List of Expeditions 1901-1929

United States.
Office of Naval Intelligence
Navy Department Washington, D.C.

17 June, 1929.

A Study made in the Office of Naval Intelligence by Lieut-Col. R.B. Farquharson, U.S. Marine Corps, of expeditions formed and landings effected by U.S. Naval Forces, in Central America, Mexico and West Indies, from 1901 to 1 May, 1929.

Distribution:
Copy to State Department.
Copy to Headquarters, U.S. Marine Corps.
Copy to Commander Special Service Squadron.
Copy to Military Intelligence Division.
Copy to Archives, Office of Naval Intelligence.
Copy to Navy Department Library.

Table of Contents

Cover Letter 1906 1912
1901 1907
1902
1903
1904
1905

-------

Cover Letter
File No. A16-3/3-1753
P-CNR

Commander U.S. Special Service Squadron
U.S.S. Rochester, Flagship.

Balboa, Canal Zone
4 September 1929.

From: Commander Special Service Squadron
To: Director of Naval Intelligence.

Subject: Expeditions formed and landings effected by U.S. Naval Forces in Central America, Mexico, and West Indies from 1901 to 1 May 1929.

Reference: (a) Letter, Director of Naval Intelligence to Comsperon, dated 18 June 1929. File, Op-16-C.

1. The study referred to in the above reference does not agree with data on hand in this Squadron, as follows:

(a) 6 September 1919, U.S.S. Cleveland, landed 2 officers and 24 bluejackets under Lieutenant T. Gibson, U.S.N., at Puerto Cortez, Honduras, to protect American lives and property. Withdrawn same date.

(b) 9 September 1919, U.S.S. Cleveland landed same party at Puerto Cortez, Honduras, to protect American lives and property. Withdrawn on 12 September 1919.

(c) 7 March 1924, party from U.S.S. Denver landed at Tela, Honduras.

(d) 9 March 1924, party from U.S.S. Denver landed at Tela, Honduras.

(e) 7 May 1926, landing party of U.S.S. Cleveland at Bluefields, Nicaragua, consisted of 213 officers and men under Lieutenant Commander S.S. Lewis, U.S.N.

(f) 27 August 1926, landing party of U.S.S. Galveston at Bluefields, Nicaragua, consisted of Navy (135) officers, (8) Marines, (52) officers (1) under Lieutenant Commander W.N. Richardson, Jr., U.S.N.

(g) 31 October 1926, 46 Marines, Lieutenant Commander H.E. Ertz, U.S.N., and three other officers left U.S.S. Rochester for duty at Bluefields, Nicaragua.

(h) 30 November 1926, landing party of U.S.S. Denver at Bluefields, Nicaragua, consisted of 103 men and 6 officers.

(i) 6 January 1927, landing party of U.S.S. Galveston at Managua, Nicaragua, was commanded by Lieutenant Commander W.N. Richardson, U.S.N. It was withdrawn 1 February 1927.

(j) 7 January 1927, landing party of U.S.S. Cleveland at Rio Grande, Nicaragua, had 5 naval officers and 1 Marine officer.

(k) 30 February 1927, landing party of U.S.S. Galveston at Leon Nicaragua, consisted of Navy (128) officers (6), Marines (54), officers (1), commanded by Lieutenant Commander W.N. Richardson, U.S.N., who was relieved on 21 May 1927, by Lieutenant Commander B.H. Lingo, U.S.N.

(l) 23 September 1927, U.S.S. Cleveland landed 27 Marines under First Lieutenant C.S. Finch, U.S.M.C., at Bragman’s Bluff, Nicaragua, to relieve landing force of U.S.S. Tulsa. Withdrawn 26 September 1927.

(m) 7 January 1928, U.S.S. Rochester landed marine detachment at Corinto, Nicaraga, for duty in Managua, Nicaragua, under Captain F.A. Hart, U.S.M.C.

(n) 14 March 1928, U.S.S. Denver’s landing party consisted of 101 men, Navy and 4 officers, under command of Lieutenant Commander W.N. Richardson, U.S.N.

(o) 30 April 1928, landing party of U.S.S. Galveston at Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, was command by First Lieutenant D.M. Taft, U.S.M.C., who was relieved on 8 October 1928, by First Lieutenant E.A. Pollock, U.S.M.C.

E.H. Campbell


This report was prepared May 1, 1929.
A List of Expeditions Formed and Landings Effected by the U.S. Naval Forces in Central America, Mexico and the West Indies, from 1901 to May 1, 1929.

NOTE - Each section is organized by:

Date
Name of Country
Name of Ship(s)
General Remarks in regard to the Landing Parties (reason for landings, etc.)
Casualties in Action (KA-Killed in Action, DW-Died of Wounds, WIA-Wounded in Action)

----------------------------------------------------------------

1901

Colombia (Isthmus of Panama)

U.S.S. Machias 26 Aug. to 10 Dec. 1901
20 November, 1901, a landing force consisting of 2 officers and 28 men, under the command of Ensign W.S. Miller, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias at Colon, Colombia, for the purpose of protecting American interests.

29 November, 1901, in addition to the men already ashore, a bluejacket company consisting of 40 men, under command of Ensign W.R. White, U.S. Navy, landed and returned to the ship the same day.

20 November, 1901, the Marine detachments from the U.S.S. Machias and Marietta, under command of Naval Cadet S. Gannon, U.S. Navy, took over the policing of the town and continued on that duty until December 2, 1901, when these detachments were returned to their respective ships.

U.S.S. Marietta 25 Nov. to 22 Dec. 1901
25 November, 1901, a landing force under the command of Ensign C.T. Owens, U.S. Navy, was landed at Colon, Colombia, and remained on duty until December 2, 1901, when the detachment returned aboard ship.

U.S.S. Concord 23 Nov. 1901 to 9 Jan. 1902
24 November, 1901, a landing force consisting of 2 officers, 12 marines, 54 bluejackets and 12 auxiliaries (special details), under the command of Lieutenant J.S. Sticht, U.S. Navy, was landed at Balboa, Colombia, for the purpose of protecting American interests and keeping open the Panama Railroad from Balboa to Colon. This detachment returned aboard the Concord on December 3, 1901.

U.S.S. Iowa 7 Sept. to 12 Dec. 1901
24 November, 1901, a landing force consisting of 12 officers, 233 marines and bluejackets, under the command of Lt. Comdr. George H. Peters, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Iowa at Panama City, Colombia, for the protection of American interests and the maintenance of railway communications from Panama City to Colon. Lt. Comdr. George H. Peters was in command of all U.S. Naval Forces on shore at Balboa and Colon. The artillery company and the Third Company of Infantry returned on board the U.S.S. Iowa on December 3, 1901. The balance of the battalion returned on board December 4, 1901.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1902

Colombia (Isthmus of Panama)

U.S.S. Machias 16 Apr. to 22 Apr. 1902
16 April, 1902, a landing force consisting of one naval cadet and 28 enlisted men, under the command of Ensign W.M. Hunt, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias at Bocas del Toro, Colombia. The Marine detachment of the U.S.S. Machias was landed on April 16, 1902, and relieved the bluejacket landing force on shore on April 18, 1902, which returned to the ship. The Marine detachment on shore returned on board April 19th, 1902.

20 April, 1902, the original landing force which was sent ashore on April 16, was again landed.

21 April, 1902, the First Sargeant of the marines with two corporals and eight privates was sent ashore to augment the bluejacket landing force.

22 April, 1902, Marines and bluejacket landing force returned to ship. These forces were sent ashore to protect American Interests.

U.S.S. Cincinannti 15 Sept. to 8 Oct. 1902
17 September, 1902, a landing force consisting of 2 officers and 50 men under the command of Lieutenant D.W. Blamer, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cincinnati at Colon, Colombia, as train guards on the Panama Railroad from Colon to Panama City. On the same date another landing force consisting of 30 men under the command of Ensign Kautz was landed at Colon, Colombia, as a train guard. Both detachments returned to the ship that evening. The U.S.S. Cincinnati furnished train guards, consisting of 20 to 40 men, daily to include October 5, 1902.

19 September, 1902, a landing force consisting of 66 men under the command of Lt. Comdr. Gillmore was landed at Colon, but returned aboard ship the same day.

23 September, 1902, Commander N.E. Mason, U.S. Navy, was in command of all the Naval forces on shore until October 15, 1902, when he was relieved of this duty by Lt. Col. B.R. Russell, U.S.M.C., by order of the Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Naval Forces of the Pacific Station.

U.S.S. Ranger 26 Jun. to 26 Oct. 1902
Note- - This vessel was located off Panama City, but apparently did not land a landing force.

U.S.S. Wisconsin Flagship 30 Sep. to 22 Nov. 1902
Note - Anchored off Panama City. Did not land a landing force.

U.S.S. Panther 22 Sep. to 18 Nov. 1902
14 September, 1902, a battalion of marines consisting of 4 companies with a total strength of 17 officers and 325 enlisted men, under the command of Lt. Col. B.R. Russell, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Panther from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pennsylvania, and arrived at Colon, Colombia, September 22, 1902. The battalion disembarked at Colon for the purpose of protecting lives and property of American interests, and furnished train guards on the Panama Railroad on September 23, 1902. One company of marines consisting of 80 men under the command of Major George Barnett, U.S.M.C., was stationed at Colon. The remaining three companies under the command of Lt.Col. B.R. Russell proceeded to Panama City. A train guard consisting of one officer and 40 men was landed daily from the U.S.S. Panther from September 28 to and including October 10th, 1902. The marine battalion was withdrawn from the Isthmus and embarked on board the U.S.S. Panther on November 18, 1902. The U.S.S. Panther sailed on November 18, 1902, for Culebra, Virgin Islands, for duty in connection with the winter maneuvers and arrived at League Island, Pa., on December 9, 1902 where the marine battalion was disembarked.

Casualties in Action: 1 Pvt. - Marines - Died of Yellow Fever.


1903

Dominican Republic

U.S.S. Atlanta 30 Mar. to 20 Apr. 1903

1 April, 1903, a detachment of marines consisting of 29 men under the command of First Lieutenant Richard G. McConnell, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S Atlanta at Santo Domingo City, as a legation guard, and remained on shore until April 20, 1903.

U.S.S. Prairie
5 November, 1902, a provisional regiment of marines, consisting of 19 officers and 522 enlisted men under the command of Colonel P.C. Pope, U.S.M.C. was assembled and embarked at Philadelphia, Pa., and Hampton Roads, Va., on board the U.S.S. Prairie, which sailed from the latter place for Culebra, Virgin Islands, arriving there on November 20, 1902. The regiment was disembarked and went into camp. On Jan. 3, 1903, Colonel Pope and a number of officers and men of the command were detached and ordered to the United States on the U.S.S. Prairie.

Casualties in Action: None.


1903

Panama

Note: Panama declared her independence from the Republic of Colombia on November 3, 1903.

Note: Owing to approaching revolution the late President Roosevelt directed the Navy Department to issue orders that would insure having ships within reach of the Isthmus in the event of a need arising.

U.S.S. Panther and U.S.S. Dixie
14 July, 1903, the officers and men of the battalion who remained at Culebra were assigned to duty on board the U.S.S. Panther and sailed for the coast of Maine for the purpose of taking part in the army and navy maneuvers. The Panther arrived at Frenchman’s Bay on July 23, 1903. Later the vessel went to League Island, Pa., arriving there Sept. 9, 1903, and placed out of commission. The marine force on board under the command of Major John A. Lejeune, U.S.M.C., was transferred to the U.S.S. Dixie, and the force increased to 10 officers and 393 enlisted men. Owing to the disturbed conditions in the Republic of Colombia, the U.S.S. Dixie sailed from League Island, Pa., on October 24, 1903 via Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for Colon, Panama, where the vessel arrived on Nov. 5, 1903. The battalion was disembarked and west into camp at Empire.

U.S.S. Prairie
9 November, 1903, a battalion of marines consisting of 11 officers and 301 enlisted men under the command of Major Lewis C. Lucas, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Prairie from the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 10 December, 1903 the marine battalion on board the U.S.S. Prairie, under command of Major L.C.Lucas, U.S.M.C., and a bluejacket company from each of the following ships: U.S.S. Alabama, Illinois, Kearsarge, Massachusetts and Prairie, were landed under the command of Lt. Comdr. Allen and participated in the ceremonies incident to the raising of the flag on McCalla Hill on the U.S. Naval Reservation at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. These organizations returned to their respective ships on the same date. The services of this battalion being required on the Isthmus of Panama, the U.S.S. Prairie sailed December 11, 1903, for Colon, Panama. A portion of the battalion was disembarked on December 14th and 21st and the balance on 24 December, and went into camp at Bas Obispo, Republic of Panama. This battalion embarked February 14, 1904, on board the U.S.S. Prairie, which sailed the next day for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where the battalion was disembarked on February 19, 1904, and remained in camp there until May 10, 1904, when it embarked on board the U.S.S. Dixie, which sailed the same date for the United States arriving at League Island Navy Yard, Pa., on May 14, 1904. The battalion of 7 officers and 325 men under the command of Major L.C. Lucas, U.S.M.C., was disembarked on May 16th, 1904.

U.S.S. Dixie
28 December, 1903, two battalions of marines under the command of Majors Eli K. Cole, and James J. Mahoney, U.S.M.C., consisting of 635 officers and men, were assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Dixie from Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., for Colon, Republic of Panama.

Brig. Gen. George F. Elliott, the Brigade Commander and Lieutenant Colonels William P. Biddle and Littleton W. Waller, the regimental commanders of the 1st and 2nd regiments, respectively, were also passengers. The Dixie arrived at Colon on January 3, 1904. Major Cole’s battalion was disembarked on January 7th, and went into camp at Empire. Major Mahoney’s battalion was disembarked on January 8th and went into camp at Bas Obispo.

The Headquarters of the Brigade was established at Haute Obispo; The 1st Regiment at Empire, and 2nd Regiment at Bas Obispo.

16 February, 1904, the Brigade Commander was detached and ordered to Washington, D.C. A few days later both regimental commanders and Major Mahoney were detached and ordered to the United States. There was a general reassignment among the battalions. Major Cole in command of 7 officers and 357 enlisted men embarked on board the U.S.S. Dixie on 24 February, 1904, and arrived at the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., on March 26, 1904, where the battalion was disembarked.

U.S.S. Yankee
Major John A. Lejeune in command of a battalion, consisting of 10 officers and 407 enlisted men, remained on duty in the Isthmus of Panama until December 22, 1904, when his battalion was relieved by a battalion under Major Thomas S. Wood, and embarked on board the U.S.S. Yankee and sailed for the United States. A provisional battalion of marines varying in strength was maintained on duty in the Isthmus of Panama until 21 January, 1914, when the post was permanently abandoned.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1903

Republic of Panama

U.S.S. Nashville 2 Nov. 1903 to 26 Feb. 1904
4 November, 1903, a landing force consisting of one officer and 42 men under the command of Lt. Comdr. H.M. Witzel, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Nashville, at Colon, Republic of Panama. The landing force returned to the ship the same day.

5 November, 1903, a landing force of 30 bluejackets under Lt. Comdr. Witzel landed and took possession of and barricaded the railroad office building at Colon. The marine guard was also sent ashore with 2-1 pdrs., and mounts, which were mounted on a flat car. The landing force was relieved ashore late the same day by a landing force from the U.S.S. Dixie.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1904

Dominican Republic

Note: A revolution against the Government of Dr. Morales had been keeping the Dominican Republic in a turmoil for some months. The Navy Department early in 1904 ordered the U.S.S. Detroit to proceed to Dominican waters and attempt to bring peace between the contending factions as well as to protect American lives and property wherever they might be endangered.

U.S.S. Detroit 1 Jan. 1904 to 13 Jun. 1904
4 January, 1904, a marine detachment under the command of Ensign C.H. Fischer, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Detroit, at Sosua, about ten miles to the eastward of Puerto Plata, D.R., to protect American interests, and remained in this locality until January 15, 1904.

7 January, 1904, a detachment of ten men under the command of Ensign. J.M. Caffrey, U.S. Navy, was landed at Puerto Plata as a consulate guard. A landing force of bluejackets and marines was sent ashore at Puerto Plata, D.R., on January 17, 1904, and returned on board same day, with the exception of the marine guard which took over the duties as consulate guard and remained on shore until Jan. 23, 1904, when it was withdrawn.

U.S.S. Newark 9 Feb. to 12 Feb. 1904; 3 Jun. to 24 Aug. 1904; 22 Jan. to 8 Apr. 1905
U.S.S. Columbia 14 Jan. to 4 Mar. 1904
11 February, 1904, in view of the fact that the revolutionists who occupied Santo Domingo City, D.R., had violated the armistice agreement by firing on the Clyde Line Steamer New York, a landing force of 8 officers and 200 men was landed from the U.S.S. Newark at that place. On the same afternoon a landing force consisting of 6 officers, 119 bluejackets and 38 marines was landed from the U.S.S. Columbia at the same place. The landing forces from both ships were under the command of Lt.Comdr. J.P. Parker, U.S. Navy, the Executive Officer of the U.S.S. Columbia. The revolutionists opened fire on the landing forces, who were supported by fire from the ships which drove the revolutionists out of the city. The landing forces returned on board their respective ships that evening.

Casualties in Action: One man from the U.S.S. Columbia accidentally wounded by discharge of his own revolver.


1905

Dominican Republic

U.S.S. Dixie
6 January, 1905, owing to the disturbed political conditions in the Dominican Republic, Companies A and B, of the Panama battalion, consisting of 6 officers and 169 enlisted men, under the command of Captain W.N. McKelvy, was embarked on board the U.S.S. Dixie at Colon, Panama, and sailed the same date for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, enroute to Dominican waters.

U.S.S. Yankee
24 March, 1905, this floating battalion was transferred to the U.S.S. Yankee, at Monte Cristi, Dominican Republic. The U.S.S. Yankee remained in Dominican waters until August 21, 1906, when she sailed to the United States, arriving at the Navy Yard, League Island, Penn., on September 14, 1906, when the battalion disembarked and demobilized.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1906

Republic of Panama

U.S.S. Columbia
21 May, 1906, a special expeditionary battalion consisting of 15 officers and 400 enlisted men, under the command of Major John. A. Lejeune, was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Columbia from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., for temporary service on the Isthmus of Panama. Lt. Col. James E. Mahoney embarked as a passenger. This force was disembarked from the U.S.S. Columbia at Colon, R.P., on May 29, 1906, and Lt. Col. Mahoney on June 4, 1906, assumed command of all the marines on the Isthmus. On July 6, 1906, the special duty for which they had been sent to the Isthmus having been completed, Lt. Col. Mahoney was detached, and the battalion under the command of Major Lejeune, consisting of 14 officers and 383 enlisted men was reembarked on the U.S.S. Columbia, and sailed for Monte Cristi, D.R., enroute to the United States. On July 12, 1906, 2 officers and 98 enlisted men of Major Lejeune’s battalion were transferred to the U.S.S. Dixie as part of an expeditionary force on that vessel. The rest of Major Lejeune’s battalion remained on board the U.S.S. Columbia and reached the United States on July 21, 1906, when the battalion was disembarked.

U.S.S. Dixie
30 June, 1906, a marine battalion consisting of 7 officers and 204 enlisted men under the command of Major Albertus W. Catlin, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Dixie, for Monte Cristi, D.R. This battalion was augmented on July 12, 1906, by the transfer of one company from Major Lejeune’s battalion from the U.S.S. Columbia. On August 15, 1906, the company from the U.S.S. Columbia was transferred to the U.S.S. Yankee.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1906

Dominican Republic

U.S.S. Dixie
30 June, 1906, owing to the disturbed political conditions in the Dominican Republic, a battalion of marines, consisting of 7 officers and 204 enlisted men, under the command of Major Albertus W. Catlin, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Dixie, from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., for Monte Cristi, D.R.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1906

Cuba

Note: Following the reelection of Thomas E. Palma as President of the Republic of Cuba in August, 1906, his political opponents began an armed insurrection against his government which quickly assumed serious proportions. President Palma expressed a wish that American warships be sent at once to Havana, and Cienfuegos to protect foreign lives and property.

U.S.S. Denver
13 September, 1906, a landing force consisting of 6 officers and 124 bluejackets and marines, under the command of Lt. Comdr. M.L. Miller, U.S. Navy was landed from the U.S.S. Denver at Havana, Cuba. This landing force returned on board the U.S.S. Denver on September 14, 1906.

U.S.S. Marietta
14 September, 1906, a landing force consisting of 1 Midshipman and 31 men, under the command of Ensign F. Rorschach, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Marietta, at Cienfuegos, Cuba, at the earnest solicitation of Mr. Hughes, Manager of Soledad Sugar Estate (American). On September 21, 1906, this force was reduced to 7 men under Midshipmen H. Brown.

15 September, 1906, a landing force consisting of 34 men, under the command of Lieut. J.V. Klemann, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Marietta at Cienfuegos, Cuba, at the urgent request of Mr. R.B. Childs for the protection of the Constancia Sugar Plantation. On September 21, 1906, this force was reduced to 11 men under Midshipman E.S. Robinson.

25 September, 1906, a landing force consisting of 4 officers, 64 bluejackets and 22 marines, under the command of Lt. J.V. Kelmann , U.S. Navy was landed at Cienfuegos, Cuba, and proceeded to Palmira, Cuba, to protect Cuban Central R.R. Lt. Klemann, 1 Midshipman, 10 bluejackets and 22 marines returned the same day.

26 September, 1906, a landing force consisting of 1 Midshipman, 10 bluejackets and 21 marines, under the command of Lt. J.V. Kelmann, U.S. Navy, was landed at Cienfuegos, Cuba, and proceeded by rail to Sague la Grande, Cuba, to protect interests of Cuban Central R.R. This force was relieved by marines on September 27, 1906. All detachments from U.S.S. Marietta were relieved by October 1, 1906, and returned aboard ship.

U.S.S. Dixie
12 September, 1906, the marine force on board the U.S.S. Dixie which was despatched to Dominican waters was augmented at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, by 1 officer and 110 men under the command of 1st Lt. H.O. Smith, U.S.M.C., whose company joined the battalion from the U.S.S. Columbia.

18 September, 1906, the following detachments were landed from the U.S.S. Dixie at Cienfuegos, Cuba: 1 officer and 50 men under the command 1st Lieutenant W.E. Parker to the Constancia Sugar Plantation; 25 men under the command of 2nd Lieut. R.T. Shepard to the Soledad Sugar Plantation; and on the following day 4 officers and 125 men under the command of Major A.W. Catlin was sent to the Homiguena Sugar Plantation.

U.S.S. Minneapolis
18 September, 1906, the Second Expeditionary battalion of marines, consisting of 16 officers and 357 enlisted men, under the command of Lt. Col. George Barnett, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Minneapolis, and was disembarked at Havana, Cuba, on September 23, 1906.

U.S.S. Tacoma; U.S.S. Newark
17 September, 1906, the Third Expeditionary battalion of marines, consisting of 15 officers and 397 men, under the command of Major T.P. Kane, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from Hampton Roads, Virginia, on board the U.S.S. Tacoma, and arrived at Havana, Cuba, on 21 September, 1906. One officer and 69 men under the command of Capt. W. Harllee was transferred to the U.S.S. Newark. This detachment was disembarked on October 3, 1906, from the U.S.S. Newark at Neuvitas, Cuba. Two officers and 98 men, under the command of Capt. W. McCreary was disembarked from the U.S.S. Tacoma at Tunas, Cuba, on October 3, 1906.

U.S.S. Brooklyn; U.S.S. Prairie
2 October, 1906, the Fourth Expeditionary battalion of marines consisting of 18 officers and 550 men, under command of Lieut. Col. F.J. Moses, of which 15 officers and 374 enlisted men were assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Brooklyn, from the Navy Yard, League Island, Pa. Three officers and 176 enlisted men were assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Prairie from Boston, Mass., on October 1, 1926 [probably meant 1906]. This battalion disembarked at Havana, Cuba, on Oct. 8, 1906.

U.S.S. Texas
The Fifth Expeditionary battalion of marines, consisted of 16 officers and 445 enlisted men, under the command of Major E.R. Lowdnes, U.S.M.C., Of this number 8 officers and 240 enlisted men, took passage on the U.S.S. Texas. Detachments from Key West, Fla., and New Orleans, La., joined the battalion by rail and steamer. Men and officers on board Texas were disembarked at Havana, Cuba, on October 8, 1906.

U.S.S. Kentucky
The marine detachments of the U.S.S. Maine, Missouri and Kearsarge took passage on the U.S.S. Kentucky to Havana, Cuba, and with the marine detachment of the latter vessel were disembarked at Havana, Cuba, on October 1, 1906.

U.S.S. Indiana
The marine detachments of the U.S.S. Iowa, Alabama and Illinois took passage on the U.S.S. Indiana, to Havana, Cuba, and with the marine detachment of the latter vessel were disembarked at Havana, Cuba, on October 1, 1906.

The marine detachments of the U.S.S. Louisiana, New Jersey and Virginia were likewise landed from these vessels at Havana, Cuba, on or about Sept. 30, 1906.

By the middle of November, 1906, all marine detachments had been detached from duty in Cuba, and joined their respective ships in the North Atlantic Squadron.

U.S.S. Dixie
2 October, 1906, one officer and 59 men under the command of Captain W.W. Low, U.S.M.C., from the M.B. Naval Station, San Juan, P.R., and one officer and 64 men, under the command of Captain Thomas F. Lyons, U.S.M.C., from the M.B. Naval Station, Culebra, Virgin Islands, were embarked on board the U.S.S. Dixie at San Juan, P.R. The Dixie remained off Monte Cristi, D.R., from October 6 - 24, 1906, when the detachments on board were returned to their respective stations on October 25 & 26, 1906.

The entire force of marines concentrated in Cuba, consisted of 97 officers and 2,795 enlisted men under the command of Colonel L.W.T. Waller, U.S.M.C.

The expeditionary force was by subsequent detachments reduced on October 1, 1907 to the strength of 39 officers and 891 enlisted men, under Lt. Col. F.J. Moses, U.S.M.C.

Note: For further details see page 1281, Report of the Secretary of the Navy, for the fiscal year of 1907.

The provisional regiment of marines which served with the U.S. Army in the Cuban Pacification from October 7, 1906, was withdrawn on January 23, 1909 and returned to the United States.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1907

Honduras

While Honduras and Nicaragua were at war in 1907, the U.S.S. Marietta was sent by the Navy Department to protect American interests along the eastern coast of Central America.

U.S.S. Marietta 18 Mar to 1 Jun 1907
18 March, 1907, a detachment of men, under the command of Ensign F. Rorshach, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Marietta as a consulate guard at Truxillo, Honduras. On the same date a similar detachment, under the command of Ensign L.N. McNair, U.S. Navy, was landed at La Ceiba, Honduras. These detachments returned on board April 11, 1907.

26 March, 1907, a detachment of 12 men, under the command of Ensign E.S. Robinson, U.S. Navy was landed at Puerto Cortes, Honduras. This force was augmented from day to day. On April 2nd Lieutenant J.V. Klemann, U.S. Navy, went ashore to take command of the landing party. On April 5th the force marched to San Pedro Sula, distance of about 30 miles into the interior.

11 April 1907, a detachment of 10 men, under the command of Ensign C.W. Densmore, U.S. Navy, was landed at Taylor, Honduras, and returned aboard the same evening.

Various detachments were landed from the U.S.S.Marietta during the month of May, 1907, the last detachment returned on board May 27, 1907.

U.S.S. Paducah 7 Apr to 5 Nov 1907
28 April, 1907, a detachment of 19 men, under the command of Ensign E.C. Oak, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah, at Truxillo as the relief of the U.S.S. Marietta landing force.

28 April, 1907, ten marines under the command of Ensign L.P. Treadwell, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah, at Laguana, Honduras, and remained there until May 23, 1907. On the latter date this detachment was transferred to Choloma, where it remained until June 9, 1907, when the detachment returned aboard the U.S.S. Paducah.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1908

Panama

U.S.S. Idaho and U.S.S. New Hampshire
20 and 21 June, 1908, respectively, an expeditionary force of marines, consisting of 19 officers and 766 enlisted men, under the command of Lieut. Col. Eli. K. Cole. U.S.M.C. was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Idaho from Philadelphia, Pa., and the U.S.S. New Hampshire from the Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y., and disembarked at Colon, Panama, on the 26th and 27th of June, respectively. This force was joined with the permanent battalion stationed on the Isthmus for the purposes of insuring a peaceful election on the Canal Zone. The regiment, less the permanent battalion, embarked and sailed from Colon, R. of P., on July 31, 1908, on board Steamer Esperanza for the United States.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1909

Cuba
January, 1909, the garrisoning of the post at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, was turned over by the U.S. Army to the U.S. Marine Corps. Captain R.M.Cutts, U.S.M.C., assumed command of the Marine Barracks, Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on January 18, 1909. Post still in existence.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1909 - 1910

Nicaragua

After the inauguration of Jose Madriz as President of Nicaragua on 21 December, 1909, his government had been opposed by an armed revolt under the leadership of General Juan J. Estrada. A force of marines was held at Corinto ready to land should circumstances require it. To protect American interests in Greytown and Bluefields during the Nicaraguan revolution, both parties were notified that hostilities would not be allowed to take place in either city. The Estrada forces finally prevailed, and Madriz left the country.

U.S.S. Dixie, U.S.S. Buffalo, U.S.S. Prairie
5 December, 1909, an expeditionary regiment, consisting of 32 officers and 709 enlisted men under the command of Colonel James E. Mahoney, U.S.M.C. was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Dixie, from vicinity of League Island, Pa., for Cristobal, Canal Zone, where the regiment disembarked on December 12, 1909, and reembarked the same day at Panama City, on board the U.S.S. Buffalo and sailed for Corinto, Nic., arriving at that place December 20, 1909, where it remained until March 15, 1910. The regiment returned to Balboa, Canal Zone, on the U.S.S. Buffalo, March 23, 1910, where it was disembarked went into camp at Las Cascadas, Canal Zone, remaining there until April 14, 1910, when it was embarked on the U.S.S. Prairie and left for the United States on April 15, arriving at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on April 25, 1910.

U.S.S. Prairie and U.S.S. Buffalo
14 December, 1909, a second regiment, consisting of 30 officers and 712 enlisted men, under command of Lieut. Col. Eli K. Cole, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Prairie, for the Canal Zone, where it disembarked on December 24, and took station at Camp Elliott, Canal Zone, remaining at that place until April 14, 1910, when, with the exception of 3 officers and 200 men, it embarked on the U.S.S. Prairie and sailed for the United States arriving at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on April 25, 1910. Three officers and 200 enlisted men embarked on the U.S.S. Buffalo on April 13, 1910, and sailed for the Navy Yard, Mare Island, California, where they disembarked on May 5, 1910.

Colonel William P. Biddle, U.S.M.C., commanded the expeditionary brigade.

U.S.S. Paducah 17 Mar to 16 Jul 1910
19 May, 1910, a landing force of approximately 50 men, under the command of Lieut. W.F.I. Bricker, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah at Bluefields, Nic. This landing force returned on board ship 5 June, 1910. 30 May, 1910, a company of marines, consisting of 1 officer and 96 men, under the command of Capt. R.M. Gilson, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board from the U.S.S. Dubuque, and disembarked May 31st at Bluefields, Nic.

U.S.S. Dubuque 16 Apr to 29 Nov 1910
19 May, 1910, a landing force of 2 officers and 57 men, under the command of Commander H.K. Hines, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Dubuque at Bluefields, Nic., to protect American interests, during the impending attack of Bluefields by the forces of Gen. Lana. This landing force returned on board ship on 5 June, 1910.

U.S.S. Tacoma 16 Jul to 29 Nov 1910
29 May, 1910, a battalion of marines, consisting of 7 officers and 205 enlisted men from Camp Elliott, Canal Zone, under the command of Major S.D. Butler, U.S.M.C., was embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Dubuque, and proceeded to Bluefields, Nic., where it was disembarked on May 31, 1910, and remained on shore until Sept. 5, 1910, when it was embarked on board the U.S.S. Tacoma and sailed for Colon, R.P. The battalion was disembarked on Sept. 6th and returned to its original station at Camp Elliott, Canal Zone, Panama.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1911

Honduras

A revolution for the purpose of putting in power former President Manuel Bonilla began in Honduras on 22 July, 1910. When the necessity for the protection of foreign lives and property no longer existed, the British and American forces were withdrawn.

U.S.S. Marietta 8 Jan to 1 Feb 1911; 11 Jun to 7 Aug 1911
14 January, 1911, a landing force of 16 men, under command of Midshipman A.S. Carpender, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Marietta, at Puerto Cortes, Honduras. This detachment returned aboard ship January 18, 1911.

15 January, 1911, a landing force of 12 men, under command of Ensign G.T. Swasey, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Marietta, at La Ceiba, Hon. This detachment returned aboard ship January 26, 1911.

U.S.S. Tacoma 23 Oct 1910 to 9 Mar 1911
21 January, 1911 a landing force of 32 men, under the command of Ensign C. McK. Lynch, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Tacoma, at La Ceiba, Honduras. The British Cruiser Brilliant also landed a landing force at the same place, on the same date. Lieutenant W. Smith, U.S. Navy attached to the U.S.S. Marietta, landed on January 22nd to take general charge of forces landed at La Ceiba, from the U.S.S. Marietta and U.S.S. Tacoma, in accordance with instructions issued him by the Commanding Officer, U.S.S. Marietta (S.O.P.) Central American Coast. The landing force of the U.S.S. Tacoma returned on board January 26, 1911.

26 January, 1911, a landing force, consisting of 1 officer and 64 men, under the command of Ensign J.B. Earle, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Tacoma at Puerto Cortes, Hon. An additional force of 1 officer and 27 men, was landed from the U.S.S. Tacoma at Puerto Cortes, Honduras, on January 30th, 1911.

31 January, 1911, a joint American and British force of 72 men moved by rail for San Pedro Sula, Honduras.

8 March, 1911, a detachment of 10 men, who remained on duty at Puerto Cortes, Honduras, returned on board the U.S.S. Tacoma.

9 March, 1911, Ensign Earle, one officer, and 50 men, who were on duty at San Pedro Sula, Hon. returned on board ship.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1911

Cuba

A provisional brigade of marines was assembled at Philadelphia, Pa., under command of Colonel L.W.T. Waller, U.S.M.C., for special temporary foreign shore service, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

U.S.S. Prairie
9 March, 1911, the First Regiment, consisting of 31 officers and 731 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel George Barnett, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Prairie, from the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., arriving at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on March 12th, 1911.

U.S.S. Dixie
9 March, 1911, the Second Regiment, consisting of 31 officers and 685 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel Franklin J. Moses, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Dixie, from the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., and from Norfolk, Va., on March 11th, arriving at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on March 15th, 1911.

Both regiments disembarked and went into camp at Deer Point, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

13 March, 1911, 22 officers and 666 enlisted men of the U.S. Marine Corps, under the command of Major George C. Thorpe, U.S.M.C., were landed at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, from the following vessels of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet: Connecticut, Michigan, North Dakota, Minnesota, Idaho, Mississippi, Vermont, Georgia, Nebraska, Rhode Island, and Virginia, and were known as the Third Regiment. Lieutenant Colonel Ben H. Fuller, U.S.M.C., assumed command of this regiment.

U.S.S. Prairie
17 June, 1911, the First Regiment reembarked on board the U.S.S. Prairie and sailed for the United States.

U.S.S. Dixie
1 June, 1911, the Second Regiment reembarked on board the U.S.S. Dixie and sailed for the United States.

The Third Regiment reembarked on U.S.S. Dixie, and the various marine detachments were returned to their respective ships during the month of June, 1911.

U.S.S. Buffalo
10 March, 1911, a regiment of marines, consisting of 12 officers and 503 enlisted men under the command of Colonel Charles A. Doyen, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Buffalo, from the Navy Yard, Mare Island, Calif., for San Diego, Calif., where the regiment was disembarked from the ships for encampment ashore at San Diego, California, March 20, 1911, returning to their proper stations during June and July, 1911.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1912

Cuba

A negro uprising, organized by the “Independientes de Color”, occurred in Cuba during May, 1912, assumed such proportions that on the 23rd of May the Navy Department ordered marines to the U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

U.S.S. Prairie and U.S.S. Paducah
A provisional brigade of marines consisting of 69 officers and 2,008 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel Lincoln Karmany, U.S.M.C., was assembled at Philadelphia, Pa., and Norfolk, Va., for temporary foreign tropical shore service. The First Regiment, consisting of 29 officers and 756 men under the command of Colonel George Barnett, U.S.M.C., embarked on board the U.S.S. Prairie, at Philadelphia, Pa., and sailed on May 23, 1912, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where the U.S.S. Praire arrived on May 28, 1912, and the regiment disembarked, less Company A, and went into camp. The regiment, less Companies A and B, reembarked on board the U.S.S. Prairie August 1, 1912, and sailed for Philadelphia, Pa., where it arrived on August 5, 1912. Company A embarked on board the U.S.S. Paducah at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on May 31st, 1912, and sailed May 31st for duty off Santiago de Cuba where the ship remained on duty until July 14th, when the vessel returned to Guantanamo Bay, and Company A was disembarked. Company B was disbanded at Guanatamo and Company A embarked on board the U.S.S. Celtic and sailed August 2nd, 1912, for the Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, where the vessel arrived on August 8th, 1912.

The Second Regiment, consisting of 40 officers and 1,252 men, under the command of Colonel James E. Mahoney, U.S.M.C., embarked on the following vessels of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet, which sailed on May 25, 26, and 27, 1912: U.S.S. Georgia, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Rhode Island and Washington - for Cuban waters. Five companies of this regiment disembarked early in June at Guantanamo Bay, when they reembarked on their respective vessels and sailed on July 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th and 10th, 1912, for the United States.

U.S.S. Eagle and U.S.S. Paducah
11 June, 1912, the Marine detachment of the U.S.S. Ohio in command of Captain R.C. Hooker, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Eagle at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and disembarked from that vessel at Nipa Bay, Cuba, on June 12th where it remained on duty until July 14th, when the detachment embarked on board the U.S.S. Paducah and sailed for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where it arrived on July 16, 1912.

U.S.S. Mississippi
19 June, 1912, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Mississippi was landed at El Cuero, Cuba, where it remained on duty until July 1, 1912, when it reported aboard ship July 2nd, 1912.

U.S.S. Nashville
10 June, 1912, a landing force consisting of one officer and 27 men from the U.S.S. Nashville, and 27 men from the U.S.S. Paducah, under the command of Lieutenant E.P. Finney, U.S. Navy, attached to the former vessel, landed at Preston, Nipa Bay, Cuba, and proceeded by rail to the mines of the Spanish American Iron Works, at Woodfred, Cuba, to protect American property there. The landing force returned on board ship on June 12, 1912, when it was relieved by Marine detachment under Captain R.C. Hooker, U.S.M.C.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1912

Dominican Republic

U.S.S Prairie
27 September, 1912, the Second Provisional Regiment of Marines, consisting of 27 officers and 755 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel Franklin J. Moses, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Prairie for Santo Domingo City, Dominican Republic, where the U.S.S. Prairie arrived on October 2, 1912. This force found no occasion to land and remained aboard the U.S.S. Prairie until its return to the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on December 7, 1912, where the regiment was disembarked.


1912 to 1925

Nicaragua

General Luis Mena, Minister of War under President Alfonso Diaz, and a disappointed aspirant for the presidency of Nicaragua, on 29 July, 1912, attempted to seize Managua, the capital of the Republic, and by a coup d’etat to possess himself of the executive power. As Minister of War, General Mena had been able to make in advance such disposition of the military stores of the State that most of them fell easily into his hands as soon as he put himself in open rebellion against the Government, and largely on this account the revolutionary movement promised to be more serious than usual.

U.S.S. Annapolis 13 Jun to 9 Dec 1912
3 August, 1912, a landing force, consisting of two officers and 100 men, under the command of Lieutenant J.A. Campbell, Jr., U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Annapolis, at Corinto, Nic., and proceeded by rail to Managua, Nicaragua, as a legation guard and to protect American interests. The landing force reported on board ship on November 11, 1912. Commander W.J. Terhune, U.S. Navy, the Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Annapolis, was absent on duty with troops in the field from August 14, 1912, to November 11, 1912.

U.S.S. Tacoma 6 Aug to 19 Oct 1912
17 August, 1912, a landing force, consisting of one officer, 38 bluejackets and 19 marines, under the command of Lieutenant B. Barnett, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Tacoma, at Bluefields, Nic., to protect the lives and property at the request of Governor Intendant [not legible] and the U.S. Consul. This landing force returned on board ship on October 13, 1912.

U.S.S. Justin
10 August, 1912, a battalion of marines, consisting of 13 officers and 341 men, under command of Major Smedley D. Butler, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the Naval Auxiliary Justin, at Balboa, Canal Zone, and sailed August 11, 1912 for Corinto, Nic., where the battalion was disembarked on August 14, 1912, and proceeded by rail to Managua, Nic., where it arrived on August 15, 1912, reenforcing the legation guard.

U.S.S. California 28 Aug to 14 Nov 1912
28 August,, 1912, a landing force, consisting of 16 officers, 270 bluejackets, 1 Marine Corps officer and 62 marines, under the command of Lieut-Comdr. G.W. Steele. U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. California at Corinto, Nic., for field service. Sept. 20, 1912, a landing force of 32 men under the command of Lieut. (J.G.) R.T. Kieran, U.S. Navy, was landed at Corinto, Nic., for duty at Chinandega, Nicaragua.

The U.S.S. California landed one officer and 25 men at San Juan del Sur, Nic., from Sept 6 to Sept. 11, 1912; Sep. 27 to Oct. 12, 1912, and from Oct. 20 to Nov. 3, 1912.

Landing force from the U.S.S. California returned to the ship on November 5, 8, 11, and 12, 1912.

24 August, 1912, a provisional regiment of marines, consisting of 29 officers and 752 men, under command of Colonel Joseph H. Pendleton, U.S.M.C., was assembled, embarked and sailed from Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Prairie, for service in Nicaragua. The regiment disembarked at the Canal Zone, and reembarked at Balboa, Panama, on the U.S.S. California, sailing on September 1, 1912, for Corinto Nic., where it arrived on September 4, 1912, and disembarked.

U.S.S. Denver 27 Aug to 26 Oct 1912
29 August, 1912, a landing force of 120 men under the command of Lieut. A.B. Read, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at Corinto, Nic., for duty ashore. This landing party reembarked aboard ship Oct. 24 and 25th, 1912. One officer and 24 men were landed from the U.S.S. Denver at San Juan del Sur, Nic., to protect the cable station and American interests from August 30, to Sept. 6, 1912, and from Sept. 11 to Sept. 27th, 1912.

U.S.S. Cleveland 14 Sep to 20 Oct 1912
15 September, 1912, a landing force consisting of 5 officers, 127 bluejackets and 37 marines, under the command of Lieut. Comdr. Edward Woods, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cleveland, at Corinto, Nic., for duty at Chinandega, Nic. This landing force returned aboard ship on Oct. 22nd and 23rd, 1912. On October 12, 1912, a landing force of 19 men under the command of Ensign J.B. Will, U.S. Navy, was landed at San Juan del Sur and remained on duty there until October 20, 1912.

U.S.S. Colorado 4 Sep to 14 Nov 1912
5 September, 1912, a landing force, consisting of 12 officers, 250 bluejackets and 61 marines, under the command of Lieutenant H.G.S. Wallance, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Colorado, at Corinto, Nic., for duty in the field. 19 September, 1912, an additional force of 2 officers and 48 men was landed at Corinto, Nic. 21 Oct. 1912, 2 officers and 53 men of landing force reported on board ship. The balance returned aboard on November 2, 10, and 11, 1912. 3 November, 1912, one officer and 20 men landed at San Juan del Sur. 12 men withdrawn on Nov. 5th and the balance reported aboard on November 8th.

U.S.S. Buffalo
21 November, 1912, the 1st and 3rd battalions of the provisional regiment of marines were embarked and sailed on board the U.S.S. Buffalo, from Corinto, Nic., for the Canal Zone. The 2nd Battalion, under Lieut.-Col. Charles G. Long, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Buffalo at Cortino, Nic., and sailed Jan. 17, 1913, for the Canal Zone.

9 January, 1913, a Legation Guard of 4 officers and 101 enlisted men was detailed for duty at Managua, Nic. The corresponding number of commissioned officers and not exceeding 125 enlisted man were maintained on duty as a legation guard until August 3, 1925, when it was withdrawn and embarked aboard the U.S.S. Henderson, which sailed August 4, 1925, to the United States via the Canal Zone.

U.S.S. Maryland 7 Nov to 14 Nov 1912
Rear admiral William H.H. Southerland, U.S. Navy, was Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet and Colonel J.H. Pendleton, U.S.M.C., was in command of operations on shore in Western Nicaragua. By 19 Sept., 1912, there were 89 Marine Corps and Naval Officers and 2,282 Bluejackets and Marines on shore on both East and West Coast of Nicaragua.

Casualties in Action:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Marines
5
0
7
Bluejackets
2
0
4
Officers
-
-
2
Totals
7
0
13

1913

Cuba

U.S.S. Prairie
The Second Provisional Brigade of marines consisting of 72 officers and 2,097 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel Lincoln Karmany, sailed on the U.S. Army transport Meade from Philadelphia, Pa., February 20, 1913, and on the U.S.S. Prairie from Norfolk, Va., February 19, 1913, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This brigade was composed of two regiments the first under command of Colonel George Barnett, and the second under command of Colonel Joseph H. Pendleton. These regiments were returned to Philadelphia, Pa., on the U.S.S. Prairie and disembarked on May 2 and June 13, 1913. The object of these movements was for the purpose to await the turn of events in Mexico.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1914

Haiti

Owing to the disturbed political conditions in Haiti, American forces were landed for the purpose of protecting American and foreign lives and property.

U.S.S. Montana 25 Jan to 13 Feb 1914
27 January, 1914, a landing force, consisting of 2 officers and 54 men, under the command of Lieut. (J.G.) N.L. Nichols, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Montana, at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, for the protection of American interests. The landing party returned on board ship on February 9, 1914.

U.S.S. South Carolina 28 Jan to 14 Apr 1914
28 January, 1914, one medical officer and 12 men of the marine detachment of the U.S.S. South Carolina, were landed at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, with instructions to report to Lieutenant Nichols, U.S. Navy. The balance of the marine detachment under the command of 1st Lieutenant A.B. Drum U.S.M.C., was landed at Port-au-Prince on January 29, 1914.

Lieut. Comdr. G.S. Lincoln, U.S. Navy, was in command of the landing parties from the U.S.S. Montana and U.S.S. South Carolina from January 29 to February 9, 1914.

5 February, 1914, the French cruiser Conde landed a detachment of 15 men at Port-au-Prince. On the same day a landing force of 35 men was landed from the H.M.S. Lancaster. The Conde sent an additional force ashore on February 6, 1914.

9 February, 1914, the International landing forces of the U.S.S. Montana, South Carolina, H.M.S. Lancaster, H.M.S. Bremen and French cruiser Conde were withdrawn from Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and returned aboard their respective ships.

U.S.S. Wheeling 15 Feb to 7 Mar 1914
16 February, 1914, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Wheeling, under command of Ensign P.R. Baker. U.S. Navy, was landed at Port de Paix, Haiti, to protect American and foreign interests. This party returned aboard ship on February 22, 1914. On February 20, 1914, a landing force consisting of 5 officers and 64 men, was landed from the U.S.S. Wheeling at Cape Haitian, Haiti, to protect American and foreign property. The landing party returned aboard ship on February 21, 1914.

U.S.S. Tacoma 2 Oct to 13 Dec 1914
18 October, 1914, a landing force, consisting of 4 officers, two companies of infantry, each accompanied by machine gun and crew, signal squad, and ambulance squad, in command of Lieut. R.S. Holmes, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Tacoma, at Cape Haitian, Haiti. One officer and 23 men returned on board October 28, 1914. The balance of the landing party consisting of 3 officers and 90 men was withdrawn on 7 Nov. 1914.

U.S.S. Celtic 19 Oct to 25 Oct 1914
24 October, 1914, a landing force, under command of Lieut. (J.G.) L.S. Stewart, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Celtic at Cape Haitian, Haiti to reenforce the U.S.S. Tacoma’s landing force. The U.S.S. Celtic’s landing party was withdrawn on the same day.

U.S.N.T. Hancock 15 Aug to 17 Dec 1914
The Special Service Squadron Battalion of Marines, consisting of the 44th, 45th and 46th companies, consisting of 9 officers and 361 enlisted men, under command of Major G. Andresen, U.S.M.C., was detached from the First Brigade of Marines at Vera Cruz, Mexico, and embarked on board the U.S.N.T. Hancock, which sailed July 14, 1914, for Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where the battalion disembarked on July 19, 1914, there to await the return of the U.S.N.T. Hancock from the United States on August 4, 1914, with the 37th, 47th and 48th Companies of marines. The entire command was designated the Fifth Regiment under command of Colonel Charles A. Doyen, U.S.M.C. This regiment remained aboard the U.S.N.T. Hancock in Haitian and Dominican waters until December 17, 1914, when the vessel sailed for Philadelphia, Pa., where it arrived on December 23, 1914, and the regiment disembarked.

U.S.S. Kansas 2 Oct to 13 Dec 1914 [no data available]

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1914

Mexico

U.S.S. Minnesota 26 Jan to 7 Aug 1914 and U.S.S. Chester 6 Jan to 8 Jun 1914
21 January, 1914, a battalion of marines, consisting of 11 officers and 387 enlisted men, under the command of Major Smedly D. Butler, U.S.M.C., stationed at Panama, reported on board the U.S.S. Minnesota at Cristobal, Canal Zone and sailed the same date for Vera Cruz, Mexico, where the vessel arrived on January 26, 1914. The companies comprising this battalion were transferred several times and eventually placed on board the U.S.S. Chester, at Tampico, Mexico, and disembarked from that vessel at Vera Cruz, on April 22nd. The battalion participated in the occupation of that city and in the engagement incident thereto. The battalion was designated as the Third Battalion, Second Advance Base Regiment, and was detached for duty with the U.S. Army, April 30, 1914.

U.S.S. Prairie 9 Mar to 28 Jun 1914 and U.S.S. Mississippi 24 Apr to 12 Jun 1914
A portion of the Second Advance Base Regiment, consisting of 14 officers and 329 enlisted men, under the command of Major W.C. Neville, U.S.M.C., was embarked on bard the U.S.S. Prairie at Pensacola, Florida, on March 5, 1914, and arrived at Vera Cruz, on March 9, 1914. This force landed at Vera Cruz, Mexico on April 21, 1914, and participated in the occupation of that city and in the engagement incident thereto. The balance of the regiment, consisting of 16 officers and 516 enlisted men remained at Pensacola, Florida, until April 21, 1914, when it embarked on the U.S.S. Mississippi and sailed for Vera Cruz, Mexico, where the vessel arrived on April 24th, 1914, and the regiment disembarked. Major Neveille was in command of the regiment until April 30, 1914, when Colonel John A. Lejeune, U.S.M.C., assumed command May 1st, 1914. This officer remained in command until the regiment was disbanded early in December, 1914.

U.S.S. Hancock 17 Apr to 14 Jul 1914
The First Advanced Base Regiment, consisting of 24 officers and 810 enlisted men, under the command of Lt. Col. Charles G. Long, U.S.M.C., was embarked aboard the U.S.S. Hancock, at New Orleans, La., and sailed April 15, 1914. The regiment was disembarked at Vera Cruz, Mexico, on April 22, 1914. Lt. Col. C.G. Long, U.S.M.C., remained in command of the regiment until May 5, 1914, when Colonel J.E. Mahoney assumed command of the regiment and remained in command until the latter part of November, 1914.

S.S. Morro Castle
The Third Regiment, consisting of 33 officers and 861 enlisted men, under the command of Col. Franklin J. Moses, U.S.M.C., was assembled at Philadelphia, Pa., embarked and sailed on the S.S. Morro Castle, April 23, 1914, and disembarked at Vera Cruz on April 30, 1914.

U.S.S. Montana 28 Apr to 3 May 1914
22 April, 1914, Captain F.L. Bradman, U.S.M.C., in command of one officer and 72 enlisted men, embarked aboard the U.S.S. Montana, at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and sailed for Vera Cruz, Mexico, where the company was disembarked on April 28, 1914.

In addition to the foregoing regiments, which were landed at Vera Cruz, Mexico, a provisional battalion of marines, consisting of 20 officers and 632 enlisted men, under the command of Major A.W. Catlin, U.S.M.C., Fleet Marine Officer, of the North Atlantic Fleet, and comprising the Marine detachments of the following named ships: Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Dakota, South Carolina, Utah and Vermont, which were landed on April 21, 22, 23 and 27, 1914. Marine Detachment, U.S.S. North Dakota landed and occupied Fort San Juan de Ulloa from April 27 to April 30, 1914. A portion M.D., U.S.S. New Hampshire on duty at the Fort from May 4, 1914, to June 2, 1914. 21st Co., 3rd Regiment, U.S.M.C., on duty Fort San Juan de Ulloa from 30 April to 26 May, 1914.

Landing forces comprising a battalion of bluejackets and special details were landed from the following named ships, with the exception of the U.S.S. Chester and U.S.S. San Francisco, which landed two companies each, on the dates set opposite their respective names; likewise the commanding officer of the landing forces from the respective ships:

Apr. 22 - Sept. 30, 1914
U.S.S. Arkansas
April 22, 1914
(Not Known)
U.S.S. Chester
April 22, 1914
Lieutenant G.E. Lake, U.S.N.
U.S.S. Florida
April 21, 1914
(Not Known)
Apr. 22 - Aug. 8, 1914
U.S.S. Louisiana
April 23, 1914
(Not Known)
Apr. 22 - June 20, 1914
U.S.S. Michigan
April 22, 1914
Lt. Comdr. J.W. Greenslade, U.S.N., (17 officers and 368 bluejackets)
U.S.S. Minnesota
April 22, 1914
Lieutenant R.R. Adams
U.S.S. New Hampshire
April 22, 1914
Lieutenant J.P. Lannon
Apr. 22 - Aug. 13, 1914
U.S.S. New Jersey
April 22, 1914
Lt. Comdr. H.E. Yarnell
Apr. 26 - Oct. 8, 1914
U.S.S. North Dakota
April 27, 1914
Lt. Comdr. W.T. Cluverius
Apr. 21 - July 17, 1914
U.S.S. San Francisco
April 22, 1914
Lt. W.J. Giles
Apr. 22 - May 23, 1914
U.S.S. South Carolina
April 22, 1914
Lieutenant A. Staton
U.S.S. Utah
April 21, 1914
Lieutenant G.W.S. Castle
Apr. 22 - Oct. 22, 1914
U.S.S. Vermont
April 22, 1914
Lieutenant J.C. Townsend (15 officers and 313 bluejackets)


U.S.S. Florida 16 Feb to 13 Jul 1914
U.S.S. Prairie
Rear Admiral F.F. Fletcher, U.S. Navy, was in command of Naval Operations ashore in Vera Cruz, Mexico, from April 21 to April 30, 1914. On the latter date Brig. General F. Funston, U.S. Army, assumed command of all U.S. Army and Marine Corps forces on shore. The bluejacket landing forces and marine detachments were returned to their respective ships on April 29th and 30th, 1914. The landing force at Vera Cruz, Mexico, on April 21, 1914, consisted of 787 officers, bluejackets and marines. This force was under the immediate command of Captain W.R. Rush, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of U.S.S. Florida, from April 21st to April 30, 1914. Commander H.O. Stickney, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of U.S.S. Prairie, was appointed Inspector of the Port of Vera Cruz, Mex., on April 23, 1914. The strength of the U.S. Naval forces on shore at Vera Cruz, Mexico on April 28, 1914 was as follows:

Headquarters 24 officers and 33 men
Naval Brigade 194 officers and 3,760 men
Marine Brigade 98 officers and 2,569 men
Total 316 officers and 6,362 men

U.S.S. Utah, 16 Feb to 15 Jun 1914; U.S.S. New Hampshire, 22 April to 21 Jun 1914; U.S.S. Minnesota;
U.S.S. Michigan
Captain J.H. Gibbons, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of U.S.S. Utah, in command of the First Naval Regiment, April 23 to 30, 1914. Captain E.A. Anderson, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of U.S.S. New Hampshire, in command of Second Regiment, April 22 to 30, 1914. Captain Edward Simpson, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of U.S.S. Minnesota, in command of Third Naval Regiment, April 23 to 25, 1914, when command was taken over by Captain A.B. Niblack, commanding officer of U.S.S. Michigan.

U.S.S. New York 4 May to 17 Sep 1914
Colonel L.W.T. Waller, disembarked from the U.S.S. New York at Vera Cruz, Mexico, on May 4, 1914, and assumed command as Brigade Commander of the Marines on shore.

U.S.S. South Dakota, 8 Apr to 2 Jul 1914; U.S.S. West Virginia, 9 May to 3 Jul 1914;

U.S.S. Jupiter, Apr. 27 - July 9, 1914
The Fourth Regiment of Marines, consisting of 28 officers and 1,100 men, under the command of Colonel Joseph C. Pendleton, was organized on the west coast of the United States, and embarked on the U.S.S. South Dakota, West Virginia and Jupiter, on April 18, 22, and 24, 1914 respectively. The regiment remained on these vessels on the west coast of Mexico, until July 3rd, 1914, when it disembarked from the vessels and went into camp at North Island, San Diego, California.

U.S.S. New York
26 April, 1914, the 45th and 46th Companies, U.S.M.C., consisting of 7 officers and 244 enlisted men under the command of Major C.G. Andresen, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. New York, and sailed that day for Vera Cruz, Mex., On June 2nd, the 45th Company was landed at Fort San Juan de Ulloa, Vera Cruz. Likewise on June 15th, the 46th company was landed at the same place, remaining there until July 13th.

U.S.S. Washington
2 May, 1914, the 44th company, consisting of 3 officers and 127 enlisted men was embarked on board the U.S.S. Washington, and disembarked from that vessel at Vera Cruz, on July 15, 1914.

25 April, 1914, an artillery battalion was organized from the companies on shore at Vera Cruz, under the command of Major Robert H. Dunlap, U.S.M.C.

S.S. Denver; S.S. Memphis; S.S. Sam Marcos
The First Brigade of Marines, comprising the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Regiments, were embarked on board chartered transports as follows: First Regiment - on Denver; Second Regiment - on Memphis and Third Regiment on Sam Marcos, and sailed on that date for the United States arriving at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on the 3rd and 4th of December, 1914, respectively, where the regiments were disembarked.

Casualties in Action:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Marines
4
0
14
Bluejackets
13
2
46
Officers
-
-
1
Totals
17
2
61

1915

Mexico

U.S.S. Colorado 20 Jun to 30 Jul 1915
In view of the raids by Yaqui Indians upon the property of American settlers in the Yaqui Valley, about twenty miles inland from Guayamas, Mexico, which were causing grave anxiety for the safety of Americans, three companies (approximately 300 men) of the Second Battalion, Fourth Regiment of Marines, embarked on the U.S.S. Colorado, at San Diego, California, and sailed on June 17, 1915, for Guayamas, Mexico. Upon the arrival of the expeditionary force at Guayamas, it was not landed. On July 30, 1915, the U.S.S. Colorado sailed for San Diego, California, where on August 10, 1915, the battalion disembarked for temporary duty on shore.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1915 to date

Haiti

U.S.S Washington 1 Jul 1915 to 31 Jan 1916
The development of a revolutionary movement in Haiti during the last week of June, 1915, caused the State Department to request that a naval force be sent there for the protection of American interests. On June 27, 1915, the U.S.S Washington, Flagship of Rear Admiral W.B. Caperton, U.S. Navy, Commander of the Cruiser Squadron, sailed from Mexican waters via Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for Cape Haitian, Haiti, where the vessel arrived on July 1, 1915. On July 3, 1915, 1st Lieut. J.P. Wilcox, U.S.M.C., in command of eight men were sent ashore to establish and operate a portable radio station at Cape Haitian. Additional marines were sent ashore on July 3rd and July 9th. On July 27, 1915, Lt. Wilcox and detachment of 18 marines reported aboard the U.S.S. Washington.

U.S.S Eagle 2 July to 2 Nov 1915
28 July, 1915, a landing force of 22 men, under command of Ensign L.B. Green, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Eagle, at Cape Haitian, Haiti, to occupy the French Consulate. This landing force returned to the U.S.S. Eagle on Aug. 8, 1915.

U.S.S. Washington
28 July, 1915, a landing force, consisting of marine detachment, U.S.S. Washington, 12th Company of Marines, and three seamen companies and pioneers, under the command of Captain George Van Orden, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Washington, at Port-au-Prince, Haiti. The marine battalion consisted of 2 officers and 162 men, and was commanded by Captain Giles Bishop, U.S.M.C. The bluejacket battalion consisted of 7 officers and 215 men and was commanded by Lieutenant Fred. W. Poteet, U.S. Navy. Captain E.L. Beach, U.S. Navy, landed to take charge of the military and civil functions as Senior Naval Officer ashore at Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Two bluejackets wee killed in the action ashore. A portion of the bluejackets battalion landing force returned aboard the U.S.S. Washington on August 14, 1915, and the balance on August 18, 1915.

U.S.S. Jason
29 July, 1915, the 24th Company of marines, under command of Capt. W.G. Fay, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Jason, at Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

U.S.S. Connecticut 4 Aug to 1 Dec 1915
31 July, 1915, 23 officers and 409 enlisted men of the 2nd Regiment, 1st Brigade of Marines, under command of Colonel Eli K. Cole, U.S.M.C., was assembled and embarked on board U.S.S. Connecticut at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., and sailed for Port-au-Prince. 1 officer and 125 men embarked off Hampton Roads, Va. This force was disembarked at Port-au-Prince, on August 4, 1915. Colonel L.W.T. Waller, U.S.M.C., a passenger, disembarked and took command of all marines ashore in Haiti. Owing to the disturbed conditions at Cape Haitian, Haiti, the U.S.S. Connecticut sailed for that place on August 5, 1915.

U.S.S. Nashville 1 Aug to 31 Dec 1915
4 August, 1915, a landing force consisting of 5 officers and 77 men, presumably under the command of Lieut. George F. Brown, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Nashville, at Cape Haitian, Haiti. Detachments of the landing party returned to the ship on August 19th, 22nd and the balance on August 24th, 1915. 1 November, 1915, a landing force consisting of 1 officer and 30 men, under the command of Ensign M. Case, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Nashville at Cape Haitian, Haiti, for duty at Haute-du-Cap road at Caracol daily until Nov. 24, 1915.

U.S.S. Connecticut
6 August, 1915, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Connecticut, under command of Capt. F.A. Barker, U.S.M.C., was landed at Cape Haitian, Haiti, to protect lives and property. This detachment returned aboard on Oct. 2, 1915. 8 August, 1915, a landing force of two companies of bluejackets, under command of Lieut. G.H. Baum, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Connecticut, at Cape Haitian, Haiti. This landing force returned aboard ship on Aug. 22, 1915. 24 August, 1915, a landing force, consisting of two companies of blue jackets, under command of Lieut. (J.G.) S.D. McCaughey, U.S. Navy, was landed from U.S.S. Connecticut, at Cape Haitian, Haiti, and a few days later a third company. A portion of the landing party returned on board September 4, and the balance on September 20, 1915. 25 October, 1915, the marine detachment and two companies of the bluejacket landing force, were landed from the U.S.S. Connecticut at Cape Haitian, Haiti. 1 November, 1915, the 4th company and a portion of the 3rd company of the bluejacket landing force of the same ship were landed at Cape Haitian, Haiti. The bluejacket landing force returned aboard ship on November 20, 22 and 24, 1915. The marine detachment returned aboard on November 27, 1915.

U.S.S. Tennessee 15 Aug to 18 Aug 1915
10 August, 1915, the Brigade Headquarters, 3rd Company, (Signal Co.), entire 1st regiment, (less 2nd company) was assembled, embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S Tennessee, for Port-au-Prince, Haiti; where the vessel arrived on Aug. 15, 1915. 16 August, 1915, the 1st Reg. Headquarters, and 1st Battalion of that regiment sailed from Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on the U.S.S. Tennessee for Cape Haitian, Haiti, for station. The 13th Company joined this force early in September, 1915. On the date mentioned Col. Cole assumed command of the 1st Regiment and Col. Kane, the 2nd regiment. 24 August, 1915, the Artillery Battalion, consisting of three companies of an enlisted strength of 318 men, under command of Major R.H. Dunlap, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Tennessee and sailed from Annapolis, Md., for Port-au-Prince, Haiti, where the battalion landed and joined the First Brigade on August 31, 1915. 25 Aug., 1915, the 19th Company of marines was landed and occupied Port-de-Paix, Haiti. 16 August, 1915, the 24th Company of Marines was landed and occupied St. Marc, Haiti. 31 August, 1915, the 7th Company of marines was landed and occupied Gonaives, Haiti. 31 August, 1915, the 12th Company of marines was landed and occupied Petit Goave and Miragoane, Haiti. 6 September, 1915, the 6th Company of marines was landed and occupied Jeremie, Haiti. 15 September, 1915, the 4th Company of Marines was landed and occupied Aux Cayes, Haiti. 16 Sept., 1915, the 17th Company of Marines was landed and occupied Jacmel, Haiti. October 4th and 11th, 1915, the 11th and 15th companies of marines were landed at Fort Liberte, Haiti.

U.S.S Eagle
11 August, 1915, three sections of the landing force of the U.S.S. Eagle, under command of Ensign L. B. Green, U.S. Navy, was landed at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and reported to the Commander of the U.S.S. Castine landing force for patrol duty on shore. This landing force returned aboard ship on August 15, 1915.

U.S.S. Castine
11 August, 1915, a patrol of 19 men sent ashore from the U.S.S. Castine, at Port-au-Prince, for duty during the night. This force was withdrawn on August 15, 1915.

The following enumerated table indicates the number of officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps operating in Haiti from 31 August, 1915, to 30 June, 1927:

Date
No. of Officers
No. of Enlisted Men
Total
31 August, 1915
88
1,941
2,029 - Peak
30 June, 1916
64
933
997
30 June, 1917
65
902
967
30 June, 1918
54
771
825
30 June, 1919
68
1,448
1,516
30 June, 1920
78
1,267
1,345
30 June, 1921
87
1,822
1,909
30 June, 1922
93
1,577
1,670
30 June, 1923
108
1,393
1,501
30 June, 1924
126
1,404
1,530
30 June, 1925
100
1,212
1,312
30 June, 1926
90
995
1,085
30 June, 1927
65
648
713

The above figures include officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps serving with the Gendarmerie d'Haiti.

U.S. Marines are still stationed in Haiti, and on 24 April, 1929, there were 81 officers and 702 enlisted men on duty in that country, serving with the 1st Brigade of Marines and the Garde d'Haiti.

Casualties in Action:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Marines
6
3
24
Bluejackets
2
0
0
Officers
1
-
2
Totals
9
3
26

1916-1924

Dominican Republic

While U.S. Marines were engaged in pacifying Haiti, after the revolutionary disturbance of 1915, the American Minister accredited to Dominican Republic, early in 1916 cabled the State Department that he believed trouble was imminent in the Republic. Early in April. 1916, Desiderio Arias, Dominican Minister of War, incensed at the treatment accorded some of his friends by President Jiminez, the Minister of War gathered his adherents and brought troops to Santo Domingo City, and secured by force the impeachment of the President. The State Department informed Rear-Admiral W.B. Caperton, U.S. Navy, at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, of its intention to support the "Constituted authorities by all proper means". Troops were landed for the protection of the legation and the foreigners massed in the Haitian legation.

May 6, 1916, President Jiminez, finding that his troops were out of ammunition, requested the American forces to capture Santo Domingo City for him

President Jiminez resigned and the American Minister took up the task of sustaining in office and authority the four remaining cabinet ministers. General Arias denied their powers.

On May 13, 1916, a conference was held at Santo Domingo City, at which the American Minister, Admiral Caperton and General Arias were present. At the close of the conference Admiral Caperton delivered an ultimatum to General Arias to the effect that if "the rebel forces" then in the capital did not disarm and surrender their equipment to the American forces by 6 A.M., May 15th, that he intended to occupy the city and forcibly disarm them.

The Dominican Congress ignored the American Minister's request to postpone the presidential election. Admiral Caperton sent a peremptory demand to the Senate that it make no move to vote. Shortly thereafter, U.S. Marines were landed at Monte Cristi and Puerto Plata with the view of pacifying the country.

U.S.S. Castine
5 May, 1916, a detachment of 8 marines was landed, under command of Ensign Lenney, U.S. Navy, from the U.S.S Castine, at Santo Domingo City, Dominican Republic to protect foreigners at the Haitian Legation, and four marines were landed from the same ship to protect the American Consulate. 6 May, 1916, a landing force, consisting of 3 officers and 74 men, under command of Lieut. (J.G.) Thomas Moran, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S Castine, at San Gerinimo Beach, Santo Domingo City, This force returned on board the U.S.S. Castine on May 22, 1916, when it was relieved by the 22nd Company of U.S. Marines stationed at Villa Duarte.

U.S.S Prairie
The 6th and 9th companies of marines reported aboard the U.S.S Prairie at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, for transportation to Santo Domingo City. They were disembarked on May 5, 1916. On May 5, 1916, a landing force of 30 men, under command of Ensign J.E. Austin, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Prairie at Santo Domingo City. Owing to the sailing of the U.S.S. Prairie, a few days later, her landing force was transferred to the U.S.S. Flusser.

U.S.S. Culgoa
The U.S.S. Culgoa, picked up the 4th company of marines at Port-au-Prince, on May 8, 1916, and the 5th company of marines at Cape Haitian on May 9th, 1916. These companies were landed from the U.S.S. Culgoa at Santo Domingo City on May 12, 1916, a landing force consisting of 1 officer and 71 men, under command of Lieut. W.C.I. Stiles, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Culgoa, at Santo Domingo City. Lieutenant Stiles assumed command of the 3rd Battalion, comprising landing forces from the U.S.S. Castine, Culgoa and Prairie. This force returned aboard the U.S.S Culgoa on May 22, 1916.

U.S.S. Panther
18 May, 1916, the Field and Staff of 2nd Regiment (Col. Kane Com'd'g.), Field and Staff of Artillery Battalion and 1st Company of Marines embarked aboard the U.S.S. Panther, at Port-au-Prince, Haiti. On May 20th, the 13th company of marines was received on board at Port-de-Paix. The Field and Staff and two companies of marines were disembarked at Santo Domingo City, D. R., on May 22nd and 23rd, 1916. 3 June, a landing force, consisting of 4 officers and 100 men, made up of 40 men from the U.S.S. Panther; 18 men from the U.S.S. Terry and 20 men from the U.S.S. Walke, under command of Lt. R.A. Theobald, U.S. Navy, Commanding Officer of the U.S.S. Walke, was landed at Monte Cristi, D. R., to assist marines in maintaining the regular established government, to preserve peace and order, and for the protection of the lives and property of Americans other foreigners in the vicinity. The landing party returned to their respective ships on June 6, 1916.

21 May, 1916, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Louisiana was embarked on board the U.S.S. Tennessee at Hampton Roads, Va. On May 26th, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Louisiana and Tennessee were transferred to the U.S.S Panther at Monte Cristi, D. R. 1 June, 1916, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Louisiana and Memphis on board the U.S.S. Panther were landed at Monte Cristi , D. R., under the command of Capt. F. M. Wise, U.S.M.C., and occupied the fort and town without opposition.

21 May, 1916, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. New Jersey and Rhode Island, consisting of 4 officers and 127 men, were embarked on board the U.S.S. Salem, at the Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. These detachments were transferred to the U.S.S. Sacremento at Puerto Plata, D. R., on May 26, 1916. 1 June, 1916, the marine detachments aboard the U.S.S. Sacremento, were landed at Puerto Plata, D. R., under command of Maj. C.B. Hatch, U.S.M.C., on the same date as a landing force, consisting of 3 officers and 63 bluejackets under command of Lt. (J.G.) H.R. Borchardt, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Sacremento at Puerto Plata. This detachment returned aboard in the afternoon. Later in the day a detachment of 30 men, under command of Ensign F.G. Percival, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Sacremento, and returned on board on June 5, 1916.

U.S.S. Memphis
3 June, 1916, a landing force consisting of 9 officers and 3 companies of bluejackets, under command of Lt. Thomas Withers, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Memphis, at Santo Domingo City, D. R. Portions of this landing force returned aboard ship on July 15th and 25th. The balance returned aboard on August 19th, 1916. 5 June, 1916, the 4th and 9th companies, U.S. Marines from Santo Domingo City, D. R., and on June 6th the Field and Staff of the Artillery Battalion, together with the 6th and 13th companies, were landed at Monte Cristi, D. R.

U.S.S. Neptune
1 July, 1916, the 24th company of Marines was embarked aboard the U.S.S. Neptune at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and was disembarked at Puerto Plata, D.R., on July 4th and 5th, 1916.

U.S.S. Hancock
6 June, 1916, the Fourth Regiment of Marines stationed at San Diego, Calif., under the command of Col. Joseph H. Pendleton, U.S.M.C., left by rail for New Orleans, La., where it arrived on June 9th, and with the 8th company of marines, stationed at New Orleans, La., embarked and sailed on the U.S.S. Hancock, on June 11, 1916. This regiment was disembarked at Monte Cristi, D.R., on June 21 and 22nd. Col. Pendleton, relieved Col. T.P. Kane, U.S.M.C., and was assigned to the command of all the forces operating on shore in the Dominican Republic, and was directed to occupy Santiago, an interior city about 75 miles distant from Monte Cristi, D.R. At this time the interior of Dominican Republic was under the control of the Revolutionary forces, only the principal ports having been occupied by the American forces.

26 June, 1916, the column under the command of Col. Pendleton advanced from Monte Cristi, D.R., towards Santiago, D.R. It consisted of the following organizations: Field and Staff (Fourth Regiment); Field and Staff (Artillery Battalion); Thirteenth Company (Artillery Battalion) Eighth Company; Twenty-sixth, Twenty-seventh, Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth, Thirty-first, Thirty-second, and Thirty-fourth companies. The Sixth Company guarded the Train.

The Twenty-fifth Company and the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Louisiana and Memphis remained on duty at the base at Monte Cristi, D.R., while the 4th, 9th and 24th companies and the marine detachments of the U.S.S. New Jersey and Rhode Island, operated from Puerto Plata, D.R., towards Navarette, D.R., under the command of Major Hiram I. Bearss, U.S.M.C.

The advance of the main column was continuously restricted by large forces of revolutionists and was impeded as well by bad roads and the fact that nearly all the bridges were destroyed. It however, made excellent progress. On July 3rd, 1916, it was found to be necessary, on account of the bad roads, to bring up its train and sever its communications with Monte Cristi, D.R. On July 4th, 1916, a force under Major Bearss, after several engagements, succeeded in operating the railroad between Navarette and effected a junction with the main column at that place.

The column then advanced to Santiago, D.R., without further opposition, entering that city on July 6th, 1916.

The following cities in the Dominican Republic were occupied by companies of the Fourth Regiment on the following dates: July 22, 1916 - La Vega was occupied by the 34th company; July 25, 1916 - Sanchez was occupied by 32nd company; July 27, 1916 - San Francisco de Macoris was occupied by 31st company; January, 1917 - San Pedro de Macoris was occupied by the first company, Mobile Artillery Force.

U.S.S. New Hampshire
11 Jan., 1917, a landing force, consisting of 3 officers and 80 men, under the command of Lt. A.S. Rees, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. New Hampshire, at San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic, and returned aboard ship on January 14, 1917.

The following enumerated table indicates the number of officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps operating in Dominican Republic from 30 June, '16 - 30 June, '24:

Date
No. of Officers
No. of Enlisted Men
Total
30 June, 1916
53
1,198
1,251
30 June, 1917
60
1,913
1,973
30 June, 1918
73
1,677
1,750
30 June, 1919
131
2,389
2,520 - Peak.
30 June, 1920
119
1,946
2,065
30 June, 1921
127
2,177
2,304
30 June, 1922
120
2,207
2,327
30 June, 1923
107
1,876
1,983
30 June, 1924
49
832
881

The above figures include officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps serving with the Guardia Nacional Dominicana.

A military government was proclaimed in the Republic on November 29, 1916, and remained in operation until July 12, 1924, when an independent native government was reestablished, and the last of the Marines were withdrawn in August, 1924.

The Second Brigade, U.S.M.C., was withdrawn from the Dominican Republic and the organization disbanded in 1924. The 4th Regiment, formerly a part of the 2nd Brigade was embarked on board the U.S.S. Henderson on August 6th and 7th, 1924, and sailed the latter date via the Canal Zone to San Diego, Calif., where the U.S.S. Henderson arrived on August 25, 1924. This left one Casual Company at Puerto Plata, D.R., and one at Santo Domingo City, D.R. These companies were disbanded during the month of August, 1924, and all marine corps forces were out of the Republic by August 31, 1924.

Casualties in Action:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Totals
Officers
4
1
6
11
Enlisted Men
10
1
47
58
Totals
14
2
53
69

1917 - 1919

Cuba

Early in February, 1917, as the time for a presidential election in Cuba drew near, the political situation in the island became dangerous to peace, and the government of the United States watched with anxiety certain signs of increasing unrest. Organized revolutionary movement was at work in Camaguey and Santa Clara provinces. As disorder increased, the Secretary of the Navy despatched naval vessels to Cuban waters.

During the month of April, the attitude of the rebels toward Americans in Cuba became bitter. Apparently their leaders had counted upon intervention by the United States and the friendly attitude of the American Navy.

On May 10, 1917, the Secretary of State informed the Secretary of War, Newton D. Baker, that conditions in Cuba were unsatisfactory and that American properties were in danger. The Secretary of State further added that he had been warned by the National Council of Defense that it considered the production of sugar in Cuba of the utmost importance for the Allied and Associated Powers in prosecuting the war with Germany, and emphasized the need of protecting that commodity from further destruction in the field.

U.S.S. Balitmore 27 Jan to 24 Mar 1917
22 March, 1917, a landing force, consisting of 2 companies of infantry and special details under the command of Lt. (J.G.) G.W. Hewlett, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Balitmore, at Santiago de Cuba, to relieve a detachment of Marines under the command of First Lt. L.W. Williams, U.S.M.C. This detachment returned aboard ship on March 23, 1917, when it was relieved by a force under the command of Lt. Col. Julio Singuily, Commander of the Military District of Santiago. Small detachments were also landed daily on March 21, 22 and 23 to protect the Aguadores Railroad Bridge and El Cobre Mines.

U.S.S. Connecticut; U.S.S. Michigan; and U.S.S. South Carolina
25 February, 1917, a landing force, consisting of the marine detachment and Field Radio Party of the U.S.S. Connecticut, comprising 5 officers, 75 marines and bluejackets, from the U.S.S. Connecticut, and the marine detachment from the U.S.S. Michigan, all under the command of Major C.H. Lyman, U.S.M.C., Division Marine Officer, landed at the dock of the Francisco Sugar Company of New York, at Gucanayabo Bay, Cuba, to protect the lives and property of citizens of the United States from violence at the hands of the Liberal Insurrectors. Likewise, 1 officer and the marine detachment of the U.S.S. South Carolina was landed on the same date for duty under Major Lyman. The Michigan detachment returned aboard ship on March 3rd; the South Carolina on March 4th and the Connecticut detachment on March 7th, 1917.

U.S.S. Eagle 21 Feb to 15 Jul 1917
27 February, 1917, a landing force of 1 officer and 30 men under the command of Lt. (J.G.) J.A. Lee, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Eagle, at Nuevitas Bay, Cuba. The landing force returned aboard on February 28, 1917. 5 March, 1917, a landing force under the command of Lt. (J.G.) J.A. Lee, U.S. Navy, was embarked on a boat from the U.S.S. Eagle for duty at Banes, Cuba. 10 March, 1917, small detachments were landed from the U.S.S. Eagle for duty at Preston, La Guara and Lacajo, Cuba. On March 12, 1917, detachments from the U.S.S. Eagle were relieved by landing parties from the U.S.S. Machias. 17 March, 1917, a landing force under the command of Lt. (J.G.) J.A. Lee, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Eagle for duty at the Mill of the Manti Sugar Company, at Batey, Nuevitas Bay, Cuba. This party returned aboard ship on April 21,1917, and was relieved by detachment of marines under the command of Lt. E.H. Jenkins, U.S.M.C. 25 April, 1917, a small landing force under the command of Ensign A.G. Paddock, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Eagle for duty at Preston, Cuba. This party returned aboard ship on April 26, 1917.

U.S.S. Machias 20 Feb to 13 Jun 1917
5 March, 1917, a landing force in charge of Ensign S.H. Mattson, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias, at Santiago, Cuba. Additional men were landed on March 9th. Landing force relieved on March 10, 1917. 12 March, 1917, a landing force, consisting of 24 bluejackets and marines with 2 machine guns, under command of Ensign M.W. Hutchison, U.S. Navy, was transferred temporarily from the U.S.S. Machias at Nipe Bay, to U.S.S. Eagle for duty at Banes, and San Geronimo to protect American interests. A portion of the landing party returned on March 15th, the balance on March 20, 1917. 20 March, 1917, a landing force of 41 men, including one field piece under the command of Ensign S.H. Mattson, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias for duty ashore. A portion of the landing party returned the same day and the balance on March 23, 1917. 21 March, 1917, a landing force consisting of 18 marines and bluejackets under the command of Ensign M.W. Hutchison, U.S. Navy was landed from the U.S.S. Eagle and returned aboard ship on April 3, 1917. 11 March, 1917, a landing force of 12 men under the command of Ensign D. Mc L. Collins, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias for duty at Guaro, Cuba, and returned aboard ship on March 23, 1917. 25 March, 1917, Ensign Collins, U.S. Navy, with a detachment of 13 men was landed from the U.S.S. Machias at Guaro, Cuba, and returned aboard ship on April 7, 1917. 27 March, 1917, a detachment of 10 men under the command of Ensign S.H. Mattson, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Machias for duty at Felton, Cuba, and returned aboard ship on April 2, 1917. These various detachments were relieved by members of the 55th company of United States Marines.

U.S.S. Montana 9 Jan to 25 Mar 1917
25 February, 1917, a landing force consisting of 11 officers and 165 men under the command of Lt. A.J. James, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Montana at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. This force was augmented by a detachment of 40 marines under the command of Lt. M.B. Humphrey, U.S.M.C., from Fisherman’s Point, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The entire force was towed by a tug to Caimanera and then embarked on train for Guantanamo City. Ship’s landing party, with the exception of the marine detachment under Lt. H. Schmidt, U.S.M.C., returned aboard ship on March 6, 1917. 9 March, 1917, a landing force consisting of 10 officers and 111 men, under the command of Lt. Comdr. R.E. Pope, U.S. Navy, was disembarked from the U.S.S. Montana, at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and proceeded by tug and rail to Guantanamo City. The entire landing party of bluejackets and marines returned aboard ship on March 24, 1917. 13 March, 1917, a detachment of 20 marines from the Marine Barracks, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, under the command of Ensign J.E. Boak, U.S. Navy, attached to the U.S.S. Montana, was on duty at Boqueron for the protection of American property from March 13th to March 24th, 1917. 10 March, 1917, a detail of 8 men under a gunner was landed from the U.S.S. Montana daily to March 23, 1917, for duty Caimanera, Cuba.

U.S.S. Olympia 20 Feb to 28 Mar 1917
8 March, 1917, a landing force consisting of 8 officers and 144 bluejackets and marines under the command of Lt. C.N. Hinkamp, U.S. Navy, was landed from U.S.S. Olympia, at Santiago, Cuba. On the same date a detail of 12 men under Ensign L.J.K. Blades, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Olympia, as a guard at El Cobre Mines. The landing force returned aboard ship on March 18, 1917. 19 March, 1917, a landing force consisting of 7 officers and 92 blue jackets and marines under the command of Lt. C.N. Hinkamp, U.S. Navy, was disembarked from the U.S.S. Olympia at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and proceeded by tug and rail to Guantanamo City. This detachment returned aboard ship on March 22, 1917. 24 March, 1917, a detachment of 18 marines under First Lt. De Witt Peck, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Olympia, at Santiago, Cuba, for duty at El Cobre Mines. On the same date a small detachment was landed daily until March 27, for duty at night as guard at Aguadores Bridge. Both detachments returned aboard ship on March 28, 1917.

U.S.S. Paducah 10 Jan to 8 Jul 1917
12 February, 1917, a landing force of 3 officers and 28 men, under the command of Lt. Marshall Collins, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah at Jobabo anchorage, Cuba, for duty at Sugar Plantation near Trinidad. The detachment returned aboard ship on February 13, 1917. 17 February 1917, a landing force of 28 men under the command of Lt. M. Collins, U.S. Navy, disembarked from the U.S.S. Paducah, and was quartered on Cuban gunboat 24 de Febrero until February 20, when it was transferred to a house on dock at Casilda, Cuba, where it remained until March 22, 1917. 24 March, 1917, a landing force of 50 men under the command of Ensign Charles T.S. Gladden, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah, at Cienfuegos, Cuba. This detachment returned aboard ship the same day. 28 March, 1917, a small detachment was landed daily from the U.S.S. Paducah at Cienfuegos, Cuba, for the protection of the Aguadores Bridge of the Spanish-American Iron Works. On the same date a landing force of 21 men under the command of Ensign Gladden, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Paducah at Cienfuegos, Cuba, for the protection of the El Cobre Mines. This detachment was relieved on April 15, 1917, by the 43rd company of U.S.M.C.

U.S.S. San Francisco 27 Jan to 24 Mar 1917
8 March, 1917, a landing force, consisting of 7 officers and 113 men, under the command of Lt. F.L. Kimball, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. San Francisco, at Santiago de Cuba. On the same date landing forces were also landed from the U.S.S. Machias and Olympia. The total enlisted strength from the three vessels was 358 men. Lt. Kimball of the U.S.S. San Francisco assumed command of the entire landing force. This force was landed to protect the lives and property endangered by abandonment of the city by a band of revolutionary forces. The 49th and 51st Companies of the U.S. Marine Corps were landed on March 9th. The landing force from the U.S.S. San Francisco returned aboard ship on March 17, 1917. 19 March, 1917, a detachment of 20 men under the command of Lt. (J.G.) O.W. Bagby, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. San Francisco, at Santiago de Cuba, for the protection of the El Cobre Mine. This detachment returned aboard ship on March 22, 1917.

U.S.S. Texas
7 March, 1917, the Marine Detachment of the U.S.S. Texas, was landed for duty at Rio Canto Sugar Plantation, Rio Canto, Cuba, and returned aboard ship on March 11th, 1917.

U.S.S. Yankton 28 Jan to 4 Apr 1917
15 March, 1917, a small detachment under the command of Lt. (J.G.) P. Hendren, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Yankton at Nipe Bay, for the protection of lives and property at San Geronimo. This party returned aboard ship March 18, 1917. 23 March, 1917, a landing force of 45 men under the command of Lt. (J.G.) H. Ertz, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Yankton for the purpose of relieving the landing force at Preston and Juaro, Nipe Bay. This force returned aboard ship on March 25, 1917.

The remaining vessels that do not show specific dates of duration of stay were in Cuban Waters from Jan. 27, 1917, to March 23, 1917.

U.S.S. Hancock and U.S.S. St. Louis.
The 7th, 17th and 20th Companies of marines stationed at Haiti, embarked aboard the U.S.S. Hancock, and sailed from Haiti, March 4th, 1917, for Cuba. These companies embarked aboard the U.S.S. St. Louis on May 24, 1917, and disembarked at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on May 30, 1917.

U.S.S. Illinois; U.S.S. New Hampshire; U.S.S. Jupiter; U.S.S. Olympia; U.S.S. Ontario; U.S.S. St. Louis.
The 43rd Company of marines embarked on U.S.S. Illinois on October 3rd, 1916, at the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., arriving at Vera Cruz, October 13, 1916. It was stationed there until 1st of March, 1917, when it sailed for Guacanayabo Bay, Cuba, arriving March 5th, 1917. The company embarked on U.S.S. New Hampshire on March 6th, 1917, and transferred to U.S.S. Jupiter on March 9th, sailing same day for Santiago de Cuba, disembarking on the 10th. Ashore until the 18th of March when it embarked on the U.S.S. Olympia arriving at Guantanamo Bay on the 19th. Embarked on the 20th aboard the U.S.S. Ontario, disembarking same day at Daiquiri, Cuba. Ashore until May 23rd, when it embarked on U.S.S. St. Louis, May 24th, and disembarked on May 30th, 1917, at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

U.S.S. Vermont; U.S.S. Jupiter; U.S.S. San Francisco; U.S.S. St. Louis.
The 51st Company of marines embarked on U.S.S. Vermont, at Charleston, South Carolina, on 24th November, 1916, arriving at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, November 29th. In the harbor until Feb. 4, 1917. Arrived at Guacanayabo Bay, Cuba, February 7th, 1917. Embarked on March 9th on U.S.S. Jupiter, disembarking same day at Santiago de Cuba, remaining ashore until March 21st. Embarked on 22nd of March on U.S.S. San Francisco, disembarking same day at Guantanamo City, Cuba. Remaining ashore until May 23rd, 1917, when it embarked on May 24, 1917, on U.S.S. St. Louis, and disembarked at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on May 30, 1917.

U.S.S. Maine and U.S.S. St. Louis
The 55th Company of marines embarked on U.S.S. Maine, at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on January 12, 1917, arrived at Guacanayabo Bay, Cuba, on Feb. 28, 1917. Sailed for Guantanamo Bay, on March 22, 1917, disembarking same day and remained ashore until March 30th. Embarked on Cuban tug Frank Tenney on March 31st, enroute to Nipe Bay, Cuba, and remained ashore until May 24, 1917. Embarked on U.S.S. St. Louis on May 25th, disembarking at Navy Yard at Philadelphia, Pa., on May 30, 1917.

U.S.S. Prairie
21 August, 1917, the 7th Regiment of U.S. Marines under the command of Colonel Melville J. Shaw, U.S.M.C., was embarked at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., and sailed on board the U.S.S. Prairie, and disembarked at Guantanamo bay, Cuba, on or about 27 August, 1917.

U.S.S. Von Steuben
25 December, 1917, the 9th Regiment of U.S. Marines, under the command of Colonel James E. Mahoney, U.S.M.C., was embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard, Norfolk, Va., on board the U.S.S. Von Stueben for duty in Cuba. Upon the arrival of this regiment in Cuba, the 9th and 7th Regiments were designated as the Third Provisional Brigade, United States Marines.

U.S.S. Hancock
30 July, 1918, the Brigade Staff of the 9th Regiment was embarked aboard the U.S.S. Hancock, sailing for Galveston, Texas, leaving the 7th Regiment on duty in Cuba. 3 November, 1918, the First Regiment, U.S. Marine Corps, under the command of Colonel Thomas C. Treadwell, U.S.M.C. embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard at Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Hancock, for duty in Cuba. Upon the arrival of this regiment in that country and with the Seventh Regiment, were designated as the Sixth Provisional Brigade, United States Marines. 21 June, 1919, the First Regiment of Marines was disbanded at Santiago de Cuba. Many of the officers and men being transferred to the 7th Regiment. On August 28, 1919, the 7th regiment embarked and sailed from Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on board the U.S.S. Hancock, for the Navy yard, Philadelphia, Pa.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1920

Mexico

U.S.S. Henderson
13 May, 1920, the 16th Regiment of marines, consisting of 53 officers and 1,050 enlisted men, under the command of Colonel Philip M. Bannon, U.S.M.C. was assembled, embarked and sailed from the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Henderson, for temporary foreign shore service on account of the disturbed conditions in the oil fields of Tampico, Mexico. The regiment was disembarked at the Navy Station, Pensacola, Fla., on May 24, 1920, where it remained in training until June 19, 1920, when it was, by order of the Department, reembarked on the U.S.S. Henderson, which proceeded to several ports in the West Indies, and distributed 400 marines from this regiment. The U.S.S. Henderson then proceeded to the Navy Yard, Philadelphia, Pa., where the balance of the regiment was demobilized on July 7, 1920.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1921

Panama

U.S.S. Pennsylvania
21 August, 1921, the Third Battalion, Fifth Regiment of U.S. Marines, stationed at Quantico, Va., under command of Major Thomes S. Clarke, composed of 15 marine officers, 3 naval officers, 368 marines, and 15 enlisted men of the Navy, sailed from Philadelphia, Pa., on board the U.S.S. Pennsylvania for special temporary duty in the vicinity of Panama relative to disturbed conditions arising over the dispute as to the Panama - Costa Rica boundary line. This battalion arrived at Balboa, Canal Zone, on August 31, where it remained until September 3, 1921. On this date it sailed for the States on the U.S.A.T. St. Mihiel, without landing on Panama territory.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1924

Honduras

The political conditions in Honduras became involved, due to the contest over the presidency in that country. It was, therefore, necessary to despatch a vessel of the light cruiser division to Amapala, Honduras, where a force was landed and proceeded to Tegucigalpa, the capital, to protect the American Legation.

U.S.S. Denver 30 Dec 1924 to 27 Jan 1925; 19 Feb to 16 Mar 1924
28 February, 1924, a landing force, consisting of the marine detachment and special details under the command of First Lieutenant T.H. Cartwright, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Denver at La Ceiba, Honduras, to protect the American Consulate. A battle between the political factions of Honduras was in progress at the time. 29 February, 1924, a landing force of 35 men, under the command of Lt. (J.G.) Rony Snyder, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at La Ceiba, Honduras. The entire landing force was under the command of Major. E.W. Sturdevant, U.S.M.C. The landing force from the U.S.S. Denver was returned on board ship on March 3rd, 1924, at Tela, Honduras, by the U.S.S. Billingsley. 4 March, 1924, a landing force, consisting of 8 officers and 159 men, under the command of Major E.W. Sturdevant, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at Puerto Cortez, Honduras, where a neutral zone was established. This landing force was returned aboard ship on March 6, 1924. 7 March, 1924, a landing force of 5 officers and 65 men, under the command of Major Sturdevant, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at Puerto Cortez, Honduras. The landing force returned on board the U.S.S. Denver on March 9, 1924. 9 March, 1924, a landing force consisting of three officers and 21men under command [of] Major Sturdevant, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at La Ceiba, Honduras. This detachment returned aboard ship on March 13, 1924.

U.S.S. Billingsley 3 Mar to 15 Mar 1924
3 March, 1924, a landing force consisting of 11 marines from the U.S.S. Denver, 2 officers and 28 bluejackets from the U.S.S. Billingsley, under command of Lt. V.H. Godfrey, U.S. Navy, was landed at Tela, Honduras, and a neutral zone declared. This landing force returned aboard their respective ships on March 7, 1924. 8 March, 1924, the same landing force was landed at La Ceiba, Honduras, and the landing force was withdrawn on March 13, 1924.

U.S.S. Lardner 8 Mar to 15 Mar 1924
6 March, 1924, a detachment of 40 marines from the U.S.S. Florida, under command of Captain R.L. Nelson, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Lardner, at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for passage to Honduras. On March 8, 1924, a landing force consisting of one officer, 40 marines and 45 bluejackets under command of Captain R.L. Nelson, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Lardner at La Ceiba, Honduras, to establish a neutral zone at Mazapon. This landing force returned aboard ship on March 13, 1924.

U.S.S. Milwaukee 15 Feb to 4 May 1924
17 March, 1924, a landing force composed of 9 officers and 167 enlisted men under the command of Commander L.D. Causey, U.S. Navy, was embarked in boats in the harbor of Amapala, Honduras, for San Lorenzo, where it arrived early on the morning of March 18. Permission was obtained from the Commandante to land and the force was disembarked on the morning of the 18th. On the same date the landing force proceeded by trucks to Sabana Grande where the force camped for the night. On March 19th, the force proceeded to Toncontin where a radio station was established; balance of the force proceeding to Tegucigalpa, the capital, a message having been received from the U.S. Minister at the capital of Honduras, that United States lives were in imminent danger on account of revolution and disturbances. On April 28, 1924, the town fell into the hands of the rebels and order having been established the landing force was returned aboard ship on April 30, 1924.

U.S.S. Rochester 7 Sep to 21 Sep 1924
10 September, 1924, a landing force consisting of three officers and 108 men under the command of Captain J.M. Bain, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester, at La Ceiba, Honduras. This landing force returned aboard ship on September 15, 1924.

U.S.S. Cleveland 11 Mar to 1 Apr 1924
No landing parties.

Casualties in Action: No remarks.


1926

Nicaragua

On January 1, 1925, Carlos Solorzano was inaugurated President of Nicaragua, with a coalition Cabinet. Shortly after the withdrawal of the U.S. Marine Detachment, stationed at Managua as a Legation Guard on 3 August, 1925, General Emiliano Chamorro, former President of the Republic, entered early one morning and took charge of the Fortress, La Loma, commanding the city without opposition. He practically compelled the President to appoint him Secretary of War on 13 January, 1926, and two days later President Solorzano is forced out of office. The Vice-President flees from the country, and General Chamorro assumes the Presidency by coup d’etat. The United States Government refused to recognize General Chamorro as the constitutional authority of the Republic and a general revolution breaks out on the East Coast of the Republic, necessitating the despatch of U.S. Naval Vessels to that coast early in May, 1926, to protect American and foreign lives and property.

U.S.S. Cleveland 6 May to 20 Jun 1926
7 May, 1926, a landing force, consisting of 213 officers and men, under the command of Lt. Comdr. Spencer S. Wood, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cleveland at Bluefields, Nic. Detachments of the landing party returned aboard ship on May 28th, June 1st, 2nd, 5th, and the balance returned aboard ship on June 6th, 1926. 23 December, 1926, a landing force, consisting of 7 officers, 136 bluejackets and 50 marines, under the command of Lt. Comdr. S.S. Lewis, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cleveland, at Bragman’s Bluff, Nic. for the purpose of establishing a neutral zone at that place, for the purpose of protecting the American and foreign lives and property. A small detachment of this landing force returned aboard ship on December 26, 1926, and the balance returned on board on January 4, 1927.

U.S.S. Denver 25 Sep to 16 Nov 1926; 27 Nov to 31 Dec 1926
10 October, 1926, a landing force, consisting of 6 officers and 103 men, under the command of Comdr. S.M. La Bounty, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at Corinto, Nic., to establish a neutral zone in order to protect the American and foreign lives and property. This force returned aboard ship on October 27, 1926. 30 November, 1926, a landing force, consisting of 8 officers, 50 bluejackets and 58 marines, under the command of Comdr. S.M. La Bounty, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver at Bluefields, Nicaragua. On December 27, 1926, an additional force of 17 marines was landed at Bluefields. The landing force ashore at Bluefields returned aboard ship on June 15th and 16th, 1927. On December 23, 1926, a landing force consisting of 2 officers and 95 men under the command of Lt. (J.G.) L. McKee, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., to reenforce the landing force of the U.S.S. Cleveland. This force returned aboard ship on the same day.

U.S.S. Galveston 27 Aug to 2 Nov 1926; 13 Nov to 27 Dec 1926
27 August, 1926, a landing force, consisting of 7 officers and 188 men, under command of Lt. Comdr. W.W. Richardson, Jr., U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Galveston at Bluefields, Nicaragua. A portion of this landing force returned aboard ship on October 3rd, 1926, and the balance on November 1, 1926.

U.S.S. Rochester 31 Aug to 9 Dec 1926; 22 Dec to 31 Dec 1926
2 October, 1926, a landing force consisting of 72 marines under command of Captain J.W. Thomason, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester, at Bluefields, Nicaragua, to proceed to El Bluff. This force returned aboard ship the same day. 31 October, 1926, a landing force consisting of 4 officers and 46 marines under the command of Lt. Comdr. Hans Ertz, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester at Bluefields, Nicaragua, also on the same date a detachment of 24 marines under the command of Captain J.W. Thomason, U.S.M.C., was landed at El Bluff. On November 1, 1926, an additional landing force, consisting of 5 officers and 58 men, was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester for duty at Bluefields. A portion of the landing party returned aboard ship on November 4, 1926, and the balance on November 30, 1926, when it was relieved by a landing force from the U.S.S. Denver. On December 23, 1926, the landing force battalion, consisting of 158 officers and men, under command of Lt. Comdr. Hans Ertz was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester at Bluefields, and embarked on Cuaymel Fruit Barge No. 4, for duty at Rio Grande Bar. On December 25, 1926, 4 officers and 128 men of the landing party returned aboard ship. On December 26, 1926, a landing force of 35 men under the command of Ensign R.W. Larson, U.S. Navy, from the U.S.S. Rochester was embarked aboard the U.S.S. Cleveland at Bragman’s Bluff, for duty at Rio Grande Bar. A portion of the landing force returned aboard ship on January 7, 1927, and the balance on January 8th, 1927, via the U.S.S. Cleveland.

U.S.S. Tulsa 20 Jun to 26 Jul 1926; 29 Aug to 28 Sep 1926; 1 Nov to 14 Dec 1926
No landing parties during the time in question.

Casualties in Action: [For casualties in action in Nicaragua, see the last Nicaragua entry].


1927

Nicaragua

U.S.S. Altair
19 February, 1927, an aviation detachment consisting of 8 officers, 2 aviation pilot mechanics and 75 enlisted men of the marine corps, with one medical officer and three hospital corpsmen and 6-D.H. planes were embarked on board the U.S.S. Altair at San Diego, Calif., for transportation to Corinto, Nicaragua. The U.S.S. Altair sailed on the 19th of February, 1927, and the aviation detachment was disembarked at Corinto, Nicaragua, on 1 March, 1927.

U.S.S. Argonne 19 to 20 Jan 1927; 24 Jan to 2 Feb 1927; 19 May to 1 Jul 1927
7 January, 1927, the Second Battalion, Fifth Regiment, of Marines, consisting of 13 officers, 344 marines and 7 hospital corpsmen, temporarily under the command of Major H.G. Bartlett, U.S.M.C., embarked on board the U.S.S. Argonne at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for transportation to Nicaragua. Lt. Col. J.J. Meade, U.S.M.C., assumed command prior to its disembarkation. 11 January, 1927, the battalion less 37 men disembarked at Bluefields, Nicaragua, on two of the Cuyamel Fruit Company’s barges for duty to establish a neutral zone at Rama, Nicaragua, about 30 miles westward of Bluefields on the Escondido river. The Battalion less the 51st Company embarked on board the U.S.S. Argonne, at Bluefields, Nicaragua, on 18 January, 1927, and sailed for Corinto, Nicaragua, where the battalion disembarked on January 31 and February 2, 1927.

12th and 13th of May, 1927, 20 officers, one warrant officer, 322 enlisted men, comprising the Hdqtrs. Co., 1st Bn, 11th Regt., 2nd, 14th and 46th companies of Marines and 6 hosptial corpsmen, under the command of Lt. Col. A.J. O’leary, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Argonne at Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and from the U.S.S. Montcalm outside the harbor of Port-au-Prince, for transportation to Corinto, Nicaragua, where this organization disembarked on the 19th of May, 1927.

28th and 29th of July, 1927, 11 marine officers, one medical officer, 623 marines and 16 hospital corpsmen were embarked on board the U.S.S. Argonne at Corinto, Nicaragua, for transportation to San Diego, California. The officers and men mentioned were disembarked from the U.S.S. Argonne at San Diego, California, on 6th of August, 1927. June 29th and 30th; and July 1st, 1927, there were embarked on board the U.S.S. Argonne, at Corinto, Nicaragua, 23 officers, 505 marines and 7 hospital corpsmen for transportation to Quantico, Va. The U.S.S. Argonne sailed on July 1st, 1927, and the above officers and men disembarked at Piney Point, Md., on July 12, 1927. 24 August, 1927, 14 officers, 127 marines and 10 hospital corpsmen comprising the Headquarters and Headquarters Company, First Battalion, 11th Regiment, and the 2nd, 14th and 46th companies of the same organization embarked aboard the U.S.S. Argonne for transportation to Port-au-Prince, Haiti, at Corinto, Nic. In addition 33 officers, 99 marines and 8 hospital corpsmen were embarked aboard for various stations in the United States. Units comprising the First Battalion, 11th Regiment, disembarked at Port-au-Prince on 31 August, 1927, and the officers and men for various stations in the United States were disembarked on 5 September, 1927.

U.S.S. Barker
17 January, 1927, a landing force of six men under Lt. (J.G.) W.R. Cooke, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Barker, at Gulf of Fonseca, Nicaragua and returned aboard ship the same date.

U.S.S. Cleveland
7 January, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 4 officers, 71 bluejackets and 30 marines, under command of Lt. Comdr. S.S. Lewis, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cleveland at Rio Grande Bar, Nicaragua. A portion of this landing force returned aboard ship on February 26, 1927 and the balance on June 6, 1927. 9 January, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 2 officers, 65 bluejackets and 22 marines, under command of Lt. E.G. Henson, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Cleveland, and a neutral zone established at Prinzapolka, Nicaragua. A portion of this landing force returned aboard ship on January 25, 1927, and the balance on June 6, 1927.

U.S.S. Denver 1 Jan to 28 Jun 1927; 15 Jul to 13 Aug 1927; 24 Aug to 8 Sep 1927;
29 Dec 1927 - [no data available]

9 January, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 2 officers, 3 bluejackets, 41 marines was landed at Pearl Cay Lagoon, Nicaragua, where a neutral zone was established. This force was withdrawn on May 27, 1927. 15 July, 1927, the following detachments were landed from the U.S.S. Denver at the places indicated:

-- Detachment of 20 marines and 2 bluejackets, under the command of First Lieutenant H.T. Nicholas, U.S.M.C., at El Gallo, Nic. This force was withdrawn on August 8, 1927.

-- A detachment of 21 men under the command of Ensign G.B. Rainer, U.S. Navy, was landed at Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. This force was relieved by a detachment from the 51st Company of U.S. Marines on August 9, 1927.

-- A detachment of 21 men under the command of Ensign S.B. Moseley, U.S. Navy, was landed at Rio Grande Bar, Nicaragua, and was withdrawn on August 8, 1927.

These detachments were transferred from the U.S.S. Denver to the U.S.S. Tulsa for distribution to the places indicated.

U.S.S. Detroit
23 March, 1927, a landing force consisting of 7 officers and 184 enlisted men, under the command of Lt. T.B. Fitzpatrick, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Detroit at Corinto, Nicaragua, for duty ashore, and relieved the landing force from the U.S.S. Raleigh from duty along the railroad from Chinandega to Leon. This landing party returned aboard ship on 17 April, 1927.

U.S.S. Galveston 5 Jan to 22 Feb 1927; 4 Mar to 20 Apr 1927; 30 Apr to 18 Jun 1927; 26 Sep to 13 Oct 1927; 6 Nov to 11 Nov 1927; 2 Dec to 23 Dec 1927
6 January, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 8 officers, 106 bluejackets and 54 marines, under the command of Lt. Comdr. W.M. Richardson, Jr., U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Galveston, at Corinto, Nic., for duty as legation guard at Managua, Nic. This force returned on board ship some time prior to February 20, 1927. 20 February, 1927, the landing force from the U.S.S. Galveston was landed at Corinto, Nicaragua, in conjunction with the landing forces of the U.S.S. Milwaukee and Raleigh, under command of Captain C.H. Woodward, U.S. Navy, to keep open the railroad communication from Corinto to Managua, Nicaragua. The landing force of the U.S.S. Galveston returned aboard ship on June 16, 1927.

U.S.S. Henderson
23 February, 1927, 70 marine corps and medical officers, 5 warrant officers, 998 marines and 25 hospital corpsmen, under the command of Brig. Genl. Logan Feland, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Henderson, at Quantico, Virginia, and sailed the same date for Corinto, Nic. 26 February, 1927, 3 marine officers, one warrant officer and 253 marines embarked aboard the U.S.S. Henderson off Charleston, S.C. 31 marines were disembarked at Coco Solo, Canal Zone. Men and officers on board the U.S.S. Henderson were disembarked at Corinto, on March 7th, 8th, and 9th and 10th, 1927. 9 March, 1927, Brigadier General Logan Feland, U.S.M.C., assumed command of all naval forces ashore in Nicaragua, except those stationed at Corinto. 24 August, 1927, the command of the Marine Corps Expeditionary Force ashore in western Nicaragua passed to Colonel Louis M. Gulick, U.S.M.C.

U.S.S. Lawrence
15 February, 1927, a landing force, consisting of two officers and 51 men under the command of Lt. (J.G.) Howard E. Orem, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Lawrence at Puerto Cabezas, Nicargua. This landing force returned aboard ship on 4 March, 1927. 18 February, 1927, a detachment of 10 men from the U.S.S. Cleveland embarked aboard the U.S.S. Lawrence and landed at Rio Grande, Nic., and returned on this vessel on 25 February, 1927, for further transfer to the U.S.S. Cleveland at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., where the detachment was transferred to the U.S.S. Cleveland on 25 February, 1927.

U.S.S. Medusa
11 May, 1927, 29 officers, 3 warrant officers of the 11th Regiment, 52nd Company, consisting of 76 men, VC Aircraft Squadron personnel 78 men, Headquarters and Headquarters Company consisting of 68 men and the service company, consisting of 96 men were embarked on board the U.S.S. Medusa at Quantico, Va., for transportation to Corinto, Nic. These elements were disembarked from the U.S.S. Medusa at Corinto, Nicaragua, on 22 May, 1927.

U.S.S. Melville
18 February, 1927, one infantry company consisting of three officers and 93 enlisted men, U.S. Marine Corps, was embarked on board the U.S.S. Melville at San Diego, California, for transportation to Corinto, Nic., and was disembarked at that place on 27 and 28 February, 1927.

U.S.S. Milwaukee 29 Jan to 27 May 1927; 2 Jun to 4 Jun 1927; 9 Jun to 13 Jun 1927
14th and 15th February, 1927, a landing force consisting of 3 officers and 85 men under the command of Lt. Comdr. L.H. McDonald, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Milwaukee, at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., to relieve the landing forces of the U.S.S. Rochester at that place. The U.S.S. Rochester’s landing force, consisting of 3 officers, 75 marines and 5 bluejackets, under the command of Lt. Comdr. J.H. Hoffman, U.S. Navy, was embarked aboard the U.S.S. Milwaukee on 15 February, 1927, for transportation to the Canal Zone, Panama, where it returned to its proper station on 16 February, 1927. A landing force from the U.S.S. Lawrence relieved the U.S.S. Milwaukee’s landing force on 15 February, 1927.

20 February, 1927, a landing force consisting of 11 officers and 275 men, under command of Comdr. C.S. Austin, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Milwaukee at Corinto, Nicaragua. 20 February, 1927, the Chinandega detachment, under the command of Comdr. C.M. Austin, U.S. Navy, consisting of 17 officers, 270 bluejackets and 86 marines landed to protect the railroad communication from Corinto to Leon, Nicaragua. Leon detachment, under command of Lt. Col. J.J. Meade, U.S.M.C., consisting of 20 officers, 215 bluejackets, 235 marines landed to protect the railroad communication from Leon to Managua, Nic. A legation guard was established at Managua under the command of Maj. H.G. Bartlett, U.S.M.C., consisting of 12 officers and 141 marines. On the same date Captain C.H. Woodward, the commanding officer of the U.S.S. Milwaukee, left ship to command naval forces ashore in the capacity of Commander of Communications Special Service Squadron, along the railroad from Corinto to Managua, and remained on this duty with the exception of two brief periods until 26 May, 1927. Captain C.H. Woodward, U.S. Navy, commanding officer of the U.S.S. Milwaukee, with Major T.S. Clarke, U.S.M.C., chief of staff with Headquarters at Leon assumed command of all naval forces operating ashore in western Nicaragua, until relieved by General Feland on 9 March, 1927. A portion of the U.S.S. Milwaukee’s landing force returned aboard ship on May 26th, and June 12th, 1927, and the balance on June 13, 1927.

U.S.S. Procyon
16 June, 1927, 3 officers and 67 enlisted men embarked aboard the U.S.S. Procyon at Corinto, Nicaragua, for transportation to San Diego, California where they were disembarked on 25 June, 1927.

U.S.S. Raleigh
30 January, 1927, six 1st Lieutenants of Marines reported aboard the U.S.S. Raleigh at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for transportation to Corinto, Nicaragua where they landed on February 6, 1927. 9 February, 1927, a detachment consisting of 1 Lt. Comdr. Medical Corps, 1 Lt. (J.G.) Dental Corps and 15 bluejackets was landed from the U.S.S. Raleigh at Corinto, Nic., where a dressing station was established. 20 February, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 7 officers and 178 men, under the command of Lt. Comdr. L.A. Davidson, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Raleigh at Corinto, Nicaragua, for duty at Chinandega and Leon, Nicaragua. The U.S.S. Raleigh’s landing force returned on board ship on 23 March, 1927.

U.S.S. Robert Smith
8 August, 1927, a landing force consisting of 19 marines and one hospital corpsmen under command of Lt. C. Cornett, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Robert Smith at Bluefields, Nicaragua, for transportation to Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, where it landed the same day relieving Ensign G.B. Rainier, U.S. Navy, attached to the U.S.S. Denver, who came aboard with a detachment of 21 men and was transferred to the U.S.S. Denver at Bluefields, Nicaragua, on 9 August, 1927.

U.S.S. Rochester 1 Jan to 21 Jan 1927; 27 Jan to 1 Feb 1927; 21 Jul to 24 Jul 1927
4 January, 1927, a landing force consisting of 129 men, under the command of Lt. Comdr. Joseph H. Hoffman, U.S. Navy, attached to the U.S.S. Rochester was disembarked from the U.S.S. Rochester at Bragman’s Bluff, Nicaragua, to relieve the U.S.S. Cleveland’s landing force at that place. This landing force returned aboard the U.S.S. Rochester on January 8, 1927. 18 January, 1927, the marine detachment under command of Second Lieutenant K.B. Chappell, U.S.M.C. was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester, for duty at Bragman’s Bluff, Nicaragua. 15 February, 1927, a landing force of 3 officers and 85 men under command of Lt. Comdr. J.H. Hoffman, U.S. Navy, from the U.S.S. Rochester, was embarked on the U.S.S. Milwaukee at Bragman’s Bluff, Nicaragua, when the duty at this place was taken over by a landing party from the U.S.S. Milwaukee.

U.S.S. Trenton 17 Apr to 16 May 1927
18 February, 1927, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Arkansas, Florida and Texas, consisting of 5 officers, 201 marines and 1 hospital corpsman under the command of Major R.E. Messersmith, U.S.M.C., embarked on board the U.S.S. Trenton at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for transportation to Nicaragua. The detachments landed at Corinto, Nicaragua, on 21 February, 1927. 17 April, 1927, a landing force, consisting of 7 officers and 189 enlisted men, under the command of Lt. Comdr. P.R. Baker, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Trenton at Corinto, Nic. An additional force of 3 officers and 2 men joined the landing force on 19 April, 1927. U.S.S. Trenton’s landing force returned aboard ship on 15 May, 1927.

U.S.S. Tulsa 3 Mar to 30 Apr 1927; 8 May to 19 Jun 1927; 13 Aug to 23 Sep 1927; 14 Oct to 7 Nov 1927; 1 Dec to 20 Dec 1927
The following detachments reported on board the U.S.S. Tulsa on 15 July, 1927, for transportation:
-- Detachment of 21 marines, under the command of 1st Lt. H.T.T. Nicholas, U.S.M.C., attached to the U.S.S. Denver, reported for transportation to El Gallo, Nicaragua, where the detachment was landed on 27 July, 1927.
-- Detachment of 21 men under the command of Ensign G.B. Rainer, U.S. Navy, attached to the U.S.S. Denver, reported at Bluefields, Nicaragua for transportation to Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua, where the detachment was landed on 18 July, 1927.
-- Detachment of 21 men under the command of Ensign S.P. Mosely, attached to U.S.S. Denver, for transportation to Rio Grande, where the detachment landed on 16 July, 1927.

17 Sept, 1927, a landing force of 29 men under command of 1st Lt. J.A. Tebbs, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Tulsa at Puerto Cabezas, Nicaragua. This detachment returned on board ship on 23 September, 1927.

Casualties in Action: [For casualties in action in Nicaragua, see the last Nicaragua entry].


1928

Nicaragua

U.S.S. Arkansas
18 March, 1928, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Florida, Utah, and Wyoming, consisting of 6 officers and 207 men, were embarked aboard the U.S.S. Arkansas at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, for transportation to the Canal Zone, and for further transfer to duty with the 2d Brigade, U.S. Marine Corps in Nicaragua. These detachments with that of the U.S.S. Arkansas were transferred on 21 March, 1928, at the Canal Zone to the U.S.S. Rochester for further transfer to Corinto, Nicaragua, where the detachments were disembarked on 25 March, 1928.

U.S.S. Bridge
21 March, 1928, - 8 officers, 1 W.O., 163 marines and 8 hospital corpsmen, under command of Captain C. McL. Lott, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Bridge at Charleston, S.C., for transportation to Nicaragua. 24 March, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Antares, under command of Captain Hamilton M. H. Fleming, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Bridge at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, also Major W.W. Buckley, U.S.M.C., for transportation to Nicaragua. Officers and men disembarked at Corinto, Nicaragua, on 30 March, 1928.

21 May, 1928, a detachment of 51 marines, under command of First Lieutenant J.W. Cunningham, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Bridge at Hampton Roads, Va., for transportation to Nicaragua. 23 May, 1928, a detachment of 192 marines and 1 hospital corpsman, under command of Second Lieutenant M.S. Crawford, U.S.M.C., embarked aboard the U.S.S. Bridge at Charleston, S.C., for transportation to Nicaragua. 28 May, 1928, First Lieutenant Cunningham, 72 marines and 1 hospital corpsman disembarked from U.S.S. Bridge at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., for expeditionary duty shore. 29 May, 1928, Second Lieutenant Crawford, U.S.M.C., 23 marines and 1 hospital corpsman disembarked from U.S.S. Bridge at Bluefields, Nic., for expeditionary duty ashore. 2 June, 1928, Captain D. Spicer. U.S.M.C., 148 marines and 3 hospital corpsman disembarked from U.S.S. Bridge, at Corinto, Nic., for duty ashore.

1 July, 1928, 2 Marine officers, 1 Medical officer, 100 marines and 6 hospital corpsmen disembarked from the U.S.S. Bridge at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., for expeditionary duty ashore.

3 July, 1928 - 7 ensigns and 95 marines disembarked from the U.S.S. Bridge at Bluefields, Nic., for duty in connection with the national elections.

1 July, 1928, the following officers and men were transferred from the U.S.S. Bridge at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., to the U.S.S. Tulsa, for transportation to Managua, Nicaragua: 3 Marine Officers, 1 Medical Officer, 1 Dental Officer, 1 Warrant Officer, 14 marines and 11 hospital corpsmen. These officers and men disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 7 July, 1928.

U.S.S. Cleveland 24 Mar to 24 Apr 1928; 29 Apr to 29 Apr 1928; 15 May to 14 Jun 1928; 31 Jul to 8 Aug 1928; 25 Aug to 22 Sep 1928; 4 Oct to 15 Oct 1928; 4 Nov to 8 Nov 1928
21 March, 1928, the marine detachment, U.S.S. Camden, under command of First Lieut. W.B. Onley, U.S.M.C., was received on board the U.S.S. Cleveland at Balboa, Canal zone, for transportation to Corinto, Nic., where the detachment was disembarked on 25 March, 1928, for duty at Brigade Headquarters, 2d Brigade, U.S.M.C., Managua, Nicaragua.

25 March, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Cleveland, under command of First Lieut. J.C. McQueen, U.S.M.C., was landed at Corinto, Nic., for expeditionary [duty] ashore at Chinadega, Nic.

23 - 24 April, 1928, the 2d Battalion, 11th Regiment, U.S.M.C., consisting of the 59th, 60th, and 61st Companies, under command of Captain H. Rose, U.S.M.C., was embarked on board the U.S.S. Cleveland, at Corinto, Nic., for transportation to Puerto Cabezas, Nic., where the battalion disembarked on 29 April, 1928.

19 November, 1928, a portion of the marine detachment U.S.S. West Virginia, consisting of 1 marine officer and 61 marines under command of Captain T.E. Burke, U.S.M.C. was received on board U.S.S. Cleveland at Puerto Cabezas, and 20 marines at Bluefields, Nic., on 20 November, 1928 for transportation to Corinto, Nic., via Canal Zone. This detachment was transferred ashore from the U.S.S. Cleveland at Cristobal, Canal Zone on 21 November, 1928.

U.S.S. Cincinnati; U.S.S. Marblehead; U.S.S. Richmond
3 July, 1928, at San Francisco, California, a Bluejacket Expeditionary Battalion with a full complement of officers and 22 additional Ensigns for duty in connection with the national elections of Nicaragua, were embarked on the following vessels for transportation to Corinto, Nic.; U.S.S. Cincinnati - 22 officers and 88 enlisted men under the command of Lieut. (j.g.) H.F. Pullman, U.S. Navy; U.S.S. Marblehead - 11 officers and 88 enlisted men, under command of Lieut. (j.g.) O.F. Gregor, U.S. Navy; and U.S.S. Richmond - 13 officers and 89 enlisted men, under the command of Lieut. -Comdr. T. Shelley, U.S. Navy. The battalion and additional officers were disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 12 July, 1928.

U.S.S. Denver 1 Jan to 11 Jan. 1928; 29 Jan to 19 Feb 1928; 5 Mar to 27 Mar 1928; 9 Apr to 15 May 1928; 17 Jun to 21 July 1928; 8 Aug to 12 Aug 1928; 6 Dec to 20 Dec 1928
19 February, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Denver, under command of First Lieutenant M.A. Edson, U.S.M.C., was landed at Puerto Cabezas Nic., for expeditionary duty ashore.

14 March, 1928, a landing force, consisting of two officers and 102 men under the command of Lieut. H.L. de Rivera, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Denver, at Corinto, Nic., for duty ashore along the Corinto - Managua Railroad. A portion of this landing force returned aboard ship on 26 March and the balance on 27 March, 1928.

U.S.S. Galveston 8 Jan to 23 Jan 1928; 26 Feb to 31 Mar 1928; 5 Apr to 11 Apr 1928; 30 Apr to 30 Apr 1928; 15 May to 18 June 1928
9 January, 1928, the marine detachment, under command of Second Lieutenant K.B. Chappell, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Galveston, at Corinto, Nic., for temporary duty ashore. Portions of the detachment returned aboard ship on January 21 and 22, 1928, and the balance on January 23, 1928. 9 January, 1928, a landing force of 18 bluejackets under command of Ensign E.L. Schleif, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Galveston, at Corinto, Nic., for duty at Ameya, Nic. Also a landing force of 17 bluejackets under command of Ensign V. Havard, U.S. Navy, was landed for duty at Paso Cabello., Nic. Both detachments returned aboard ship on 21 January, 1928.

6 April, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Denver, on duty at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., reported on board U.S.S. Galveston for transportation to Cape Gracios A. Dios, Nic., where the detachment disembarked on 7 April, 1928, under the command of Captain M.A. Edson, U.S.M.C.

30 April, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Galveston, under command of First Lieutenant D.M. Taft, U.S.M.C., disembarked at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., for expeditionary duty ashore.

15 November, 1928, Seven (7) Ensigns reported aboard the U.S.S. Galveston at Bluefields, Nic., for transportation to the Canal Zone, having been relieved from duty at that place in connection with the national elections of Nicaragua.

U.S.S. Kanawha
24 November, 1928, - 12 officers, 1 Warrant Officer, and 169 men of the Bluejacket Expeditionary Battalion, under command of Lieut. -Comdr. T. Shelly U.S. Navy, embarked aboard the U.S.S. Kanawha at Corinto, Nic., for transportation for the West Coast and were disembarked to various vessels at San Pedro, California, on 2 December, 1928, and the balance transferred to the U.S.S. Doyen for further transfer to San Diego, California.

21 November, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. West Virginia, consisting of 1 officer and 81 men under command of Captain T.E. Burke, U.S.M.C. embarked aboard the U.S.S. Kanawha at Cristobal, Canal Zone, from the U.S.S. Cleveland for transportation to Corinto, Nic., where the detachment was disembarked on 24 November, 1928.

U.S.S. Maryland
27 November, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Maryland, was relieved from expeditionary duty ashore in Nicaragua, and was embarked aboard that vessel at Corinto, Nicaragua.

U.S.S. Medusa
30 June to 3 July 1928, the marine detachments of the following ships were embarked on board the U.S.S. Medusa at San Pedro, California, for transportation to Nicaragua: U.S.S. Arizona, California, Colorado, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, Procyon, Tennessee and West Virginia, consisting of 18 officers and 642 enlisted men under the command of Lieut.- Col. G.M. Kincade, U.S.M.C. These detachments were disembarked 14-15 July, 1928, at Corinto, Nic. At a later date Colonel J.C. Beaumont, U.S.M.C., assumed command of the Battle Fleet Marines on shore.

U.S.S. Milwaukee; U.S.S. Raleigh; U.S.S. Trenton
9 January, 1928, the 1st Battalion, 11th Regiment, U.S.M.C., consisting of the 14th, 46th and 47th companies were embarked at Charleston, SC., on the following vessels for transportation to Corinto, Nic.: U.S.S. Trenton - Brig. Gen. Logan Feland and Lieut.- Col. C.R. Sanderson, U.S.M.C., as passengers. 46th Company, consisting of 2 officers and 102 men, under command of Captain H.H. Phipps. U.S.M.C.; U.S.S. Milwaukee - 47th Company, consisting of 2 officers and 104 men , under command of 1st Lieut. G.W. Scherer, U.S.M.C.; and U.S.S. Raleigh - 14th Company, consisting 108 men, under command of Captain P.C. Geyer, U.S.M.C. These companies disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 15 January, 1928.

On or about 15 January, 1928, Brig. General Logan Feland, U.S.M.C., relieved Colonel L.M. Gulick in command of the expeditionary forces ashore in Nicaragua.

U.S.S. Nitro
9 January, 1928, the 2nd Battalion, 11th Regiment, U.S.M.C., consisting of 22 Marine Officers, 1 Medical Officer, 1 Chaplain, 467 marines and 6 hospital corpsmen, embarked aboard the U.S.S. Nitro at San Diego, California, for transportation to Nicaragua and disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 16 January, 1928.

3 May, 1928, 2 Marine Officers, 18 men and 2 amphibian planes were landed from the U.S.S. Nitro at Puerto Cabezas, Nic., for duty with Aircraft Squadron located there.

13 June to 24 June, 1928, the Marine detachments of the U.S.S. Idaho, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania, consisting of 6 officers and 197 men, under command of Major W.C. Emory, U.S.M.C., were embarked aboard the U.S.S. Nitro, which sailed from San Diego, California, on 29 June, 1928, for Corinto, Nic., where the detachments were disembarked on 6 July, 1928.

U.S.S. Oglala
10 January, 1928, the U.S.S. Oglala sailed from Hampton Roads, Va., having on board 38 Marine Officers, 3 Medical Officers, 389 marines and 16 hospital corpsmen, under the command of Colonel R.H. Dunlap, U.S.M.C., for transportation to Nicaragua. The officers and men were disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 19 - 20 January, 1928.

23 March, 1928, the U.S.S. Oglala sailed from Hampton Roads, Va., having on board 34 Officers, 4 Warrant Officers and 411 Marines, under the command of Lieut. -Colonel L.S. Willis, U.S.M.C., for transportation to Nicaragua. The officers and men were disembarked at Corinto, Nicaragua on 1 April, 1928.

U.S.S. Rochester 7 Jan to 31 Jan 1928; 16 Feb to 14 Mar 1928; 24 Mar to 6 Apr 1928; 28 May to 30 May 1928; 8 Jul to 17 Jul 1928; 21 Aug to 25 Aug 1928; 22 Sep to 27 Sep 1928; 19 Oct to 26 Nov 1928; 31 Dec 1928 - [no data]
15 January, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Rochester, under command of Captain F.A. Hart, U.S.M.C., was landed at Corinto, Nic., for duty at Managua, Nic.

21 March, 1928, eight (8) officers and 312 marines, consisting of Marine Detachments, U.S.S. Arkansas, Florida, Utah, Wyoming and small detachments from M.B. Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, and Coco Solo, Canal Zone, were received on board the U.S.S. Rochester at the Canal Zone for transportation to Corinto, Nic., where the detachments were disembarked on 25 March, 1928, for duty ashore.

30 October, 1928, a landing force, consisting of 2 Officers and 97 bluejackets, under command of Lieut. -Comdr. Thomas M. Shock, U.S. Navy, was landed from the U.S.S. Rochester at Corinto, Nic., for duty at Leon, Nic., in connection with the national elections. This landing force returned aboard ship on 8 November, 1928.

U.S.S. Texas
14 June, 1928, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Texas, under the command of Captain T.E. Kendrick, U.S.M.C., was landed from that vessel at Corinto, Nic., for expeditionary duty ashore. The marine detachment rejoined the vessel at the Canal Zone on 17 January, 1929.

U.S.S. Tulsa 6 Jan to 16 Feb 1928; 10 Mar to 10 Mar 1928; 14 Jun to 1 Jul 1928; 7 Jul to 11 July 1928; 1 Jul to 25 Jul 1928; 7 Aug to 21 Aug 1928; 1 Sep to 16 Sep 1928; 28 Sep to 4 Oct 1928; 18 Nov to 9 Dec 1928
6 January, 1928, the marine detachment under the command of First Lieutenant J.A. Tibbs, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Tulsa, at Corinto, Nicaragua, for duty at Chinandega, Nic., and returned aboard ship on 9 February, 1928.

10 March, 1928, the marine detachment, under the command of Captain J.A. Tebbs, U.S.M.C., was landed from the U.S.S. Tulsa at Puerto Cabezas, Nic. for expeditionary duty ashore.

U.S.S. Vega
24 November, 1928, one officer and 87 enlisted men of the Bluejacket Expeditionary Battalion, under command of Lieut. (j.g.) H.F. Pullen, U.S. Navy and 22 Ensigns, who had been on duty ashore in connection with the Nicaraguan National elections, embarked on board the U.S.S. Vega at Corinto, Nic., for transportation to the West Coast, were disembarked at San Diego, California, on 3 - 5 December, 1928, respectively.

Casualties in Action: [For casualties in action in Nicaragua, see the last Nicaragua entry].


1929

Nicaragua

U.S.S. Cleveland
30 March, 1929, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Cleveland reported aboard that vessel at Balboa, Canal Zone. The temporary duty ashore at Chinandega, Nic., having been completed.

U.S.S. Denver
1 Jan to 4 Jan 1929; 16 Jan to 21 Jan 1929; 11 Apr to 14 Apr 1929
12 April, 1929, the following marine detachments reported aboard the U.S.S. Denver at Puerto Cabezas, Nic.: M.D. U.S.S. Denver, 38 men under command of First Lieutenant E.A. Pollock, U.S.M.C.; M.D. U.S.S. Galveston, 36 men under command of First Lieut. R.B. DeWitt, U.S.M.C. This detachment was transferred to the U.S.S. Galveston at Balboa, C.Z., on 22 April, 1929; Marine Detachment U.S.S. Tulsa consisting of 16 men under command of First Lieut. S.C. Zern, U.S.M.C., which was transferred to the U.S.S. Sacramento at Cristobal, C.Z., on 15 April, 1929.

U.S.S. Medusa
24 January, 1929, the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Mississippi, New York, Pennsylvania, Procyon, Tennessee and West Virginia, consisting of 18 officers and 619 men under command of Lieut.-Col. G.M. Kincade, U.S.M.C., embarked on board U.S.S. Medusa, at Corinto, Nic., for transportation to the Canal Zone, where the marine detachments were transferred to their respective ships on 28-29 January, 1929, with the exception of the Marine Detachment, U.S.S. New York, which joined that vessel from the U.S.S. Arizona, at Balboa, Canal Zone, on 25 March, 1929.

U.S.S. Nitro
11 January, 1929, 2 marine officers and 201 enlisted men reported aboard the U.S.S. Nitro at San Diego, California, for transportation to Nicaragua. The officers and men were disembarked at Corinto, Nic., on 19 January, 1929.

19 January, 1929, 4 Majors, 4 Captains, 8 Lieutenants, 15 hospital corpsmen and 406 marines embarked on board U.S.S. Nitro at Corinto, Nic., for transportation to the Canal Zone and for further transfer to ships of the Scouting Fleet. 22 January, 1929 the marine detachments of the U.S.S. Florida and Utah were transferred to those vessels at the Canal Zone. The marine detachments of the U.S.S. Antares, Arkansas, and Wyoming were transferred to the U.S.S. Antares at Balboa, C.Z., on 22 January, 1929. The marine detachments joined the U.S.S. Arkansas and Wyoming on 28 and 27 January, 1929, respectively. The balance of casuals on board the U.S.S. Nitro were transferred at Hampton Roads, Va., on 6 February, 1929.

U.S.S. Rochester
1 Jan to 7 Jan 1929; 4 Feb to 10 Feb 1929
5 January, 1929 the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Texas, consisting of 1 officer and 81 men under command of Capt. T.E. Kendricks, U.S.M.C., reported aboard U.S.S. Rochester at Corinto, Nic., for transportation to the Canal Zone. 7 January, 1929, Colonel J.E. Beaumont, U.S.M.C. also reported aboard for transportation. 17 January, 1929, Colonel Beaumont and the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Texas joined that vessel at Colon, Panama.

10 February, 1929, the marine detachment of the U.S.S. Rochester, reported aboard that vessel at Corinto, Nic., the temporary duty ashore in Nicaragua having been completed.

26 March, 1929, Brigadier General Logan Feland, U.S.M.C., was detached from command 2nd Brigade, U.S.M.C., and Colonel R.H. Dunlap, U.S.M.C., assumed temporary command of the Brigade from 27 March to 18 April, 1929, when Brig. Gen. Dion Williams, U.S.M.C., assumed command.

Casualties in Action up to 1 May, 1929.

Marine Corps:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Totals
Officers
2
1
5
8
Men
22
8
47
77
Totals
24
9
52
85

One Medical Officer and one Chief Pharmacist’s Mate wounded in action.
Two Marine Officers and three enlisted men killed in airplane accidents incident to the occupation.


1928-1929

Nicaragua

The total Marine Corps and Naval Forces ashore in Nicaragua on the dates specified were as follows:

Date
U.S. Navy
U.S. Marine Corps
Total
31 July 1928
456
5,365
5,821 - Peak.
31 Aug 1928
476
5,322
5,798
30 Nov 1928
175
5,079
5,254
31 Jan 1929
178
4,145
4,323
28 Feb 1929
166
3,979
4,145
31 May 1929
156

2,946

3,102

These figures include officers and enlisted men of the Navy and Marine Corps, serving with the Guardia Nacional of Nicaragua.

S U M M A R Y

During the period from 1901 to May 1, 1929, U.S. Naval Forces landed in Central America, Mexico and the West Indies, twenty-one times as follows:

Colombia and Panama Six times
Cuba Three times
Dominican Republic Three times
Haiti Two times
Honduras Three times
Mexico One time
Nicaragua Three times

The following casualties in action occurred among officers and enlisted men during the period in question:

Killed in Action
Died of Wounds
Wounded in Action
Totals
Marine Corps Officers
7
2
14
23
Naval Officers
-
-
3
3
Bluejackets
17
2
51
70
Marine Corps Enlisted Men
47
12
139
198
Totals
71
16
207
294

Note: This report has been prepared from various sources, and its correctness cannot, therefore, be guaranteed. This office especially invites comments on errors, omissions or misstatements of facts noted in the report. It is desired that comments be submitted at an early date in order that the report may be reprinted in a more suitable form.

Note: Slight modifications to the original document including formatting, typographical corrections, and small editorial changes, have been made to assist the reader. The original non-circulating fragile document is available at the Navy Department Library.