Regulations for the Information of Officers On Neutrality
Duty in Connection With the Visits of Belligerent Vessels of War [1916]

Title page.

Regulations

FOR THE INFORMATION OF OFFICERS ON NEUTRALITY DUTY IN CONNECTION WITH

The Visits of Belligerent
Vessels of War


TO WATERS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE UNITED STATES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE TREATMENT OF SUCH VESSELS AND THEIR CREWS AFTER INTERNMENT

November, 1916

WASHINGTON

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1916


NAVY DEPARTMENT,
Washington, D. C., October 20, 1916.

The following regulations for the information and guidance of officers on neutrality duty in connection with the visits of belligerent vessels of war to waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, with special reference to the treatment of such vessels and their crews after internment, are hereby promulgated for the information and appropriate action of all concerned.

Particular attention is invited to the statement of the policy of the United States regarding the internment of belligerent vessels of war, appearing on page 5 of these regulations.

W. S. BENSON,
Acting Secretary of the Navy.

(3)


POLICY OF UNITED STATES REGARDING INTERN-

MENT OF BELLIGERENT VESSELS OF WAR.

The policy of the United States regarding the internment of belligerent vessels of war is hereby defined:

If the government to which the vessel belongs shall give its assurance that neither such vessel nor any member of her crew will attempt to leave the territory of the United States, or violate the neutrality thereof during the war in progress; and if that government shall authorize the officers to give their parole to that effect, and the commanding officer to give his parole for the enlisted men under his command; and, further, if the government to which the vessel belongs shall agree to cooperate with the United States in using all practicable means to apprehend, punish, and return to the custody of the Untied States any officer or member of the crew thus paroled who escapes:

Then the Government of the United Sates will accept such assurances and paroles and will, after the officers and men have been paroled and after the vessel has been rendered incapable of again taking the sea, extend to such vessel, its officers, and crew, the treatment which is usual in time of peace, reserving only such supervision as may be necessary to safeguard the neutrality of the United States:

Provided that the right to revoke the above privileges at any time without notice and without assigning a cause, and to place in operation the rigorous methods of internment recognized by international law as legitimate, is reserved, such revocation to be considered in no sense an unfriendly act.

(5)


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REGULATIONS FOR THE INFORMATION AND GUIDANCE OF OFFICERS ON NEUTRALITY DUTY IN CONNECTION WITH THE VISITS OF BELLIGERENT VESSELS OF WAR TO WATERS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE UNITED STATES, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE TREATMENT OF SUCH VESSELS AND THEIR CREWS AFTER INTERNMENT.

Definitions. -- (1) The term “vessel of war,” as used in these regulations, means any vessel under public control for hostile or military purposes.

(2) The term “commandant” means commandant of a naval district in territory or waters under the jurisdiction of the United States.

GENERAL.

Authority of the commandant. -- (3) Whenever a belligerent vessel of war anchors in waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, the commandant of that naval district shall assume complete charge of all matters in connection with her visit. The commanding officer of the belligerent vessel shall be informed promptly of this fact.

Delegation of authority at commandant’s discretion. -- (4) The commandant is the representative of the United States to insure the observance of our neutrality by such vessel, and to carry out the provisions of these regulations, unless otherwise ordered. He is authorized to delegate to commanding officers of vessels or detention guards, charged with duties in connection with the maintenance of neutrality, whether before or after internment, any of the authority granted him by these regulations that, in his opinion, will facilitate administration, but he is responsible for the intelligent utilization of the authority so delegated.

Commandant to make tentative arrangements in advance for reception of belligerent vessels of war. -- (5) The commandant of each naval district will, on


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receipt of these regulations, make arrangements in accordance with their provisions at each of the ports within his district for the reception and treatment of a visiting belligerent vessel of war, so that in case of such a visit those who will actually perform the duties in connection therewith may become familiar with these regulations and know what the Government expects of them.

(6) In those ports where there are no permanent naval representatives, arrangements should be made with Army department commanders and the district collectors of customs, by which the most convenient officers of the War or Treasury Departments can be utilized to make boarding calls, serve on boards, obtain the information and give the notices required by these regulations.

(7) Tentative arrangements should also be made for interning such a vessel, should this become necessary, and if considered more expedient for any port that the vessel be interned under custody of the Army authorities, arrangements to accomplish this should be made.

(8) The arrangements mentioned above should be submitted to the Navy Department for its approval, also for reference to the War Department, if necessary.

Situations not covered by these regulations. -- (9) In case of situations arising which are not covered by these regulations, the commandant is authorized to act in accordance with their general spirit, or to refer the matter to the Department for its decision.

Use of force authorized if absolutely necessary. -- (10) If force should be absolutely necessary to carry out any of the provisions of these regulations, the commandant is authorized to use it, but no more force than necessary to accomplish the purpose shall be used. In case of the failure of a belligerent vessel of war to leave the waters of the United States after due notice to depart, she shall not be expelled by force without specific authority from the Department, but if she has remained beyond the time limit after notice to


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depart, she shall be then prevented, by force, if necessary, from departing until her case has been decided upon by the Department.

General nature and importance of neutrality duty. -- (11) Officers charged with the maintenance of neutrality of the United States and the custody of an interned vessel and her personnel should bear constantly in mind that the United States, as a neutral, is bound, under its previous practice and under the treaty stipulations of The Hague Conference [Convention], 1907, to which the United States is a party, to prevent the commission of any unneutral acts within its territorial waters, and, in case of internment, to prevent the interned vessel and her personnel from again participating either directly or indirectly in the hostilities.

The extent and rigor of the surveillance employed in accomplishing the above result is a matter within the discretion of the United States alone.

While the use of rigorous methods of restriction on the interns can not be considered by their Government as unfriendly, neither can the other belligerent regard as unneutral the granting of the widest degree of freedom to them, provided always that we fulfill our solemn obligation to prevent the vessel or the interned individuals from again participating either directly or indirectly in the hostilities.

The interned individuals are the subjects of a friendly nation, and are entitled to be treated as such; humanity and friendship alike require that their stay in this country shall be as agreeable as the peculiar circumstances of their visit permit.

Therefore, unless the conduct of such interned individuals should indicate that an abuse of our confidence has rendered further privileges unwarranted, such requests from the commanding officer of the interned vessel as are not inconsistent with the best interests of the United States and which do not do violence to our paramount duty to detain the vessel and her personnel, should, if practicable, receive favorable consideration.


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SECTION I. – FOR TEMPORARY VISITS OF BELLIGERENT VESSELS OF WAR TO WATERS UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE UNITED STATES.

Arrival. – (12) Upon the arrival of a belligerent vessel of war within waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, the senior naval officer present should there be a vessel or vessels of the United States Navy in the vicinity at that time, shall immediately report her arrival to the commandant.

(13) The commandant shall arrange with Army department commanders and district collectors of customs for them, during the absence of Untied States naval vessels, to inform him by telephone or telegraph of the arrival of a belligerent vessel of war at any anchorage within their respective districts.

Visit of welcome, by whom made. – (14) If there are naval vessels in the vicinity, the senior officer present thereof shall send a boarding officer to perform the visit of welcome. He shall immediately report the result of his visit to the commandant, sending the boarding officer in person, if practicable and not too inconvenient, to make this report.

(15) If there are no naval vessels in the vicinity at the time, the commandant shall send the most convenient officer available and suitable for the purpose to make this visit. He may utilize any officer of the Navy or Marine Corps on duty within the limits of his command (hydrographic duty, recruiting duty, etc., included). In case it is impracticable to send a naval officer to make this visit, the commandant will request the Army officer or the collector of customs who has been previously designated, as provided in article 6, to make it.

Duties of the boarding officer. -- (16) The boarding officer shall furnish the commanding officer of the belligerent vessel with a copy of the President’s proclamation of neutrality, ascertain from him the cause of his visit, how long he desires to remain in port, and whether or not he desires to take on fuel or supplies or to make any repairs.


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(17) The boarding officer shall give notice to the commanding officer of the belligerent vessel that the United States expects that, while within its waters:

(a) He will comply with the provision of the President’s proclamation of neutrality.

(b) He will not use his wireless signal apparatus while within the waters of the United States.

(c) He will not prolong his visit in such port, harbor, roadstead, or waters beyond 24 hours unless his entry therein is on account of stress of weather, or of his requiring provisions or other articles necessary for the subsistence of the crew, or for repairs; in any of which cases, he will depart as soon as the cause for such delay is at an end.

(d) Regardless of the length of his stay, he will not take on board stores of any kind without the approval of the commandant of the naval district or the senior naval officer present.

(e) He will not depart from the waters of the United States without permission from the authorities mentioned in (d).

(f) If, for any reason, he prolongs his visit beyond 15 days, he will accept internment for the vessel and her crew for the rest of the war.

The boarding officer shall also give notice that, in case the belligerent vessel commits any act in violation of the neutrality of the United States, she will be required to leave the waters of the United States at once, and permission for her to again enter during the rest of the war will be refused. (See form letter at end of these regulations.)

Commandant to report arrival of belligerent to Navy Department. -- (18) The commandant shall report to the Department by the most expeditious method the arrival of a belligerent vessel of war within his jurisdiction, together with the reasons given by her for making such visit and what action he has taken in regard thereto. He shall keep the Department informed on matters of interest during the course of her visit.

Quarantine regulations must be observed. -- (19) In making the boarding visit prescribed above, the usual


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formalities in regard to quarantine shall be observed. The boarding officer will cooperate with the quarantine authorities with a view to expediting this duty.

(20) In case pratique is not granted by the quarantine authorities, the commandant will permit communication with shore by the belligerent vessel, only upon the express permission of the quarantine officer and in accordance with these regulations. In case such a situation should arise, the commandant shall report the matter to the Department by telegraph, together with the recommendation of the quarantine officer as to the probable duration of her quarantine, the advisability of transferring her sick to the hospital, and whether or not it is advisable for her to receive fuel and supplies while in quarantine.

Amount of supplies, fuel, etc., obtainable. -- (21) If considered necessary to determine the amount of supplies and fuel that the belligerent may take on board, or the amount of repairs she may make, the commandant may convene a board of commissioned officers of the Navy, if practicable, or if this is impracticable, a board of such competent persons as may be available for the purpose, to determine --

(a) The amount of supplies necessary to complete her normal peace supply.

(b) The amount of fuel required, in addition to her present supply, to enable her to reach her nearest home port.

(c) The amount of repairs necessary to render her seaworthy.

(d) The estimated time to obtain (a), (b), and (c).

(e) The date she was last in a United States port, and the amount of supplies, fuel, and repairs therein obtained.

Employment of United States vessels on this duty when necessary. -- (22) In case there are vessels of the United States Navy in the vicinity, the senior officer present thereof shall perform the duties enumerated in article 21, convening a board for the purpose if considered necessary. He shall report promptly


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to the commandant the information obtained, employing the quickest method of communication, and forward to him without delay the report of the board, if one is convened.

(23) In case there are no naval vessels in the vicinity and the belligerent is anchored at sufficient distance from port to warrant it, the commandant shall send a proper vessel to the locality of her anchorage to carry out the above enumerated duties; if no proper vessel is at his disposal, he shall request the proper authority to furnish him one for the purpose.

(24) The procedure for the commanding officer of such vessel shall be the same as for the senior officer present of naval vessels in the vicinity, as prescribed above.

Notice to depart. – (25) As soon as possible after the receipt of the information required by article 21 above, the commandant shall give notice to the commanding officer of the belligerent vessel, in accordance with (a), (b), and (c) of article 21, of the amount of supplies and fuel she may take on board and the amount of repairs she may make; and also the time limit before the expiration of which she must depart from the waters of the United States. The commandant shall report her departure to the Department by the most expeditious method and forward the report of the board without delay.

(26) In every case in which a belligerent vessel of war remains within the waters of the United States for a longer period than 24 hours, the time limit mentioned in the preceding article shall be prescribed as follows:

(a) In case the belligerent is permitted to take on supplies or fuel, the time limit shall be fixed so as to permit her to leave as soon as possible after such supplies or fuel have been received on board.

(b) In case she is permitted to make repairs, the time limit shall be fixed so as to permit her to leave within 24 hours after such repairs have been completed.

Except that in either of the above cases if it is necessary to prevent the departure of such a vessel


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within 24 hours after the departure of a public or private vessel of an opposing belligerent (except vessels devoted exclusively to religious, scientific, or philanthropic purposes), in order to permit a period of at least 24 hours to elapse between the two such departures, a further delay of 24 hours shall be required by the commandant.

Increasing supply of war material or augmenting crew prohibited. -- (27) The commandant shall not permit a belligerent vessel of war, while within the waters of the United States, to take on board supplies or fuel, or to make repairs, except in conformity with article 21 above. Repairs must be made without delay. In no case shall such a vessel be permitted to replenish or increase her supplies of war material or armament, or to complete or augment her crew.

(28) A belligerent vessel of war, while within the waters of the United States, shall not be permitted to transfer to another vessel any of her personnel or stores, nor shall such vessel be permitted to take on board any material or supplies of any kind without specific permission, in each instance, from the commandant.

(29) No belligerent vessel of war shall be supplied with fuel, while within the waters of the United States, more than once in any period of three months without special permission from the department, and in no case more than as specified in article 21.

Detention in port on account of other vessels. -- (30) No belligerent vessel of war shall be detained in any port, harbor, roadstead, or waters of the United States for a longer period than 24 hours by reason of the successive departures from such port, harbor, roadstead, or waters, of more than one vessel of an opposing belligerent or her ally.

(31) If there are several vessels of opposing belligerents in the same port, harbor, roadstead, or waters at the same time, the order of their departure therefrom shall be arranged by the commandant so as to afford opportunity of leaving alternately to the vessels of the opposing belligerents and to cause the least detention consistent with the provisions of these regulations.


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The commandant and the collector of customs will cooperate with each other, with a view to delaying the sailings of such vessels as may be necessary for a period of 24 hours, in order to carry out the provisions of this and the preceding article.

Failure to depart after due notice. -- (32) If, for any reason, a belligerent vessel of war fails to depart from the waters of the United States after due notice, the commandant shall request of her commanding officer a statement of his reasons for failing to comply with the notice given, and report the matter to the Department by telegraph, together with a recommendation as to whether there are any circumstances which warrant an extension of the time in her case, or whether she should be compelled to intern. (See article 10 above.)

(33) If the commandant recommends that the vessel be interned, he shall include in his recommendation the most suitable place, within his jurisdiction, for her detention and what additional force, if any, will be required to properly guard her and her personnel.

SECTION II. – FOR THE DETENTION OF BELLIGERENT VESSELS OF WAR AND THEIR CREWS AFTER INTERNMENT.

Internment. -- (34) On receipt of orders from the Department to intern a belligerent vessel of war, which has failed to leave the waters of the United States in accordance with the notices prescribed in the preceding section, the commandant shall send a commissioned officer aboard her to inform the commanding officer of his orders to this effect, that on behalf of the United States he is taking the vessel over into the custody of the United States, and that the United States expects that the commanding officer will, in accordance with the provisions of The Hague Convention, facilitate the execution of such measure as the United States may find necessary in order to render the vessel incapable of again tak-


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ing the sea during the war. (See form letter at end of these regulations.)

(35) The commandant shall send the vessel under proper convoy to the place designated by the department as the place of internment, placing on board her, if considered necessary, a sufficient guard to insure her safe passage; assign a suitable place for mooring; disable her machinery so as to prevent her movement under her own power; disable her battery beyond possibility of its being used; remove all ammunition and small arms to a place of safety on shore, except such revolvers, with a reasonable amount of ammunition, as may be necessary for officers for their use for disciplinary purposes, and disable or seal the wireless outfit so as to prevent its being used. He shall also disable the vessel in such other manner as may be prescribed by the department.

NOTE. -- If the belligerent Government owning the vessel will give the United States certain assurances mentioned below, it is the intention of this Government, after paroling the officers and crew, not to disable the vessel more than necessary to insure her inability to put to sea and not to place any unusual restrictions upon the personnel; this question to be taken up with the Government of the belligerent at the time through diplomatic channels.

(36) It is considered undesirable to intern a belligerent vessel at a navy yard, and if she is interned at a place other than a navy yard a United States vessel or other suitable guard should be selected to guard the interned vessel and her crew. If the vessel employed in connection with the belligerent’s visit prior to internment is of material military value, such vessel should be relieved from this duty as soon as practicable by any vessel suitable for the purpose, or by a detention guard, if the interns are quartered on shore.

(37) In case the interned vessel is uninhabitable, or for any other reason not a suitable place for quartering the interns, the commandant shall report the fact to the Navy Department, together with a recommenda-


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tion as to what other vessel or what place on shore is proper and available for the purpose. If additional officers and men are required as a detention guard, he shall request that they be furnished him. If the crew is removed from the vessel, a sufficient number must be left on board to look out for her.

(38) If, on internment, the crew of the vessel is in urgent need of succor, the commandant shall furnish such relief as humanity may require.

(39) In case captured individuals are found on board the vessel at the time of her internment, such individuals shall be set free.

Limits of internment. – (40) The limits of internment shall be the limits of the vessel herself, if the crew are quartered on board; if the crew are quartered on shore, the limits of internment shall be the limits of the buildings or camps occupied by the interns and their immediate vicinity – such limits to be definitely prescribed by the commandant.

(41) No officer or man not under parole shall be permitted to leave the limits of internment. Sentries shall guard against the escape of interns in every way short of firing upon them. This shall not prevent the commandant or other superior officer having charge of interned persons from using all necessary means at his command to suppress riot or organized revolt among interns.

Requests for parole. -- (42) If the commanding officer of the interned vessel desires the privilege of parole for himself or any of his command, he should make request therefor to the commandant. Such request must be accompanied by a list of the commissioned officers and other members of his crew for whom parole is desired, with their full names and ranks or ratings.

Limited parole may be granted by commandant. -- (43) The commandant is authorized to accept, within his discretion, a limited parole within the limits of his command for any intern, in accordance with the instructions contained in articles 48-54, whenever he may consider it necessary for the health and comfort


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of the interns. The general form of the parole given below will be followed. It should contain, in addition to the promises contained in article 55 below, the purpose for which granted and the limits for which it is effective.

Extended parole only to be granted by special authority from the department. -- (44) In case the commanding officer desires the privilege of extended parole within the limits of the United States for himself and the members of his command, his request therefor should be accompanied by a full list of those commissioned officers and other members of his crew for whom such parole is desired, and also of those commissioned officers and other members of his crew, if any, for whom parole is not desired.

(45) The commandant shall forward to the Department all requests for extended parole.

Status of interned vessel in case of certain assurances by its government. -- (46) If the government of the interned individuals will give its official assurances to the Government of the United States that neither the vessel nor any member of the crew will attempt to leave the territory of the United States or violate the neutrality thereof during the continuance of the war in progress; that the officers are authorized to give their parole to that effect; that the commanding officer is authorized to give his parole for the enlisted personnel of his command; that in case of any violation thereof, if brought to its attention, the belligerent government will use all practical means to apprehend, punish, and return to the custody of the United States any intern who escapes in violation of the parole as thus given, the United States will be justified in relying on these assurances and paroles, and granting during good behavior the privileges as herein enumerated.

(47) In case the assurances mentioned in the preceding article are given by the home government of the interns, the organization of the vessel will be continued intact during the observance of parole by the interns; the commanding officer of the vessel will

82733-17-2


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be permitted to exercise the authority granted him by the regulations of his own government, to maintain order and discipline among the crew, and subject to the good behavior of the interns and these regulations the status of the vessel will be the same as in times of peace.

(48) None but commissioned officers will be permitted to give parole. For all other interns, the commanding officer of the interned vessel, if he desires parole for them, must give parole on their behalf.

(49) No officer can be compelled to give parole either for himself or any other intern.

(50) In no case will parole be accepted for any intern who is prohibited by the regulations of his own government from giving it.

(51) In case the commanding officer of the interned vessel disapproves the giving of parole by any member of is command, such member will not be permitted to leave the limits of internment, as prescribed in article 40 above.

(52) All paroles will be signed in triplicate, one copy to be retained by the commandant and two to be sent to the Navy Department, one of which will be forwarded to the Government of the interns.

(53) Under no circumstances will any intern be permitted to return to his own country without the consent of the opposing belligerent. Such requests must be accompanied by reasons therefor. They will then be taken up by the Department through diplomatic channels.

(54) In case of breach of parole by any intern or interns, the commandant shall report to the Department the names and ranks or ratings of such offenders, together with the attendant circumstances. Pending the Department’s action in the matter, the rest of that class, in accordance with the classification given in article 57 below, shall be restricted to the limits of internment, as prescribed in article 40.

Form of parole. – (55) The following form of parole is prescribed for each commissioned officer, including the commanding officer, desiring extended parole, to be


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signed by such officer with the approval of the commanding officer:

“I hereby state that there is no regulation issued by the Government of my own country which prohibits my giving this parole, and I do hereby promise that I will strictly observe, during the present war, the neutrality of the United States, as defined by the proclamation of the President thereof, of the _________ day of _________of the year _______, and that I will not leave the limits of parole, as herin prescribed, without special permission from the President of the United States or his duly authorized agent; nor will I visit, without special permission from the commandant of the naval district, the buildings or territory forbidden by him.”

To the commanding officer’s parole will be added the following:

“I do further promise that I will adequately punish, or recommend to my superior officer for punishment, or surrender to the United States authorities, if requested, any officer or enlisted man under my command violating the terms of his parole.”

(56) The following form of parole is prescribed for the commanding officer on behalf of all members of his command, except commissioned officers desiring extended parole:

“I hereby state that there is no regulation issued by the Government of my own country which prohibits my giving this parole, and I do hereby promise, on behalf of all members of my command, other than commissioned officers, that they will each and all strictly observe, during the present war, the neutrality of the Untied States, as defined by the proclamation of the President thereof, of the _________ day of __________ of the year ______, and that they will not leave the limits of parole as herein prescribed, without special permission from the President of the United States or his duly authorized agent; nor will they visit, without special permission from the commandant of the naval district, the buildings or territory forbidden by him.”


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The commandant shall prescribe such additional restrictions, in regard to visiting public buildings or territory, which, in his opinion, should not be visited by foreigners.

Classes of interns. -- (57) For the purpose of granting privileges to interns on parole, the following classes are established:

Class 1. All commissioned officers excluding the commanding officer.

Class 2. All officers other than commissioned officers.

Class 3. Petty officers of all grades.

Class 4. All enlisted men other than petty officers.

Leave of absence. -- (58) The commandant is authorized to prescribe the conditions under which the commanding officer of the interned vessel may grant leave to the members of his command who have given parole.

(59) While it is intended by the preceding article to allow the interns the widest latitude consistent with the terms of their parole, yet nothing contained therein shall be construed as in any degree restricting the right of the commandant to have the interns mustered by the officers under his command, or limiting his authority to withdraw privileges or restrict the interns individually, by classes or as a body, if, in his opinion, the neutrality of the United States is being either directly or indirectly violated, or for any reason it becomes actually desirable to do so. In fact, it is his duty to do this if he has reason to believe that the privileges granted are being in any way abused.

Hospital privileges. -- (60) At the request of the commanding officer of the interned vessel, sick or wounded may be transferred to a United States naval hospital for treatment. While within such hospital interns will be subject to the hospital regulations.

(61) Those interns for whom the commanding officer has given parole shall not be required to sign a personal parole on being transferred to the hospital, the commanding officer’s parole being considered still binding. Interns so transferred shall be notified to this effect.


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(62) In case the commanding officer of the interned vessel desires to transfer any interns not on parole to the hospital, such transfer will be authorized only on the condition that the commanding officer accept parole on behalf of such interns, or that he send a paroled intern in charge of them while en route to and from the hospital.

(63) The commanding officer of the United States vessel, or the detention guard in immediate charge of the supervision of the interned vessel, is responsible to the commandant for the safe custody of the ship and the interns.

Correspondence. -- (64) All official correspondence from the interned vessel to the officials of the United States should be addressed to the commandant.

Expenses. -- (65) All expenses incident to guarding the interned vessel and her personnel will be borne by the United States, and no charge will be made for the personal services of members of the naval service, including those of the hospital corps, attending sick or wounded interns while in a naval hospital. All other expenses, including those of food, clothing, transportation, etc., will be borne by the belligerent; but, if for any reason the commanding officer of the interned vessel should be unable to defray these expenses, payment thereof shall, upon approval by the commandant of the naval district, be made by a disbursing officer of the Navy designated by the commandant, and charged to the appropriation “Contingent, Navy.”

(66) No expense for which it is intended the Government of the interns should repay the Government of the United States shall be made without the knowledge and approval of the commanding officer of the interned vessel.

(67) An account covering these expenditures shall be prepared in duplicate and, after being properly certified as correct by the commanding officer of the interned vessel, shall be forwarded to the Navy Department for submission to the belligerent Government for reimbursement. An accurate account of all ex-


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penditures made under authority of this article shall be kept in accordance with such instructions as may be issued by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts.

(68) An interned vessel of war shall be permitted to fly her national colors.

(69) The following forms of letters are suggested:

[Form of letter to commanding officer of belligerent vessel of war on arrival.]

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

COMMANDING OFFICER,

_______________________

Sir: I have the honor to inform you that by direction of the Secretary of the Navy I am charged with all matters relating to the visit of belligerent vessels of war to the waters of the United States that lie within this naval district.

I inclose for your information a copy of the President’s proclamation of neutrality.

The Government of the United States expects that while your vessel is within the territorial waters of the United States:

(a) You will comply with the provisions of the President’s proclamation of neutrality.

(b) You will not use your radio for either sending or receiving.

(c) You will not prolong your visit beyond 24 hours unless you have entered because of stress of weather, or because of need of provisions for the subsistence of the crew, or because of need of repairs; and that in any of these cases you will depart as soon as the cause for delay is at an end.

(d) Regardless of your length of stay you will not take on stores of any kind without my approval or the approval of the senior United States naval officer present in port.


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(e) You will not depart from United States waters without my permission.

(f) You will accept internment for the vessel, officers, and crew, under your command, if for any reason you prolong your visit beyond 15 days.

(g) You will make no transfers to other vessels of men or stores.

Should the vessel under your command or any of her officers or crew violate the neutrality of the United States, the vessel may be required to leave the waters of the United States immediately and will thereafter be denied permission to enter again the waters of the United States during the continuance of the war.

Very respectfully,

__________________________,
U. S. Navy,
Commandant, ____________ Naval District


[Form of letter to commanding officer of belligerent vessel of war about to be interned.]

________________________________________

________________________________________

________________________________________

COMMANDING OFFICER,

_______________________

SIR: I have the honor to inform you that I have been directed by the Navy Department to intern the vessel under your command, together with her officers and crew. The Government of the United States expects that you will, in accordance with the provisions of The Hague Convention, facilitate the execution of such measures as may be found necessary to render the vessel under your command incapable of again putting to sea during the war.

___________________, United States Navy, will represent me for the time being.


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I forward herewith copies of regulations regarding internment for your information and guidance.

I shall be pleased to be of any service to yourself, your officers, and crew.

Very respectfully,

__________________________,
U. S. Navy,
Commandant, ____________ Naval District