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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Inventory of the Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library, in Record Group 45.
All of these documents are located at the National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20408, and all inquiries about these records should be made to them.

Records of Shore Establishments, 1814-1919

Baltimore Naval Station

A naval station was established at Baltimore, MD, during the War of 1812. Many vessels were sent to Baltimore for repair, a practice which continued through the time of the Civil War. During the Civil War the naval rendezvous at Baltimore furnished crews to vessels at the station and equipment and supplies were provided to vessels ordered to the South.

423. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Jan. 1863-Mar. 1864. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of addressees.

The letters were sent primarily to the Secretary of the Navy and bureau chiefs. They relate to such matters as orders, vessels, ordnance, supplies, and requisitions. The volume was presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library on June 11, 1925, by Miss Nannie Dornin Barney and her brothers and sisters, grandchildren of the commandant, Como. Thomas A. Dornin.

Boston (Charlestown) Navy Yard

In 1800 the State of Massachusetts ceded to the U.S. Government 65 acres of land at Charlestown for the establishment of a navy yard. A purchase of 35 additional acres was made in the same year, and other purchases were made in subsequent years. Capt. Samuel Nicholson was the first officer-in-charge of the yard. Some of the most famous vessels of the U.S. Navy for the Civil War period were launched at the Boston Navy Yard including the USS Cumberland, Merrimac, Princeton, and Hartford.

Most of the records for the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years and consist primarily of correspondence between the commandant of the yard and the Secretary of the Navy, the Navy Department bureaus, officers commanding vessels, heads of departments at the yard, and private companies and individuals. Records of the yard for other time periods are in the Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181. For a history of the yard, see entry 413.

424. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
Sept. 1859-Aug. 1866. 22 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for February 7-April 10, 1863.

The letters are to officers commanding naval vessels, other officers at the yard, the commanding officer of the naval rendezvous at Boston, the Navy agent at Boston, commandants at other navy yards, civilian employees of the yard, private contractors, local law enforcement officials, and other public and private individuals. Among the many subjects discussed are recruitment, apprehension of deserters, preparation of vessels for sea duty, assignment of vessels to search for privateers off the Massachusetts coast, and procurement of supplies and equipment.

425. Press Copies of Letters and Telegrams Sent to Secretary of the Navy.
May 1859-Aug. 1867. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are name and subject indexes in the volumes for May 1861-March 1862.

The letters relate mainly to such matters as arrival and departure of vessels, transfer and discharge of enlisted men, and the assignment of officers to duty. The originals of these records are among those described in entry 51.

426. Letters and Telegrams Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Oct. 8, 1861-Dec. 1, 1864. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are a name and subject index in the volume for January-November 1864 and chronologically arranged lists of subjects of letters in the volumes for October 1861-May 1862 and October 1862-May 1863. There are no letters for June-October 1863.

The records relate to such matters as examination and appointment of officers, discharges of crews, departure dates of vessels, disposition of prisoners of war and contraband at the yard, and wages paid to civilian employees. The date on which acknowledgment was sent and other action taken is usually noted on the letter.

427. Register of Courts-Martial.
June 13, 1814-Sept. 19, 1833. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically by date of trial.

There are entries for courts-martial held at the yard and on vessels in Boston Harbor. The information given includes location, date, name and rank of person tried, nature of charge, verdict, sentence if applicable, and remarks, usually including names of members of the court-martial board.

428. Canceled Checks of the Boston Navy Yard.
1830-39 2 ft.

There are checks for the year 1830, arranged alphabetically by the surname of the payee and for the years, 1831-33, arranged chronologically. For the year 1837, the bundle is labeled "destroyed checks, April, May June, July." There is only one check for 1839.

The checks are issued to naval officers, enlisted men, civilian employees, suppliers, and contractors. They are signed by Purser Edward N. Cox.

Gosport (Norfolk) Navy Yard

The navy yard at Norfolk (Gosport), VA, was permanently established in 1801. During the 1830s and 1840s the yard was constantly used for fitting out, refitting, and laying up Navy vessels. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during this period were the John Adams, Yorktown, Union, Southampton, Perry, and Jamestown.

Most of the records of the Norfolk Navy Yard are in Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

429. Report of Annual Survey of Articles on Hand in Departments.
Oct. 1, 1840. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by department and thereunder for the most part by vessel.

Entries include type of article, number or amount (sometimes broken down by those in good order and those needing repair), and value.

430. Reports of an Inspection and Work Performed on the USS Trenton at the Norfolk Navy Yard.
Sept. 17, 1886-June 22, 1887. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically with a subject index.

The inspection report, prepared by Chief Engineer Joseph Trilley in September 1886, comments on the condition and operation of the vessel machinery. The report of work performed, which is accompanied by a drawing detailing the repairs made on the vessel machinery, was submitted by Chief Engineer B. H. Wharton in June 1887.

Havana, Cuba, Naval Station

In an Executive order of December 6, 1898, President William McKinley directed the Commission for the Evacuation of Cuba to turn over to the U.S. Navy Department the entire naval establishment at Havana, Cuba, formerly the property of the Spanish Government. In a subsequent order of December 12, 1898, the commission was directed to give the U.S. naval officer in command of the station jurisdiction of the harbor of Havana, Cuba, which would include enforcing the rules and regulations regarding anchorage of vessels and enforcing quarantine regulations.

Because of unsuitable docking facilities and places for unloading bulky cargoes, the navy yard, which came under the jurisdiction of the commandant of the naval station, was turned over to the U.S. Army in June 1900. The property occupied by the naval station was eventually returned to the Cuban Government.

431. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
Jan. 1899-Mar. 9, 1903. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are primarily letters to U.S. Navy and Army officers, private contractors, and Spanish naval officers in Cuba. They concern the shipment of stores, sanitary measures adopted at the stations, claims for coal at the station, the decoration of grave sites of naval personnel killed on the Maine, and numerous other subjects. Also included are letters to Cubans temporarily appointed as pilots, sanitary inspectors, and lighthouse inspectors.

432. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
Mar. 2, 1899-Mar. 9, 1903. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters concern such administrative matters as the station's requirements for clothing and small stores, orders for officers, and the closing of the station and the transfer of personnel and records to the naval station at Key West, FL.

433. Press Copies of Telegrams Sent.
Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 4, 1903. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The telegrams, most of which were addressed to the Secretary of the Navy and the chiefs of bureaus, concern such subjects as deaths of naval personnel at the station from yellow fever and other causes, payroll difficulties, departures of foreign vessels from the port of Havana, and delays in the delivery of coal and other supplies.

434. Orders.
Mar. 4, 1899-Mar. 2, 1903. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are press copies of orders issued by the commandant to officers concerning such matters as the duty assignment and pay accounts of officers and enlisted men.

435. Office Timebook of the Department of Yards and Docks.
Jan. 1899-Mar. 1903. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged by month and thereunder numerically.

The information is on a printed from and includes the name, occupation, which days worked, total number of days worked, pay per day, and total pay for each employee.

The volume also contains the office timebooks for the Department of the Captain of the Port, January-June 1899; the Department of Construction and Repair, July 1901-October 1902; and the Department of Steam Engineering, May-August 1899.

436. Vouchers.
Sept. 1899-Mar. 1903. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are press copies of vouchers for various supplies and stores, medical and transportation services, and funeral expenses.

Mare Island Navy Yard

In January 1852 a board was appointed by the Secretary of the Navy to select a site for a navy yard in California. The Mare Island site was selected and purchased in March 1853. Most of the records of the Mare Island Navy Yard are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

437. Log.
Sept. 16, 1854-Mar. 22, 1856 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically. A note in the inside cover states that the log was written in the hand of Admiral Farragut.

The log contains weather data and brief descriptions of yard activities.

438. Photographs of Drydock Excavation.
July 4, 1873-Nov. 1874. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Twenty-three numbered black-and-white photographs depicting various stages of the work. The contractor for the excavation was Charles Murphy.

Mound City, IL, Naval Station

A naval station was established in 1864 at Mound City, IL, on the Ohio River 8 miles above its confluence with the Mississippi River. Because of its location, the station was vital to the Union Navy's plans for control of the Mississippi River. After the Civil War the station continued to operate, but its relative unimportance resulted in its discontinuance in the 1870s. Other records for this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

439. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
Dec. 3, 1864-Jan. 10, 1871. 5 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name and subject indexes in the volumes. There are no letters for January 1868-September 1869.

The letters concern such matters as employment and pay of civilians at the station, examination of officer candidates, marines and apprentices attached to the station, deserters, surveys of repairs needed by vessels, contracts, and supplies. Letters to the Secretary or July-October 1864 are among those described in entry 440.

440. Press Copies of Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
July 4, 1864-Nov. 16, 1867. 4 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name or name and subject indexes in the individual volumes. There are no letters for the period October 2-December 2, 1864.

The volumes include letters to officers and civilian employees at the station; the commanding officer and other officers attached to the Mississippi Squadron; the commanding officer of the ordnance department at Jefferson Barracks, MO, and other Union Army officers; the commanding officer of the U.S. receiving ship Great Western at Cairo, IL; and private contractors. The letters concern coal and other supplies and stores needed at the station and by vessels of the Mississippi Squadron, payment of bills, recruits, leaves of absence, and numerous other subjects. During the period July 4-October 1, 1864, the commandant also served as a flag officer of the Mississippi Squadron, and there are letters transmitting orders to officers commanding vessels of the squadron and reporting the outcome of naval expeditions and the movements and locations of Confederate forces along the Mississippi River. There also are some letters concerning Confederate prisoners of war and cotton seized by Union vessels. Letters to the Secretary of the Navy are included for this July-October 1, 1864, period.

441. Letters Received.
July 29, 1864-Aug. 30, 1869. 7 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, with gaps. There is some overlapping between volumes. There are name or name and subject indexes in most of the volumes.

The letters are primarily from chiefs of bureaus in Washington, the commanding officer of the Mississippi Squadron, and the commanding officer of the U.S. receiving ship Great Western at Cairo, IL. For the period of the Civil War, they concern numerous subjects including coal for the squadron, repairs and equipment needed on vessels at the station, surveys performed on vessels and ordnance stores, payment of bounty money to recruits, charges of embezzlement, paroled prisoners, and deserters. The letters for the postwar period primarily concern such administrative matters as vacancies in the crews of vessels at the station and assignments of officers.

442. Letters Received Concerning Coal Shipments.
Dec. 6, 1864-Aug. 6, 1865. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There is a name and subject index.

Most of the letters are from Comdr. R. N. Stembel at the U.S. Naval Coal Agency at Pittsburgh, PA, concerning the delivery of coal and sale of barges. Other correspondents included the commanding officer of the Mississippi Squadron and officers commanding vessels attached to the squadron.

New Orleans Naval Station

New Orleans was one of the sites selected for establishing a naval station during the war of 1812. Ordnance was furnished to vessels calling at the port, and crews were raised for vessels awaiting orders to sail. During the Civil War, New Orleans once again served as an ordnance depot for the Union Navy. Other records for this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

443. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Oct. 1, 1863-July 22, 1867. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, but the end of the volume includes a considerable number of letters out of order. Entries in a register, arranged mostly by office of addressee, at the beginning of the volume include name of addressee, subject, and page number.

The letters were addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, chiefs of bureaus, and the commanding officer and other officers attached to the Gulf Blockading Squadron concerning ordnance requirements of vessels, results of vessel surveys, bills for labor and repair of vessels, and other administrative matters. The letters were signed by persons with a succession of titles and the office was identified for the most part as the U.S. Naval Ordnance Depot, October 1863-September 1865; U.S. Naval Headquarters, October-December 1865; U.S. Naval Station, February-August 1866; U.S. Iron Clads in Ordnance, August 1866-July 1867.

New York (Brooklyn) Navy Yard.

On February 7, 1801, the U.S. Government purchased 41.9 acres of land on the left bank of the East River (Brooklyn), which included a privately constructed shipyard at which the U.S. frigate Adams had been launched in 1799. Later purchases of adjacent property were made by the Government in 1824, 1848, and 1867. Following the 1801 purchase, Lt. Jonathan Thorne was ordered to the yard to act as officer-in-charge.

No vessels were constructed by the Navy at the yard prior to 1817, but many naval vessels received equipment and supplies there during the War of 1812. Beginning in the 1830s steam vessels were constructed at the yard, and during the period of the Civil War 14 vessels were constructed and about 400 vessels equipped and supplied.

The records of the New York Navy Yard in Record Group 45, many of which fill gaps in series in Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181, consist primarily of letters sent and received by the commandant. Correspondents included the Secretary of the Navy, the Board of Navy Commissioners, Navy Department bureaus, and naval officers and civilians at the yard. Some of the records appear to have been transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library from private sources.

444. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
June 15, 1859-Feb. 6, 1862. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. A chronologically arranged list of letters is at the beginning of the volume.

The letters concern occurrences or activities at the yard, including arrivals and departures of vessels, recruitment and transfer of enlisted men, employment of civilian personnel, apprehension of deserters, and repair of vessels.

445. Letters Sent to Naval Officers and Civilians at the Yard.
Nov. 21, 1859-Aug. 4, 1865. 8 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period September 20, 1864-February 10, 1865. Entries in registers in the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of addressee, include date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

The letters concern assignments to duty, sailing orders, discharges, pay, crews for vessels, examination of officer candidates, repairs needed on vessels, and numerous other subjects. A few letters are addressed to other persons, including the customs collector at New York, prize commissioners, and Army officers.

446. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy and Board of Navy Commissioners.
Jan. 26, 1815-Aug. 31, 1842. 22 vols. 7 ft.

Arranged chronologically, except that in the volume for 1817 letters rom the board are separated from letters from the Secretary. Entries in chronologically arranged registers in most of the volumes give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents. There are no letters for 1816, 1818, or April 6, 1823-December 22, 1824.

Letters from the board relate to such subjects as timber, ordnance, and other supplies delivered to the yard; uniforms; wages paid mechanics; vessels under construction; and sale of vessels and condemned supplies and equipment. Letters from the Secretary are similar in content to those described in entry 447. There are few letters from the Secretary after 1817 and none after 1823.

447. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Nov. 13, 1826-June 8, 1875. 49 vols. 15 ft.

Arranged for the most part chronologically, but for the late 1850s and the 1860s there is much overlapping. Entries in chronologically arranged registers in most of the volumes give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents. The volume for December 1864-March 1865 is in Record Group 181, Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments.

The letters relate to many subjects including crews for vessels, personnel actions, deaths of officers, pay of enlisted men, marines attached to the yard, courts-martial, and repairs and supplies for naval vessels. For the period prior to 1843, most letters concerning vessel repairs, supplies, and equipment were from the Board of Navy Commissioners. See entry 446.

448. Letters Received from Officers.
Mar. 1, 1842-May 31, 1875. 29 vols. 9 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the periods July 16, 1853-June 7, 1855; October 15, 1868-July 18, 1869; October 5-December 22, 1869; or March 19, 1870-July 1, 1874. Entries in registers in most of the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer, give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Included are letters from commanding officers of receiving ships at the yard and the naval rendezvous, commanding officers o vessels and squadrons, commandants of other navy yards, and Army and Marine Corps officers. Subjects of the letters include transfers of crew, surveys of vessels, transportation of troops during the Mexican and Civil Wars, ship collisions, delivery of supplies and equipment to the squadrons, prisoners of war, and deserters. Other letters from commanding officers of receiving ships are described in entry 452; there a few letters from officers among those described in entry 450.

449. Letters Received From the Fourth Auditor of the Treasury.
Sept. 15, 1843-June 7, 1850. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is one letter each for the years 1854, 1856, and 1859. Entries in a register in the front of the volume give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Almost all of the letters are requests to have the purser of the yard add names of officers to the rolls for pay.

450. Miscellaneous Letters Received.
Jan. 3, 1845-July 24, 1874. 9 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in registers contained in the volumes, arranged alphabetically by initial letter of surname of writer, give date and page of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Correspondents included the U.S. Marshal and the U.S. District Attorney for the Southern District of New York, consular officials at New York City, officials of New York City and the State of New York, the Acting Assistant Provost Marshals General and Superintendents of Volunteer Recruiting for the Northern and Southern Divisions of New York, the U.S. Sanitary Commission, officials of private businesses, the clerk and other civilian employees of the yard, and the parents and other family members of enlisted men stationed at the yard. There are a few letters from naval officers. The letters relate to such subjects as proposals and contracts for furnishing goods and services, inspections, recruits, arrival of foreign vessels, purchase of land for the yard, claims, bounties, prize vessels, prisoners of war, civilian pay, and applications for positions.

451. Letters Received from Naval Constructor B. F. Delano.
Sept. 2, 1861-July 15, 1869. 1 vol. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a register at the beginning of the volume give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

The letters concern such subjects as results of vessel examinations, equipment and machinery to be fitted on vessels, and material and labor used in the Naval Contractor's Department of the yard. There are a few letters from other persons concerned with naval construction.

452. Letters Received From the Commanding Officers of Receiving Ships Stationed at the Yard.
July 10, 1863-Aug. 22, 1865. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in the volume's chronologically arranged register include date and page number of letter and a summary of its contents.

The letters, most of which were received from the USS North Carolina, relate to such subjects as deserters, personnel removed from the ships under writs of habeas corpus, prisoners held on the ships, and requests for leave of absence. Other letters from commanding officers of receiving ships are among those described in entry 448 and in Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, in entry 394.

453. Letters Received From the Bureau of Navigation and the Office of Detail.
Nov. 30, 1866-Nov. 20, 1868. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a chronologically arranged register include date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its contents.

Included are letters transmitting orders to officers at the yard, informing the commandant of officers granted leaves of absence and enlisted men accused of desertion, authorizing discharges, and directing that civilian employees be employed in the yard's Navigation Office.

454. Fiscal Records.
Mar. 1823-May 1873. 1/2 in.

Arranged by type of record and thereunder for the most part chronologically. Included are accounts relating to the repair and supply of vessels, March 1823-October 1824, 1828, March 1857, and November 1858; and transfer, pay, receipt, and muster rolls, February 1871-May 1873, with gaps.

455. Reports of Boards of Survey.
Dec. 30, 1824-Aug. 1853. 4 vols. 7 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a subject index in the first volume and a register in the third volume.

The first volume contains reports, December 30, 1824-March 14, 1842, of surveys in the yard and of the USS Franklin, Cyane, Brandywine, United States, and Ontario and other vessels in the yard. The next volume, for August 1842, contains the reports of a survey conducted on the USS Grampus. The third volume contains requests for and reports of surveys conducted at the yard during the period January 1845-September 1849, and the last volume contains the repor of a survey conducted on the USS Congress in August 1853. Some are general reports of examinations of the hull, equipment, and stores of all departments of the ships and estimates of the costs of making repairs; others are of a more specific nature. Many concern the quality of provisions, clothing, and stores. A few relate to the health of certain men.

456. Station Logs.
1834-47, with gaps. 7 vols. 10 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The logbook entries include weather information, number of workers employed, type of work projects, and the names of arriving and departing ships.

457. Autographs of Officers and Lists of Ships.
ca. 1861-ca. 1863. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by type of record.

The purpose for which the autographs were assembled is unclear; the signatures appear to be those of famous people including most Civil War admirals, other notable officers, and a Russian prince. The purpose for which the list of ships was assembled is equally unclear.

458. Register of Orders Filled by the Naval Storekeeper's Office.
Mar. 27-Oct. 30, 1863. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries include order number, appropriation on which drawn, vessel or personnel for whom the items were requested, brief description of items, and the quantity ordered.

459. Rules for the Government of the New York Navy Yard.
ca. 1865. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

These rules, which may have been compiled by the executive officer of the yard, relate to almost all aspects of yard operations and to the duties of civil and naval officers at the yard, including the heads of yard departments. Also included are general orders for persons on watch duty and fire department regulations.

460. Records Relating to the Improvement of the New York Navy Yard.
1897-1905. 5 in.

Unarranged.

The records include correspondence, reports, recommendations, blueprints, maps, and specifications relating to improvements made at the New York Navy Yard.

Newport Torpedo Station

In 1869 a torpedo school was established at Newport, RI, to offer training in explosives and electricity to naval officers. An experimental laboratory also formed part of the station at which the attack and defensive capabilities of various torpedo devices were tested. In 1889 the Naval War College at Newport was consolidated with the torpedo station. Other records of this naval station are part of Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, Record Group 181.

461. Classroom Notebooks Kept by Officers Attending Lectures.
ca. 1884. 6 vols. 6 in.

Arranged by officer and thereunder by subject.

Notebooks of Master Nathan Sargent, Lts. Albert R. Couden and Charles M. McCarteny, and Comdr. George C. Remey, kept during lectures given at the station on torpedoes, electricity, and explosives. The lecturer is usually identified.

Pensacola Navy Yard

On March 3, 1825, Congress passed an act (4 Stat. 127) authorizing the establishment of a navy yard on the Florida coast and appropriating $100,000 for the purchase of a site and for construction. A survey team of naval officers selected Pensacola Bay as the location for the yard, and in 1826 work was begun. The first commandant of the yard was Capt. Lewis Warrington.

In 1837 a plan for the development and improvement of the Pensacola Navy Yard was adopted, and subsequent congressional appropriations made possible the construction of a floating drydock and other facilities for the docking, repairing, and building of naval vessels.

In January 1861 the Pensacola Navy Yard fell into the hands of the Confederates and was not retaken by Union forces until the fall of 1862. The yard was almost destroyed by the Confederates but was restored adequately to serve as a repair and supply base for the West Gulf Blockading Squadron.

Most of the records of the Pensacola Navy Yard included in this record group are for the period following the recapture of the yard in 1862 and the post-Civil War years and consist primarily of correspondence between the commandant of the yard and the Secretary of the Navy, chiefs of Navy bureaus, and officers at the yard.

462. Letters Sent.
Dec. 30, 1862-Feb. 27, 1874. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters for the following time periods: December 30, 1862-November 10, 1863; March 6, 1864-January 17, 1865; June 21,1865-August 25, 1866; January 18, 1867-April 24, 1869; October 6, 1869-June 7, 1867; and June 18, 1872-February 27, 1874. There are name indexes in all of the volumes except those dated later than October 6, 1869.

The 1862-63 letters are handwritten fair copies; the other letters are press copies. Addressees included the Secretary of the Navy and bureau chiefs; the commanding and other officers of the Gulf Blockading, West Gulf Blockading, and Gulf Squadrons and the North Atlantic Fleet; Army officers, including the commanding officer of the District of West Florida; the Provost Marshal at Pensacola; and Treasury agents. The many subjects of the letters include coal, timber, and other supplies and equipment; vessel repair; contractors; mail delivery; deserters and prisoners; and the outbreak of yellow fever at the station.

463. Letters Sent to the Assistant Naval Constructor.
Jan. 23, 1865-Mar. 27, 1868. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There is a list of letters in the front of the volume.

Most of the letters gave orders for the repair of vessels or requested equipment. Some are letters of request sent to the commandant and returned with his decision noted on them.

464. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Constructing (Civil) Engineer's Office.
Oct. 24, 1865-Nov. 23, 1867. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters to the Secretary of the Navy, bureau chiefs, the commandant of the yard, and various civilians relating primarily to repairs and replacement of equipment at the yard and to civilian employees.

465. Press Copies of Letters Sent by the Acting Naval Storekeeper and Other Officers at the Yard.
Aug. 13, 1866-Aug. 5, 1868. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part, the letters were sent by the naval storekeeper and, beginning in July 1867, the equipment officer, to the commandant and Navy bureau chiefs, particularly concerning materials coming into the yard and accompanying bills and invoices. Other letters were sent by inspectors and the acting navigation officer.

466. Letters Received From Naval Officers.
Jan. 9, 1863-Dec. 9, 1873. 4 vols. 8 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Letters were from commanding and other officers of the Gulf Blockading Squadron, West Gulf Blockading Squadron, Gulf Squadron, and North Atlantic Fleet. Many concern supplies for vessels and vessel repairs needing to be performed at the yard. Other subjects of the letters include facilities at the yard, courts-martial, and employment and pay of workers. There are also a few orders received.

467. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy and Bureau Chiefs.
July 17, 1865-Apr. 9, 1869. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters only for July 17, 1865-May 16, 1866, and January 24, 1868-April 9, 1869. There is a list of letters in the volume for the latter period.

The letters pertain to civilian employees, the naval hospital at the yard, vessel surveys, contracts, and many other subjects.

468. Station Logs.
Jan. 1837-Dec. 1875. 12 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are no logs for 1838-64.

Log entries describe the weather, ships arriving or departing, and work done at the yard.

469. Register of Officers.
Dec. 1862-Oct. 20, 1911. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries are arranged for the most part chronologically by date reported.

A complete entry (many are incomplete) includes name and rank of officer, date of order to report, date on which reported, previous duty, date of detachment order, date of detachment, and duty to which ordered or other change of status. Included is a list of commandants of the navy yard, 1851-1911.

470. Journal of Comdr. John F. Armstrong, Commandant.
Jan. 2, 1865-Mar. 31, 1866. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The entries include meteorological data and information concerning activities at the yard, including the kind of work performed, number of persons employed, and arrivals and departures of vessels. There is also a list of persons buried, January 1866-January 1867.

Philadelphia Navy Yard

During 1800 and 1801 the Navy Department purchased from private owners several parcels of land at Southwark, PA, to be used as the site of a navy yard. Immediately after the purchases were completed, construction was begun of storehouses, blacksmith ships, mould lofts, an office for civilian personnel, and various other buildings needed for the yard. Subsequent additions were made during the period 1807-21. The first keel laid at Philadelphia Navy Yard was that of the USS Franklin in 1815. During the Civil War the City of Philadelphia purchased and presented to the U.S. Government over 900 acres of land on League Island in the Delaware River. The navy yard at Southwark was sold at public auction to the Pennsylvania Railroad and all navy yard activities were transferred to League Island in January 1876. Most of the records of the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years.

471. Letters Sent.
May 16, 1817-Oct.29, 1822. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters were sent to the Secretary of the Navy or Board of Navy Commissioners. They relate to such subjects as the construction and equipping of the USS Franklin and North Carolina, conditions at the yard, the yard hospital, courts-martial, copper, timber, and wages of employees.

472. Press Copies of Letters Sent.
Sept. 20, 1859-July 26, 1862. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters to commandants of other yards, naval storekeepers in foreign ports, the Governor of the Naval Asylum, companies doing business with the Navy, private citizens, and, occasionally, officers at the yard concerning such subjects as coal shipments, other supplies furnished under contract, naval operations on the Susquehanna River, and admissions to the Navel Asylum.

473. Press Copies of Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
Sept. 1, 1860-May 14, 1862. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters concern such matters as arrivals and departures of naval vessels and their sale, purchase, and repair; naval personnel suspected of disloyalty to the Union; and deaths at the yard.

474. Press Copies of Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Nov. 1860-May 1865. 20 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters were addressed to officers stationed at the yard, including those commanding vessels and serving as recruiting officers. Also included are a few letters addressed to civilian employees at the yard. Among the subjects discussed are crews and repairs for vessels, supplies furnished under contracts, examinations of officer candidates, enlistment of recruits, and reports of bribery occurring at the yard.

475. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Jan. 5, 1861-Dec. 31, 1862. 2 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are lists of letter subjects in the volumes.

Subjects of letters include detachments of officers from the yard, prize vessels and crews, complements for newly purchased vessels, and expenditures.

476. Register of Receipts for Goods (Articles) Received.
Jan. 12, 1823-Nov. 1828. 1 vol. 1 in. Arranged chronologically.

Entries include name of supplier, date, account charged, types and amounts of articles, and cost.

477. Orders Issued by the Commandant.
June 8, 1826-Oct. 6, 1831. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The orders relate to pay, leave, desertion, duties, promotions, courts-martial, and other matters. There are a few letters received relating to the orders.

478. Registers of Officers.
June 1860-Dec. 1866. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by time periods: June 1860 and June 1861-September 1864, December 1863-December 1866, and September 1864-December 1866. Entries within volumes are arranged for the most part chronologically. There is duplication between volumes.

Entries include name and rank of officer, date or reporting, duty to which assigned and from which relieved, date and source of order, and sometimes remarks.

479. Register of Naval Officers Granted Leaves of Absence From the Yard.
Aug. 1864-Jan. 1867. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Entries include the date on which leave was granted, the name of the officer, his rank, ship to which assigned, date on which leave expired, address while on leave, and remarks that generally indicate when the officer returned from leave.

480. Register of Vessels in Dock.
June 1866-June 1876. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically by date docked. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries show name of vessel, dates docked and undocked, the draft and other measurements of vessel, and usually some indication of the work done on it. The volume also contains a list of monitors and ironclads docked, June 1862-October 1868, arranged chronologically, which shows the name of the vessel and the date docked, and a letter sent by the Naval Constructor at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, December 4, 1867, forwarding the volume to the Assistant Naval Constructor.

Portsmouth, NH, Navy Yard

The Portsmouth Navy Yard was established on January 12, 1801, on Dennet's Island, an island of 58 acres on the Piscatagua River south of Kittery, NH. The first line officer to serve as commandant of the yard was Capt. Isaac Hull, who took charge on October 4, 1812. Little activity occurred at the yard prior to the War of 1812, but during the war and the period following, shipbuilding and ship repair activities increased. Numerous improvements were proposed and carried out, and additional land purchased for expansion of the yard during the period 1818-59. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during this period were the USS Porpoise, 1821; USS Preble, 1839; USS Congress, 1842; USS Saratoga, 1843; USS Portsmouth, 1844; USS Saranac, 1848; and USS Mohican, 1859.

481. Station Logs.
1840-45 3 vols. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Log entries show weather data, arrival and departure of ships, and personnel actions.
Rio Grande Station
The Rio Grande Station was established about the year 1875 to oversee operations on the Rio Grande following the outbreak of violence along the U.S.-Mexican border. The station was successively under the command of Comdr. George C. Remey, Lt. Comdr. Henry L. Johnson, Comdr. Benjamin F. Day, Comdr. Bartlett J. Cromwell, Lt. Thomas A. De Blois, and Comdr. Charles F. Schmitz.

482. Letters Sent by Officers Commanding the USS Rio Bravo and the Naval Forces in the Rio Grande.
Nov. 16, 1875-Apr. 7, 1879. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters, addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, bureau chiefs, and the Senior Naval Officer at New Orleans, concern recruiting personnel at New Orleans for duty on the river, measures taken to prevent attacks by cattle thieves on settlements along the river, and revolutionary activities in Mexico, particularly in the area around Matamoras. The officers were stationed primarily at Brownsville, TX, and Matamoras, Mexico.

U.S. Naval Academy

The U.S. Naval Academy was established as the U.S. Naval School on October 10, 1845, on the site of Fort Severn at Annapolis, MD. In 1850 the Naval School was renamed the U.S. Naval Academy and was transferred from the supervision of the Secretary of the Navy to that of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography.

Most of the records of the Academy, 1845-1926, are part of the Records of the U.S. Naval Academy, Record Group 405.

483. List of Books in the Academy Library.
Feb. 7, 1852-Feb. 10, 1852. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by initial letter of key word of title.

Entries show title and usually the author and the number of volumes and, when appropriate, indicate that the book was a gift.

Washington Navy Yard.

The Washington Navy Yard, established in 1800, was built on a tract of land previously reserved for Government use that bordered on what was then called the eastern branch of the Potomac River (now the Anacostia River). During its early years the yard was primarily engaged in construction, maintenance, and repair of vessels. Among the vessels constructed at the yard during the years 1806-25 were the Wasp, Frolic, Brandywine, and Shark.

An ordnance department was organized at the yard under the direction of Lt. John A. Dahlgren in 1847. By the time of the Civil War, the yard had developed into the principal ordnance depot of the U.S. Navy. The ordnance department of the yard was detached from the supervisio of the commandant in 1862 but was restored in 1866. In 1886 a gun factory was established at the yard.

From July 1801 to July 1832, the commandant performed the additional duties of Navy agent for the yard. During the Civil War, telegraphic orders from the Navy Department to vessels on blockade duty along the Potomac were transmitted through the office of the commandant. On March 28, 1863, the commandant of the Washington Navy Yard took on the additional title of commanding officer of the Potomac Flotilla.

Most of the records for the yard in this record group cover the Civil War years. In addition to the commandant's correspondence with the Secretary of the Navy, the Navy Department bureaus, and other naval officers, there are also several series of records primarily pertaining to ordnance activity at the yard. For oaths of allegiance of civilian workers at the ordnance department, see entry 175.

484. Letters Sent Relating to Requisitions.
Jan. 9, 1832-July 11, 1832. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The volume contains letters to the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners requesting that requisitions be issued by the Secretary of the Navy for funds to cover various yard expenses. They are addressed to the Secretary of the Navy, the Board of Navy Commissioners, and the President of the "Navy Yard Board."

485. Letters Sent to the Secretary of the Navy.
Jan. 1, 1858-June 26, 1868. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These letters primarily concern such occurrences as arrivals and departures of vessels, discharges of personnel, examination of officer candidates, and pay of civilian employees at the yard. There are some letters relating to prisoners of war brought to the yard. Letters include information about the repair and display of USS Monitor in October 1862, including a plan of the ship and letter by John Ericsson. For April 1865, there are instructions for the John Wilkes Booth autopsy and confinement of Lincoln assassination suspects on ships in the yard.

486. Letters Sent to Naval Officers.
Nov. 1, 1860-June 30, 1866. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no letters for the period December 17, 1861-December 31, 1863.

Most of the letters give orders or instructions concerning such matters as assignment to and detachment from duty, vessel repairs, machinery experiments, preparation of parts, transfer of supplies and equipment to other yards and stations, and discharge of crews.

487. Telegrams Sent by the Commandant and the Officer in Charge of the Ordnance Yard.
Nov. 1, 1862-Oct. 12, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. Most of these telegrams were sent in response to telegrams received from the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy and the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance concerning civilian employees and the repair and equipment of vessels.

488. Miscellaneous Letters Sent.
July 2, 1864-June 19, 1869. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Addressees included the Secretary of War, the Navy agent at Washington, the commanding officers of the North Atlantic Squadron and the Potomac Flotilla, the officer in charge of the Naval Observatory, the Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy, the Provost Marshal of the District of Columbia, businessmen, and private citizens. The letters relate to such subjects as purchases of goods and equipment, repairs to squadron and flotilla vessels, transfers of crews, and deserters.

489. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy.
Nov. 1, 1861-June 28, 1866. 5 vols. 1 ft.

Arranged chronologically.

The letters concern such matters as enlistments, discharges, and transfers of crews; civilian employees at the yard; paroled prisoners; and repair and equipment of naval vessels. A few letters for the period April 1865-June 1866 relating to admittance of visitors to prisons ships at the yard, including persons authorized to view the body of John Wilkes Booth, are signed by both the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of War. There are also a few general orders.

490. Telegrams Received by the Commandant and the Officer in Charge of the Ordnance Yard.
Nov. 1, 1862-Sept. 2, 1863. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the telegrams were received from the Secretary or Assistant Secretary of the Navy or the Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and relate to different types of ordnance and the shipment of ordnance to various locations.

491. Report Concerning Removal of Gunpowder From the Naval Magazine During the British Invasion of Washington.
Sept. 10, 1814-Sept. 10, 1815. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Report submitted by clerk Mordecai Booth to the commandant covering the period August 22-September 10, 1814, during which Booth supervised the removal of the gunpowder to the farm of Daniel Dulany near Falls Church, VA, and its subsequent return to the magazine. The powder was removed on orders of Comdt. Thomas Tingey.

492. Station Log.
Nov. 1822-Mar. 1830. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

The entries describe the weather, ship arrivals and departures, and activities of employees.

493. Inventory of Public Property at the Yard on April 1, 1844.
May 20, 1844. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged by department of the yard.

494. Register of Guns and Miscellaneous Ordnance Registers.
1858-93. 4 vols. 6 in.

The registers of guns and howitzers are arranged by type of gun and thereunder numerically by ordnance number.

These volumes were loaned to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1939 from the Bureau of Ordnance. They are marked "Washington Navy Yard Ordnance." The entries in the registers of guns show the base ring, trunnions, dates received and issued, the number of test fires made, and condition of the gun or howitzer. The other volumes include: Rough Data Concerning Ordnance Received, 1859, which shows the articles delivered, their costs, and the places from which received; and register of metal sheets assigned for testing, 1883.

495. Records of the Wheelrights and Coopers Department.
July 1861-Nov. 1873. 1 vol. 1 in.

Divided into a daily register of work performed and other records, and thereunder for the most part arranged chronologically. The register was maintained in compliance with an order issued by the commandant on July 15, 1861, requiring that all master workmen and heads of departments keep a daybook with the following information: article(s) ordered for manufacture, date and purpose of order, date completed, and disposition of the articles(s). The other records include general orders, circulars, letters received, a list of articles manufactured in the department with costs, and list of applicants for work.

496. Press Copies of Reports Concerning Tests and Experiments Conducted by the Office of the Chief Engineer.
Nov. 9, 1874-July 30, 1887. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are a few letters dating from 1898 to 1908.

The reports to the commandant are on such diverse items as a liquid cooler, a patented furnace door, a vitrified emery wheel, an electric marine governor a steam generator, and a spiral punch. There are a few drawings and diagrams illustrating the experiments and equipment.

497. Inventory of Ordnance Stores.
July 1, 1886. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged by category of equipment. There is a table of contents.

Entries include type of equipment, the number and value of serviceable articles and of articles needing repairs. There is a summary recapitulation of all categories of equipment.

498. Register of Vessels Supplied With Guns and Mounts at the Yard.
1889-1909. 2 vol. 6 in.

Arranged by name of vessel. Vessels assigned to expositions or militia units are entered under the name of the expositions or unit. The volumes contain indexes to names of ships.

These volumes were loaned to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1939 from the Bureau of Ordnance. They are marked "Washington Navy Yard Ordnance." Entries show the types of guns and mounts supplied to the vessels.


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21 June 2005