Radar Bulletin No. 6, (RADSIX), CIC Manual (page 2)

Part V. TYPE ORGANIZATIONS

5000.
    The following chapters discuss the organizations of a combat information center for specific classes or types of ships. For uniformity the material will be considered in its relation to parts I through IV. Where details are discussed in earlier sections they will be referred to only in the manner (if any) in which they differ from the general details of the earlier sections. Definitions will conform to part I. Each type organization will be discussed under the following headings:
      Introduction:
      Basic functions of the command on the type of ship being considered:
      Functions, duties, and responsibilities of CIC.
        General functions with reference to parts II, III, and IV of RAD SIX.
        Special duties and responsibilities in type of ship being considered, which are not covered by earlier sections.
        Administrative organization of CIC, (Pending decision).
        Diagram of CIC (and auxiliary CIC, where applicable) (Showing equipment, design, and stations of personnel involved).
      Communications of CIC:
        Diagram of S/P communications and other intraship communications (MCs, voice tubes, etc.)
        Equipment used for intership radio communications.
      Operational organization of CIC:
        Diagram of battle bills and condition watches.
        Detailed duties.

    The watch bills are necessarily presented as a composite of the types and are furnished only as a guide.

    Communication diagrams show circuit outlets, authorized for the CIC of the type.

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COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC in an Amphibious Command Headquarters Ship (AGC).

        1. The AGC type of ship has been designed for serving as the flagship of the amphibious force commander. An amphibious operation may involve hundreds of ships and landing craft of all types. The elements of a typical amphibious force are shown in the accompanying diagram (fig. 1).

      1. Functions, duties, and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The combat information center in an AGC shall be organized to perform the general functions listed in parts II, III, and IV of this publication.

        2. Essentially the duties and responsibilities of CIC in an AGC are similar to those of any other ship. However, all data must be evaluated and processed in terms of the whole force in addition to data in terms of the single ship because of the presence of a flag aboard. It frequently is the responsibility of CIC on an AGC to coordinate the functioning of other CICs in the force. Aboard an AGC, the personnel in joint operations room, flag plot, and the staff duty officer rely on CIC for much information.

      1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision.)

      1. Diagram of CIC (fig. 2).

      1. Communications in CIC.

        1. Diagram of sound power and other intraship communications (table 1). The purpose of the accompanying diagram is to show those circuits which, are commonly used by each individual, not the number available.

TABLE 1.--AGC--Communication Diagram
  JA 1,2,
3,4,
6,
JF
JL
JC
1JP 1JS 21JS 22JS 23JS 24JS 81JS 1JV 1,
4JW
JX 49JY X6J 21, 22,
24MC
VHF
&
UHF
Evaluator                                  
CIC officer                                  
Fighter director                                  
Assistant fighter director                                  
Radar control officer                                  
Geographic plot officer                                  
Assistant geographic plotter                                  
Geographic recorder                                  
Summary plotters                                  
Intercept plotters                                  
DR plotter                                  
Surface plotter                                  
Assistant surface plotter                                  
Surface status board keeper                                  
Air status board keeper                                  
Gunnery liaison officer                                  
Radar supervisor                                  
SG operator and stand-by                                  
SK operator and stand-by                                  
SP operator and stand-bys                                  
Precision PPI operator                                  
Radio recorders1                                   
JA talker                                  
JL talker                                  
JF talker                                  
Flag liaison officer                                  

     1. Additional radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands.

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ELEMENTS OF A TYPICAL AMPHIBIOUS FORCE

image of chart "Elements of a Typical Amphibious Force."

Figure 1.

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COMINCH P-013

Image of chart - figure 2 - CIC-AGC.

Figure 2.--CIC--AGC.

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COMINCH P-013

    CIC--AGC

    PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.
    12.
    13.
    14.
    15.
    16.
    17.
    18.
    19.
    20.
    21.
    22.
    23.
    24.
    Evaluator.
    CIC officer.
    Fighter director.
    Assistant fighter director.
    Radar control officer.
    Geographic plot officer.
    Assistant geographic plotter.
    Geographic recorder.
    Summary plotters.
    Intercept plotters.
    DR plotters.
    Surface plotter.
    Assistant surface plotter.
    Surface status board keeper.
    Air status board keeper.
    Gunnery liaison officer.
    Radar supervisor.
    SG operator and standby.
    SK operator and standby.
    SP operators and standbys.
    Precision PPI operator.
    Radio recorders.
    JA talker.
    JL talker.
    C.
    D.
    F.
    G.
    H.
    I.
    J.
    Radiophone unit and speaker amplifier.
    Wind direction and velocity indicator.
    Speaker.
    Radiophone selector switch
    Sound-powered selector switch
    Sound-powered handset
    Radiophone handset.

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        1. Equipment used for intership radio communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous channels.

          Equipment Frequency Examples of use
          2 remote control transmitters and speakers. VHF Maneuvering and emergency warning.
          4 transmitters and receivers. VHF Fighter net, inter-CIC and support aircraft direction.
          4 10-channel transmitters with 2 10-channel receivers. VHF Aircraft control force (group) CIC circuit.
          2 radio telephone units (R, P, U.) (transmit and receive). VHF, HF Fighter net, CIC circuit and local air warning.
          3 radio receivers. HF, VHF General purpose.

      1. Operational organization of CIC. Officers and men having their battle stations in CIC or assigned as watch officers should be carefully trained at a CIC training center.

        1. Diagram of battle bill and condition watches (table 2).

        2. Duties and Stations of CIC Personnel.

          1. Evaluator:

            1. The evaluator should be an experienced officer charged with the general responsibility for operation of the CIC at general quarters. This normally requires that the executive officer or navigator act as evaluator and have the CIC as his battle station.

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    TABLE 2.--AGC-CIC Watch Bill
    Station Condition I Condition I A
    Officers Men Officers Men Officers Men
    Evaluator 1   1      
    CIC officer 1       1  
    Fighter director 1   1      
    Assistant fighter director 1       1  
    Radar control officer 1   1   1  
    Geographic plot officer 1   1   1  
    Assistant geographic plotter   1        
    Geographic recorder   1        
    Summary plotters   3   3   3
    Intercept plotters   2   1   1
    DR plotter   1   1   1
    Surface plotter   1   1   1
    Assistant surface plotter   1        
    Surface status board keeper   1   1   1
    Air status board keeper   1   1   1
    Gunnery liaison officer1 1   1   1  
    Radar supervisor 1          
    SG operator and standby2   2   2   2
    SK operator and standby   2   2   2
    SP operators and standbys   4   4   4
    Precision PPI operator   1   1   1
    Radio recorders3   3   3   3
    JA talker   1   1   1
    JL talker   1   1   1
    JF talker (if flag embarked)   1   1   1
    Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked) 1   1     1
    Station Condition II and III
    Officers Men
    CIC watch officer 1  
    Radar control officer 1  
    Geographic plotter   1
    Surface plotter   1
    Summary plotters   2
    Intercept plotter   1
    SG operator and standby2   2
    SK operator and standby   2
    SP operator and standby   4
    JA talker   1

      1 Officers supplied by other divisions if necessary.

      2 Omit in those vessels with SG indicators installed outside of CIC. Target designation switchboard manned by one of the talkers.

      3 Additional radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands. During condition III, duties of personnel should be combined as complement requires.

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COMINCH P-013

            1. The evaluator's station should have a selector switch to the principal sound power circuits with call-up buttons to local air (joint ops), staff watch officer's shelter, pilot house, intelligence office, joint operations control, and war command room.

          1. CIC officer:

            1. The CIC officer should be an experienced officer, qualified in all phases of CIC work. He is responsible for the training and administration of the combat information center. He should be qualified to take over the evaluator's position at general quarters when that officer is required elsewhere.

            2. The CIC officer's station should have a selector switch to the same sound power circuits as the evaluator. In addition, his station should have a voice radio selector switch connected with the principal transceivers and transmitters. The MC circuits and ship's service telephone should be convenient for his use.

            3. The CIC officer normally should not stand condition watches but will be on call at any time.

          2. Fighter director officer:

            1. The fighter director will be directed by the evaluator or CIC officer to take over the responsibility for interception of a specific raid threatening our forces. He should alternate with the CIC officer during extended general quarters (Condition I A) and act as evaluator during the absence of both the CIC officer and the evaluator.

            2. The fighter director station should have a voice distribution system utilizing all VHF channels used for aircraft control and inter-CIC reporting.

            3. The fighter director normally should not stand condition watches but will be on call at any time in event enemy aircraft threaten our forces.

          3. Assistant fighter director officer:

            1. The assistant fighter director should be an officer qualified to conduct the interception of enemy aircraft. He should supervise the intercept plot and handle visual fighter direction if the necessity arises.

          4. Summary plotters and the radar control officer:

            1. The summary plotters will man the vertical plotting board. The men will plot radar, radio, and lookout information on the back of the transparent plot, and the radar control officer may filter this information when necessary. The radar control officer should see that all air information is available and assist the evaluator.

            2. Sound-powered radar circuits are available to the summary plotters. The radar control officer should have a radio phone selector switch and the necessary sound powered outlets available.

          5. Geographic plotters:

            1. The geographic plot officer is a CIC watch officer who supervises the plotting on the DRT and the surface plot as well as the solution of surface tactical problems. He should see

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COMINCH P-013

              that all information is readily available and assist the evaluator in every way possible. An enlisted man assists him.

          1. Gunnery liaison officer:

            1. The gunnery liaison officer should be an officer from the gunnery department who should stand watch in CIC at general quarters. He should be responsible for passing to gunnery control all information required. The lookout talker may assist the gunnery liaison officer.

            2. The gunnery liaison officer's station should include sound-powered telephone selector switch with radar, gunnery, and command circuits.

          2. Surface plotter:

            1. The surface plotter may be an enlisted man who keeps the surface plot up-to-date under the direction of the geographic plot officer.

          3. Intercept plotters and DR plotters:

            1. The intercept plotters should be enlisted men who will plot the track of enemy raids and DR plotters should dead reckon friendly fighters sent to intercept. The are under the supervision of the assistant fighter director.

          4. Status board keepers:

            1. The status board keepers will be enlisted men who will handle the surface and air status boards respectively. The geographic plot officer should supervise recording on the surface status boards and the assistant fighter director should supervise the keeping of the air status boards.

            2. The surface status board keeper should have the low angle search radar circuits available. The air status board keeper should have an outlet from the VHF equipment used for the fighter net.

          5. Lookout talker:

            1. The lookout talker should man the JL (or JC) sound power circuit and relay lookout and gunnery reports to CIC. He may plot air and surface contacts on the summary plot.

          6. Radar operators:

            1. The two radar operators are desirable at each radar during general quarters permitting continuous operation with one man on the set for 30 minutes and then resting 30 minutes while the other takes over. During condition watches the radar operators should rotate duty with the enlisted talkers and plotters.

        1. During condition II and III watches there should be two officers stationed in the CIC. The CIC watch officer in charge should act as evaluator and coordinate the functions of the CIC. The assistant CIC watch officer will aid him in all respects, act as radar control officer when necessary, supervise plotting, and provide the solution of tactical problems.

      1. Joint operations room.
        A thorough knowledge of facilities and operation of the joint operations room is necessary for CIC personnel, if they are to be of maximum value.

        1. This room is usually located on the main deck, amidships, forward of the ship's wardroom and just aft of the CIC. Here the staff officers of the Army (Marines), Navy and air forces of either service coordinate the employment.

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COMINCH P-013

          in detail of the forces participating and maintain and evaluate the complete picture of the battle situation.

    1. The CIC in a Relief Headquarters Command Ship (RAGC).

        1. A RAGC is a vessel designed for serving as the relief flagship of the amphibious force commander. It will usually be an APA with modifications to accommodate a flag.

      1. Functions, duties and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The general functions of CIC are the same as those listed in parts II, III, and IV of this publication.

        2. The duties and responsibilities of CIC on a RAGC are similar to those of any other ship. When a flag is aboard, the work in CIC should be closely coordinated with the work of the staff which will depend upon CIC for much information.

      1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision.)

      1. Diagram of CIC (omitted).

      1. Communications in CIC.

        1. Diagram of sound power and other intraship communications (omitted).

        2. Equipment used for intership communications in or adjacent to CIC. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous channels.

          Equipment Frequency Examples of use
          2 remote control transmitters and speakers. VHF Maneuvering and emergency warning.
          2 transmitters and receivers, VHF Inter-CIC and aircraft control.
          1 10-channel transmitter with 2 10-channel receivers. VHF Aircraft control, force (group) CIC circuit.
          2 radio telephone units (RPU) (transmit and receive). HF Aircraft control, secondary CIC circuit and local air warning.
          3 radio receivers. HF, VHF General purpose.

      1. Operational organization of CIC.

        1. Battle bill and condition watches (table 3).

        2. Duties and stations of CIC personnel: Similar to those of personnel on a AGC (see par. 5152).

        3. During condition II and III watches there should be one officer stationed in CIC who should act as evaluator and coordinate the functions of CIC He will supervise the work of the enlisted men on watch.

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COMINCH P-013

    TABLE 3.--RAGC-CIC Watch Bill
    Station Condition I Condition I A
    Officers Men Officers Men Officers Men
    Evaluator 1   1      
    CIC officer 1       1  
    Fighter director 1   1      
    Assistant fighter director 1       1  
    Radar control officer 1   1   1  
    Geographic plotter   1   1   1
    Geographic recorder   1        
    Summary plotters   3   2   2
    Intercept plotters   2   1   1
    DR plotter   1   1   1
    Surface plotter   1        
    Status board keeper   1        
    Gunnery liaison officer1 1   1   1  
    SG operator and standby   2   1   1
    SK operator and standby   2   1   1
    Radio recorders2   3   2   2
    JA talker   1   1   1
    JL talker   1   1   1
    JF talker (if flag embarked)   1   1   1
    Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked) 1   1     1
    Station Condition II and III
    Officers Men
    CIC watch officer 1  
    Geographic plotter   1
    Summary plotters   2
    Intercept plotter   1
    SG operator and standby   1
    SK operator and standby   1
    JA talker   1
    JL talker   1

      1 Officers supplied by other divisions if necessary.

      2 Additional radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands. During condition III, duties of personnel should be combined as complement requires. Target designation switchboard manned by one of the talkers.

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COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC in an Attack Transport, Attack Cargo Ship and Destroyer Transport (APA, AKA, APD).

        1. These vessels are designed as troop transports and cargo ships to be used during amphibious operations.

      1. Functions, duties, and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The combat information centers on an APA, AKA, or APD should be organized to perform the functions listed in parts II, III, and IV of this publication.

        2. Special duties and responsibilities:

          1. Essentially the duties and responsibilities of CIC on these vessels are similar to those of any other type of ship. If the vessel acts as a group or division flagship the staff will rely on CIC for much information, and the work in CIC should be closely coordinated with that of the staff.

          2. Boat wave tracking:
            The function of boat wave tracking is performed by these types of vessels. In an amphibious operation the waves of assault boats must be carefully tracked by the parent ship and all interested stations kept informed of their progress toward the beach. It is possible to obtain from a good plot:

            1. Course of boats to the beach or line of departure; whether they will reach the correct location.

            2. Speed of waves; whether they will arrive at destination on time.

            3. Position of marker, control, and support vessels.

      1. The administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision.)

      1. Diagram of CIC (fig. 3).

      1. Communications of CIC.
        1. Diagram of sound power and other intraship communications (table 4).

TABLE 4.--APA, AKA--Communication Diagram
  JA1 JL1 1, 2JP 21JS 22JS 51JS2 1JV 1JW JX X6J 21MC VHF
&
HF
Evaluator                        
CIC officer                        
Geographic plotter                        
Air plotter                        
Surface (or summary) plotters                        
Air search radar operator                        
Surface search radar operator                        
Radio recorder/operator                        
JA talker                        
JL talker1                         

     1 Combined on some vessels, in which event No. JL talker necessary.
     2 IF radio direction finder fitted.

        1. Equipment used for intership radio communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker

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COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 3 - CIC--AKA,APA,APD.

Figure 3. CIC--AKA, APA, APD

--57--

COMINCH P-013

          amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous channels.

          Equipment Frequency Examples of use APA AKA APD
          Remote control transmitter and speaker. VHF Maneuvering and emergency warning. 1 1 1
          Remote control transmitter and speaker. VHF Aircraft control. 1 1 1
          10-channel transmitters with 2 10-channel receivers. VHF Boat wave control. 1 1 1
          Radio receiver. HF General. 1 1 1

      1. Operational organization of CIC.

        1. Battle bill and condition watches (TABLE 5).

        2. Duties and stations of CIC personnel similar to those on AGC and RAGC.
    TABLE 5.--APA-AKA-APD: Watch Bill
    Station Condition I Condition I A
    Officers Men Officers Men Officers Men
    Evaluator 1   1      
    CIC officer 1       1  
    Geographic plotter   1   1   1
    Geographic recorder   1        
    Air plotter   1   1   1
    Surface (or summary) plotters   2   1   1
    Air search radar operator   1   1   1
    Surface search radar operator   1   1   1
    Radio recorder/operator1   1        
    JA talker   1        
    JL talker   1   1   1
    Station Condition II and III
    Officers Men
    CIC watch officer 1  
    Geographic plotter   1
    Air plotter   1
    Surface search radar operator   1
    Air search radar operator   1

    1 Additional radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands. During Condition III, duties of personnel should be combined as complement requires.

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COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC on a Battleship and Cruiser (BB, CB, CA, CL).

        1. The functions of battleships and cruisers are essentially similar. Their main batteries of heavy, long-range guns are their chief reasons for being. These types of ships will be used mainly in surface actions and bombardments. They have also proved useful as an antiaircraft screen for carrier units.

      1. Functions, duties, and responsibilities of CIC. The CIC is an agency for the collections of combat and tactical information by every possible means. Collected information is plotted, recorded, kept on file to facilitate its evaluation and dissemination to interested stations. Parts II, III, and IV of this publication deal with these general functions of CIC in detail.

        1. Special duties and responsibilities:
          The following functions will be performed by CIC. The order of importance is dependent upon the tactical situation.

          1. Air search and warning.

          2. Surface search and warning.

          3. Recognition and identification.

          4. Target indication.

          5. Tracking.

          6. Plotting.

          7. Navigation.

          8. Control of aircraft.

      1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision.)

      1. Diagram of CIC and auxiliary CIC, charthouse and flag plot, (figs. 4, 5, 6 and 7).

      1. Communications in CIC. The sound power phones are CIC's primary system of interior communication. Outlets for a large number of circuits have been placed in CIC. To give flexibility to this system, many of the circuits have outlets through one of two types of switches--the selector switch or a panel of toggle switches. The advantage of each is also its disadvantage. With a panel of toggle switches, circuits can be crossed. This is sometimes desirable. It leads, however, to unintentional crossing, which may seriously impede communications. Selector switches permit being on only one circuit at a time. The single, double, or quadruple sound-powered jack-box outlets are also installed in CIC. Many circuits have outlets in CIC which are seldom used. These have been installed for the unusual situations. CIC's today have most of the sound-powered outlets in CIC wired through panel of 10 or 20 toggle switches.This means that a majority of the circuits leading to CIC are available to a large number of the personnel in CIC. Operationally this is misleading, because with a few exceptions each person in CIC has only one or a very limited number of circuits which he uses. The purposes of the accompanying diagram are not to show circuits which are AVAILABLE to each person but circuits which are COMMONLY USED by each individual.

        1. Diagram of S/P Communications and other intraship communications. (See table 6.)

--59--

COMINCH P-013

    Image of chart - figure 4 - CIC-CL.
    FIGURE 4.--CIC-CL

    See legend on page 61.

--60--

COMINCH P-013

CIC--CL
PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
Evaluator.
CIC officer.
Fighter director.
DR plotter.
Intercept plotter.
Geographic plot officer.
Geographic plotter.
Geographic recorder.
Air plotter.
Assistant air plotter.
Surface plot officer.
Surface plotter.
Surface status board keeper.
Air status board keeper.
MB gunnery liaison officer.
AA gunnery liaison officer.
Radar supervisor.
Surface search operation and standby.
Air search radar and standby.
SP operators.
Precision PPI operator.
Communication officer.
Radio recorder/operator.
JS talker.
JA talker.
JL talker.
JW talker.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
M.
Radiophone unit and speaker amplifier.
Wind direction and velocity indicator.
Pitometer.
Speaker.
Radiophone selector switch.
Sound powered selector switch.
Remote range and bearing indicator.
BB, CA, CB, CL--AUXILIARY CIC AND CHART HOUSE
PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
OinC auxiliary CIC.
Geographic plotter.
Assistant geographic plotter.
Geographic recorder.
Surface plotter.
Assistant surface plotter.
SG radar operator.
Standby SG operator.
VF operator.
Radio recorder.1
JA talker.
JL talker.
JC talker and status board keeper.
5JP talker.
JS talker.
C.
H.
I.
J.
Radiophone unit and speaker. Amplifier.
Sound powered selector switch.
Sound powered handset.
Radiotelephone handset.

    1 Mans JX circuit if necessary.

--61--

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    Image of figure 5 - Auxiliary CIC.
    FIGURE 5.--Auxiliary CIC

    See legend on page 61.

--62--

COMINCH P-013

    Image of figure 6 - Chart House.
    FIGURE 6.--CHART HOUSE

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    Image of figure 7 - Flag Plot.
    FIGURE 7.--FLAG PLOT

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COMINCH P-013

BB, CB, CA, CL--FLAG PLOT
PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
Geographic plotter.
Assistant geographic plotter.
Geographic recorder.
Surface (or summary) plotter.
Assistant surface (or summary) plotter.
Status board keeper.
Surface search radar operator.
Standby surface search radar operator.
Precision PPI operator.
JF talker.
JS talker.
C.
D.
E.
H.
I.
K.
L.
Radiophone unit and speaker amplifier.
Wind direction and velocity indicator.
Pitometer.
Sound-powered selector switch.
Sound-powered handset.
Remote bearing indicator.
Remote range indicator.

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TABLE 6--BB, CB, CA, CL-Communication Diagram
  JA 1,
2,
JB
JC JF JL 1,
2,
3,1
4,1
5,
JP
1
JS
21
JS
22
JS
23
JS
24
JS
25
JS
31
JS,
32
JS
41
JS,
42,
43,1
441
71
JS
81
JS
1,
5JV
1,
2,
3,
4,
5,
6,
7,1
8,1
JW
JX 49
JY
(4)
2JZ XJA X1JV X1JW
X2JW,
X5JW,
X6JW,
X7JW,1 X8JW1
XJX X6J 20,
21,
22,
24
MC
VHF
&
HF
Evaluator                                                        
CIC officer                                                        
Fighter director                                                        
Intercept plotter                                                        
DR plotter                                                        
Geographic plot officer                                                        
Assistant geographic plotter                                                        
Geographic recorder                                                        
Air plotter                                                        
Assistant air plotter                                                        
Surface (or summary) plotter                                                        
Assistant surface (or summary) plotter                                                        
Surface status board keeper                                                        
Air status board keeper                                                        
MB gunnery liaison officer1                                                         
AA battery gunner liaison officer1                                                         
Radar supervisor                                                        
SG operator and stand-by                                                        
SK operator and stand-by                                                        
SP operators and stand-bys                                                        
Precision PPI operator                                                        
Radar switchboard operator                                                        
Communications officer1                                                         
Radio recorders/operators                                                        
JS talker                                                        
JA talker                                                        
JL talker                                                        
JV talker                                                        
JW talker                                                        
JF talker (if flag embarked)                                                        
Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked)                                                        
1 BB only.

--66--

COMINCH P-013

        1. Equipment used for intership radio communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment therefore would be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote Radio Phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving multitudinous channels.

          Radio Frequency Examples of use
          2 remote control transmitter-receiver units. VHF Primary warning and maneuvering.
          2 transmitter and receiver units. VHF Aircraft control, Inter CIC circuit.
          3 10-channel transmitter-receiver sets.1 VHF Aircraft control, Force (Group) CIC circuit.
          4 radio telephone units (R/P.U.) transmit and receive. VHF, HF Aircraft control, CIC circuit and local air warning, spotting circuit.
          3 radio receivers. VHF, HF General purpose.
          1 (3 for BB, 2 for CA, CL)

      1. Operational organization of CIC. The standard organization of battleship and cruiser CIC's should provide for manning stations at general quarters and during condition watches. Due to currently existing differences in the arrangements of CIC equipment in ships of the fleet even of the same type, variations from the standard bill may be found.

        1. Battle Bill and Condition Watches of Auxiliary CIC (Chart House) and Flag Plot (tables 7, 8 and 9.)

--67--

COMINCH P-013

    TABLE 7.--BB, CB, CA, CL--Watch Bill
    Station Condition I
    Officers Men
    Evaluator 1  
    CIC officer 1  
    Fighter director 1  
    Intercept plotter   1
    D.R. plotter   1
    Geographic plot officer 1  
    Assistant geographic plotter   1
    Geographic recorder   1
    Air plotter   1
    Assistant air plotter   1
    Surface (or summary) plotter 1  
    Assistant surface (or summary) plotter   1
    Surface status board keeper   1
    Air status board keeper   1
    MB gunnery liaison officer3 1  
    AA battery gunnery liaison officer3 1  
    Radar supervisor 1  
    S.G. operator and standby2   2
    SK operator and standby   2
    SP operators and standbys   4
    Precision PPI operator   1
    Radar switchboard operator4   1
    Communications officer3 1  
    Radio recorders/operators5   2
    JS talker   1
    JA talker   1
    JL talker   1
    JV talker   1
    JW talker   1
    JF talker (if flag embarked)   1
    Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked) 1  
      Condition II and III
    Officers Men
    CIC watch officer 1  
    CIC watch officer 1  
    Geographic plotter   1
    Geographic recorder   11
    Surface (or summary) plotter   1
    Assistant surface (or summary) plotter   11
    Air plotter   1
    Assistant air plotter   11
    SG operator and standby2   2
    SK operator and standby   2
    SP operator and standby   4
    Precision PPI operator   1
    Radar switchboard operator4   1
    Radio recorder5   11
    JS talker   1
    JL talker   1
    1 BB only.

    2 Omit in those vessels with SG indicators installed only in Auxiliary CIC. Target designation switchboard manned by one of the talkers.

    3 Officers supplied by other divisions if necessary.

    4 Usually located outside of CIC.

    5 Additional radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands. During condition III, duties of personnel should be combined as complement requires.

--68--

COMINCH P-013

    TABLE 8.--BB, CB, CA, CL: Auxiliary CIC (Chart House) Watch Bill
    Station Condition I
    Officers Men
    OinC auxiliary CIC 1  
    Geographic plotter   1
    Assistant geographic plotter   1
    Geographic recorder   1
    Surface plotter   1
    Assistant surface plotter   1
    SG radar operator   1
    Stand-by SG radar operator   1
    VF operator   1
    Radio recorder   1
    JA talker   1
    JL talker   1
    JC talker and status board keeper   1
    5JP Talker   1
    JS Talker   1
      Condition II and III
    Officers Men
    Surface plotter   1
    SG radar operator   1
    Stand-by SG radar operator   1
    JS talker   1
    Auxiliary CIC will not normally be manned during condition III except, in those vessels where the SP radar has replaced 1 of the 2 authorized SGs and the indicator of the remaining SG is located in auxiliary CIC.

--69--

COMINCH P-013

    TABLE 9.--BB, CB, CA, CL: Flag Plot Watch Bill
    Station Condition I
    Officers1 Men
    Geographic plotter   1
    Assistant geographic plotter   1
    Geographic recorder   1
    Surface (or summary) plotter   1
    Assistant surface (or summary) plotter   1
    Status board keeper   1
    Surface search radar operator   1
    Stand-by surface search radar operator   1
    Precision PPI operator   1
    JF talker   1
    JS talker   1
      Conditions II & III
    Officers1 Men
    Surface (or summary) plotter   1
    Surface search radar operator   1
    Stand-by surface search radar operator   1
    JF talker   1
    JS talker   1
    1 Officers as assigned by Flag.

        1. Detailed duties.

          1. Evaluator:

            1. Require that immediate reports be made to him of pertinent information received from all sources, including radar, radio, internal communications systems, lookouts, and visual signals.

            2. Require that CIC personnel coordinate their efforts to display and filter this information.

            3. Furnish timely, properly evaluated, accurate information to the command and control stations, and be prepared to recommend a course of action based on evaluated information.

            4. Consult directly with command via sound-power hand sets, MC circuits, or voice tubes.

            5. Be thoroughly familiar with the capabilities and limitations of all radar and RCM equipment.

            6. Assist command in conning the ship with regard to avoiding collision or grounding.

          2. CIC officer:

            1. Be thoroughly familiar with the duties and responsibilities of the evaluator, and be prepared to assume these duties in the absence of the evaluator.

--70--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Maintain a check on operating methods to insure maximum effective search consistent with the prescribed condition of radar silence.

            2. Keep operators informed of expected sectors of contact with friendly or enemy units.

            3. Receive and correlate information from lookouts, radio and flag signals.

            4. Check on radar contacts reported as side lobes, ionized clouds, land, double echoes, interference, and countermeasures.

            5. Insure that main and secondary battery fire control radars, directors, and automatic weapons are coached on to designated targets.

            6. Insure that all personnel concerned are informed of the designations give to the various raids.

            7. Insure rapid dissemination of information to control stations.

            8. Select surface contacts to be tracked, with particular attention to those nearest or most dangerous.

            9. Keep command and the control stations informed of the progress of interception problems.

            10. Assist the navigator when operating near land by selecting suitable landmarks for radar fixes.

            11. Assist the evaluator in the performance of control functions delegated to CIC.

            12. Utilize the VF (precision PPI) for analyzing radar contacts.

            13. Be ready to render assistance in furnishing maneuvering and tactical data.

          1. Fighter director:

            1. Protect his ship or force against air attacks by effective use of the fighters assigned to his control.

            2. Control communications with combat air patrol, and if necessary, the inter FD channel with force (group) CIC officer and ship's CIC officer of other units.

            3. Control the operation of the air search radar.

            4. Be prepared to direct planes engaged in antisubmarine patrol, and perform that function when ordered.

            5. Know the responsibilities of force (group, unit) and ship C.I.C. as laid down in USF 10.

            6. When not handling fighter direction, coordinate air plotting and the dissemination of air information as directed by the evaluator.

          2. Intercept plotter:

            1. Maintain close communications with the air search radar.

            2. Plot contacts with neatness, accuracy, and speed, in accordance with standard plotting procedure.

            3. Enter amplifying information along track of target.

            4. Keep plotting board clear of unnecessary detail.

            5. Supervise other air plotters.

            6. Record number of friendly planes in the air with their search sectors.

          3. DR plotter:

            1. Keep a DR plot of own fighters.

            2. Wear headset connected to fighter net channel.

--71--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Know thoroughly the technique of DR as prescribed in the Air Plotting Manual. (RADFOUR)

          1. Geographic plotter:

            1. Maintain a continuous plot on the DRT of own and enemy ships to determine their course and speed and any changes therein.

            2. Check scale setting of DRT frequently.

            3. Supply bearings and ranges course and speed for initial rangekeeper solution to gunnery liaison officer if requested.

            4. Provide ranges and time interval to initial firing point when requested.

            5. Correct DRT bug during bombardment for set and drift determined by navigational fixes.

            6. Keep the evaluator informed of all important data.

          2. Assistant geographic plotter:

            1. Works with the geographic plotter as a teammate to speed the plotting.

            2. Label plots, determine courses and speeds, etc.

            3. May be designated to operate the teleplotter. However, an additional man may be necessary for this.

          3. Air plotter:

            1. Plot all air contacts with proper labels including raid designations, courses and speeds, composition, angels, etc.

            2. Provide such information as possible of sun, force and direction of wind, etc.

            3. Keep a plot of the tactical air situation, including sector of probable enemy approach, bearing and distance of own and enemy bases, and own planes in the air.

            4. Keep the evaluator and AA gunnery liaison officer informed of all important data or change occurring in the plot.
            5. Check with surface search radar for spotting low flying aircraft.

          4. Assistant air plotter:
            The assistant air plotter should assist the air plotter in maintaining a continuous plot of all air targets reported by the air search radar, lookouts, or radio.

          5. The surface (or summary) plotter:
            It is often desirable that he be an officer. He will be the surface plotter if a surface plot display is being kept on the plotting board he is manning, (i.e. all surface and air units, friendly and enemy). He should:

            1. Keep a continuous track of all surface contacts (or all surface and air contacts), to keep the cognizant personnel in CIC informed of the identity of any surface radar contact (if summary plotter, any surface or air contact) in question.

            2. Aid the gunnery liaison officers in preventing the fire of own ship from endangering friendly ships.

            3. Maintain a relative plot of own disposition.

            4. Indicate location and disposition of friendly ships, pickets, and stragglers.

--72--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Maintain maneuvering board plot of own ship's course and speed, and be prepared to furnish tactical data.

            2. Provide ranges and bearings of sound contacts by escorts, in relation to self and to fleet center.

            3. Plot such data as rain clouds, land, wind speed, and direction.

            4. Plot reports from radar operators and lookouts.

            5. Coordinate lookout information, radio information, and radar information for identification and composition.

          1. Assistant surface (or summary) plotter:

            1. Assists the surface (or summary) plotter in the execution of his duties as outlined above.

          2. Recorders--geographic: surface (or summary). The geographic and surface (or summary) recorders should keep an accurate record of radar ranges and bearings. use of VG (projection PPI) with tracking paper may obviate the necessity of having recorders. If proper plotting procedure is used, the tracing paper on the VG will preserve the record. This together with equipment for photographing the PPI will aid in keeping a record of the action.

            Tracing paper on the DRT may give sufficient information to reconstruct an action; however, the geographic plotter is often in need of a reference if he misses a range or bearing. If the raid time, bearing and radar range data is presented conveniently for all concerned on the surface status board, it will not be necessary to have a surface recorder as such. When this, due to the physical limitations of CIC's, is not applicable, it is necessary to provide a recorder for either the geographic plotter or both geographic plotter and surface (or summary) plotter.

          3. Surface status board keeper. The surface status board keeper should be under the supervision of either the surface (summary) plot officer or the geographic plot officer. He should:

            1. Maintain an up-to-date record of the tactical data on the board.

            2. Record data on surface raids, if board is designed to include such data.

          4. Air status board keeper. The air status board keeper should be under the supervision of the fighter director officer. He should:

            1. Maintain an up-to-date record of all intercept information.

            2. Keep posted such information as condition of weather, clouds, states of sea, time of sun and moon rise and set, current, drift, force of wind, etc.

            3. Record information on physical condition of fighter planes, ranges and bearings of enemy planes and force, losses, status of own carriers and patrols.

          5. M.B. (main battery) gunnery liaison officer. M.B. gunnery liaison officer shall by observation of the surface search radars, the geographic plot, the VF, the surface or summary plot:

            1. Keep the evaluator and gun control stations informed of the surface gunnery situation.

            2. Analyze all contacts by checking IFF indications, lookouts reports, and the known location of own ships and land masses.

            3. Inform the AA liaison officer of any air targets appearing on surface radar scope.

--73--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Check CIC's computation of courses and speeds of targets being tracked against M.B. plot computer-solution.

            2. Coach directors on target as ordered.

            3. Check director train and range indicators to insure they are on designated targets.

            4. Warn evaluator and gun control stations when own ships are in danger of own firing.

            5. During shore bombardment (indirect fire), give advanced range, bearing, and elevation of the target.

          1. Antiaircraft (secondary battery) gunnery liaison officer.

            1. Keep the evaluator and air defense officer informed of the developments in the air situation.

            2. Make every effort to determine the character of contacts by checking for IFF, approach bearings, altitudes, course, speed, identification by lookouts, and location of own air patrols.

            3. Coach AA fire control directors on to designated targets employing target designators or the appropriate telephone circuits.

            4. Insure that directors are on designated targets by checking target range and bearing indicators located in CIC.

            5. During low visibility torpedo attacks insure that AA guns do not fire on bearings which endanger other ships of the screen.

            6. Follow the same procedure for the secondary as MB gunnery liaison officer does for the main battery when the secondary battery is firing on surface targets.

          2. Surface and air search operators:

            1. Maintain an alert search on the prescribed range scale, with the antenna rotating at the prescribed rate.

            2. Report all contacts, amplifying initial reports as additional information becomes available.

            3. Report all unusual or doubtful indications, and be able to recognize double echoes, side lobes, ionized clouds, second trip echoes, wake signals, interference jamming, window, land echoes, aircraft, and surface craft.

            4. Check all contacts for IFF, when ordered, and identify the code.

            5. Know disposition of ships in company.

          3. Communications officer:

            1. Supervise the watch on all radio circuits and inform the evaluator of all pertinent incoming messages.

            2. Encodes and transmits messages as directed by evaluator (e.g., contact and amplifying reports).

            3. Decodes messages received, notifying personnel concerned.

            4. Be familiar with and have access to standard tactical instructions and the current operations and communications plans.

          4. Radio recorders:

            1. Should be proficient in keeping receivers tuned.

            2. When desirable, they will be used for recording designated radio circuits which CIC is monitoring. If mechanical recorders are provided, they will operate these.

--74--

COMINCH P-013

            1. If C/W is in use, radiomen shall be provided to record and send.

          1. Telephone talkers. Talkers must be carefully trained in proper S/P maintenance and procedure, in accordance "CominCh's Telephone Talkers Manual."

          2. Flag liaison officer. The flag liaison officer, if assigned, should observe all scopes, plots, and status boards, and consult with the evaluator, and provide the flag officer with all evaluated information needed.

          3. Officer in charge of auxiliary CIC. The officer in charge of CIC should be a qualified CIC watch officer and preferably a radar officer. He should:

            1. Supervise the operation and maintenance of radars and plots in auxiliary CIC.

            2. Provide assistance to CIC when needed.

            3. Be prepared to assume the most urgent functions of CIC in the event of damage to the main installations.

          4. Recognition officers. The recognition officer is an officer who has specialized in recognition training. He should be qualified in the operation of CIC and the mechanics of aircraft control and fighter direction. He should:

            1. Supervise the performance of the battle lookouts.

            2. Perform visual fighter direction when ordered.

        1. Condition watch organization. (See 5451).

          1. During condition of readiness watches, CIC shall be prepared to perform the same functions as during General Quarters, but with reduced personnel.

          2. The CIC watch officer shall perform the duties of the evaluator during condition watches. In addition he should:

            1. Perform the duties of CIC communications officer.

            2. Qualify as a radar operator.

            3. Conduct systematic training of condition watches personnel to perfect radar operation, and plotting techniques, as well as team training in the performance of all functions of CIC.

            4. Brief the relieving watch before relinquishing the watch.

--75--

COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC on a Carrier (CV, CVB, CVL, CVE).

        1. The aircraft carrier (CV, CVB, CVL, CVE) is designed for use as an operating base for aircraft which may be controlled offensively, and/or defensively by own carrier or by other control stations.

      1. Functions, duties, and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The combat information center should be organized to perform the following functions. (Their order of importance is not determined by the order of listing, but varies with the tactical situation.)

          1. Air search and warning.

          2. Surface search and warning.

          3. Aircraft control.

          4. Recognition and identification.

          5. Plotting and tracking.

          6. Gunnery.

          7. Navigation.

          These functions have been discussed in detail in parts II, III, and IV of this publication.

        2. In addition to the above general functions, the combat information center on carrier type ships, should be so designed as to perform the following special functions:

          1. Maintenance of complete records of all friendly air-borne aircraft (including mission, time of departure, and return of all strike groups).

          2. Communication with all air-borne aircraft.

          3. Control and coordination of all defensive fighter planes of a task group or task force.

          4. Control of, and assisting, all pilot-rescue planes or ships.

        1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision)

        1. Diagram of CIC and air plot (figs. 8, 9, and 10).

        1. Communications in CIC.

          1. Intraship communications (table 10).

--76--

COMINCH P-013

TABLE 10--CV, CIC, and Air Pilot Communication Diagram
  JA JF 1JG 2JC X1
JG
JL 1,
2,
5
JP
1JS 21
JS
22
JS
23
JS
24
JS
25
JS
41
JS,
42,
JS
71
JS
81
JS
1,
5JV
JX 49
JY
XJA X1
JV
XJX 19,
20,
21,
22,
24
MC
VHF
&
HF
Evaluator                                                
CIC officer                                                
Fighter director                                                
Assistant fighter director                                                
Radar control officer                                                
Geographic plotter                                                
Geographic recorder                                                
Summary plotters                                                
Intercept plotters                                                
DR plotter                                                
Surface plotter                                                
Assistant surface plotter                                                
Status board keeper                                                
Gunnery liaison officer                                                
Ship's information officer                                                
Radar supervisor                                                
Maintenance man                                                
SG operator and standby                                                
SK operator and standby                                                
SP/S.M. operators and standbys                                                
Precision PPI operator                                                
Radar switchboard operator                                                
Radio recorder/operator                                                
JA talker                                                
JL talker                                                
JX talker                                                
JF talker (if flag embarked)                                                
Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked)                                                

        1. Intership communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous H.F. channels.

          Equipment Frequency Examples of use
          2 remote control transmitter-receivers VHF Maneuvering and emergency warning.
          4 transmitters and receivers VHF Inter CIC, force (group) CIC circuit.
          4 10-channel transmitter receivers1 VHF Fighter net, aircraft control, force (group) CIC circuit.
          8 radio telephone units (RPU) transmit and receive2 VHF, HF Search and attack local air warning.
          3 receivers VHF, HF General purpose.
          1 2 for CVL, CVE.

          2 6 for CVL, CVE

--77--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 8.
Figure 8.

--78--

COMINCH P-013

    CV CIC
    PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
    1. Evaluator. A. Radiophone unit.
    2. CIC officer. B. Speaker amplifier.
    3. Fighter director. C. Radiophone unit and speaker amplifier.
    4. Assistant fighter director. D. Wind direction and velocity indicator.
    5. D.R. plotter. E. Pitometer.
    6. Ship's information officer. F. Speaker.
    7. Radar control officer. G. Radiophone selector switch.
    8. Gunnery liaison officer. H. Sound-powered selector switch.
    9. Radar supervisor. I. Sound-powered handset.
    10. Air operations officer (air plot officer). J. Radiophone handset.
    11. Assistant air operations officer (assistant air plot officer). K. Remote bearing indicator.
    12. Assistant air operations officer (assistant air plot officer). L. Remote range indicator.
    13. Geographic plot officer. M. Remote range and bearing indicator.
    14. ACI officer.  
    15. Geographic plotter.  
    16. Surface recorder.  
    17. Surface plotter.  
    18. Intercept plotter (at VG).  
    19. Intercept plotter or surface plotter (at VG).  
    20. Summary plotter.  
    21. Summary plotter.  
    22. Summary plotter.  
    23. Status board keepers.  
    24. Status board keeper.  
    25. SG operator.  
    26. SG operator.  
    27. SK operator.  
    28. SK operator.  
    29. SM/SP operator.  
    30. SM/SP operator.  
    31. Radio operator/recorder.  
    32. Radio operator/recorder.  
    33. Radio operator/recorder.  
    34. JA talker.  
    35. JL talker.  
    36. JX talker.  
    37. 1JG talker.  
    38. 2JG talker.  
    39. Yeoman.  
    40. Messenger.  
    41. Aerology.  
    42. Teletype operator.  
    43. Radio operator/recorder.  

--79--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 9 - CIC and Air Plot-CVE (105 Class).
Figure 9.--CIC and AIR PLOT--CVE (105 Class)

--80--

COMINCH P-013

    CVE CIC
    PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
    1. Evaluator. C. Radiophone unit and speaker amplifier.
    2. CIC officer. D. Wind.
    3. Fighter director. E. Pitometer.
    4. Assistant fighter director (and ships information officer). G. Radiophone selector switch.
    5. DR plotter. H. Sound-powered selector switch.
    6. Radar control officer. I. Sound-powered handset.
    7. Gunnery liaison officer. J. Radiophone handset.
    8. Radar supervisor.  
    9. Air operations officer (air plot officer).  
    10. Assistant air operations officer (assistant air plot officer).  
    11. Geographic plotter.  
    12. Assistant geographic plotter.  
    13. Geographic recorder.  
    14. Surface plotter.  
    15. Intercept plotter.  
    16. Intercept plotter.  
    17. Status board keeper.  
    18. Summary plotter.  
    19. Summary plotter.  
    20. SG operator.  
    21. SG operator.  
    22. SP operator.  
    23. SP operator.  
    24. SK operator.  
    25. SK operator.  
    26. Radio operator recorder.  
    27. Radio operator recorder.  
    28. JA talker.  
    29. JL talker.  
    30. 1JG talker.  
    31. 2JG talker.  
    32. Yeoman.  
    33. Radio operator recorder.  

--81--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 10 - CIC-CVL- and Air Plot.
Figure 10.--CIC-CVL and AIR PLOT

--82--

COMINCH P-013

    PERSONNEL LEGEND
    1. Evaluator. 17. Summary plotter.
    2. CIC officer. 18. Summary plotter.
    3. Fighter director. 19. Status board keeper.
    4. Assistant fighter director (ships information officer). 20. SG operator.
    5. DR plotter. 21. SG operator.
    6. Radar control officer. 22. SK operator.
    7. Ships information officer. 23. SK operator.
    8. Gunnery liaison officer. 24. SM/SP operator.
    9. Radar supervisor. 25. SM/SP operator.
    10. Air operations officer (air plot officer). 26. Radio operator/recorders.
    11. Assistant air operations officer (assistant air plot officer). 27. JA talker.
    12. Geographic plot officer. 28. JL talker.
    13. Geographic plotter. 29. JX talker.
    14. Geographic recorder. 30. 1JG talker.
    15. Intercept plotter. 31. 2JG talker.
    16. Intercept plotter or surface plotter (at VG). 32. Yeoman.
    17. Summary plotter.    
    18. Summary plotter.    

--83--

COMINCH P-013

      1. Operational organization of CIC.

        1. Diagram of battle bill and condition watches (Table 11).

TABLE 11.--CV: Watch Bill
Station Condition I Condition IA
Officers Men Officers Men Officers Men
Evaluator 1          
CIC officer 1   1      
Fighter director 1       1  
Assistant fighter director 1   1   1  
Radar control officer 1   1   1  
Geographic plot officer            
Geographic plotter   1   1   1
Geographic recorder   1        
Summary plotters   3   3   3
Intercept plotters   2   1   1
DR plotter   1   1   1
Surface plotter   1   1   1
Assistant surface plotter   1        
Status board keepers   2   1   1
Gunnery liaison officer1 1   1   1  
Ship's information officer 1          
Radar supervisor 1   1   1  
Maintenance man   1   1   1
SG operator and standby3   2   2   2
SK operator and standby   2   2   2
SP/SM operators and standbys   4   4   4
Precision PPI operator   1   1   1
Radar switchboard operator4   1   1   1
Radio recorder/operator2   3   2   2
JA talker   1        
JL talker   1   1   1
JX talker            
JF talker (if flag embarked) 1          
Flag liaison officer (if flag embarked)   1        
Station Condition II and III
Officers Men
CIC watch officer 1  
Fighter director 1  
Geographic plotter   1
Summary plotters   2
Surface plotter   1
Status board keeper   1
SG operator and standby   2
SK operator and standby   2
SP/SM operator and standby   4
Radar switchboard operator   1
Radio recorder operator   1
JL talker   1
    1 Officers supplied by other divisions if necessary.

    2 Additional Radio recorders supplied as the occasion demands. During condition III, duties of personnel should be combined as complement requires.

    3 Omit in those vessels with SG indicators installed in auxiliary CIC. Target designation switchboard manned by one of the talkers.

    4 Usually located outside of CIC.

--84--

COMINCH P-013

        1. Stations and detailed duties of CIC personnel.

          Station Duties
          Evaluator May be executive officer, air officer, assistant air officer, or suitably experienced officer delegated by air officer. Exercises control and supervision over all stations. Evaluates and digests information for presentation to captain and flag. Recommends courses of action based on radar information and intelligence.
          CIC officer He is charged with the administration, training and organization of the CIC; he is the division officer. At General Quarters he assists the evaluator as directed. He carries out the duties prescribe in USF 10A. He exercises tactical control of CAP subject to orders of the OTC. He is responsible for providing an organization which furnishes the flag, captain, and control stations with all the tactical information, air or surface, which is essential to the respective stations.
          Fighter director Assists CIC officer. Maintains information of VF status in own ships, and other air-borne aircraft. Conducts interceptions as directed.
          Assistant fighter director Under the direction of the CIC officer he conducts interceptions of designated raids. When not so engaged, a surface plot can be kept on his projection PPI or polar plotting board.
          DR plotter Plots radar reports. Dead reckons aircraft.
          No. 1 intercept plotter Plots reports from designated air search radars.
          No. 2 intercept plotter Same; in addition, maintains a surface plot when the plotting board or VG is not in use as an intercept plot.
          No. 2 DR plotter Plots reports from fighter direction radar, dead reckons as required. He may act as extra geographic plotter, instead of above.
          Ship's information officer Mans ship's information circuit. Disseminates information available in CIC to all control stations.
          Gunnery liaison officer Furnishes gunnery officer and gunnery stations with information and coaches gun directors to targets. Directs transfer of targets from search to fire control radar via the target designation system.
          Status board keepers Maintain information and status boards. Status of CAP including fuel, vector calls, altitude, time out and in, searches A/S patrols, weather, disposition of VF, etc.
          Radar control officer Controls radar of own ship and force under direction force (Group, Force) CIC officer or ship's CIC officer in accordance with air search doctrine. Supervises vertical summary plot. Filters plots as necessary. Plots warning net reports. Initiates warning net reports as directed.
          Geographic plot officer and assistant geographic surface recorder Plot SG/SM-SP reports on DRT; record SG-SM-SP reports with bearing, distance, and time.
          Talker (JA) Talker.
          Talker (JX) Talker.
          Messenger Messenger.
          Visual fighter directors Conducts visually directed intercepts as designated by ship's CIC officer. Plotter plots radar information relayed from CIC.
          Radio recorder Record TBS No. 1.
          Radio recorder Record TBS No. 2.
          Radio recorder Record VHF 1 thru 10 (as required).
          Radio recorder Record HF warning net.
          Radio recorder Record search and attack frequencies.
          Radio recorder Record HF fighter net (as required).

--85--

COMINCH P-013

          Station Duties
          SK radar operator Operates SK radar.
          SK radar Talker as required or second scope operator.
          SG radar Same as for SK.
          SM/SP radar Operator PPI scope.
          SM/SP radar Operator "A" and "R" scopes.
          SM/SP radar Talker (sometimes required)..
          Radar supervisor Roving watch. Supervision of SM/SP, SK, SG radar operation and maintenance. Check identification, composition, and altitude of contacts.

--86--

COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC of a Destroyer (DD).

        1. The destroyer is a general utility ship and has many missions to perform. It may be used in surface actions, air actions or against subsurface craft. Its primary weapon of attack is the torpedo, but it has a potent secondary weapon of dual purpose guns. Escort work for combatant or noncombatant ships is also a destroyer's duty.

      1. Function, duties and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The CIC of a destroyer performs the same general functions as outlined in Parts II, III and IV of Rad SIX. The CIC of a destroyer should provide for the efficient handling of simultaneous enemy attacks of all types.

        2. In addition to the general functions, a destroyer's CIC has the following added responsibilities:

          1. Torpedo fire.

          2. Anti submarine warfare.

          3. Escort work.

      1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision)

      1. Diagram of CIC (figs. 11, 12, 13, and 14).

--87--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 11 - CIC-DD (1620-1630 ton).
Figure 11.--CIC--DD (1620-1630 ton)

(See legend on page 92.)

--88--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 12 - CIC-DD (1,850 ton).
Figure 12.--CIC--DD (1,850 ton)

(See legend on page 92.)

--89--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 13 - CIC-DD (2,100 ton).
Figure 13.--CIC--DD (2,100 ton)

(See legend on page 92.)

--90--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 14 - CIC-DD (2,200 ton).
Figure 14.--CIC--DD (2,200 ton)

(See legend on next page.)

--91--

COMINCH P-013

    DD (1620-1630, 1850, 2100, 2200 TON CLASS) CIC
    PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.
    12.
    13.
    14.
    15.
    16.
    Evaluator.
    CIC officer.
    Fighter director.
    Gunnery liaison officer.
    Geographic plotter.
    Assistant geographic plotter.
    Geographic recorder.
    Air plotter.
    Assistant air plotter.
    Surface plotter.
    JA talker.
    Radio recorder.
    SG operator.
    Standby SG operator.
    SC operator.
    Standby SC operator.
    C.
    E.
    F.
    H.
    K.
    L.
    M.
    Radio phone unit and speaker amplifier.
    Pitometer.
    Speaker.
    Sound-powered selector switch.
    Remote bearing indicator.
    Remote range indicator.
    Remote range and bearing indicator.

--92--

COMINCH P-013

      1. Communications in CIC.

        1. Diagram of S/P communications and other intraship communications. (See table 12.)

TABLE 12.--DD: Communication Diagram
  JA 1JP 21
JS
22
JS
41
JS
81
JS
JU 1JV 1
or
5
JW
JX 49
JY
(4)
X6J 21
MC
VHF
&
HF
Evaluator                            
CIC officer                            
Fighter director                            
Gunnery liaison officer                            
Geographic plotter                            
Assistant geographic plotter                            
Geographic recorder                            
Surface plotter                            
Air plotter                            
Assistant air plotter                            
SG operator and standby                            
SC operator and standby                            
Radio recorder                            
JA talker                            

        1. Equipment used for intership radio communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous H.F. channels.
          DD(445-692)

          Equipment Frequency Use
          2 remote control transmitter-receivers VHF Maneuvering and emergency warning.
          1 transmitter and receiver VHF Inter CIC, support aircraft direction.
          2 10-channel transmitters receivers1 VHF Aircraft control, force (group) CIC circuit, fighter net.
          2 radio telephone units (RPU) transmit and receive VHF, HF Fighter net, CIC circuit, local air warning.
          2 radio receivers HF General purpose.
          1 3 for picket DD, 1 for DM-DMS, DE and other DD.

--93--

COMINCH P-013

      1. Operational Organization of CIC.

        1. Battle bill and condition watches (table 13).

TABLE 13.--DD: CIC Watch Bill
Station Condition I
Officers Men
Evaluator 1  
CIC officer 1  
Fighter director 1  
Gunnery liaison officer 1  
Geographic plotter   1
Assistant geographic plotter   1
Geographic recorder   1
Surface plotter   1
Air plotter   1
Assistant air plotter   1
SG operator and standby   2
SC operator and standby   2
Radio recorder   1
JA talker   1
  Condition III
Officers Men
CIC watch officer 1  
Geographic plotter   1
Surface plotter and VF operator   1
Air plotter   1
SG operator   1
SC operator   1
    Precision PPI operated by surface plotter or gunnery liaison officer during condition I. A precision PPI operator may be desirable, in addition, during condition I.

        1. Detailed duties--battle bill.

          1. The evaluator should:

            1. Supervise all activities in CIC during General Quarters.

            2. Furnish timely, properly evaluated, accurate information to the captain, the unit commander embarked and the control officers as necessary.

            3. Train CIC teams so that specific orders are not necessary.

            4. Supervise exterior and interior communications used by CIC. Require that immediate reports be made to him of all pertinent information received from all sources, including radio, internal communications systems, lookout, and visual signals.

            5. Coordinate the plotting and tracking of all air and surface contacts.

            6. Use fire control radars to check doubtful contacts.

            7. Make initial reports to command on all contacts and see that necessary contact report is sent out on warning net.

--94--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Make necessary amplifying reports to command and warning net.

            2. Designate targets as ordered by the commanding officer. Coach main battery and torpedo directors and automatic weapons on to invisible targets.

            3. Inform the radar operators of all facts that might aid them in radar interpretation, such as presence of all land echoes, masses, squalls, expected friendly contacts, second sweep echoes.

            4. Use all facilities to insure safe navigation of the ship.

            5. Have DRT and other equipment checked for accuracy at frequent intervals. Gyro repeaters should be checked every 15 minutes.

            6. Report enemy countermeasures immediately to command.

            7. Be thoroughly familiar with the capabilities and limitations of all radar and identification equipment.

          1. The CIC officer should:

            1. Be thoroughly familiar with the responsibilities of the evaluator, and in his absence assume those responsibilities.

            2. Coordinate and supervise the tracking of targets, supervise the upkeep of the surface plot insuring that standard plotting procedures are followed.

            3. Solve all problems involving the use of the maneuvering board, own and enemy torpedo effective range devices and the CIC equipment.

            4. Be thoroughly familiar with destroyer tactical, torpedo, gunnery, and associated doctrines, including the force plans.

            5. When in contact with unidentified surface units, solve torpedo effective range problems and advise the evaluator of his findings.

            6. Furnish necessary information on invisible targets to the torpedo director for the solution of torpedo control problems.

            7. Understand and control the use of IFF.

            8. Perform other duties as directed by the evaluator.

          2. The fighter director should:

            1. Know the responsibilities of the force (group, unit) and ship CIC in connection with the control of aircraft as laid down in current tactical publications and the operations plans.

            2. Control communications with the combat air patrol, and, when necessary, with the force (group, unit) CIC officer and CIC officers of the other units.

            3. Control the use of the air search radar when actually engaged in the direction of fighter aircraft.

            4. Relinquish his control of the air search radar to the officer performing gunnery liaison duties when air attack is imminent.

            5. Keep the evaluator informed of the air situation.

            6. Have an accurate log of radio transmission kept.

            7. When not engaged in directing fighter aircraft, supervise maintenance of air or summary plot.

            8. Be prepared to direct aircraft engaged in antisubmarine patrol, and perform that function when ordered.

            9. Notify the evaluator at once of the bearing and range of emergency IFF.

--95--

COMINCH P-013

          1. The gunnery liaison officer should:

            1. Coordinate and supervise the operation of search radars, following standard operational procedures.

            2. Interpret all radar contacts and be proficient in that function.

            3. Keep himself and all radar operators informed of expected contacts.

            4. Coach main battery director on invisible targets designated by the evaluator, using all available facilities such as precision PPI.

            5. Furnish radar spots to the gunnery control officer as requested.

          2. Visual fighter director (applies to specially designated fighter director ships) should:

            1. Take over direction of aircraft by visual means when the situation dictates this necessity.

            2. Assist the fighter director in CIC by coordinating all visual information and relaying to CIC.

            3. This officer may be the recognition officer or other officer appropriately trained.

          3. Geographic plotter, assistant geographic plotter and the geographic recorder should:

            1. Work as a team, tracking all unidentified or designated targets on the DRT accurately and rapidly.

            2. Give particular attention to targets designated by the evaluator when plotting several targets simultaneously. A rough plot should be kept of the location of all unidentified units.

            3. Include in the plot up-to-date minute data on course, speed, number, and composition of targets, in accordance with standard surface plotting procedures.

            4. The surface recorder should keep a record of time, target range, bearing and identity of all targets being tracked, and give the time "marks" for such tracking.

            5. Check the DRT and supplementary equipment for proper scale settings, alignment and accuracy.

            6. Aid in low visibility navigation and shore bombardment.

          4. The air plotter, assistant air plotter should:

            1. Work as a team, plotting all air targets rapidly and accurately in accordance with standard air plotting procedure, and in accordance with standard air plotting procedure, determine their altitude, identity, course, speed, and composition. When plotting several targets, particular attention should be given those targets designated by the fighter director or, if attack is imminent, by the evaluator or his assistant.

            2. Maintain an up-to-date air status board.

            3. Advise the fighter director and air search radar operator of all targets which fail to track with a normal air speed.

            4. Dead reckon friendly planes when they are being vectored for interception if no fixes are reported by radar.

            5. Keep reference points plotted and convert contacts for contact and amplifying reports.

            6. Check with surface search radar for spotting low flying aircraft.

--96--

COMINCH P-013

          1. The surface (or summary) plotter should:

            1. By keeping a continuous track of all surface contacts (or all surface and air contacts); keep the cognizant personnel in CIC informed of the identity of any surface radar contact (if summary plotter, any surface or air contact) in question.

            2. He must aid the gunnery liaison officer in preventing the fire of own ship from endangering friendly ships.

            3. Maintain a relative plot of own disposition.

            4. Indicate location and disposition of friendly ships, pickets, and stragglers.

            5. Maintain maneuvering board plot of own ship's course and speed and be prepared to furnish tactical data.

            6. Provide ranges and bearings of sound contacts by escorts, in relation to self and to fleet center.

            7. Plot such data as rain clouds, land, wind speed, and direction.

            8. Plot reports from radar operators and lookouts.

          2. Surface search radar operator should:

            1. Operate the surface search radar in accordance with standard operating procedures.

            2. Report all new targets as soon as detected, and obtain acknowledgment.

            3. Report ranges and bearings of targets in accordance with standard procedure.

            4. Report any abnormal performance of the surface search radar, and obtain acknowledgment.

            5. Report the suspected use of radar countermeasures.

            6. Report presence of IFF on all targets.

            7. Be alert to pick up low flying aircraft and report them to the air search radar operator and geographic plotter.

          3. Assistant surface search radar operator should:

            1. Assist the surface search radar operator with his duties.

            2. Alternate with the surface search radar operator in operating the radar.

            3. Report ranges and bearings to surface (or summary) plotter if desired.

          4. Air search radar operator should:

            1. Operate the air search radar in accordance with procedure set forth in paragraph (i) above.

          5. Assistant air search radar operator should:

            1. Assist the air search radar operator with his duties.

            2. Alternate with the air search radar operator in operating the radar.

          6. JA talker should:

            1. Report to the evaluator all transmissions in this circuit.

            2. Serve as the evaluator's talker.

        1. Detailed duties--condition watches.

          1. CIC watch officer should:

            1. Perform the duties assigned during General Quarters to the evaluator, CIC officer, and gunnery liaison officer.

            2. Conduct sufficient drills and training exercises when practicable to train condition watch CIC team.

--97--

COMINCH P-013

          1. The geographic plotter should:

            1. Perform the duties assigned to the geographic plotting team during General Quarters.

            2. Maintain the surface (or summary) plot.

            3. Alternate with a search radar operator at frequent intervals (about every 30 minutes).

          2. The air plotter should:

            1. Perform the duties of the air plotting team during General Quarters.

            2. Maintain a record of all voice transmissions.

            3. Alternate with a search radar operator at frequent intervals.

          3. The surface search radar operator should:

            1. Perform the duties assigned to the surface search operators during General Quarters.

            2. Alternate with one of the plotters at frequent intervals.

--98--

COMINCH P-013

    1. The CIC in a Destroyer Escort, Patrol Frigate or Coast Guard Cutter (DE, PF, CGC).

        1. These ships are designed as escorts and antisubmarine ships. They have highly developed antisubmarine equipment, but little surface or air armament. These types of ships are particularly important for the protection of merchant ships without radar.

      1. Functions, duties and responsibilities of CIC.

        1. The normal functions and responsibilities of a combatant ship's CIC as indicated in parts II, III, and IV apply to these ships including fighter direction, surface tracking and efficient radar search for both air and surface targets.

        2. See section on CIC and antisubmarine warfare in part IV. These ships, as antisubmarine ships, should have a CIC that is prepared to handle information from the sonar equipment in an efficient manner. CIC should be cognizant of latest doctrines in antisubmarine warfare, particularly concerning:

          1. Regaining contact procedures.

          2. Use of retiring search plans.

          3. Current doctrine in coordinated attacks, including creeping attacks.

          4. Control of planes for aerial antisubmarine operations.

          5. Launching, monitoring, and recovering effective sonobuoy patterns.

          Torpedo control by radar on destroyer escorts may be the function of CIC at night or during low visibility. With no torpedo director, CIC should be prepared to control torpedo fire by giving orders directly to tubes.

      1. Administrative organization of CIC. (Pending decision)

      1. Diagram of CIC. (See fig. 15.)

      1. Communications in CIC.

        1. Diagram of S/P communications and other intraship communications. (See table 14).

TABLE 14.--DE: Communication Diagram
  JA 1
JP
51
JS
21
JS
22
JS
81
JS
JU 1
JV
JX 21
MC
VHF
&
HF
Evaluator                      
CIC officer                      
Geographic plotter                      
Geographic recorder                      
Surface plotter                      
Air plotter                      
Assistant air plotter                      
Surface search radar operator                      
Air search radar operator                      
Assistant air search radar operator                      
Radio recorder                      
JA talker/status board keeper                      

--99--

COMINCH P-013

Image of figure 15.
Figure 15

(See legend on facing page.)

--100--

COMINCH P-013

    CIC DE (3")
    PERSONNEL LEGEND EQUIPMENT LEGEND
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
    5.
    6.
    7.
    8.
    9.
    10.
    11.
    12.
    13.
    Evaluator.
    CIC officer.
    Geographic plotter.
    Assistant geographic plotter.
    Geographic recorder.
    Air plotter.
    Assistant air plotter (optional).
    Surface plotter.1
    Status board keeper.
    Surface search radar operator.
    Air search radar operator.
    Radio recorder.
    JA talker (if necessary).
    A.
    B.
    F.
    E.
    H.
    I.
    Radiophone unit.
    Speaker amplifier.
    Speaker.
    Pitometer.
    Sound-powered selector switch.
    Sound-powered hand set.
    1 Small polar plot located where convenient.

--101--

COMINCH P-013

        1. Equipment used for intership radio communications. The allowance of radio equipment changes often, and the installation at times varies from the allowance. A specific list of radio equipment would therefore be misleading. The VHF channels available will indicate in a general manner the extent and type of radio equipment provided. Remote radio phone units and speaker amplifiers provide CIC with a flexible means for transmitting and receiving on multitudinous H.F. channels.

          Radio Frequency Examples of use
          1 Remote control transmitter-receiver unit. VHF Primary warning and maneuvering.
          2 10-channel transmitter-receiver sets VHF Aircraft control, Inter CIC circuit.
          2 radio telephone units (RPU) transmit and receive VHF, HF Spotting circuit, inter-CIC circuit, local air warning.
          2 receivers HF General purpose.

      1. Operational organization of CIC.

        1. Battle bill and condition watches. (See table 15.)

TABLE 15.--DE: CIC Watch Bill
Station Condition I
Officers Men
Evaluator 1  
CIC officer 1  
Gunnery liaison officer 1  
Geographic plotter   1
Geographic recorder   1
Surface plotter   1
Air plotter   1
Assistant air plotter   1
Surface search radar operator   1
Air search radar operator   1
Assistant air search radar operator   1
Radio recorder   1
JA talker/status board keeper   1
  Condition II and III
Officers Men
CIC watch officer 1  
Geographic plotter   1
Air plotter   1
Air search radar operator   1
Surface search radar operator   1

--102--

COMINCH P-013

        1. Detailed duties.

          1. Evaluator (executive officer) should:

            1. Exercise general supervision over the collection of all combat and tactical information by CIC.

            2. Evaluate this information.

            3. Disseminate the evaluated information.

            4. Recommend courses of action to the commanding officer.

            5. Assist in the execution of chosen courses of action.

            6. Execute any specific control functions which command may delegate to CIC, such as target designation, torpedo firing control, and the monitoring of voice circuits.

            7. Maintain an hourly plot of ship's position on the strategic chart.

          2. CIC Officer (division officer) should:

            1. Execute direct supervision over the collection of all information by CIC and its presentation to the evaluator.

            2. Assist in evaluation.

            3. Prepare contact and all amplifying contacts.

            4. Use CIC aids, such as the maneuvering board and MK 7 angle solver in the solution of tactical problems.

            5. Be prepared to serve as evaluator.

            6. Be prepared to serve as fighter direction officer should an emergency warrant detailing limited fighter direction to the ship.

          3. Geographic plotter, assistant geographic plotter, surface recorder, should:

            1. Track unidentified and designated targets on the DRT.

            2. Note on the plot all amplifying data, such as identification, course, speed, number of targets, in group, wind direction, firing of and track of torpedoes, and opening of gunfire.

            3. Maintain an orderly record of time, range, and bearing of all plots.
            4. Be able to track 2 targets simultaneously, plotting each once a minute.

            5. Be able to track 2 targets simultaneously, plotting each 1 a minute, while at the same time maintaining an approximate multiple plot on at least 10 other targets.

            Procedure:

            1. Destroyer escort and frigate IFF should be considered non-directional. Apparent IFF bearings should not be used in checking identification of targets. With two targets at the same range, analysis should be made by the CIC officer before noting, friendly indication for either target. The plotters should not make this deduction themselves.

            2. In tracking targets at long range where the radar pip may fade, the radar operator should give the time mark. Where radar conditions permit, the recorder should give the time mark, preferably at regular intervals.

            3. To avoid confusion in sonar target tracking, only the time mark, center bearing, and range should be furnished the plotting team. Such information should be furnished by the sonar-hut over sound-powered phones. Other sonar

--103--

COMINCH P-013

              information required by the evaluator should be collected over other phone circuits. Use of the 21 MC should be avoided.

            1. Whenever possible standard scale settings of 2,000 yards per inch should be used on the DRT for plotting surface targets, and 200 or 500 yards per inch for sonar targets.

          1. Air plotter and assistant air plotter should:

            1. Maintain an air plot of all air radar contacts for identification and defensive gunnery purposes. This primary function should not be sacrificed for the tracking of specific targets.

            2. Track only those air targets designated by the evaluator.

            3. Dead reckon friendly planes.

            4. Note all possible amplifying data on unidentified and enemy targets, such as course, speed, altitude, size, and number.

            5. Be able to maintain a plot on at least 10 different air targets.

            6. Keep air information on data board.

            Procedure:

            1. Apparent IFF bearings should not be used in checking identification of air targets. With two targets at the same range, the air plotters should make a careful analysis before noting which is showing IFF.

          2. Surface plotter should:

            1. Maintain a plot of the relative location and identity of all surface targets within radar or visual range. When disposition or size of force makes this impossible with all targets, emphasis should be centered on the following:

              1. New or enemy targets.

              2. The guide.

              3. Adjacent ships.

              4. Major radar land marks.

              5. Screening ships.

              6. Column leaders.

              7. Stragglers.

              8. Major ships in company.

              9. Other friendly units.

            2. Be able to identify each pip on the surface search radar scope at all times.

            3. Maintain the relative movement line of each target, paying particular attention to adjacent ships.

            4. Keep posted on the data board the disposition, formation, course, speed, and axis, patrol speed, and details of zigzag plans.

            Procedure:

            1. Man JA circuit to receive lookout reports.

            2. Obtain radar information by reading surface search radar scope directly, without interfering with the operation.

            3. Label identified targets with the TBS calls, or with raid designations as directed by the CIC officer.

          3. Surface search radar operator should:

            1. Search for new targets, using normal operating procedure.

            2. Maintain this search effectively at all times, even when providing data on targets.

--104--

COMINCH P-013

            1. Reports new targets immediately to evaluator and obtains his acknowledgment.

            2. Check unidentified targets for IFF, first requesting permission from the evaluator, and report results to surface plot.

            3. Furnish ranges and bearings to surface plot as requested.

            4. Furnish ranges and bearings of guide to the OOD or evaluator upon request to assist in station keeping.

            5. Make immediate and forceful reports to the evaluator of any target closing the ship within one thousand yards and obtain his acknowledgment.

            6. Check the alignment of azimuth on scope each half hour against ship's head by magnetic compass if using SL radar.

            7. Report any casualty or erratic performance of the radar to the evaluator.

          1. Air search radar and assistant operator should:

            1. Search for air targets, using normal operating procedure.

            2. Maintain this search effectively at all times, even when providing data on targets.

            3. Report new targets to evaluator immediately and obtain his acknowledgment. Indicate as soon as possible the size of contact, altitude, and number of aircraft in group.

            4. Check unidentified targets for IFF< first requesting permission from the evvaluator, and report results to air plot.

            5. Furnish ranges and bearings to air plot to assist in tracking.

            6. Report any casualty or erratic performance of the radar to the evaluator.

            7. Report any indications of radar countermeasures to the evaluator.

          2. Radio recorder should:

            1. Maintain a log of all exterior voice traffic heard in CIC, both incoming and outgoing.

            2. Keep the volume of all speakers at the minimum required for proper reception.

            3. Make sure the evaluator has heard all important messages.

            4. Report any circuit failure to the evaluator.

            5. Inform the CIC officer when unable to keep up with traffic volume.

            6. Assist in decoding and encoding voice messages as traffic permits.

          3. JA talker should:

            1. Serve as the evaluator's talker, unless the evaluator himself wears the phones, in which case the talker is not necessary.

            2. Report to the evaluator all transmission on this circuit.

            3. Report routine information to the bridge when directed by the evaluator.

        1. The following stations should be manned in CIC during war cruising conditions:

          1. CIC watch officer: Assists plotting on surface plot where necessary.

          2. Geographic plotter: Plots on geographic plot. Rotates with surface search radar operator.

          3. Air plotter: Also handles radio recording.

          4. Surface search radar operator.

--105--

COMINCH P-013

          1. Air search radar operator: Alternates with surface search radar operator if air search radar is not being used.

          During war cruising condition, the CIC watch officer assumes the combined duties of evaluator and CIC officer. The CIC watch officer must be properly relieved before leaving his station in CIC. He is responsible for (a) the proper functioning of CIC and (b) furnishing the OOD with all possible information and assistance.

--106--


APPENDIX

CIC Glossary

A
Position angle.
ABA-1
(SCR-515-A) airborne IFF transponder, Mk. IV system.
ABK
Airborne IFF transponder, series, Mk. II system.
ABF
Airborne IFF transponder.
A/C
Aircraft.
ACI
Air combat intelligence.
ACIC
Auxiliary combat information center.
ADCC
Air defense control center (shore based).
AEW
Airborne early warning--radar.
AF
Audio frequency.
AFDO
Assistant fighter director officer.
AFDS
Auxiliary fighter director ship.
AGC
Automatic gain control--also, amphibious force flagships.
AI
Airborne intercept radar.
A/J
Antijamming.
AM
Amplitude modulation.
AN/APA-5
(Formerly LAB-2) airborne radar auxiliary bombing equipment.
AN/APA-6, AN/APA-11
Airborne pulse analyzer: RCM.
AN/APA-16
(Formerly B-LAB) airborne auxiliary bombing attachment used with ASB
AN/APA-18, AN/APA-19, AN/APA-21
Airborne LAB adaptor assemblies.
AN/APG (Series)
Airborne gunlaying, gun sighting or bomb release equipment.
AN/APN-1
(Formerly AYF) airborne radar altimeter--L band.
AN/APN-4
(SCR-622) LORAN.
AN/APN-9
LORAN--similar to AN/APN-4.
AN/APQ-2
("RUG") RCM--airborne jammer.
AN/APR Series
Airborne radar search receiving equipment (RCM).
AN/APS-2
(Formerly ASG) airborne radar search equipment ("S" band).
AN/APS-3
(Formerly ASD) airborne radar search equipment ("X" band).
AN/APS-4
(Formerly ASH) airborne radar search equipment ("X" band).
AN/APS-6
(Formerly AIA) airborne search-intercept-gun-aiming radar with beacon and IFF search provisions.
AN/APS-8
(Formerly MBA) airborne radio marker beacon receiving equipment.
AN/APS-9
Airborne "tail warning" radar equipment used in fighter planes.
AN/APS-10
Very light airborne search radar. "X" band.
AN/APS-11
Airborne "tail warning" radar. UHF and FM.
AN/APS-13
(SCR 718) airborne "tail warning" radar. "L" band used in fighter planes.
AN/APS-15
(Formerly British H2X) airborne radar search equipment for high altitude or night bombing. Combination of ASD and ASG.
AN/APS-16
(Similar to ASB) airborne "tail warning" radar. "L" band. Use in bombers and night fighters.
AN/APS-17
(Similar to ASJ) airborne "tail warning" radar. "S" band. Used in patrol bombers.
AN/APT (series)
Includes "Carpet," "Diana II," "Mandrel," "Broadloom," etc. RCM--airborne radar transmitting equipment.
AN/APX-1
Airborne transponder equipment. (IFF.) Similar to SCR-695.
AN/APX-2
(Formerly ABJ) airborne interrogator-responder-transponder equipment.
AN/ARC (series)
Airborne radio communication equipment.
AN/ARN-1
(Formerly AYD) airborne radar altimeter ("L" band).
AN/ARN-5
Airborne radio VHF receiving equipment for instrument landings.
AN/ARN-6, AN/ARN-7
Airborne automatic radio compass.
AN/ARN-8
(Formerly ZA-2) airborne radio approach receiving equipment.
AN/ARN-10
(Formerly ZAX) airborne radio approach receiving equipment.
AN/ARQ (Series)
Airborne special radio equipment (RCM).
AN/ARR (Series)
Airborne radio receivers.
AN/ARW (Series)
Airborne radio (remote control) equipment.
AN/ASQ (Series)
(Formerly MAD series) airborne magnetic submarine detection equipment.
AN/CPN-3
Air transportable homing beacon--See YK.
AN/CPN-6
Air transportable homing beacon (X-band). See YM.

--107--

COMINCH P-013

AN/CRT-1A
Radio sono-buoy which detects propellor sounds and transmits them to AN/ARR-3 and other suitable airborne receivers.
AN/TPSI-B
Portable long-range early warning search radar. Replacing SCR 602.
AN/TTQ-1
ADCC telephone system and operations room.
ARC
Airborne radar intercept search receiver (redesignated as APR-1).
ARD
Aircraft radar intercept search receiver.
Argus
Navy shore-based fighter direction unit.
ASAP
Antisubmarine attack plotter.
ASB
Airborne search radar.
A-Scan
Radar oscilloscope with horizontal trace.
ASD
Airborne search radar.
ASE
Airborne search radar.
ASG
Airborne search radar.
ASH
Airborne search radar.
ASP
Antisubmarine patrol.
ASV
Airborne search radar.
ASW
Antisubmarine warfare.
AVC
Automatic volume control (same as AGC).
AWS
Air warning squadron (Marine).
A-1
Continuous wave (CW).
A-2
Modulated waves (MCW, ICW).
A-3
Voice modulated waves.
BC-639
Radio voice receiver. VHF.
BC-640
Radio voice transmitter. VHF.
BDI
Bearing deviation indicator.
BK
IFF transponder.
BL
IFF interrogator-responder.
BM
IFF interrogator--(A band).
BO
IFF interrogator-responder.
Broadloom-2
AN/APT-6 electronic jammer.
Broadloom-3
AN/APT-4 electronic jammer.
BN
IFF interrogator, for surface search radars.
B-Scan
Radar oscilloscope showing pip on rectangular plot of bearing vs. range.
C
Condenser; capacity.
CAP
Combat air patrol.
Carpet
AN/SPT-2, AN/APT-2 electronic jammer.
Carpet-3
AN/APQ-9 electronic jammer.
Carpet-IV
AN/APT-5 electronic jammer.
Carpet Sweeper
AN/APQ-1 electronic transceiver.
CD
Conning Director.
CHICK
RCM decoy.
C & I
Control and indicator (radar console).
CIC
Combat Information Center.
CM & D
Countermeasure and deception.
CRO
Cathode ray oscilloscope.
CRT
Cathode ray tube.
C-Scan
Radar oscilloscopes showing pip on rectangular plot of bearing vs. elevation.
CXHR
Preproduction designation of SX radar.
DAK
LF-MF radio direction finder.
DAQ
HF radio direction finder.
DC
Depth charge.
DC
Direct current.
DF
Radio direction finding.
DINA-2
AN/APT-1 electronic jammer.
DP
MF airborne radio direction finder.
DRA
Dead reckoning analyzer.
DRP
Dead reckoning plotter.
DRT
Dead reckoning tracer.
DUMBO
Rescue plane (usually PB type).
E-call
Buzzer, bell or light indicating system.
Echo
Reflected radar signal.
ECM
Electrical coding machine.
E-1, E-2, etc.
System of designating echo strength.
ETA
Estimated time of arrival.
ETI
Estimated time of interception.
ETRA
Estimated time to reach altitude.
F
Suffix; fighter director officer designation.
f
Frequency.
Fade
Disappearance of echo from radar screen.
FDO
Fighter director officer.
FDS
Fighter director ship.
FDT
Fighter director tender.
FFDO
Force fighter director officer.
FM
Frequency modulation.
GCA
Ground control approach.
CGI
Ground control intercept.
GMCM
Guided missile countermeasures.
Grass
Noise as seen on radar scope (amplitude indication).
GS
Guardship.
Gulls
Balloon supported radar reflectors to simulate targets.
HAYRAKE Junior
Radar beacon and homing device.
HF
High frequency (3,000-30,000kc).
H/H
Hedge hogs.
H-Scan
Radar oscilloscope showing double dot presentation of range, bearing and elevation.
HTD
Hand target designator.
HV
HIGH voltage.
IC
Interior communications.
IF
Intermediate frequency (receiver).
IFF
Identification friend or foe (radar).
IO
Intercept officer.
Jackal
RCM deceptive device--barrage jammer.
KC
Kilocycle (1,000 cycles).

--109--

COMINCH P-013

KITES
Previously called angels: Delayed descent or balloon-supported types of electromagnetic reflectors dropped by aircraft to simulate radar targets; consisting of light metal sheets on various frame works of various shapes of a series of resonant dipoles.
Kts
Knots.
KV
Kilovolt (1,000 volts).
KW
Kilowatt (1,000 watts).
LF
Low frequency (30-300 kc).
LLI
Latitude and longitude indicator.
LORAN
Long range navigation.
MANDREL
AN/APT-3 electronic jammer.
MAS
Low-powered guided missile jammer.
MC
Megacycle (1,000,000 cycles).
MEW
Micro-wave early warning radar with multiscopes.
MF
Medium frequency (300-3,000 kc).
MF
Midget peeper radar jam (training with fire-control radar).
Mk. 3
Main battery fire-control radar (formerly FC).
Mk. 4
Secondary battery fire-control radar (formerly FD).
Mk. 8
Main battery fire-control radar (formerly FH).
Mk. 11
Automatic weapons fire-control radar.
Mk. 12
Secondary battery fire-control radar.
Mk. 22
Secondary battery low angle fire-control radar.
Mk. 27
Auxiliary fire-control radar, with precision sweep, lobe switching for matched pips. S-band. For BB's and CA's.
Mk. 28
Secondary battery fire-control radar.
Mk. 101
Radar jamming transmitter for training.
MN, or MAN
Very high frequency voice radio (FM).
Moonshine
RCM countermeasures device.
M-Scan
Horizontal trace with step (e.g. SK).
MTB
Maintenance of true bearing.
NAN
Night signalling equipment.
OAA
Radar test equipment.
OBJ
Training device for placing synthetic aircraft echoes on certain radar equipment.
OCJ
Training device for placing synthetic surface echoes on certain radar equipment.
Osc
Oscillator.
OSC
Own ship's course.
Picket
Advanced or distant radar guard ship.
PD
Target designator circuit; also Navy model letters for transcribing and reproducing equipment.
PE
Permanent echo; also Navy model letters for transcribing and reproducing equipment.
Phantom
Radar decoys.
Pip
Displacement of radar trace caused by echo.
Pipology
Determination of target composition from appearance and behavior of target's echo.
PPI
Plan position indicator.
PPPI
Precision plan position indicator (VF) (P31). Shows expanded segment on B scope (also called 3PI).
PPPI
Projection plan position indicator (VG) similar to British skiatron.
PRF
Pulse repetition frequency.
PRR
Pulse repetition rate.
QCJ
Underwater sound gear.
QCL
Underwater sound gear.
R
Resister; resistance.
R
Suffix; radar officer designation.
Racon
Radar beacon and homing device (Hayrake Junior).
Radar
Radio detection and ranging.
Radex
Radar countermeasures training.
RAB
Radio receiver (HF).
RAK
Radio receiver (HF).
RAO
Radio receiver (HF).
RAS
Radio receiver (MF to HF).
RBB
Radio receiver (MF).
RBC
Radio receiver (HF).
RBH
Radio receiver (HF).
RBK
Radio receiver (VHF).
RBO
Radio receiver (HF).
RBW
Panoramic adapter for use with RBK.
RBY
Radio receiver with panoramic display.
RCK
Radio receiver.
RCM
Radio and radar countermeasures.
RCO
Radar control officer.
RCO
Radio receiver (VHF).
RCS
Radar control ship.
RDF
Radio direction finder.
RDF
British designation for "radar" (obsolete).
RdM
Petty officer designation for enlisted radarman.
RF
Radio frequency.
RMO
Radio matériel officer (radar maintenance).
RP
Raid plotter.
RPD
Radar planning device.
RPPI
Remote plan position indicator.
R-scope
Radar oscilloscope showing expanded segment of "A-scope".
RT
Petty officer designation for enlisted radio technician.
R/T
Voice radio.
RUG
AN/APQ-2 electronic jammer.
Rx
Receiver (general term).
SA
Air-search radar (series) (shipborne).
SBK
Status board keeper.
SC
Air search radar (series) (shipborne).
SCI
Ship-controlled intercept.

--109--

COMINCH P-013

SCR
Signal corps radio. Followed by three numbers designates the particular Army radio or radar units. Used only for equipment types on which production was commenced prior to adoption of AN designation system (17 Feb., 1943). Some of the more common are listed below:
SCR 268
Gunlaying radar for AA and searchlight control.
SCR 270
Mobile long range, early warning air search radar (270-DA has 12-inch PPI and 12-inch scope added.)
SCR 271
Fixed long range, early warning air search radar. (271 DA has 12-inch PPI and 12-inch A scope added.)
SCR 299
Mobile HF radio voice transmitter and associated receiver.
SCR 399
Transportable HF radio CW-voice transmitter and associated receiver.
SCR 499
Air transportable HF radio voice transmitter and associated receiver.
SCR 508
Vehicular radio voice FM transceiver.
SCR 522
Airborne radio voice transceiver. VHF 4-channel, battery powered.
SCR 527
Mobile GCI radar.
SCR 573
Mobile VHF transmitter.
SCR 574
Mobile VHF receiver.
SCR 575
Mobile lVHF DF equipment.
SCR 584
Gunlaying radar for AA and searchlight control. Designed to replace SCR 268. Being used also by Army for GCI.
SCR 588
Fixed GCI radar--American version of British CHL.
SCR 602
Portable short range, early warning radar.
SCR 608
Radio voice FM transceiver.
SCR 610
Radio voice transceiver.
SCR 615
Army version of Navy SM.
SCR 624
Air transportable radio voice transceiver. VHF 4-channel. Generator powered.
SCR 627
Air transportable radar, similar to SCR 527 with improved antennas.
SCR 634
Ground DF VHF unit--air transportable.
SCR 639
Automatic radio compass.
SCR 640
Homing beacon.
SCR 720
Airborne intercept radar.
SCR 729
Airborne IFF equipment.
SCR 808
Radio voice FM transceiver.
SD
Aircraft detection radar for submarines.
Sea Clutter
Echo from surface of sea (sea return).
SF
Surface search radar.
SFDS
Standby fighter director ship.
SG
Surface search radar.
Shackle
Code used in Pacific Fleet.
SHF
Super high frequency (3,000-30,000 mc.).
SIO
Ship's information officer.
SJ
Surface search radar for submarines.
SK
Air search radar (shipborne).
SK-1M
Modified (mobile) SK for shore-based operation.
Skiatron
British term for projection plan position indicator.
SL
Surface search radar.
SM
Air and surface search radar, capable of giving altitude of a/c directly.
SN
Portable surface search radar.
Snow
Receiver noise seen on PPI scope (amplitude indication).
SO
Surface search radar.
Sonar
Sound and navigation ranging.
S/P
Sound power phone.
SP
Summary plotter.
SP
Air and surface search radar, capable of giving altitude of a/c directly, a newer and smaller production model of SM.
SP-1M
Modified (mobile) SP for shore-based operation.
SR
Air search radar receiver (shipborne).
STC
Sensitivity time control.
SU
Surface search radar.
S/V
Surface vessel.
SX
Radio receiver (Hallicrafter series).
SX
Search and altitude determining radar with constant sweep.
T
Suffix; Radio specialist officer.
TAJ
Radio transmitter.
TBD
Target bearing designator.
TBI
Target bearing indicator.
TBK
Radio transmitter (HF).
TBL
TBM
Radio transmitter (HF).
TBS
Radio transceiver (VHF).
TCS
Radio transceiver (HF).
TDS
Target designation system.
TDT
Target designation transmitter.
TDT
Radio transmitter (VHF).
TDQ
Radio transmitter (VHF).
TEA
Gamming transmitter (VHF); GMCM.
TR-box
Transmit-receive duplex switching box on radar antenna lead.
TVG
Time variation of gain.
TX
Transmitter (general term).
U-sec
Micro-seconds (millionths of second).
VHF
Ultra high frequency (300-3,000 mc).
VC
Remote PPI equipment.
VD
Remote PPI equipment.

--110--

COMINCH P-013

VE
PPI equipment standardized for either remote or direct use.
VF
See PPPI.
VG
See PPPI.
VHF
Very high frequency (30-300 mc).
VFD
Visual fighter director.
WE 233A
Airborne radio voice transceiver. VHF 4-channel, battery powered.
WE 233X
Airborne radio voice transceiver. VHF 10-channel, battery powered (AN/ARC-1).
Window
Freely flowing bodies, usually paper with metallized surface, of a size and shape which best reflect radar beams, and suitable for projecting into space from a plane, rocket or shell, to deceive enemy radar as to number and location of targets.
W/T
Wireless telegraphy (British).
X
Suffix intercept officer designation.
YE
Aircraft radio homing beacon (Hayrake).
YG
Land-based radio homing beacon (called Mother by many shore bases).
YH
Radar beacon. Used with ASE, AN/APX-2, SCR 729.
YJ
Radar homing beacon. Used with ASE, ASB, AN/APX-2, SCR 729.
YK
Radar beacon. (Also AN/CPN-3, SCR 620). Used with ASD, ASD-1, AIA, AN/APS 3, 4, 5, 15.
YM
(Also AN/CPN-6) radar beacon. Used with ASD, ASD-1, AIA, AN/APS-1, 4, 6, 15.
Z
Impedance.
ZA
Airborne instrument approach equipment.
ZB
Airborne part of HF homing equipment.
λ
Lambda--wave length.


STANDARD NOMENCLATURE OF UNITED STATES NAVAL VESSELS

BB Battleships.
CA Heavy cruisers.
CB Large cruisers.
CL Light cruisers.
CV Aircraft carriers.
CVB Large aircraft carrier.
CVL Small aircraft carrier.
CVE Escort aircraft carrier.
DD Destroyers.
DE Destroyer escort vessels.
OBB Old battleship.
SS Submarines.
MINE VESSELS
CM Mine layers.
CMc Coastal mine layers.
ACM Auxiliary mine layers.
DM Light mine layers.
DMS High speed mine sweepers.
AM Mine sweepers.
AMc Coastal mine sweepers.
PATROL VESSELS
SC Submarine chasers (110').
PCS Submarine chasers (136').
PC Submarine chasers (173').
PCE Escort (180').
PCE(R) Escort (rescue) (180').
PE Eagles.
PF Frigates.
PG Gunboats.
PGM Motor gunboats.
PT Motor torpedo boats.
PTC Motor boats, submarine chasers.
PY Yachts.
PYc Yachts, coastal.
AUXILIARIES
AB Crane ships.
AD Destroyer tenders.
AE Ammunition ships.
AF Store ships.
AG Miscellaneous.
AGC Amphibious force flagships.
AGP Motor torpedo boat tenders.
AGS Surveying ships.
AH Hospital ships.
AK Cargo ships.
AKA cargo, attack.
AKN Net cargo ships.
AUXILIARIES
(continued)
AKS General stores-issue ships.
AKV Cargo ship and aircraft ferry.
AN Net laying ships.
AO Oilers.
AOG Gasoline tankers.
APA Transports, attack.
AP Transports.
APc Coastal transports (small).
APD High speed (destroyer) transports.
APH Transports fitted for evacuation of wounded..
APB Barrack ships; self-propelled.
APL Barrack ships.
APV Transport and aircraft ferry.
AR Repair ships.
ARB Repair ships, battle damage.
ARD Floating drydocks.
ARDC Repair dock, concrete.
ABD Advance base docks.
ABSD Advance base sectional docks.
AFD Mobile floating drydocks.
ARG Repair ships, internal combustion engine.
ARH Heavy-hull repair ships.
ARL Repair ships, landing craft.
ARS Salvage vessels.
ARV Aircraft repair ships.
AS Submarine tenders.
ASR Submarine rescue vessels.
ATF Ocean tugs, fleet.
ATA Ocean tugs, auxiliary.
ATO Ocean tugs, old.
ATR Ocean tugs, rescue.
AV Seaplane tenders.
AVC Catapult lighters.
AVD Seaplane tenders (destroyer).
AVP Seaplane tenders (small).
AW Distilling ship.
IX Miscellaneous, unclassified.
LANDING SHIPS
LSD Dock.
LSM Medium.
LST Tank.
LSV Vehicle.

--111--

COMINCH P-013

LANDING CRAFT
LCI(G) Infantry (gunboat).
LCI(L) Infantry (large).
LCS(L)(3) Support (large) (Mk. III).
LCT(5) Tank, Mk. V.
LCT(6) Tank, Mk. VI.
DISTRICT CRAFT
YHB House boats.
YO Fuel oil barges.
YOG Gasoline barges.
YOS Oil storage barges.
YPK Pontoon stowage barges.
YSR Sludge removal barges.
YS Stevedoring barges.
YTT Torpedo testing barges.
YW Water barges.
YD Floating derricks.
YSD Seaplane wrecking derricks.
YAG Auxiliary, miscellaneous.
YDG Degaussing vessels.
YDT Diving tenders.
DISTRICT CRAFT
(continued)
YM Dredges.
YFB Ferryboats and launches.
YFD Floating drydocks.
YCF Car floats.
YCV Aircraft transportation lighters.
YA Ash lighters.
YF Covered lighters.
YG Garbage lighters.
YC Open lighters.
YCK Open cargo lighters.
YFT Torpedo transportation lighters.
YNT Net tenders (tug class).
YNg Gate vessels.
YMS Motor mine sweepers.
YP Patrol vessels.
YPD Floating pile drivers.
YSP Salvage pontoons.
YHT Scows, heating.
YTB Harbor tugs, big.
YTM Harbor tugs, medium.
YTL Harbor tugs, little.
YR Floating workshops.
YRD(H) Workshops, floating, drydock (hull).
YRD(M) Workshops, floating, drydock (machinery).


SPECIAL TERMS USED BY SHOREBASED ADCC's

It is possible that ships operating in areas where ADCC's are stationed may intercept reports containing the following terms. These are being included for information only. They should not be used by shipboard CIC's.

IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT
Able Experimental of calibration.
Charlie Army.
Dog Navy.
Green Star Area activity, friendly planes.
How Transport.
Item Antisubmarine patrol.
King Combat air patrol
Red Star Area raid, hostile.
X-Ray Indian Gunnery or local maneuvering mission.
Bluebird Crash boat.
Bojangles Turn on IFF.
Check Oil Check radar station for azimuth accuracy.
Check Water Check radar station for range accuracy.
Curtains Turn off IFF.
Fortune Attempt local identification.
Fortune Negat Cannot identify locally.
Rainbow IFF Mk. III response from more than one transponder in such a manner that the code cannot be distinguished.
Rusty IFF Mk. II.
Snow Window.
Stretcher IFF Mk. III abnormal response from single transponder (not according to any given code).
Wet Cat Pilot (or crew member) bailed out in vicinity of---
NETS OF PRIMARY CONCERN TO CIC
ASC Air support command net.
ASP Antisubmarine patrol net.
H/K Hunter killer net.
ICSA Inter commander support air net.
IFD Inter fighter director net.
IFW Inter force warning net.
IIRT Inter island radar telling net.
LAW Local air warning net.
Primary Primary fighter control net.
SAD Support air direction net.
SAD (E) Support air direction net (emergency).
SAO Support air observer net.
SAR Support air request net.
Secondary Standby fighter control net.
SNASP ASP net, when used for antisnooper patrol.
TBS Tactical voice circuit.

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COMINCH P-013

TRAINING FILMS

The letter designation in front of the project numbers for the films listed below signify:

MN: Sound motion picture produced by the Training Film Branch, Photographic Division, Bureau of Aeronautics.

SN: Slide films produced by the Navy (BuAer).

MA: Sound motion pictures (Army).

MC: Commercial films distributed by the Bureau of Aeronautics.

The films desired should be requested from the nearest Training Aids Library in your district or area by letter indicating:

  1. Quantity desired.
  2. Navy project number.
  3. Title of film, and subtitle where there are several in a series.

Refer to the Basic Catalog of United States Navy Training Films, NAVAER TF 22-10 for additional details concerning the latest available films.

AMPHIBIOUS OPERATIONS
Project No. Title
MN-942s Amphibious Warfare: The Ship-to-Shore Movement in a Joint Amphibious Operation.
MN-942u Amphibious Warfare--Naval Gunfire Support in a Landing Operation.
ANTISUBMARINE WARFARE
SN-2760a-e MAD (AN/ASQ-1A) Operation Series.
SN-2761a-b MAD (AN/ASQ-1A) Alignment and Adjustment Series.
MN-3420a MAD Signal Interpretation (AN/ASQ-2)
AVIATION
MN-1327n Flight Characteristics of the F4U Corsair.
MN-1327p Flight characteristics of the F6F Hellcat.
MN-84e Fighter Combat Tactics: Attack Against Bomber Formations.
MN-84h Fighter Combat Tactics: Fighter Escort.
MN-84i Fighter Combat Tactics: Combat Air Patrol.
MN-84f Offensive Tactics Against Enemy Fighters.
MN-84g Defensive Tactics Against Enemy Fighters.
MN-1460f American Torpedo Plane Tactics and Combat Incidents.
MN-15a Carrier Landing Signals.
MN-15d Carrier Operations--Aircraft Rendezvous.
MN-1247 Fighter Pilot.
MN-32 Oxygen in Aviation.
MN-84c Snoopers--and How to Blast 'em.
COMBAT INFORMATION CENTER
MN-3634 Combat Information Center.
Communications
SN-62r Sound Powered Telephone.
MN-1389a-c Hits, Runs, and Errors in Aircraft Tactical Communications (in three parts).
FIGHTER DIRECTION
MN-1006d This Is Fighter Direction.
MN-1006f The Radarman in Fighter Direction.
MN-1006g Communications in Fighter Direction.
MN-1006h Fighter Direction--Principles of Interception.
MN-1006i Typical Intercepts--Straight in Attack.
MN-1006j Typical Intercepts--Crossing and Dog Leg.
MN-1006k Typical Intercepts--Reconnaissance Planes.
MN-1006L Typical Intercepts--Low Visibility.
FIRE CONTROL RADAR
MN-955c Operation of Mark 3 Fire Control Radar.
MN-955d Operation of Mark 4 Fire Control Radar.
MN-3202a-b Fire Control Radar--Mark 8 at Sea.
MN-3221a Fire Control Radar--Mark 12.
MN-3221b Fire Control Radar--Mark 22.
MN-4922 Fire Control Radar--Main Battery Fire Control Equipment (Mark 8, 13, 19) (available about 1 June).
MN-4925 Fire Control Radar--Heavy Machine Gun Radar.
MN-5050c-d Radar Scope Interpretation--Fire Control Radar--Parts I and II. Available about 1 June.

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COMINCH P-013

GUNNERY
Project No. Title
MN-942u Amphibious Warfare--Naval Gunfire Support in a Landing Operation.
IFF AND IDENTIFICATION
MN-3224 Mark III IFF.
MN-3224b IFF Operation (AN/APX-2).
MN-3224c IFF Operation (AN/APX-8).
SN-3472a-j ABK Maintenance.
RADAR--GENERAL
MN-1550 Radar, Weapon of Attack.
MN-955a Finding the Enemy.
MN-2104a The Cathode Ray Tube--How It Works.
MN-2140b The Cathode Ray Oscilloscope.
MN-2104d1 The Cathode Ray Tube--Types of Indicators.
MN-5050a and b1 Radar Scope Interpretation--Fundamentals--parts I and II.
MN-5050e1 Radar Scope Interpretation--Air Search.
MN-5050f and g1 Radio Scope Interpretation--Surface Search and Piloting
RADAR COUNTERMEASURES
MN-2867b Radex--ASB.
MN-955j Radar Jamming.
MN-2867a Window.
MN-2867c Radex--Fire Control Radar Mark 3.
MN-2867d Radex--Fire Control Radar Mark 4.
MN-2867e Radex-Air-borne PPI and B Scan.
MN-2867f Radex--Shipboard Search.
MN-3635 Introduction to Radar (short version of MN-1550)
RADIO AND RADAR--AIR-BORNE
SN-1075-1084 ASV Operation Series.
MN-1315 ASE Interpretation.
SN-1316a-ad ASE Maintenance Series.
SN-1317a-e ASB Operation Series.
MN-1309 ASB Interpretation.
MN-1312 ASG Interpretation.
SN-1303a-p ASB Maintenance Series.
SN-1300a-j ASG-ASC Operation Series.
SN-1305a-y ASG Maintenance Series.
SN-1318a-e ASD Operation Series.
MN-1311 ASD Interpretation.
SN-1304a-t ASD Maintenance Series
MN-2736 AN/APS-3 (ASD-1) Interpretation.
SN-2732a-e ASO-1 Operation Series.
SN-1307a-d AIA Operation.
MN-2452 AIA Interpretation.
SN-2726a-h LZ Test Gear Series.
SN-2737a-d ASH Operation Series.
MN-2741 AN/APS-4 Interpretation.
SN-2738a-g ASH Alignment and Adjustment Series.
SN-2749a-b YJ Beacon Operation.
SN-2750a-g YJ Beacon--Alignment and Adjustment.
MN-3583 YJ Beacon Operation.
MN-4363 AN/APS-15 Operation.
MN-2104c The Cathode Ray Tube in Air-borne Radar.
SN-2745a-c Radio Altimeter (AN/ARN-1) Operation Series.
SN-2746a-c Radio Altimeter (AN/ARN-1) Alignment and Adjustment Series.
SN-2747a-f Radio Altimeter (AN/ARN-1) How It Works.
SN-2748a-e Radio Altimeter (AN/ARN-1) Trouble Shooting Series.
AIR-BORNE ELECTRONIC INTERFERENCE SERIES
MN-5014a Sources and Effects of Interference.
MN-5014b-c Techniques for Eliminating Interference to Communication Gear.
MN-5014d Techniques for Eliminating Interference to Radar Gear.
MN-5014e Eliminating Electronic Interference Through System Engineering.
RADAR EQUIPMENT
MN-955b Operation of SC-1 Radar.
MN-955c-d Operation of Mark 3 and 4 Fire Control Radar.
MN-955e Operation of SG Radar.
MN-955L Operation of SF Radar.
MN-955m SL Radar Operation.
MC-955o Operation of the SO Radar Series.
MC-955p Servicing the SO Radar Series.
MN-2104a Cathode Ray Tube--How it Works.
MN-2104b Cathode Ray Oscilloscope.
MC-955q Maintenance of the SO Radar Series. Part I: Units of the SO Series.
MC-955r Part II: The Motor Alternator and Modulator Assembly.
MC-955s Part III: The Transmitter and Receiver Unit.
MC-955t Part IV: The Rectifier Power Unit, Indicator Unit, the Antenna.
MN-2562a Maintenance of Transmission Lines--the Coaxial Line.
MN-2562b Maintenance of Transmission Lines--the Wave Guide.
NAVIGATION
SN-2357d-f LORAN--Air-borne Operation and Adjustment.
SN-2728a-e LORAN Maintenance.
MN-2731a LORAN--Basic Principles.
MN-2731b LORAN--Air-borne Operation.
MN-2731c LORAN--Shipboard Operation.
MN-2731d LORAN-Ground Station System (available about 1 July).
MN-2731e LORAN--Air-borne Signal Characteristics.
MA-1706 Radio Transmitters.
MA-750 Airplane Antennas--Types and Installations.
MN-1389a-c Hits, Runs, and Errors in Aircraft Tactical Communications (three parts).
1 In production.

--114--

COMINCH P-013

Publications

The reports and publications listed in the Electronic Index may be obtained from the following source by request through the proper channels.
  1. Commander in Chief, U.S. Fleet, Readiness Division, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  2. Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  3. Bureau of Aeronautics, Publications Section, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  4. Bureau of Ships, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  5. Commander in Chief, Pacific Fleet, FPO, San Francisco, Calif.
  6. Bureau of Ordnance, Publications Section, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  7. Commander, Destroyers, Pacific Fleet, FPO, San Francisco.
  8. Pacific Fleet Radar Center, FPO, San Francisco.
  9. Technical Information Unit, Airborne Coordinating Group, Naval Research Laboratory, Bellevue 20, D.C.
  10. Hydrographic Office, Navy Department, Washington, D.C.
  11. Commander, Amphibious Forces, Pacific Fleet, FPO, San Francisco, Calif.
  12. Commander in Chief, Pacific Ocean Areas, FPO, San Francisco, California.
  13. Commander, Air Pacific Fleet, FPO, San Francisco, Calif.
  14. Bureau of Naval Personnel, Training Division, Washington, D.C.

NOTE.--Publications which list R. P. S. as the source may be obtained from the Registered Publications Issuing Office in your area.

Title General publications date Classification Source
Air Navigation Bulletin Quarterly Confidential (2)
Anti-Submarine Bulletin Monthly Secret (1)
BuAer Confidential Bulletin Monthly Confidential (3)
Bulletin of Ordnance Information Quarterly Confidential (6)
CIC Magazine Monthly Confidential (2)
Digest of Airborne Radio and Radar News Monthly Confidential (3)
Harbor Underwater Detection Monthly Confidential (2)
Mine Warfare Notes Periodically Confidential (2)
Naval Aviation Confidential Bulletin Monthly Confidential (2)
Naval Aviation News Bimonthly Restricted (2)
Naval Communications Security Bulletin Quarterly Restricted (2)
Recognition Journal Monthly Restricted (2)
Description of Amphibious Force Flagship (AGC) (Cominch P-02) 1944 Confidential (1)
COMBAT INFORMATION CENTER
Title Date Short Title or No. Classification Source
Undetected Enemy Plane Attacks       (7)
The Capabilities and Limitations of Shipborne Radar*   RADONE-A Confidential (1)
Tactical Uses of Airborne Radar*   RADTWO-A Confidential (1)
Radar Operator's Manual 1944 RADTHREE Confidential (1)
The Air Plotting Manual 1944 RADFOUR Confidential (1)
The Surface Plotting Manual 1944 RADFIVE Confidential (1)
Radar Countermeasures Manual*   RADSEVEN Confidential (1)
Aircraft Control Manual*   RADEIGHT Confidential (1)
The Shipborne Radar Countermeasures Operator's Manual*   RADELEVEN Confidential (1)
* In preparation.

--115--

COMINCH P-013

COMMUNICATIONS
Title Date Short Title or No. Classification Source
Central Pacific Area Communication Plan and Doctrine April 1944 CENTCOMTWO Confidential R.P.S.
United States Fleet Basic Rapid Communications Plan for War March 1943 PAC 71 Confidential (5) or R.P.S.
Signal Vocabulary   CSP 412   R.P.S.
Communications Instructions 1944 DNC-5 Restricted R.P.S.
United States Fleet Basic Rapid Communications Doctrine and Basic Communications Plan for War March 1943 USF 70(A) Confidential R.P.S.
Telephone Talkers' Manual November 1943 NAVPERS 14005 Restricted (14)
Combined Operating Signals (U.S.-British) 1944 CCBP-2-2 Confidential R.P.S.
Notes on Communications Security 1943   Restricted R.P.S.
Combined Communications Instructions   CCBP-5 Confidential R.P.S.
Signal Communication   FM-1-45   (3)
Signal Communication   FM-24-5   (3)
Combined U.S.-British Radio-telephone (R/T) Procedure.   RM-24-9   (3)
Combined Radio-telegraph (W/T) Procedure   FM-24-10   (3)
Air-Ground Communications   TM 1-465   (3)
Communications Handbook   CO-NAVAER 00-80V-44 Confidential (3)
General Signal Book March 1944   Confidential R.P.S.
The Communication Officer 1944 NAVPERS 16101 Restricted (14)
Catalogue of Naval Radio Equipment August 1944 Ships 275 Confidential (4)
DOCTRINE AND TACTICS (GENERAL)
Current Tactical Orders and Doctrine, U.S. Fleet February 1944 USF-10 (A) Confidential R.P.S.
War Instructions, U.S. Navy 1934 FTP-143 (A) Confidential (1)
General Tactical Instructions 1940-42 FTP-183/188 Confidential R.P.S.
U.S. Fleet Anti-Submarine and Escort of Convoys 1945 FTP-223 A Confidential R.P.S.
Current Tactical Orders, Battleships 1938 USF-16 Confidential R.P.S.
Current Doctrine, Battleships 1938 USF-17/td> Confidential R.P.S.
Current Tactical Orders, Cruisers January 1941 USF-20 (rev.) Confidential R.P.S.
Current Doctrine, Cruisers January 1941 USF-21 (rev.) Confidential R.P.S.
Current Doctrine, Submarines May 1944 USF-25 (A) Confidential R.P.S.
Current Tactical Orders, Destroyer 1940 USF-32 (rev.) Confidential R.P.S.
Current Doctrine, Destroyers 1940 USF-33 (rev.) Confidential R.P.S.
Current Tactical Orders, Aircraft Carriers, U.S. Fleet 1943 USF-77 (A) Confidential R.P.S.
Transport Doctrine, Amphibious Forces, U.S. Pacific Fleet May 1944   Confidential (11)
Current Tactical Orders and Doctrine, U.S. Fleet Aircraft, vol. 2, Battleship and Cruiser Aircraft May 1943 USF 75 (A) Confidential R.P.S.

--116--

COMINCH P-013

Title Date Short Title or No. Classification Source
FIGHTER DIRECTION
Fighter Direction and Combat Air Patrol January 1944   Confidential (7)
Fighter Director Vocabulary 1943 CCBP-11-2 Restricted R.P.S.
Fighter Direction Manual (Tent.) for Island Based Fighter Director Officers November 1943   Confidential (13)
Air Defense Control Center Doctrine (Tent.) March 1944   Confidential (5)
Aircraft Control Manual*   RADEIGHT Confidential (1)
FIRE-CONTROL RADAR
Fire-Control Radars Mark 3 (FC) and Mark 4 (FD)   OP 657 (rev.) Confidential (4)
Fire-Control Radar Mark 8   OP 658 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 8 Mods. 1 and 2   OP 658 (rev.) Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 12 Mod. 0   OP 1076 (with change 1). Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 13 Mod. 0   OP 1297 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 22 Mod. 0   OP 1153 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 26 Mods. 3, 4   OP 1154 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 27   OP 1155 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 28 Mods. 0, 3   OP 1156 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 28 Mod. 2   OP 1238 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 29 Mod. 2 1945 OP 1299 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 32 Mod. 1 1945 OP 1300 Confidential (4)
Radar Equipment Mark 34 Mods. 3, 4 1945 OP 1301 Confidential (4)
Radar Beacon Mark 1 Mod. 1   OP 1193 Confidential (4)
Radar Beacon Mark 2 Mods. 0, 1   OP 1336 Confidential (4)
GUNNERY
Gunnery Instruction, U.S. Navy 1940 FTP-134 Confidential R.P.S.
Gunnery Doctrine and Standard Fire Control Procedures for Destroyers with 5"/38 and 3"/50 Batteries January 1944 DTB-1-44, DTB-2-44 Confidential (7)
Destroyer Torpedo Attack Instructions (Tent.) October 1943 DTB-4-43 Confidential (7)
Destroyer Torpedo Doctrine and Manual of Torpedo Control February 1943 DTB 4-44 Confidential (7)
Shore Bombardment   CO-NAVAER 00-80V-54 Confidential (3)
Spotting   NAVAER 00-80V-52 Restricted (3)
Air Gunner--Get that Fighter   NAVAER 00-80S-32 Restricted (3)
Combat Air Patrol   CO NAVAER 00-808S-21 Confidential (3)
Defensive Tactics   CO NAVAER 00-80S-17 Confidential (3)
Don't Kill Your Friends   NAVAER 00-80Q-1 Restricted (3)
Gunnery Approaches   CO NAVAER 00-80V-59 Confidential (3)
How to Get Hits   CO NAVAER 00-80V-27 Confidential (3)
Offensive Tactics   CO NAVAER 00-80S-15 Confidential (3)
Gunnery Sense   NAVAER 00-80Q-3 Restricted (3)
* In preparation.

--117--

COMINCH P-013

IFF AND IDENTIFICATION
Title Date Short Title or No. Classification Source
Routing, Recognition and Identification of Aircraft, Pt. 4: Identification Procedure, Change No. 5 January 1944   Confidential R.P.S.
Radar Operator's Manual 1944 RAD THREE Confidential (1)
Recognition and Identification Sense   NAVAER 00-80Q-21 Restricted (3)
Capabilities and Limitations of Shipborne Radar* 1945 RAD ONE (A) Confidential (1)
NAVIGATION
Tactical Plotter, No. 1   NAVAER 30-104-81   (3)
Air Navigation Radio Aids Weekly     (10)
Manual for Operation of Airborne LORAN   CO NAVAER 00-80V-46 Confidential (3)
LORAN Handbook for Shipboard Operators   SHIPS 278 Confidential R.P.S.
The Amphibious Sketch, Its Function in Amphibious Training and Operation 1945 HO PUB 227 Restricted (10)
CIC Manual 1945 RAD SIX Confidential (1)
Tactical Uses of Radar in Small Vessels*   RAD NINE Confidential (1)
Radar Planning Device   CO NAVAER NO. 30-160R-28 Confidential  
RADAR EQUIPMENT
Instructional Radar Diagrams
     No. 2-SA Radar
     No. 3-SC, SK Series
1944   Confidential (4)
Timing Circuits May 1944 NAVSHIPS 900-013 Confidential (4)
List of Naval Radio, Radar and Sonar Equipment 1945 SHIPS 242A Confidential (4)
Fire Control Radars Mark 3 (FC) and Mark 4 (FD) April 1943 ORD 657 Confidential (6)
Fire Control Radar Mark 8 Operation January 1943 ORD 658 Confidential (6)
Operation of Airborne Radar 1944 CO NAVAER 00-80V-38 Confidential (2)
* In preparation.

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COMINCH P-013

RADIO
Title Date Short Title or No. Classification Source
Elements of Electricity and Radio April 1944 NAVSHIPS 900,012 Restricted (4)
Radio-Frequency Transmission Lines May 1944 NAVSHIPS 900,008 Restricted (4)
Airborne Radio Maintenance Notes, 2 parts   ARMN Confidential
Restricted
(3)
List of Naval Radio and Sonar Equipment February 1944 SHIPS 242 Confidential R.P.S.
Catalogue of Naval Radio Equipment August 1944 SHIPS 275 Confidential (4)
Radio and Electrical Equipment for Naval Aircraft June 1943   Confidential (3)
The Radio Operator   TMT 11-454   (3)
Radio Fundamentals May 1944 RM 11-455 Restricted (3)
Radio and Sound Bulletin Quarterly NAVSHIPS 900,011 Restricted (4)
The Klystron   NAVSHIPS 903-7 Restricted (4)
RADAR COUNTERMEASURES
Radar Countermeasures Manual*   RADSEVEN Confidential (1)
The Shipborne Radar Countermeasures Operator's Manual*   RADELEVEN Confidential (1)
The Airborne Radar Countermeasures Operator's Manual*   RADTWELVE Confidential (1)
Countermeasures and Deception Summary, Issues 1 to 6 (discontinued) 1944   Secret (2)
What is Window 1944 Bull. 2 Confidential (8)
RCM Letter Monthly   Confidential (4)
Countermeasures and Deception Bulletins As necessary   As proper (5 & 12)
Attack Plotters Mark 1 Mods. 1 and 2 January 1944 OP 1101 Confidential (6)
RADAR--GENERAL
Radar Electronic Fundamentals June 1944 NAVSHIPS 900,016 Confidential (4)
Radar System Fundamentals April 1944 NAVSHIPS 900,017 Confidential (4)
Radar Maintenance Bulletin Monthly NAVSHIPS 900,034 Confidential (4)
Microwaves and Waveguides   NAVSHIPS 903-5 Restricted (4)
Microwave Techniques   NAVSHIPS 900,028 Confidential (4)

--119--

Related Sources:
CIC operation in an AGC
CIC Operations on a Night Carrier
CIC [Combat Information Center] Yesterday and Today
Cursor Scales for the VG
Post Mortem CIC Notes
Target Information from CIC