Joseph Davis William Butler Ceeser Skinner Charles Snowden Selvy Reddin and John Carroll on the 4th of march 1857 on wensday

A Sad accident occurred at the washington navy yard a Labour by the name of oconnel a native of ireland had his leg fracture on the 27th of march 1857 on friday

A Labour by the name of Fenwick in Mr Padgett Gang fell from the Eves of the old ordnance Shop on the 30th day of march 1857 on monday

page 154

--154--

155       1857

Launch of the united States Steamer fulton off the new marine railway on the 5th day of april 1859 on wensday

But in Launching of her She Stoped half way of the Dock and the Constructor Mr S Pook and Mr Edward foster and the Commanding officers of the yard Tryed There Best get her off But She Still reamined in that Position until friday the 10th day of april 1857

The first Stone that was layed for the New Shell house in the washington navy yard by the the order of Captain william Sango Civil Engineer and Mr philipps master mason on the 20th day of may 1857 on Thursday

The honorable Secretary of the Navy Mr Toucy visited the Washington navy yard on the 30th of may 1857 on Satturady And was received by Commodore Lavalette and his officers

The arrival of the united States Steamer water witch at the Washington navy yard With a draft of 70 odd men for the united states Sloop of war plymouth the 11th day of June 1857 on Satturday

The u S Steamer Engineer Left the washington navy yard on the 13th day of June 1857 on Satturday

The honorable Secretary of the navy Mr Toucey visited the washington navy yard the 2nd time on the 23rd day of June 1857 on Tuesday and was Received by Commodore Lavalette and his officer and then was Escorted on Board of the u S Sloop of war Plymouth under the Command of Captain John A Dalhgren and his officers and they fired a Salute and Maned the yard

the united States Sloop of war plymouth Left The Washington navy yard on the 25th day of June in Thursday under the Command of Captain John A Dalhgren and was towed out by a Little Tug Boat then She was taken in Tow by the united States Steamer fulton and towed Down the mouth of the River

page 155

--155--

156       1857

The first Starting of the new Engine of the new machine Shop at the Washington navy yard on the 20th day of June 1857 on Satturday by the Superintendance of the Chief Engineer Mr henry hunt and Mr Edward Bright

The Great hail Storm in washington DC the Commencement of the Storm was Clouds raised at the South west and more off to the North west abd and every Shewed Lighening

and Looking at apparently i did not look as it was going tot he be anything But turn in on the 21th day of June 1857 on Sunday and it was the Largest hail That I ever Saw in my life and it fell with out intermission For about fifteen minutes

The first day of June on monday 1857 the Election taken Place in Washington city and there was a great excitement among the People at different precincts. There was about fifteen or twenty men gone from Baltimore in time of the election was going on. And cull them Selves plug uglys82 and they went to the poles and interfered with the Election and raised such a excitement that the mayor and the whole of the police force could not sop them and they was forced to call on the president of the united States and the Secretary of the navy for aid of the u S marines for to preserve the peace and the Secretary of the navy the honorable Mr Toucy issued an order to Brigadier General archibald henderson a commander of the marine forces and The marines was ordered to get ready and there was about one hundred and ten in number and was Commanded by Captain henry B tyler and Brevet captain william R Maddox and acting adjutant Lieutenant Charles henderson and they marched them to City hall and reported to the mayor And in the mean Time they Was formed in line there was stones throwned At them and Pistols fired at Them and one of the marines was shot in the face and severely wounded and it was supposed that the marines fired Through a mistake of order and there was Several People killed And wounded

page 156

--156--

157       1857

The united States Steam frigate minaSota Sailed from Gosport navy yard under the Command of Captain Dupont Detined for the East indies and China Seas and on the 2nd day of July 1857 on Thursday

The united States Sloop of war plymouth Sailed froom Gosport navy yard under the Command of Captain J. A. Dalhgren and first Lieutenant Gatsby Jones on the 2nd day July 1857 on friday

The Death of the honorable william L. marcy ExSecretary of the State he Died on the 4th of July 1857 on Satturday He died in new york

on the 20th day of july 1857 on monday Mr. Henry hunt Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard put the new engine and the whole of the Machinery in operation in the new machiner Shop

died in washington DC adjutant Park howell of the u S marine Corp on the 24th day of July 1857 on Thursday

The first Brick that was Layed for the office of the Clerk of the Yard the 24th day of July 1857 on friday

The first piles that was drove for the extension of the East wall at Washington navy yard on the 23rd of July 1857 on Thursday

ExcurSion Taken Place from washington navy yard on Board of the u S Steamer water witch with the honorable Secretary of the State Navy Mr ISaac Toucy and all the Cabinet as far as indian head Down the potomac on the 25th day of July 1857 on Satturday

page 157

--157--

157       1857

The first Bricks that was Layed for the Shell house the 3rd day of august 1857 on monday

The Death of the honorable Secretary of the Navy J.C. dobbin the 4th day of August 1857 on Tuesday he died at his residence in north Carolina

The removing of the old oakum Loft from the South Corner of the new marine Railway by the orders of Captain W.P. Sango on the 12th day of august 1857 on wensday and Superintended by Mr Joseph Padgett overSeer of the yard hands and they was one week removing it and Was removed to the South East Corner of the ordnance Shop

The atlantic telegraph Cable was laid Between the Two Governments The united States and great Britan as far as my memory goes it parted on the 11th day of august 1857 on Tuesday

Died in washington DC Commodore Thomas Newton of the unitedStates navy on the 28th day of august 1859 friday

The Death of Com modore Steven Cassel he died at his residence in Geogetown DC on the 29th of august 1857 on Satturday

The first Starting of the new Engine No 2 in the washington navy yard in the new Boiler Shop on the 5th day of September 1857 on Satturday

The first Stone that was laid for the Extension of the East wall at the Washington navy yard onhte 7th day of September 1857 on monday

The Starting of number two Engine for good and making of the Bell Boats And all the Boiler Shop machinery at the washington navy yard on the 24th day of September 1857 on Thursday and all the machinery Worked handsomely

page 157.1

--[157.1]--

158       1857

The first Bricks that was Laid for the ExtenSion of the East Wall At the washington navy yard on the 30th day September 1857 on wensday

The united States Steamer fulton Sailed from washington navy yard under the Command of Captain almer on the 10th day of october 1857 on Wensday

The first stone was laid for a large ice house in washington navy yard by the orders of Captain W. P. Sanger on the 14th day of October 1857 on wensday and the Brick caved in an caught two Labours and one was a native of germany and the other of ireland

The first keel that was laid for those Bell Boats83 was Built in the washington navy yard on the 23rd day of october 1857 on friday by the orders of Captain W.P. Sango Civil Engineer and Mr Edward Bright Chief Engineer of the washington navy yard and Mr Thomas Champion master Boiler Maker and Mr John Smith quarteramn

The arrival of the united States Sloop of war plymouth in front of the u S Arsenal at Wshington under the Command of Captain J. A. Dalhgren With her Sails Crowded and firing a Salute at the Same Time on the 18th day of novemebr 1857 on wensday and no the leastr Doubt That being as the Channel is narrow She got off Track And She got a ground

And She never got up to the navy yard until the 21st day of november 1857 on Satturday and Commodore Joseph Smith Chief of the yards and Docks Come up in her and Captain ingraham Bureau of ordnance When I Seen her coming up and her Sails Crouded And firing a Salute my whole Sould was filled with Joy to See her Come up so pretty and when I heard tha she was a ground my Feather fell on the 30th day of may 1857 on monday the united States frigate Potoma c under the Command of Commodore John Downs and first Lieutenant Shubrick CroSSed that bar with all of he rguns Except five Cannonade 2 pounder of the Spar Deckguns

page 158

--158--

159       1857

on the 19th day of november 1857 on Thursday while hoisting a iron rafter For the Shell house in washington navy yard James Buckly Labour Got his leg Broken and Captain W. S. Sango and Mr Joseph Padgette Was present when it happened

The uper Part of the Eastern Branch was frozen over Clear a Cross on the 23rd of november 1857 on monday

The 24th day of november 1857 on Tuesday day froze a Cross

The 25th day of november 1857 on wensday day froze a Cross

The 26th day of november 1857 on Thursday day froze a Cross

The honorable Brigadier General Franklin Pierce Expresident of the united States and his Lady passed Through Baltimore Enroute For norfolk and hwas treated with the highest Respect by the People in Baltimore on the 30th day of november 1857 on monday and I was Highly Delighted when I heard the Expresident andhis Lady met Such a great reception

Lauching of the mud machine off the new marine Railway on the first of December 1857 on Tuesday

The members of Congress held a Caucus in the new house of Represenatives on the 5th day of December 1857 on Satturday

And the first Setting of Congress inthe the new house of Represenatives on the 7th day of December on monday 1857

The Sailing of the u S Steam frigate Powhatan from hamton Roads on the 10th day of December 1857 on Thursday and had on Board the Honorable Brigadier General franklin Pierce Expresident and his Lady And I hope the General and his Lady may return Safe to the united States again

page 159

--159--

160       1857

The Surrender of major General walker commander in Chief of the Fillibuster army Surrendered him Self and his forces to Commodore Hiram Paulding who waS in command of the home Squadron at Niguruiga on tuesday the 8th day of December 1857 and it is a Great Blessing that he fell in the hands of Commodore Paulding. Although great many People think he committed a error But I believe now the people of this country that are well Wishers of their fellow men believe that it was a great piece of Charity restored on General walker and his men by Commodore Paulding arresting him

I am in hopes that the people of this country Will appreciate Commodore Paulding proceedings and all such men like him that will look out for the honour of their Country and the wellfare of the People as General walker fell into the hands of Commodore Paulding Rather then for him to fall into the hands of great Britain or any other nation for when General walker was there before they Suffered misery and Death and God knows what would Be the fate this time if any Surrendering to be Done let it to your own country When a man has violated his laws with or on his responsibility let him Submit to his law like a man84

Snowed on the 25th day of December 1857 on friday

Snowed on the 26th day of December 1857 on Satturday

page 160

--160--

161       1858

A visit to the washington navy yard by Diferent Tribes of indians on the 27th day of January 1858 on wensday They were escorted to the marine Barracks And there they was engaged in their former way of Dancing Something Similar To a Spanish Fandango Sometime their Clothes on and Sometimes off

The first Pile that waS Drove for the new iron Timber Shed in the washington navy yard on the 28th Day of January 1858 on Thursday by the instructions of Captain W. P. Sango Civil Engineer

The first Cylinder that was CaSted for the new marine railway in Washington navy yard on the 29th day of January 1858 on friday by the instructions of Mr Hoffnagle maSter moulder and Mr andrew Lenord Quarterman

page 161

--161--

162       1858

The Death of Mr Philip otterbach Senior85 in washington DC on the 6th day of February 1858 on Thursday after a long Spell of Sickness and for my Self Michael Shiner I have know Mr. Otterbach ever Since I was a boy and for those last years I have Had considerable dealing with him and I always Found him to be a perfect Gentleman

The new Code of laws in the District of Columbia Was voted Down on the 17th Day of february 1858 on monday

Captain Turner had Snow piled up in the Washington Navy Yard for to Commence filling the ice house for There was a great appearance of a ScarSity ice on the 15th day of february 1858 on monday

They Commenced filling the ice house with Snow on the 16th day of february 1858 on tuesday and by order of Commodore Lavallette and Captain Tierney and Mr Joseph Padgett overSeer of the yard hands and the remainder of the officers of the yard the ice house waS nearly filled86

The raising of the Statute of the honorable major General George WaShington At Richmond The Capitol of virginia on the 23nd of february 1858 on monday

The Death of Commodore matthew C Perry he died in new york on The 5th day of march 1858 on friday

page 162

--162--

163       1858

The last Ice That was put in Ice house in the washington navy yard on the 6th day of march on Satturday

The first iron That was worked by the Long hammer in the new forge Shop in the washington navy yard on the 15th day of march 1858 on monday Mr James Tucker master Black Smith of the washington navy yard with Mr James Tucker quarterman and it forged reasonably well

A visit was paid to the washington navy yard by admiral Pacha of Turky and his officers on the 19th day of march 1858 on friday And was Escorted Commodore Lavalette and Captain C.C. Turner and Captain J.A. Dalhgreen and [line crossed out] Lieut Patterson and various other gentleman

The first Bell Boats That was hauled of the Boiler Shop in the Washington navy yard bt Superintendence of Mr Joseph Padgett master Labour on the 19th day of march 1858 on friday

The first pile that was drove for the addition of the Boiler Room in the washington navy yard by the order of Captain W.P. Sango Civil Engineer and mr Padgett overSeer of the yard hands on the 29th day of march 1858 on monday

Page 163

--163--

164       1858

The first Commencement of Calling of the Roll in The new Roll office in the waShington navy yard by Richard Barry on the East part of The Building and Mr Hilbron on the north Side of The Building on the first day of april 1858 on Thursday.

The Death of the Honorable Colonel Thomas Benton in waShington DC He died on the 10th day of april 1858 on Satturday and he was a a fine Heart and Candid man and Left many friends to mourn his Loss

The Second piles That was Drove for the addition to [line illegible] the new marine Railway in the waShington navy yard by the orders of Captain W.P. Sango Civil Engineer and Mr Joseph Padgett overSeer of the yard hands on the 19th day of april 1858 monday

Page 164

--164--

165       1858

Hauling of the united States Steamer water witch on the new marine railway at washington navy yard on the 6th Day of may 1858 on Thursday

And on the 8th day of may 1858 on Satturday They hauled her Within ten feet of her foremast Touching the Ship house

There was a visit Paid to washington navy yard By Sir Lord Napier and The British Secretary of Legations and was received Cordially by Commodore Lavalette and his officers on The 8th day of may 1858 on Satturday

The Presentation of a Silver Pitcher and Goblet to Commodore Lavalette by the master workman and mechanics of the washington Navy yard on the 12th day of may on wensday

Commodore J. Rudd Taken command of the washington navy yard on the 15th day of may 1858 on Satturday

The u S Steamer water witch arrived at the washington navy yard on the 26th day of may 1858 on wensday under the command of Captain J. Rodgers by a Special order of the Department and Commenced to unloading her

And on the 27th day of may 1858 on Thursday She was DiSpatched For the Gulf of mexico in Search of the inglish man of war Stykes

The united States Sloop of war plymouth Left washington navy yard under Command of Captain J. A. dalhgren and first Lieutenant Cateby Jones on the 29th day of may 1858 on Satturday

Page 165

--165--

166       1858

The Cylinder of the Hyerodaolic waS placed in its poSition in the upper Ship house in the washington navy yard For hauling up vessels on on the 26th day of June 1858 on Satturday by Mr henry hunt Chief Engineer of the washington Navy yard and Mr. M. E. Bright quarterman

A young man by the name of inlafer Belonging to the united States marine Corps accidently got Drowned whilst Batheing in the waShington navy yard on the 26th day of June 1858 on Satturday

The Execution of the young man Powers In washington City DC on the 26th day of June 1858 on Satturday

The united States revenue Cutter harriet Lane arrived in front of the united States arSnal at washington on the 12th day of July 1858 on monday Captain John Fouce f 1-Lieut F Bearu 2 Lieut H Cowley

The Laying of the first Stone for the new anchor Shop in the washington navy yard by the order of Captain W. P. Sango Civil Engineer Mr James Philipps Master mason on the 12th day of July 1858 monday

The united States Steamer artic [Artic?-not a Navy ship according to DANFS] arrived at washington Navy yard on the 24th day of July 1858 on Satturday

page 166

--166--

167       1858

The first vessel that was hauled up by that hierodrolic Power In washington navy yard waS the united States Steamer water witch on the 19th of august on wensday

The u S mail Steamer Central america was Lost on her way from California to new york on the 12th day of august 1858 on wensday

Commenced Launching the united States Steamer water witch on the 24th day of august 1858 on wensday

And finshed Launching of the united States Steamer water Witch on the 25th day of august 1858 on Thursday

page 167

--167--

168       1858

The Lost of The mail Steamer austoia on the High Seas by fire on the 13th day of September 1858 on monday

When I first Discovered the Comet it was between North West and North East until then it enlarged and work its Way South on the 13th day of September 1858 on monday87 The united States Steamer water witch Left washington navy yard on the 21th day of September 1858 on Tuesday

The united States Steamer fulton Left washington navy yard on the 22th day of September 1858 on wensday

The first Bricks That was Layed for the Extension of the naval Store at washington navy yard by the order of Captain W. P. Sango Civil Engineer Mr James Philipps master Mason on the 28th day of September 1858 on TueSday

The first Bricks that was laid for the new anchor Shop in the Washington navy yard by the orders of Captain W. P. Sango Mr James Philipps master mason on the 27th day of october 1858 on wensday

page 168

--168--

169       1858

The arrival of the united States Sloop of war Plymouth at Washington under the Command of Captain J. A. Dalhgren the 8th day of December 1858 on wensday and in coming up to the navy yard She got a ground Below the old Sugar House and there She remained

The united States Sloop of war plymouth was got off on the 9th day of December 1858 on Thursday and arrived at the Navy yard

The arrival of the united States Steamer Dispatch at the washington navy yard on the 26th day of December 1858 on Sunday

The united States Sloop of war Plymouth Left the washington navy yardunder the Command of Lieutenant murray of ordnance on the 28th dayof December 1858 on tuesday And was towed out by the united States Steamer Dispatch

And she never got off until the 29th day of December 1858 on wensday

if They had of minded what that lad of a Boy Said they Would not run aground I am not pretending to Dictate But I think it would Be wise for the Goverment to Employ Some of the young men That was raised about those wharfs for pilots in they know every inch of the Channel

Page 169

--169--

170       1858

Died at washington at His Residence at the marine Barracks Brigadier General archibal henderson in Command of the united States marine CorpS the 6th day of January 1859 on Thurday

The Death of Mrs ann marie Careno henderson The wife of the late Brigadier General henderson She died on the 18th day of January 1859 on tuesday

The Death of Mr Philipp Barton Key States attorney of the District of Columbia on the 27th day of february 1859 on Sunday

The Death of Honorable Aron Brown Postmaster General he died in Washington DC on the 8th day of march 1859 on tuesday

The honorable Aron Brown Postmaster General was Buried on the 10th day of march 1859 on Thursday and orders come Down from the Department to washington navy yard to Commodore John Rudd on the 9th day of march 1859 on wensday that the Day he was to Buried The mechanics and Labours Should come In and anSwer Their muster and walk out of the yard

The united States Steamer artic Lef washington navy yard on the 10th day of march 1859 on Thursday

Commodore John Rudd Left washington navy yard on the 3rd of april 1859 on Sunday

page 170

--170--

171       1859

A Fire Takein Place in the north west part of washington navy yard in the Boiler room on the first day of may 1859 on Sunday

The arrival of the united States Steamer fulton At the washington navy yard on The first day of may 1859 on Sunday

The united States Steamer water witch at the washington navy yard on the 2th day of may 1859 on monday

The united States Steamer water witch Left the washington navy yard on the 3rd day of may 1859 on Tuesday

The united States Steamer fulton Left the washington navy yard on the 4th day of may 1859 on wensday

The arrival of the united States Steamer anacosta [Anacostia] at the washington navy yard on the 26th day of may 1859 on Thursday

Finished Hauling of the united States Steamer ancosta up the new marine Railway at washington navy ayrd on the 31th day of may 1859 on tuesday

Commodore Buchanan Taken Command of the washington navy yard on The 30th day of may 1859 on Tuesday88

page 171

--171--

172       1859

The Death of william Nokes and James wilson in washington navy yard by the explosion of a Gun and others wounded on 14th of July 1859 on Thursday Commenced moving out of the old anchor Shop in washington navy yard by the order of Commodore Buchanan and Captain Charles Turner and Captain W.P. Sanger into the new anchor Shop by the superintendence of James Tucker Master BlackSmith and James Tucker quarteman on Friday the 15th day of July 1859 on Friday afternoon when the funeral taken place orders were given by first Lieutenant murray of the wshington navy yard a the Roll Office that all the mechanics and labour Should answer their Starboard and Larboard Muster and pass out the main Gate to attend the funeral of the men who was killed

The arrival of the united States Steam frigate minaSota at Charlestown navy yard massachusetts under the Command of Captain Dupont on the 29th day of July 1859 on friday

Commenced Launching of the united States Steamer anacosta off the Marine railway on the 2nd day of August on Tuesday

They finished Launching The united States Steamer anacosta on the 3rd day of august 1858 on wensday

Hauling up of the united States Steamer anacosta Stern foremast on the marine railway at washington navy yard on the 22th day of august 1859 on Satturday

Commenced working the new Engine in the new anchor Shop in the washington navy yard on the 22th day of august 1859 on monday

The arrival of Expresident Brigadier general franklin Pierce and His Lady at Charleston massachusettes on the 27th day of august 1859 on monday Lauchin of the united States Steamer anacoSta at washington navy yard on the 26th day of august 1859 on friday

page 172

--172--

173       1859

The arrival of the Philadelphia fire Company in washington DC With a Steam Engine on the 19th day of September on monday

The united States Steamer anacosta from washington navy yard with a load of freight under the Command of Captain filbrown at a quater past one oclock and She got in the mouth Turkey Buzzard Creek This Side of washington arsenal and There was a Tremendous Storm and She was Blown a Shore in fron of the indian assylum on the 17th day of September 1859

The united States Steamer anacosta was reload The 18th day of September 1859 on Sunday

The first Peice of iron That They taken a heat on in the new anchor Shop In the washington navy yard on the 27th day of September 1859 on Tuesday by Mr James Tucker master Black Smith and Mr John Tucker quarterman

Lieutenant General winfield Scott Commander in Chief of the united States Army Embarked from new york for the island of San Juan on the 29th Day of September 1859 on Tuesday with a volunteer act of his own

page 173

--173--

174       1859

The Death of honorable John mason minister to France he died in france on the 3rd day of october 1859 on monday in Disharge of his duty in Bhalf of his County and in Presidents Polks time he was appointed and confirmed as attorney General Then when Mr polk appointed the honorable Mr vancroft That was Secretary of the navy minister to england Then the Honorable Judge mason was transfered from attorney General Seat to fill The Seat of the Secretary of navy

on the 16th of october1859 on Sunday The people of harpers ferry va Was higly excited by the apperance of an individual Called Captain asowatomie John Brown89 and he and his colleagues They came Between the hours of Midnight and Day and Taking Charge of Goverment Property The armory And other Goverment property at harpers ferry va frightened The People arround harpers ferry verry Badly

The President of the united States James Buchanan received a dispatch From harpers fery on the 17th day of october 1859 on monday That a man by the name Captain John Brown and his party had taken posession of Harpers ferry and The Goverment arms and the honorable James Buchanan President of the united States and the honorable Isaac Toucy The Secretary of the navy Sent orders Down to Colnel John Howard commanding officer of the marine Corps at washington for all marines That was active for to Dispatch off to harpers ferry and it was done immediately and the marines was Commanded By Lieutenant Green of harpers ferry they was Taken in Command by Colonel Rober Lee at that time a full Colonel in the united States army and Captain John Brown and his party was captured

page 174

--174--

175       1859

The Hauling of the united States Steamer anacosta on the new marine railway at washington navy yard on the 28th day of November 1859 on monday

And finished hauling up of the united States Steamer Ancosta on the new marine railway at washington navy yard on the 29th day of november 1859 on tuesday Stern foremast her main mast with two feet of the Ship house

Launching of the Steamer anacosta at washington navy yard on the 2nd day of December 1859 on friday

The Execution of Captain John Brown at Charlestown va on the 2rd day of December 1859 on friday

      1860

The Dedication of the honorable General Washington Statue in washington DC on the 22th Dayof february 1860 on wensday the President of the united States the honorable James Buchanan and his cabinet was Present and Chief Justice Taney of the Supreme court of the united States and the other four Judges and several Govenors of Diferent States Was present and a great number of Spectators was present and the united States marines under the Command major terrett and Several volunteer Companys of washington and The 7th Regiment from new york and the horse Company from Charles County undder the command of Captain lawer Cox and the whole of the Military was under the Command of major general JeSup

page 175

--175--

176       1860

The arrival of the Jappanese at the washington navy yard on the 15th day of May 1860 on monday and they was received by Commodore franklin Buchanan who was in Command of the washington navy Yyrd and Captain McBlair and first Lieutenant Lewis and 2nd Lieutenant Charles Simms Was present and Several members of the Congress and the Honorable Major General Cass Secretary of the State and the Hoorable John C. Breckinridge Vice President of the United States and the Honorable John C. Lloyd Secretary of War and the Honorable Howell Cobb Secretary of the Treasury and the Honorable Isaac Tucey Secretary of the Navy and several Foreign Ministers and areat number of Citizens was in the Navy Yard and the Japanese was escorted from the navy yard to Willard's Hotel by the United States Marines under the Command of Terrett and on the 16th day of May 1860 on Tuesday they called on the President of the United States the Honorable James Buchanan and the Secretary of State the Honorable Major General Lewis Cass and they stayed here in Washington city until the treaty was made on the 20th day of May 1860 on Satturday there was a great Storm in washington City and it Blowed the top of a house off that Belonged to Judge Douglas Senator of the united States90

South Carolina Seceded from the union on the 15th day of December 1860 on friday

page 176

--176--

177       1861

Honorable abraham lincoln arived in washington on the 2 of march 1861 on Saturday and takin his seat on 4 of March 1861

Fort Sumter Command by Major anderson were fiered upon on the 12th of april 1861 on friday

on the 15 of april president lincoln issued proclamation for 75 Thousand men on monday

the 6th Massachusts Regiment were atacked in Baltimoore By a Mob while on its way to washington the 19th day of april 1861 on friday

There was Senators and representatives in the Washington Navy Yard on Monday night the 22 of April 1861

on the 20th of April 1861 on Saturday president lincoln levied on all the Steam Boats in the potomack and had them Brought to Washington navy yard and They was bringing the Boats to the yard all night Satturday night and a the Same time marshal law was declared by the honorable abraham lincoln President of the united States and the honorable W.H. Steward Secretary of State

And on the 22nd of april 1861 on monday there were Different companys ordered in to washington navy yard to guard the government property and the same time the navy yard under the command of Captain John A Dalhgren Who Deserves great credit for he stood by the Government and Fought for it in the Darkness of its hours and long may he live91

Adn on the 22nd of april 1861 on monday they commenced Hauling flour from the Different Ware houses in Washington DC and Georgetown to the Capitol of the united States

page 177

--177--

178       1861

There was Senators and Representatives Garerding in the Washington navy yard on monday night the 22th of april 1861

The 7th new york Regiment arrived in washington on the 23d Day of april 1861 on tuesday

The 21th new york Regiment arrived in Washington on the 18th day of may 1861 on Thursday

on the first Day of June 1861 on Satturday Justice Clark was sent Down to the Washington navy yard For to administer the oath of allegiance to the mechanics and the Labouring Class of working men With out DistincSion of Colour for them to Stand by the Stars and Stripes and defend for the union and Captain Dalgrren Present and I believe at that time I michael Shiner was the first Colered man that had taken the oath in washington DC and that oath Still Remains in my heart and when I had taken that oath I Taken It in the presence of God without predudice or enmity to any man And I intend to Sustain That oath with The assistance of the Almighty God until I die for when a man takes an oath For a Just cause it is more then taking a Drink of water Sitting Down to his Breakfast92

The first Battle of Bull Run on The 21th day of July 1861 on Sunday

The Emancipation of the DC of Columbia on the 16th Day of April 1862 on wensday by the Senate and the house of Representatives and Signed by the president of the united States the Honorable abraham lincoln and the Secretary of State the Honorable Wm H. Seward and Thanks Be to the Almighty

page 178

--178--

179       1862

on the 10th of March 1862 on Sunday the monitor Whip the merrimack the monitor under command of lieutenant worden and the merrimack were command by commander Franklin Buchanan when the commander saw the Monitor coming he said What Dam Thing is that Coming Tore it to her

A proclamation whereas on the 22nd day of September 1862 a proclamation was issued by the president of the united States that on the first of Jan 1863 all persons held as slaves within any state or part of whom a state shall then be in Rebellion against the the United States the Slaves shall henceforth and forever free and the government of the United States including the military and naval authorities thereof will recognize and maintain the freedom of such persons and will in any efforts s they may make for their own freedom now Therefore i Abraham Lincoln President of the United States by virtue of power in me rested as Commander in Chief of the army and navy of the united states in time of actual armed rebellion against the authorities and government of the united States and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing Said rebellion Do on this first of Jan 1863 Declare all persons held as Slaves free henceforth and forever free93

page 179

--179--

180       1864

The Battles of geterBurge wher fought Between general meads And general lee on the Second an thrid of July 1863 general Lee had foreMen to general meads One general Meads him foughs on his own ground

VixksBurge where Surrendred to Major general grant and of the united States armmy on the 4 of July 1863 Major General pemberton of the Confederate armmy and after the victory where gained by the federals arms the government Began to know her Strenth

      1864

on the 17 of March general grant assumed Command of all the armmy of the united States with his Headquarters at that Time in the field with the armmy of the potomac The Confederate Commanders Tried with all ther strategy to remove general grant from his position in front of Richmond but they Could not

on the 10 of july 1864 Major General John E Breckinridge with part of the Confederate army made an attack upon the northwest of washington and on 11 orders Came from the navy departments admiral goldsborough Came with them instructing admiral John C Montgomery to send evy man that were fit for service to send them from washington navy yard out to fort lincoln to man that fort94

page 180

--180--

181       1864

and then it was it was Doubtful Sad time when the inglish manner war [man of war?] and the french manner war near and different manner of wars who were Laying in our waters where ready to Take thire minesters on board

and the Hon Abraham Lincoln Presiden of the u s road up and down the Lines all knight long whear the fedearl troops whear fighting and on the 12th Major [General] Brackin ridge was drove Back in disorder and his forces May the Hon Abraham Lincoln Name be recorded for ever ever on the Book of Fame he was as brave as man that ever been on the face of earth and all that he done he done it with Clear Conition [Conscience] before his creator

page 181

--181--

182       1865

And on the fourth of march 1865 on Saturday the hon Abraham Lincoln taken his Seat

Before he Came out on the porch to take his [seat] the wind blew and it rained with out inter mistion and as soon as Mr Lincoln came out the wind ceasis blowing an the rain ceased raining and the Sun Came out and it was near as clear as it could be and calm and at the mean time there was a Star comet made its apperence South west rite over the Capitol and it Shined just as bright as it could be 95

on the 23rd day of March on Thursday 1865

the Hon Abraham Lincoln

Left washington on thursday

for the Armmy of the potomac and there he Staid till richmond whear taken
page 182

--182--

183       [1865]

And when Mr Lincoln went down That verry Same day on thursday the 23rd of March there came up a herician of wind and it blew as if the heaveen an earth whear coming to gether

and at the Same time A little water boy was kiled in washington Navy yard By the name of gorge gates whear killed that day by one of the corners of the uper Ship house that blew of the winds

the Secd day of april 1865 on Sunday night and

and Left Major Brackinridge to Set fire to different Buildings in the City

on monday morning the third Day of april

the u s armmy marched in to richmond

page 183

--183--

184       1865

and the Hon Abraham Lincoln with them.

and 1865

The Hon abraham Lincoln was assinated assanated on the 14 of April on good friday knight at fords theater in washing

and he died on the 15 of april 1865 on Satturday

and on friday evening before he was assanated Mr Licoln and his Lady whear Both down at the washington navy on good friday the 14 1865 96

page 184

--184--

185       1865

and on the 1 of april 1865 on Sun day

genreal Lee

Surrendered all his

fources to genrel grant

all the officers of the confedrate armmy an

and it was the

request of Mr Lincoln to genreal grant to allow all the confedrate offercers to keep all there horses and Side arms

 

the Hon

M.G.

grant

taken his Seat on the

fourth of march 1869

on thursday and it rained up

till twelve oClock but not hard

an there it held up raining but yet

page 185

--185--

      186

was cloudy

and may the lord be with him during his administration and forever here after

i Michael Shiner have Seen

Eleven

Presidents take thire Seats

and Some of thoes presidents

i have seen take there seats twice

page 186

--186--

This Book is a Verry Valuable Book and it is verry Interesting.

It is worthy of perusal and the Author Michael Shiner was a Patriot. May he rest in peace.

Captain W.H. Crowly
U.S. Army

page 187


Michael Shiner His Book

Washington DC

Navy Yard

9th St No 474

page 188

[End of Manuscript]


Endnotes:

1. First quote: Critic-Record, Washington, DC, September 12, 1873, second quote: Report of Committees of the House of Representatives for the Second Session of the Forty-Second Congress. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1872. [See Shiner testimony on pages 471-473.]

2. District of Columbia Department of Education, Special Report of the Commissioner of Education on the Condition of Public Schools in the District of Columbia, Submitted to the Senate June 6, 1868 and to the House with Additions June 13, 1870. (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1870): 215, 221.

3. Significant racial tension was evident at the Washington Navy Yard from its beginning as the Navy Department attempted with limited success to manage a workforce consisting of white mechanics and laborers, free African Americans and significant numbers of slaves. See Dudley, page 524 and Sharp pages 16-17.

4. Commandant Isaac Hull's letter to the Naval Board of Commissioners, dated 5 April 1830, National Archives and Records Administration RG 45.

5. Commandant Isaac Hull's letter to the Board of Naval Commissioners, dated 8 May 1829, National Archives and Records Administration RG 45.

6. Navy Yard Hill was for most of the 19th century the residential area immediately around the Washington Navy Yard. Capitol Hill was the name for the area as far east as 6th Street Southeast, after which it was called Navy Yard Hill.

7. The Congressional Cemetery was established in 1802. Among the cemetery founders was Commodore Thomas Tingey. Many of the early employees of Washington Navy Yard are buried within its grounds, including Thomas Howard, Michael Shiner's master. The cemeteries of Washington DC, like nearly everything else in the District were strictly segregated with African Americans excluded until well into the 20th century. Michael Shiner was buried in Beckelts Cemetery on January 17, 1880, Archives of the District of Columbia, District of Columbia, Death Certificate, number 22895.

8. Lloyd Pumphrey, 1795 -1838 the son and heir of William Pumphrey was a District of Columbia building contractor.

9. The United States Army in June 1812, totaled just 6,744 officers and men. While the Congress had authorized a greater force for later that year, the country still relied on the militia system of uniformed state citizen-soldiers who were all volunteers with their own elected officers. Uniforms and weapons were supplied either by the men themselves or by their officers. The Washington Navy Yard had its own Navy Yard Rifle Company (later named Stull's Rifle Company), but like most militia companies, the Yard's unit had more enthusiasm than military skill. Benjamin Latrobe who knew the Yard well wrote (1807) that "Upon the whole I find that Navy Yard cannot produce a single good rifleman" See 1834, page 57 of the diary for Michael Shiner's comments on another group of District militia.

10. Wheelers Ferry was located across the Anacostia River.

11. Commodore Joshua Barney 1759-1818 was born in Baltimore, MD. He fought in numerous engagements in the American Revolution. Barney also fought in the War of 1812 and took part in the defense of Washington. He was badly wounded at the Battle of Bladensburg and taken prisoner by the British. Barney died in 1818 while traveling to his new property in Pittsburgh, PA.

12. The Battle of Bladensburg, MD, was fought on 24 August 1814. During the engagement the American militia and regular army units were defeated by British troops, and British forces were able to enter Washington, DC and burn the Capitol and White House. Commodore Thomas Tingey and other Navy Yard employees burned the Washington Navy Yard less it fall into British hands. The battle was derisively referred to as the "Bladensburg Races" due to the overwhelming British victory and hasty American retreat.

13. The Congreve rocket was named for the inventor William Congreve. The rocket consisted of an iron case of black power for propulsion and either an explosive or incendiary charge. The warheads were attached to wooden guide poles and were launched in pairs. They could be fired up to two miles although at any range they were fairly inaccurate and had a tendency to prematurely explode. They were as much a psychological weapon as a physical one for they were rarely if ever used except alongside other types of artillery. They were used at Battle of Fort McHenry, hence the "rockets' red glare" in our National Anthem.

14. The freezing cold and disease Michael Shiner refers to is confirmed in local and national records. In 1815 Mount Tambura on the island of Sumbawa (modern Indonesia) erupted killing perhaps 100,000 people and throwing immense amounts of ash and volcanic particles into the earth's atmosphere which led to drastic changes in weather patterns around the world. The year 1816 became know as "the poverty year," "eighteen hundred and froze to death," and "the year with no summer." Temperatures in Washington DC in June and July of 1816 were only in the low 60's. The damage to local crops and livestock caused by killing freezes in July and August drove farm prices up (e.g. oats went from 12 cents to 92 cents a bushel) and caused wide spread hunger and malnutrition among the poor of the District, leading to outbreaks of disease. The situation did not begin to improve until 1817.

15. Descriptions and records of weather occupy a large portion of Shiner's manuscript and were a major interest, and an important factor in his work life, and that of his colleagues. Changes in weather were crucial since most Washington Navy Yard employees worked out of doors, especially laborers and slaves. The workforce was primarily composed of per diem workers, and the practice at Washington Navy Yard and other federal shipyards was to retain only the absolute number of these men necessary for a given shop to operate or complete a ship repair. Accurate weather observations were therefore useful in projecting the number and types of workers required. Cold weather meant that large numbers of laborers (unlike carpenters painters and blacksmiths who could work indoors in a shop or shed) would be laid off until warmer weather made outdoor projects feasible. Early records reflect this trend as work was often reduced by 20% or more during the winter months (American State Papers, Volume 1: 848). Commandant Isaac Hull recognized this as a problem and did his best to keep as many laborers on the station rolls through the winter as possible observing that: "They have large families and can not make a cent to support them except what they receive from their labor at this yard. If I discharge them now I see no way for them to live through the winter." Maloney, Linda M. The Captain from Connecticut: The Life and Naval Times of Isaac Hull. Boston: Northeastern University Press, 1986 p. 422.

16. The Reverend Payton's full name was Yelverton T. Peyton (1797 - 1831). He was the pastor of the Ebenezer Methodist Church in 1822 and 1823 when Michael Shiner attended the watch service he records. Lloyd Pumphrey and various members of his family were members of Ebenezer Methodist Church. Phillis Shiner and her children were slaves of the Pumphrey family. The Ebenezer Methodist Church was locate between 4th and G Streets. A "watch meeting" also known as a watch night service, is the New Year service where the many Methodist and other District churches congregations met to pray in the New Year. This information was kindly supplied by Ms. Gale Munro; see also Ferguson, W. M. (Rev.), Methodism in Washington.

17. Colonel William Doughty 1773 -1859 worked for many years as a naval constructor (similar to naval architect) at the Washington Navy Yard. He was popular among many Washington Navy Yard mechanics and laborers, and was supportive of the 1835 strike. That same year, Washington Navy Yard Commandant Isaac Hull appealed to the Board of Naval Commissioners unsuccessfully to have Doughty removed. William Doughty's career as a shipbuilder was long and very successful. In 1850 his real property was stated to be worth $35,000 (Source: 1850 US census of Washington, DC.).

18. Benjamin King (1764-1840) was for many years the Washington Navy Yard's Master Blacksmith. King was born on the Isle of Man and immigrated to the United States as a young man. King was first appointed Master Blacksmith in 1804 by Commodore Thomas Tingey and by 1817 his annual salary was $1,500.00 per year. King did much of the early iron work for the nation's capitol and held numerous District public offices. As Master Blacksmith, he supervised the anchor shop, which employed as many as 19 slaves (including 5 owned and leased to Washington Navy Yard by King). In 1830, Washington Navy Yard Commandant Isaac Hull unsuccessfully appealed to the Board of Naval Commissioners to remove Benjamin King for alleged incompetence. Benjamin King was later demoted to a non-supervisory position. King died in 1840 at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

19. The Long Bridge was built in 1808 and was a toll bridge. The bridge was nearly a mile in length and by the late 1820's, the time of Michael Shiner journey, the bridges wood supports had begun to rot, making walking precarious.

20. The Washington Navy Yard Daily Log for 1827 provides the official Yard account of the fire at Alexandria, Virginia, Thursday, 18 January 1827 - These 24 hours fresh gales from the N.W. very severe cold frost morning. Laborers Riggers Ordinary Men Carts & Oxen working as above until half past 11 o'clock A.M. when Bell rung a letter from the Secretary of the Navy read aloud to the Workmen requesting Commandant Tingey to send all the force within his power to Alexandria to extinguish a large fire that took place there; the men took two fire engines and proceeded to Alexandria where they arrived about two o'clock; at about 3 o'clock they had orders from Capt. Booth to proceed home with the fire engines as all fire was extinguished by the exertions of the people of Alexandria City of Washington & Georgetown; they got the engines back to the Navy Yard about 5 o'clock PM. One of the Engineers got broke in some respect in going down but was temporary mended.

21. The mizzen mast was the after most mast in a three masted ship. The shrouds were standing rigging which stretched from the side of the ship to the mast, which, together with the staysails, held the mizzen mast vertical.

22. Rigging Screws were used to hold rigging. This was the general name used to hold masts, spars.

23. Samuel Southard was Secretary of the Navy from 16 September 1823 to 3 March 1929.

24. "[Page 20] Friday ­- Independence Day Chesapeake and Ohio Canal commenced. . .Between seven and eight this morning I went with my son John to the Union Hotel of Georgetown where were assembling the President and Director of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal Company, the Mayor and Committees of the Corporations of Washington, Georgetown and Alexandria. The Heads of the Departments, foreign ministers and a few other invited persons. About eight o'clock a procession was formed and proceeded by a Band of music to the wharf where we embarked in the Steam boat Surprise; followed by two others we proceeded to the entrance of the Potomack Canal and up there on canal boats . . . to a spot selected for breaking the ground. The President of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal with a very short address delivered to me the Spade with which I broke the ground addressing the surrounding auditory consisting perhaps of two thousand persons. It happened that at first stroke of the spade it met immediately under the surface with a large stump of tree, after repeating the stroke three or four times without making any impression, I threw off my coat and resuming the Spade, raised a shovel full of the Earth, at which a general shout broke forth from the surrounding multitude, and I completed my address which occupied about fifteen minutes. . . [Page 21] . . . The incident that chiefly relieved me was the obstacle of the stump, which met and rejected the spade and my casting off my coat to overcome the resistance ­- It struck the eye and fancy of the spectators, more then all the rhetoric in my speech and diverted their attention from the stammering haste taken of a deficient memory."

John Quincy Adams diary 36, 1 January 1825 - 30 September 1830, pages 20 and 21 [electronic edition]. The Diaries of John Quincy Adams: A Digital Collection. Boston, MA: Massachusetts Historical Society, 2004. [Available online at http://www.masshist.org/jqadiaries.]

25. Commodore Thomas Tingey (like many prosperous naval officers) owned a number of slaves. In the 1820 District of Columbia U.S. census, he is described as owning five slaves. His slave footman was not the first to feel his wrath. Tingey was a rough and even brutal master; something of his attitude toward his slaves can be glimpsed in his 1821 reward notice for his runaway slave, Sukey Dean:

Whereas my servant Surrey calling herself Sukey Dean is strolling about the city, or in the vicinity sometimes attempting to hire herself out as a free women asserting she has my assent to do so; neither are true. She is short thick women of a yellow complexion now advancing to forty years of age, is a very good family cook, washes and irons well and understands the management of same - in short if her tongue were safely extracted she would be a most excellent servant. She has been a short time at the residence of Samuel H. Smith Esq. but finding that I assented to her remaining there immediately left. But whosoever will secure her in jail or otherwise of the three days advertisement in the city newspapers sells her at public venue for cash shall have on fourth of what she sells for in full cash less any charges.

Thomas Tingey
Navy Yard Washington
(Daily-National Intelligencer
16 August 1821)

26. At sea the boatswain would use a "starter," which was the end of thickly mounted rope to hit, whip or strike sailors to induce them to do something. In this instance it clearly appears to have been used to discipline Washington Navy Yard slaves.

27. Commodore John Rodgers (1772-1837) had a long and distinguished naval career. He served in both the Quasi War with France and in the War of 1812, and was later President of The Board of Naval Commissioners. The Board was a United States Navy administrative body in existence from 1815 to 1842, with responsibility for the Navy's material support. Commodore Rodgers was President of the Board from 1815 to 1824 and again from 1827 to1837.

28. The 1870 report on District of Columbia Schools (see page 274) gives the location as near "Eight Street between N and O Street in the Northern section of the City a location known as 'Nigger Hill' at that time center of a large colored population."

29. The Piscataway Creek is a tributary of the Potomac River located in Prince Georges County, Maryland.

30. From the Washington Navy Yard's surviving Daily Station Logs for the year 1828 there are two entries recording Michael Shiner activities. For Saturday 27 December1828, the officer of the watch, recorded: "Michael Shiner who has liberty out from Wednesday till Friday Morning has not come to the yard" Again on Sunday 28 December 1828, we read: " This day pleasant airs from the SW and fair weather. Michael Shiner got home this evening."

31. Traditionally the term Jolly Boat refers a boat carried on a ship, powered by 4 or six oars and occasionally yawl rigged sails.

32. Salvadore Catalano was a native of Palermo, Sicily. He served as pilot to Captain Stephen Decatur during the Navy's burning of Tripoli during Barbary Pirate Wars. On Captain Decatur's return to the Washington Navy Yard, Catalano chose to stay with the US Navy and was promoted to sailing-master. He worked for many years at the Yard and Michael Shiner would have known him well. He died 4 March 1846.

33. Commodore Isaac Hull commanded the Washington Navy Yard from 31 March 1829 to 1 October 1835.

34. The new Yard Commandant, Isaac Hull, made many changes upon assuming command in 1829. Isaac Hull was a former Captain of the USS Constitution and hero of the War of 1812. He was known for running a "tight ship", in contrast to Commandant Tingey (who was popular with the men) and was of a more taciturn disposition. In 1835, he was nearly 60 years old and suffering from acute hearing loss due to his many exposures to cannon and shell noise. After his appointment as Commandant, Hull rapidly found that mechanics at the Yard enjoyed many freedoms he was unfamiliar with in setting work priorities. Hull's subsequent actions to restrict the mechanics' customary practices, combined with the Washington Navy Yard mechanics' demand for a ten hour work day, led to the strike of 1835.

35. This solar eclipse was widely seen in the United States and for many people was a sign of dread and foreboding. An unsuccessful motion was even made in the U.S. House of Representatives to adjourn for the occasion. The black enslaved preacher Nat Turner saw this same eclipse as a vision from God of a "black angel" overtaking a "white angel." Turner's slave rebellion gained impetus among other slaves and, on 13 August Turner saw yet another spectacle - a sunspot visible to the naked eye. His rebellion began on 21 August but was quickly crushed and he and some of followers were executed. See: Lewis P Masur 1831: The Year of the Eclipse.

36. Basil Brown was born in Maryland in 1803. He manumitted prior to 1850 and worked as a laborer. He is listed in the 1870 Washington, DC census, which states that he then owned property worth $3,000.00.

36a. Camboose is an older nautical term for a metal ship's kitchen constructed to prevent a fire aboard wooden war ships. These kitchens were constructed at Washington Navy Yard.

37. The "Ordinary house" is where the ordinary seamen were lodged when stationed at a naval yard or in transit to another station.

38. In hitting his master back, Michael Shiner risked at the very least, a severe beating, but by playing "crazy" he managed to convince Captain Aulick (and apparently Thomas Howard) not to discipline him. See page 37 of the Diary where Michael Shiner adopted a similar strategy when he struck Clement Hewitt, a District magistrate.

39. Captain John H. Aulick was the Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 7 March 1843 to 21 February 1841.

40. Thomas Howard, Sr. was the Washington Navy Yard's Chief Clerk. Howard was Michael Shiner's owner from 1828 to 1832. The Thomas Howard family had at least four other slaves in addition to Michael Shiner, they were: Louisa Barton, John Davis, Maria Cartwright and Maria's two children Ann Sophia and Joseph Cartwright. Source: Will of Thomas Howard, of Washington Co., DC, dated 18 Nov. 1832, probated 21 Dec., in Book 4, pages 172-173(173-174), located in Record Group 2, Records of the Superior Court, District of Columbia Archives; also see District of Columbia Government, the Congressional Cemetery, 1621, Box 11. Thomas Howard's mother was in her 70's in 1831. The Howard residence was located on the northeast corner of 3rd and E Street.

41. In 1832 cholera was a relatively new disease, having just arrived in the United States from Asia by way of Europe. While there is no exact mortality figures for Washington, DC, in 1832 the disease killed over 3,000 people in New York and over 4,000 in New Orleans.

42. Michael Shiner is referring to the "Nullification Crisis" which was initiated by South Carolina's threat to succeed from the Union. President Jackson's strong response (which Shiner supported) ended the crisis.

43. John Armfield and Isaac Franklin were the nation's most notorious slave dealers. The firm's slave pen was located at 1315 Duke Street, Alexandria, Virginia, and managed by John Armfield. Isaac Franklin established and ran the firm's markets at Natchez and New Orleans. By the 1830s they were sending more than 1,000 slaves annually from Alexandria to their Natchez and New Orleans markets to help meet the demand for slaves in Mississippi and surrounding states. Franklin and Armfield's procedure was to send an annual overland coffle, or slave caravan, from Virginia to their Forks of the Road market near Natchez, Mississippi. If Phillis Shiner and her children had not gained their freedom they would almost certainly have been forced into a slave coffles leaving Alexandria,VA, in mid to late summer and forcibly taken through to Natchez, Mississippi, and the Forks of the Road slave market where they would have been sold to the highest bidder. During such overland marches male slaves were usually manacled and chained together in double files and were under the close supervision of mounted drivers. Women such as Phillis Shiner would have walked while their children and injured slaves rode in the wagons that accompanied the coffle. The white males guarding the coffles were normally armed with both guns and whips. In the period between 1825 and 1830 the average price for young adult male slaves in Virginia was $400. In contrast, Isaac Franklin sold four slaves (sex unspecified) at the Forks of the Road in 1826-27 for $700, $600, $500 and $450.

44. The proper reference is to a writ of attachment, which is a court order allowing a party to seize to take into custody another person's property (in the case of slavery, another person's slave).

45. The manumission reads as follows,

Know all me by these presents that I Levi Phumphrey of the city of Washington in the District of Columbia for divers good and sufficient causes me thereun to moving have manumitted emancipated set free and relieved from Slavery a negro women named Phillis and her three children named Ann Harriet and Mary Ann purchased by me at the sale of my father’s property the said Phillis being at the time age about twenty five years and her three children aged as follows Ann about four years - Harriet about three years and Mary Ann about four months the said Negro women Phillis is in good health and entirely competent to obtain livelihood for herself and children by her own labor. And that I do by these presents manumit emancipate set free and discharge from Labor & Slavery the said Phillis and her three children. In witness whereof I have hereto subscribe my name and affix my seal the 11th day of June in the year of our Lord one Thousand - Eight Hundred and thirty-three. (District of Columbia Free Negro Registers 1821 1861, Volume 2, pp.255 -256, NARA RG 21.)

Levi Pumphrey’s former slave “Hanson”, remembered “I was owned by Levi Pumphrey an old man with one eye, a perfect savage; he allowed no privileges of any kind, Sunday or Monday.” (Stills, William, The Underground Railroad (Revised Edition), Volume 2, Philadelphia: William Stills, 1886, p.115.)

46. See footnote 39.

47. William Ellis, Washington Navy Yard engineer, was born in Pennsylvania in 1807. He moved to Washington, DC, and later ran a successful business with brother Jonas Ellis at which manufacturing steam engines.

48. Michael Shiner was observing the "Leonid Meteor Shower." Another observer noted, "On the night of November 12-13 1833 a tempest of falling stars broke over the Earth... The sky was scored in every direction with shining tracks and illuminated with majestic fireballs. At Boston the frequency of meteors was estimated to be about half that of flakes of snow in an average snowstorm. Their numbers... were quite beyond counting; but as it waned a reckoning was attempted from which it was computed on the basis of that much-diminished rate that 240,000 must have been visible during the nine hours they continued to fall." From: Agnes Clerke Victorian Astronomy Writer. [This information was supplied by Peter Jennisken, Ph.D., of NASA in an email to John Sharp, dated June 20, 2007.]

49. Joseph M. Padgett (1808 - 1865), Master Laborer, survived his fall to later become overseer of the yard laborers. Padgett was also one of the founders of Washington Navy Yard Beneficial Society, an organization which helped Yard workers with funeral expenses and provided for their widows and orphans. He is buried at Congressional Cemetery. His son (also named Joseph M. Padgett) worked at the Washington Navy Yard for over 50 years, retiring in 1920.

50. The orders to which Michael Shiner refers to are as follows: " The Mechanics and laborers employed in the Yard with the exception of the Anchor Smiths & Engineers are prohibited entering the Workshops Ship houses and other places where the public property tools are deposited during the hours allotted for meals. The Mechanics & laborers are forbidden to bring their meals into the Yard either in baskets bags or otherwise and none will be permitted to eat their meals within the Yard unless specifically permitted by the Commandant. The Anchor Smith Foundry men & attendants of the Steam Engines are so permitted wherever their fires are kept during meal hour " General Orders for the Regulation of the Navy Yard, Washington, DC (circa 1833 - 1850 Washington Navy Yard, orders no. 13 and 14].

51. Israel Jones lived in Baltimore, Maryland; his residence was on Forest Street, North of Douglass. Jones was a free black and foremen of the Baltimore-based caulking crew that Commandant Isaac Hull had brought to the Washington Navy Yard.

52. Michael Shiner refers here to the strike for a ten hour workday that took place that year at most federal shipyards. This movement began in the Philadelphia shipyard and rapidly spread down the eastern seaboard. While the Washington Navy Yard strikers failed to win a ten hour day that year, their names were later restored to the yard rolls and President Martin Van Buren in 1840 issued an executive order placing all federal shipyards on a ten hour workday.

The Yard strikers (as Michael Shiner wrote) blamed Commodore Isaac Hull for bringing in black caulkers from Baltimore, Maryland. These strikers believed that black workers were to be used to break their strike. This and other incidents exacerbated always simmering racial tension in Washington, and Washington Navy Yard white mechanics and laborers went on a three day rampage in which they threatened blacks and broke up their businesses and property. After days of disorder and riot, President Andrew Jackson ordered a company of US Marines to restore order.

52a. The "young mulatto" man was Arthur Bowen, 18 years old, and a slave to Mrs. Anna Thorton. Based on Mrs Thorton's accusation that Bowen tried to murder her, Arthur Bowen was tried and convicted of attempted murder. The prosecutor in the Bowen case for the District of Columbia was Francis Scott Key, the author of the "Star Spangled Banner." Mrs. Thornton eventually had second thoughts regarding her accusations and wrote to President Andrew Jackson a long letter, urging Jackson to pardon Bowen, which President Jackson did on 4 July 1836.

53. American historians have pointed out that the year 1835 saw more urban riots (53) than in any year prior to the Civil War. As in the case of the Washington DC riot described by Shiner, most of these riots were the result of white mobs attacking blacks or as in the Baltimore City riot of that same year, mobs attacking "foreigners" (i.e. Irish Catholics). See Daniel Howe, page 431.

54. James Marshall was a Washington, DC, Ward 6 blacksmith who also acted as a Justice of the Peace.

55. The Judge is here issuing a threat to the attackers. As a slave Shiner had virtually no legal rights as an individual and was considered an item of personal property. Although Shiner had no rights of redress personally against his attackers, his owner, Thomas Howard, had the right to bring civil legal action for compensatory damages against Shiner's attackers for any injury received by Shiner.

56. Captain John Gallagher relieved Commodore Isaac Hull as Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard. Gallagher served as Commandant from 1 October 1835 to 1 March 1836.

57. Captain Henry E. Ballard was Commandant of Washington Navy Yard from 1 October 1849 to 15 October 1852.

58. Captain Daniel Patterson was the Washington Navy Yard Commandant from 1 March 1836 to 25 August 1839.

59. In 1840 President Martin Van Buren, by Executive Order changed work hours in federal naval ship yards from 12 to 10 per day. The order as implemented on the Washington Navy Yard stated "By Direction of the President of the United States all public establishments will hereafter be regulated as to working hours by the "ten hour System". The hours for labor in this Yard will therefore be as follows viz: From the 1st day of April to the 30th day of September inclusive from 6 o'clock a.m. to 6 o'clock p.m. -- during this period the workmen will breakfast before going to work for which purpose the bell will be rung and the first muster held at 7 o'clock -- at 12 o'clock noon the bell will be rung and then home from 12 to 1 o'clock p.m. allowed for dinner from which to 6 o'clock p.m. will constitute the last half of the day.

From the 1st day of October to the 31st day of March the working hours will be from the rising to the setting of the Sun -- the Bell will then be rung at one hour after Sunrise that hour being allowed for breakfast -- at 12 o'clock noon the bell will again be rung and one hour allowed for dinner from which time say 1 o'clock till sundown will constitute the last half of the day. No quarters of days will be allowed." General Orders for the Regulation of the Navy Yard Washington DC. (Circa 1833 - 1850, order numbers 29).

60. Phillip Inch, Master Painter at the Washington Navy Yard (1794 - 1844) was born in Plymouth, England. Inch was Michael Shiner's supervisor for many years. He is buried at the Congressional Cemetery.

60a. Michael Shiner's diary refers to three different ships called Water Witch. The first Water Witch was a steamer built in 1844-45 at the Washington Navy Yard. She was originally designed to serve as a water supply vessel, but was unable to do so as her draft was too deep to pass through the locks of the Great Dismal Swamp. After attempting to convert her to a harbor vessel or tug was also unsuccessful, she was condemned and sent to the Philadelphia Naval Yard where her hull was extended by some 30 feet and she was refitted. Because of the extensive renovations to her hull, the ship was deemed a new ship and became the second Water Witch. Water Witch [2] saw action in the Mexican War, but developed problems with her hull and propulsion systems. In 1851, her hull broke down while sailing from Norfolk, Virginia. She was towed to the Washington Navy Yard and was placed out of commission on 25 April 1851. Her machinery was removed and her hull was used for gunnery practice (See page 111 of the Diary). A third Water Witch (a wooden-hulled, side wheel gunboat) was built at the Washington Navy Yard in 1851 (See page 106 of the Diary). Interestingly, the third Water Witch was siezed by the Confederate States Navy in the Civil War and burnt to prevent recapture by the United States Navy.

61. On 28 February 1844, the Screw Steamer USS Princeton departed Alexandria, Virginia, on a pleasure and trial trip down the Potomac River with President John Tyler and his cabinet and approximately two hundred guests on board. After the final firing of Commodore Stockton's Peacemaker cannon, the defective gun finally burst, which instantly killed Secretary of State Abel P. Upshur; Secretary of the Navy Thomas Gilmer; Captain Beverly Kennon (Chief of the Bureau of Construction Equipment and Repairs); Rep.Vigil Maxey of Maryland (Chargé d'Affaires to Belgium 1837-42); Rep. David Gardiner of New York; and the President Tyler's valet, a black slave named Armistead. The explosion also injured about 20 other people, including Stockton.

62. Gustavo's Higdon was the owner of a dry goods store on L Street. He did a lot of business with the Washington Navy Yard and probably knew Michael Shiner through these transactions.

63. Starboard is the right side of a ship or vessel.

64. Commodore Charles S. McCauley was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 1 September 1846 to 1 October 1849.

65. On 9 August 1849 Michael Shiner married Jane Jackson (Feb. 1834 - April 21, 1884) in Washington, DC. Michael Shiner's diary does not have any reference to his second marriage or what became of his first wife, Phillis. His Diary is simply silent as to his family life with Janet Jackson, and the couple's children.

66. The 1850 US census for Washington, DC, 6th Ward, reflects that Michel Shiner was born in DC (1860 census states Maryland, as does the 1880 census for his daughter Mary, where she listed her father's birthplace as Maryland). The 1850 cenusus states that he was then 46 years old and lived with Jane Jackson Shiner, 19 years old, daughter Sarah E., 12 years old, son Isaac M., 5 years old and their infant son Braxton, 6 months old. Michael Shiner's occupation is listed in 1850 as painter. The census taker has listed Michael as black and stated that he is unable to read or write. Phillis Shiner (Michael Shiner's first wife) most likely died sometime after 1833, but there is no record reflecting the event. Based on the ages of the children, a date of circa 1848 seems probable. The 1850 census listed the total population of the District of Columbia as: 51,687, consisting of: White 37,941; Free Negro 10,059; and Slave 3,687. The Sixth Ward where Michael Shiner and his family resided had 46 male and 64 female slaves.

67. Joseph Mundell was born in Antrim County, Ireland, in 1809. He emmigrated to Philadelphia in 1827. Mundell enlisted first in the United States Army, serving eight years. He later joined the United States Marine Corps, where he served 25 years. Mundell served in both the Florida - Seminole and Mexican Wars. In all, he served for 33 years, rising to the rank of Marine Corps Quartermaster Sergeant. After his retirement he lived in Washington, DC, Ward 6 and went to work at the Washington Navy Yard as watchmen. He and his wife Martha had 11 children. Two of his daughters, Ellen and Anna, later worked for the US Treasury as currency folders. In 1851 in a notorious case referred to in Michael Shiner's Diary (see page 107), Joseph Mundell's 14 year old son Samuel Mundell was murdered by William Wells Marin in a dispute during a hunting excursion. Two of Joseph Mundell's other sons, Joseph Jr. and Jared Mundell, both served in the Civil War. After the war, Joseph Mundell's son, Jared, also went to work at the Washington Navy Yard where he labored for over half a century before retiring in 1920 as the yard's oldest male employee. Joseph Mundell died of consumption on 9 September 1874 and is buried at the Congressional Cemetery (R35/ 178).

68. Henry E. Ballard was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 1 October 1849 to 15 October 1852.

Lajes Louis Kossuth 1802-1894 was a noted Hungarian patriot who led a failed revolution against Russian rule. After the 1848 Hungarian Rebellion he went into exile and visited the United States. Kossuth was immensely popular and given an enthusiastic reception in Washington, DC.

69. The Marine Railway was invented by Commodore John Rodgers in 1822 at the Washington Navy Yard. Basically the railway was a rail track used to move a vessel from the water. In Michael Shiner's era, manpower alone was used to move a vessel or ship up the railway, like iron rails to a ship house. This procedure was later mechanized with steam winches providing the motive power.

70. Captain Charles W. Morgan was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 15 October 1852 to 5 January 1853.

71. In 1852, then Secretary of the Navy John P. Kennedy, arbitrarily attempted to set aside President Van Buren's 1840 ten hour workday order, and in order to increase production at Charlestown and Washington Navy Yard issued his own order to begin the workday at both yards an hour earlier, or from sunrise to sunset. This effectively extended the workday to eleven hours. At the Charlestown Navy Yard, Secretary Kennedy's order resulted in a strike of three hundred mechanics and laborers. At the Washington Navy Yard, employees also began work stoppages. Secretary Kennedy's order was quickly rescinded just forty-eight hours after it was issued and both yards returned to work.

72. Charles King was 19 years old. His father Martin King was a successful merchant.

73. John Rose was appointed to his position before the War of 1812. He was paid a salary of $1,500.00 per year.

74. George Edwards was a US Marine Corps' musician, 41 years of age, and lived in the 6th Ward with his wife Mary and three children. The George Edwards family lived one house away from Michael Shiner.

75. John H. Peake was Michael Shiner's Forman after the death of Phillip Inch. John H. Peake was born 1817 in the District of Columbia. In the 1850 census for the District of Columbia, Peake stated he owned his own residence (which was valued at $900.00) in Ward number 6. Peake was married, with one child, and continued to work for the Washington Navy Yard for many years. Peake later opened a paint store and (according to the 1870 census), by 1870 he owned real estate valued at $6,000.00. He died sometime after 1880.

Captain Hiram Paulding was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 21 January 1853 to 30 June 1855.

76. Philip Barton Key was born in 1818, in Georgetown, in the District of Columb, and died 27 February 1859, in Washington, DC. He was the son of Francis Scott Key, the author of the lyrics to the National Anthem. Philip Barton Key was for a number of years the United States Attorney for the District of Columbia. In 1859 Congressman Daniel Sickles shot and killed Phillip Barton Key for having had an affair with his wife, Teresa Bagioli Sickles. The murder took place on Lafayette Square, just across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House. Sickles was acquitted on the basis of temporary insanity in one of the most controversial trials of the 19th century.

77. On Christmas Day, 1853, the San Francisco, was disabled and on 6 January 1854, she foundered with a loss of more than 200 lives. Upwards of 500 passengers were saved principally by the splendid work of the following ships: The Three Bells of Glasgow, the Antarctic from San Francisco and the Bark Kilby.

78. Many shipyard families maintained a tradition of working at Washington Navy Yard. The McCathran family served at the Yard until the 1940s.

79. Casting was always dangerous at Washington Navy Yard since super heated metals could crack the mold or slop over and burn the workers and destroy the cast.

80. Commodore French Forrest was the Commandant of Washington Navy Yard from 30 June 1855 to 15 August 1855.

81. The snowfall of 17 January 1857 affected many of the cities of the eastern United States. Washington, DC recorded a snowfall total of 24 inches. This storm, as Michael Shiner notes, was unique for its extreme cold and very high winds.

82. The "Plug Uglies" were an urban gang affiliated with the "Know-Nothing" Party. They were based originally in Baltimore, but spread rapidly to Washington, DC and other cities. In 1857 the Plug Uglies were brought to the District where they instigated a bloody riot involving over one thousand people in the District of Columbia. They were trying to prevent Irish-Americans from voting in Washington, DC's municipal elections. Ultimately six people were killed and many wounded before the Marines were able to suppress the fighting. According to one historian the Plug Uglies took their name from the large plug hats they wore.

83. Bell Boats were the design of James Buchanan Eads, one of the most outstanding civil engineers of the 19th century. Eads is noted for his development of diving bell techniques to salvage sunken steamboats. Eads' attention was attracted by the numerous losses of boats and cargoes. In 1842 he patented an adaptation of the diving bell and engaged in the salvage business. He built the first of a series of "bell boats" bearing the name Submarine and became very successful. The Navy Department used these boats to clear channels of underwater obstructions.

84. William Walker (1824-1860) was a physician, lawyer, and soldier of fortune who attempted to create an empire in South America. He overthrew the government of Nicaragua in 1856 and was briefly president of that country. Walker later attempted a similar venture in Honduras that resulted in his capture and execution by firing squad. William Walker held racist views and advocated setting up an agricultural empire based on slavery. His rash actions in Central America were lauded by many in the southern states where he was perceived of as man of destiny. Michael Shiner's praise for his former Washington Navy Yard Commandant, Commodore Hiram Paulding, stands out since Shiner seldom discusses his own political views. Commodore Paulding was the subject of severe criticism by southern senators once word of his arrest of William Walker reached Washington, DC.

85. Phillip Otterbach (1796-1858) was a butcher and resident of the 6th Ward. Otterbach was German immigrant who ran a very successful business. The 1850 Washington, DC Census indicates that he owned real estate valued at $125,000.00. His relationship to Michael Shiner is unclear.

86. Captain Ellie A.F. Lavellette was Commandant of Washington Navy Yard from 15 August 1856 to 14 May 1858.

87. The comet Michael Shiner observed was comet C/1858 L 1 (Donati) discovered in June, 1858 and widely visible during September, 1858. [Source: Email to John Sharp from Dan Green, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, dated 21 February 2007.]

88. Captain Franklin Buchanan was Commandant from Washington Navy Yard from 26 May 1859 to 22 April 1861. Shortly after the events Michael Shiner recounts, Captain Buchanan resigned his commission and joined the new Navy of the Confederate States, where he became a Rear Admiral.

89. John Brown was often called "Osawatomie Brown" because of his leadership of an anti-slavery group, which defended Osawatomie, Kansas (a town founded by abolitionists) against pro-slavery attackers on 30 August 1856. When Brown's "Army" was dispersed, the pro-slavery attackers destroyed the town. For more information on John Brown and the Battle of Osawatomie, see http://kansastravel.org/johnbrownmuseum.htm.

90. The 1850 U.S. Census for Washington, DC lists Michael Shiner as living in the 6th Ward, 55 years of age with his wife, Jane Jackson, 29 years old; daughter Sarah E., 21 years old; son Isaac M., 6 years old; daughter Rose Ann, 8 years old; and daughter Jane M., 3 years old. Michel Shiner is listed on the 1850 Census as a painter, with property worth $800.00. The 1850 Census lists Michael Shiner as being born in Maryland. The same census shows all of Michael Shiner's immediate neighbors being white.

91. Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren was the Washington Navy Yard's Commandant from 22 April 1861 to 22 July 1863.

92. The 1861 oath reads as follows: "I do solemnly swear that I will bear true allegiance to the United States of America and that I will serve them honestly and faithfully without any mental reservations against all enemies or opponents whatsoever; that I will observe and obey orders of the President of the United States and the officer appointed over me; according to the rules and articles for government of the United States." In all, over 400 Washington Navy Yard workers swore allegiance, while 37 chose not to take the oath and were dismissed.

93. The 1860 US Census for DC listed a total population of 75,080. Of this total, the inhabitants were broken down as follows: 60,764 White; 11,131 Free Negro; and 3,185 Slave. In Michael Shiner's immediate neighborhood,Ward 6 (where his family resided), the 1860 Slave Census listed 32 male and 48 female slave inhabitants.

94. Commodore John B. Montgomery was Commandant of the Washington Navy Yard from 31 December 1863 to 13 October 1865. Rear Admiral L. M. Goldsborough was Commandant of Washington Navy Yard from 14 October 1870 to 1 October 1873.

95. On the day of Lincoln's second inaugural, Noah Adams, another observer, noticed the same phenomena as did Michael Shiner. Adams recounted that as President Lincoln rose to speak: "Just at that moment the sun which had been obscured all day burst forth in its unclouded meridian of splendor and flooded the spectacle with glory and light." Quoted in Ronald C. White, Lincoln's Greatest Speech The Second Inaugural (New York, NY: Simon & Schuster, 2005): 42.

96. On Good Friday in the late afternoon, President and Mrs. Lincoln went for a drive. They stopped in the Washington Navy Yard to view three monitors recently damaged in engagement in Fort Fisher, NC. The President talked of the time when could return to Illinois and live quietly. Pratt, Personal Finances, page 124; Rufus R. Wilson ed. Intimate Memories of Lincoln. (Elmira, NY: Primavera Press, 1942) 430.


Note: The Navy Department Library gratefully acknowledges John G. Sharp, former Assistant to the Director, Human Resources Office Washington, Washington Navy Yard (retired), for providing the above transcription, introduction and notes to the diary of Michael Shiner.


Source: Library of Congress MSS 20.957 microfilm