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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Inventory of the Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library, in Record Group 45.

All of these documents are located at the National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20408, and all inquiries about these records should be made to them.

Records of the Chief of Naval Operations, 1887-1945

The creation of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations by a naval appropriations act of March 3, 1915 (38 Stat 928), was the culmination of efforts made by the Congress and the Secretary of the Navy to bring more efficient administration to the Navy Department. As a result of its creation, the aide system was abolished and the new Chief of Naval Operations was given responsibility, under the direction of the Secretary of the Navy, for fleet operations and the preparation of war plans. On August 29, 1916, another naval appropriation act (39 Stat 556) was passed providing the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations more definite status and giving the Chief of Naval Operations the rank and title of admiral, taking rank after the Admiral of the Navy. All orders issued by him were to be considered as emanating from the Secretary. To assist him, the 1916 act provided for assignment to the office of not less than 15 officers of and above the rank of lieutenant commander of the navy or major of the Marine Corps.

Following his appointment in 1915, two principal assistants on operations and materiel were appointed to assist the Chief of Naval Operations, and the previously organized Communication Office, Office of Naval Intelligence, Office of Target Practice and Engineering Competition, Radio Service, Office of Naval Aeronautics, and Division of Naval Militia Affairs were brought under the new office. The oldest of these offices, the Office of Naval Intelligence, had been established in the Bureau of Navigation by Navy Department General Order 292 of March 23, 1882, to collect and record technical, scientific, and sometimes political information useful to the Navy Department in both war and peace. The first naval officer to head the office, Lt. Theodorus B. M. Mason, was given the title Chief Intelligence Officer; the title was changed in 1911 to Director of Naval Intelligence.

The Office of Naval Intelligence was transferred to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy in 1890 but was returned to the Bureau of Navigation in April 1898. The bureau retained responsibility for the direction of the office until 1909, when the office was placed under the jurisdiction of the Aide for Naval Operations. Following the abolition of the aide system and the creation of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations on March 3, 1915, the Office of Naval Intelligence was transferred to the newly formed office.

The Office of the Assistant for Operations was established in 1918. About one year later, a Ship Movements Section was organized with responsibility for directing and keeping records of the movements of naval vessels and aircraft. In 1919 the section became part of the Division of Operating Forces with added responsibility for the operation of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS), which was organized by order of the Chief of Naval Operations in January 1918. The NOTS was composed of vessels taken over from the merchant marine, some foreign vessels, and new vessels furnished by the Shipping Board of the Emergency Fleet Corporation. The NOTS directed the operation of this fleet of vessels engaged in carrying supplies to naval forces in Europe and assisting the Army in transporting and supplying the American Expeditionary Forces in France. Part of the fleet was demobilized at the conclusion of the war, and the remainder was used to supply the forces maintained in Europe and to transport troops back to the United States. The NOTS was abolished in July 1920 and replaced by the Naval Transportation Service in the Ship Movements Division, the successor to the Division of Operating Forces.

In 1916 the title of the Radio Service was changed to the Naval Communication Service, and the head of the service became known as the Director of Naval Communications, with responsibility not only for radio communications, but also for telegraph, telephone, cable, and all other communications between the Navy Department in Washington and operating forces and shore establishments.

In June 1918 a Historical Section was organized in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations under the direction of Rear Adm. William Kimball and was composed primarily of staff detailed from the Office of Naval Intelligence. The section collected and arranged naval records relating to U.S. naval operations during World War I from both the Navy Department files and the files of naval forces operating abroad. Administrative histories prepared by various units in the Department were collected and a number of monographs of World War I naval activities were prepared, some of which were published.

During the latter part of 1919, major changes were made in the organizational structure of the office. An Assistant Chief of Naval Operations and Chief Clerk were appointed in the immediate office of the Chief of Naval Operations, and nine divisions were established: Planning, Operating Forces, Intelligence, Communications, Materiel, Naval Districts, Inspection, Gunnery Exercises and Engineering Performances, and Files and Records. The Naval Aviation Division created in 1918 was abolished, and the Director of Naval Aviation was placed under the Planning Division.

The Chief of Naval Operations records in this record group relate mostly to units of the office created prior to 1920. The records include some of the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, records that were given to the Office of Naval Records and Library by private donors; war diaries; lists and other records created by the office during World War I pertaining to ships and naval events; and copies of letters, cablegrams, telegrams, and reports sent and received by the Office of the Secretary of the Navy and by the Bureau of Navigation pertaining to Latin America and the Far East that were assembled for reference purposes.

Other records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations are among records in Record Group 38, Records of the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Record Group 72, Records of the Bureau of Aeronautics, Record Group 24, Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel; and Record Group 313, Records of Naval Operating Forces.

Most of the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, Director of Naval Communications, Board of Inspection and Survey and Division of Fleet Training are with Record Group 38. Records of fleets and operating units other than the World War I period are with Record Group 313. Records of the Division of Naval Militia Affairs and additional communication logs are with records of Record Group 24. Records created by the Office of Naval Aeronautics, Naval Aviation Division and the Director of Naval Aviation were transferred to the Bureau of Aeronautics in 1921 and are now in Record Group 72.

Records of the Assistant for Naval Operations

212. Messages Received Regarding Peace Negotiations.
1918. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged generally by country.

These messages were collected by Assistant William V. Pratt from the Commander-in-Chief of Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, Adm. William S. Sims; the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. William S. Benson; naval attachés; and other naval personnel stationed in Europe during the Armistice. Those in this series primarily concern the surrender of German vessels to the Allies and the reactions of various national groups, including the Bavarians, Jugo-Slavs, and Italians, to the Paris peace negotiations. A few of the messages are marked "secret." Also see entry 231.

213. Translations of Secret and Confidential Messages Sent and Received by the Chief of Naval Operations.
Apr.-Oct. 1918. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged by time period, thereunder by subject, and thereunder chronologically.

These records were collected by the Assistant for Naval Operations. Most of these copied messages were exchanged by the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. William S. Benson, and the Chief of Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, Adm. William S. Sims. They concern operational matters, logistical support for operating forces, and relations with the Allies. Also discussed are recommendations on strategic and political matters taken by the Inter-Allied Naval Council and Inter-Allied Supreme War Council. Messages received by the Chief of Naval Operations from the Commander-in-Chief of the Asiatic Fleet, the naval attaché at Peking, and vessel commanders concerning Bolshevik activities in Russia, conditions among Austrian and German prisoners in Siberia, developments in the region of Siberia controlled by the Czecho-Slovaks, and Japan's possible intervention in the war are in this series. There are also a small number of memorandums prepared by the Assistant for Operations, William V. Pratt, for the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet on the same subjects. Some of the messages have been annotated by Pratt. Also see entry 231.

214. Copies of Memorandums, Messages, and Reports Received by the Chief of Naval Operations Concerning Russian Affairs.
1918-19. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These records were collected by the Assistant for Naval Operations. This copied correspondence, most of which was forwarded to the Chief of Naval Operations from the naval attaché at Stockholm and by the State Department, concerns operations of Allied troops in Siberia and in eastern Russia, developments among the Bolsheviks, the struggle for control of the Chinese Eastern Railroad from Vladivostock to Chita, the attitude of the Finnish Government toward the Bolsheviks, and relations between the Czechs and other ethnic groups and the Bolsheviks. Other forwarded memorandums, messages, and reports in the series were submitted to the Navy Department by the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet, commanding officers of vessels stationed near Russia, and naval attachés. Also see entry 213.

Records of Divisions, 1897-1940

Ship Movements Division

215. Quarterly Cruising Reports of Vessels.
July 1897-June 1933. 105 vols. 18 ft.

Arranged in 19 volumes and 86 binders by fiscal year (July-June), thereunder for the most part alphabetically by name of vessel, and thereunder chronologically.

The reports include name of vessel and of commanding officer, departure and arrival times, names of ports visited, distances sailed, ship's speed, and the nature of the vessel's service or mission. Reports for the earlier years usually also include the date and place last docked and reason for docking and information concerning sailing and weather conditions and fuel consumption. Earlier reports for 1895-97 are in entry 421. Quarterly employment reports of vessels, which replaced the cruising reports, are described in entry 228.

216. Daily Reports of Movements of Vessels.
Sept. 1, 1897-Dec. 31, 1915. 34 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. The volume for July-December 1911 is missing.

These are printed or mimeographed (1914-15) reports that give dates of arrival of naval vessels at U.S. and foreign ports and of departures with destinations. Sometimes there are notes concerning commissioning and assigning of vessels and similar matters. They were prepared by the Bureau of Navigation until December 4, 1909, and then by the Division of Operations of the Fleet. Beginning in January 1912, now issued by the Department without any identification of a lower unit, the reports included lists of orders to officers and additional notes, including such items as the reports of deaths of officers.

217. Registers of Movements of U.S. Naval Vessels.
Jan. 1, 1900-June 30, 1941. 42 vols. 8 ft.

Most volumes cover a period of one year from July 1 through June 30 and are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. Volume 42, for July 1, 1940-June 30,1941, includes ships with names beginning with A-Q. The R-Z volume has not been located. There are indexes to names of vessels in the volumes.

Entries show dates and ports of arrivals and of departures (with destinations). There are also notes concerning commissioning, assignments, and other such matters. For separate registers for certain types or categories of vessels, see entries 220 (submarine chasers), 221 (submarines), 225 (eagle boats), and 222 (Army account vessels).

218. Registers of Voyages to France by Vessels of the Cruiser and Transport Force.
1917-1919. 7 in.

Arranged in three binders by time period. Entries within binders are arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Entries include the number (cycle) of the voyage, number of passengers transported westbound and eastbound, dates of westward and eastward sailings, ports of embarkation and debarkation, days at sea traveling westbound and eastbound, tons of cargo carried westbound and eastbound, and number of days spent in foreign and home ports. Delays are explained under remarks.

219. Register of Movements of Vessels Carrying Marines.
1917-20. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries give dates and ports of arrivals and of departures (with destinations) and sometimes the date due to arrive.

220. Registers of Movements of Submarine Chasers.
Oct. 1917-July 1940. 3 vols. 7 in.

The volumes cover overlapping time periods, but there does not appear to be duplication of information. Within volumes, entries are arranged by chaser number and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. Usually the entries for a chaser start on the same page number as the number of the chaser. Two of the volumes have lists of the vessels.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (with destinations). There is also information concerning the status of the vessel, nature of assignments, and its ultimate disposition (usually sold). There are entries for some vessels transferred to France in the first volume.

221. Registers of Movements of Submarines.
Jan. 1918-June 1937. 5 vols 1 ft.

Arranged by time period with some overlapping. Entries within volumes are arranged alphabetically by vessel and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There are references to a sixth volume that has not been located. There are indexes to names of submarines in the volumes.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (including destinations). There is also information concerning such matters as commissioning and disposal of the submarines.

222. Registers of Movements of Vessels of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (Including "Army Account Vessels").
Jan. 1918-June 1920. 2 vols. 5 in.

Divided into two somewhat overlapping time periods. Entries within each volume are arranged by vessel, for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of name and thereunder chronologically by date of movement. There is an index to names of vessels in each volume.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departure (including destinations). There is also information concerning acquisition, commissions, transfers (for the most part the return of vessels acquired from the U.S. Shipping Board), retirements, and other such matters. Entries for vessels still operated by the Navy in 1920 were continued in the main series of registers of vessel movements (see entry 217).

223. Register ("Log") of Departures of Merchant Convoy Vessels From U.S. Ports En Route to Europe.
Mar.-Nov. 1918. 1 in.

Arranged in a binder in rough chronological order by date of departure. Included in the entries is the name of the vessel and whether it was assigned to the Army or Navy or privately owned, the port for which destined, ship's speed, cargo carried, port where loaded, date on which vessel was scheduled for sailing, date on which vessel was assigned to a convoy, the number of the notification sent to the local convoy officer, the unit issuing the ship orders, and the date of sailing. What appear to be actual or projected arrival dates have been entered under the remarks column. Most of the vessels were going to France, but some were bound for Great Britain, Italy, Gibraltar, or Russia.

224. Reports of Port Activities of Vessels of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service.
Sept. 1918-Aug. 1919. 6 vols. 9 in.

Divided into two sets: one (five volumes) is for U.S. ports; he other, principally for foreign ports. Thereunder arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder chronologically.

The reports consist of completed forms that include name and type of vessel, account (usually Army, Navy, or Shipping Board), port of arrival, port from which sailed, movements of the vessel within the harbor, time spent loading and unloading cargo and ballast, and information concerning fuel bunkered and time spent on repairs.

225. Registers of Movements of Eagle Boats.
Oct. 1918-Nov. 1940. 3 vols. 4 in.

Arranged by time period with some overlapping. Entries within volumes are arranged by vessel number and thereunder chronologically. The entries for each boat start on the page number that corresponds to the vessel number. The last two volumes have lists of the boats.

Entries include dates and ports of arrival and of departures (with destinations). There is also information about such matters as commissioning and the placing of boats in ordinary. Eagle boats were a type of coastal patrol boat.

Entries for the three boats still in operation in 1940 are continued in volume 42 of the main series of registers of movements of vessels (entry 217).

226. Card Register of Naval Overseas Transportation Service Vessels.
ca. 1919. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Entries, on 3- by 5-inch cards, include some or all of the following: name of vessel, owners, information on inspections, dates of operation, place and date of demobilization, and information concerning authority and account chargeable.

227. Carded Records of Troop Transports for World War I.
ca. 1919. 1 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of ship.

Most entries, on 3- by 5-inch cards, give name of transport, owner, place where surveyed and information concerning redelivery.

228. Quarterly Employment Reports of Vessels ("Cruising Reports").
July 1933-Dec. 1940. 21 vols. 6 ft.

Arranged in binders by fiscal year, thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel, and thereunder chronologically. A few reports for January-March 1941 are with those for July-December 1940.

The reports are on completed printed forms that show name of vessel and its commanding officer; command to which assigned; and places, dates, and types of employment. These types include gunnery, tactics, services, fleet problem or exercise, upkeep, and navy yard. A remarks column gives more precise information such as "buoy upkeep," "engine trial run," "towing targets," and "at New York for liberty and recreation." The reports were submitted quarterly, but entries were made on a weekly basis. For earlier quarterly cruising reports, which these reports replaced, see entry 215.

Communication Divisions

229. Guide to Titles on Message Binders, 1917-26.
ca. 1917-26. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by message type, source, or country. Many of the cards are filed under the letter "I" for incoming or letter "O" for outgoing.

These 3- by 5-inch cards include the binder title, binder number, and dates of the messages in each binder in entry 231. Most of the cards show the full designation of the short message codes shown on the binders. For example, the binder title "O-O" refers to outgoing messages from Naval Operations.

230. Index to Messages Sent and Received, 1917-23.
ca. 1917-23. 241 ft.

Divided into four major categories: localities, flag officers, ships, and commandants. Within categories, arranged by year and hereunder divided into outgoing and incoming messages. Thereunder arranged alphabetically by surname or title of correspondent. Entries on cards are arranged chronologically.

Entries on these 4- by 6-inch cards include message number and sometimes the code name or title of correspondent, subject of message, and security classification, if any.

231. Messages Sent and Received.
Apr. 1912-Sept. 1926. 208 vols. 87 ft.

Arranged in binders numbered from 1 to 207, with some "A" (supplementary) binders and some missing binders. The binders are grouped according to some characteristic (for example, source, type, subject, or security classification). Usually incoming and outgoing messages are in separate binders. Messages in each binder are mostly arranged chronologically and numbered in sequence. Index cards for messages for the period 1917-23 are in entry 230. A guide to the binder titles is in entry 229.

Included are carbon copies and drafts of cablegrams, telegrams, radiograms, and other types of messages received and sent by the Secretary of the Navy; bureau chiefs; the Chief of Naval Operations; the Office of Naval Intelligence; commanders in chief of fleets; force, division, and squadron commanders; commanding officers of vessels and stations; naval attachés; U.S. representatives sent to France to conduct peace negotiations following World War I; and the War Department. Most of the binders are identified by the codes that are described on cards in entry 229 (for example: I-L, Incoming, London; I-Mess, Incoming Confidential Messages; and O-O, Outgoing, Operations). Binders arranged by subject include ones on Mexico, Russian affairs, and Santo Domingo. The messages relate to a wide variety of subjects, including transportation of Army troops and naval personnel to and from Europe, damages received by naval vessels and naval casualties, meetings of naval attachés with representatives of foreign governments, Paris peace negotiations, proposed plans for a League of Nations, mail censorship, revolutionary activities in Latin America, vessel repairs and inspections, and various administrative matters.

232. Communications Logs and Messages of U.S. Naval Vessels, Forces, Bases, and Squadrons.
1914-29. 123 vols. 14 ft.

Arranged in three subseries, the first of which is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel except in instances where dispatches for two vessels are contained in the same volume. The second subseries is arranged by name of force, base, or station. The last is arranged roughly by type of message (chiefly ALNAV, All Atlantic) and thereunder chronologically and numbered consecutively within the calendar year.

These logs were maintained by communications officers. About half of them actually follow the format of a log and contain extracts of the messages sent and received, the names of the officers or units to whom they were sent or from whom they were received, and the methods by which the messages were transmitted (blinker, flag, signal, or radio). Pasted into the remainder of the logs are the actual messages received and copies of messages sent. Messages were exchanged among vessels, bases, and stations.

Many messages in the first two subseries were transmitted through the U.S. Naval Radio Service and reported sinkings, mine dangers, movements of German and Allied vessels, and operations undertaken. Other messages concern such administrative matters as medical examinations to be conducted; reports to be completed; and instructions for coaling, docking, and repairing vessels and aircraft and transferring personnel. Messages received by the U.S. naval representative at Murmansk and intercepted messages also are included.

Most of the ALNAV and All Atlantic messages (third subseries) were transmitted through the U.S. Naval Radio Service. The ALNAV messages were sent to all vessels and shore establishments of the Navy, and the All Atlantic messages generally were of a confidential nature and were transmitted by the Chief of Naval Operations in code; translations usually are not included. The ALNAV messages usually were issued by the Secretary of the Navy, Bureau of Navigation, or the Chief of Naval Operations. They were not considered confidential, relating to such matters as conversion rates for foreign currency, procedures for reenlistment, examinations, uniforms and pay increases. There are additional communication and radio logs for the period 1917-23 in Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24 (see Preliminary Inventory Number 123, entries 129-131).

233. Orders and Other Directives Issued and Received by Naval Transports and Patrol Boats.
1917-19. 15 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by vessel and thereunder in rough chronological order. The records for the USS Talofa are in a binder.

For the most part, these are volumes kept by the executive officers of certain vessels into which have been entered or pasted orders, memorandums, and other directives issued to the officers and crew of the ship. For some vessels, the records consist partially or entirely of orders, regulations, and other issuances received from or transmitted by naval districts. Many of the directives relate to operations, including patrol procedures, the routine for abandoning ship, inspections, antisubmarine procedures, signals, water supply, personnel, and watch duty. The directives received concern such matters as licenses to navigate and sailing orders.

234. Radio and Signal Messages Sent by Antisubmarine and Destroyer Escort Vessels.
Feb. 1918-Mar. 1919. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no messages for the period April 1918-January 1919.

The messages were sent to other U.S. and Allied merchant and naval vessels, division headquarters, and U.S. and Allied naval stations. They include reports of sightings of enemy vessels, requests for assistance, and instructions for vessel formations. Some of the messages for February-March 1919 were sent by the escort vessels accompanying the USS George Washington, carrying President Woodrow Wilson to the peace negotiations in Paris.

235. Register of Messages Sent and Received by the Commanding Officer of the Special Service Squadron.
Oct. 1920-Apr. 1924. 2 vols. 4 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Entries identify the sender, the receiver, and the reference number of the message and contain a brief description of the content of the message.

Division of Operating Forces

236. Logs and Reports of U.S. Naval Vessels, Bases, and Stations.
1917-19. 38 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged by vessel, base, or station and thereunder by type of record.

Included are logs kept by merchant convoys, bases, and stations; telephone logs; patrol reports; reports of ships' positions; shipping reports; and watch, quarter, and station bills. There is data concerning drills performed by vessels and crews, destinations of vessels, cargoes carried, and daily occurrences on board ship and at naval stations. Included are logs and reports for the U.S. Naval Station, Kilingholme, England; the U.S. Naval Air Station, Lough Foyle, Ireland; the U.S. Naval Base, Bordeaux, France; and vessels stationed in U.S. and European waters and at other bases in the United States and Europe.

Air Operations

237. Flight Logs of First Navy Airplanes.
June 27, 1911-Feb. 11, 1914 3 vols. 2 in.

The entries in the log are arranged chronologically. Two of the volumes have tables that show for each flight the name of pilot, name of passenger, designation of aircraft, distance flown, altitude, wind speed, and time in the air.

Volume one describes the first flight of Navy airplane A-1 piloted by Glenn Curtiss and Aviator Lt. Theodore G. Ellyson at Hammondsport, NY, on July 1, 1911, and three other flights on the same day. The second flight log is dated November 12, 1912-April 30, 1913 at Camp Curtiss (Hammondsport); Annapolis, MD; Washington, DC; and Guantanamo, Cuba. The third log, dated May 1, 1913-February 11, 1914, documents the first aviation casualty, the June 20, 1913, death of Ensign W. D. Billingsly and injury of Lt. John H. Towers over the waters near Annapolis, MD. The logs also describe flights at San Diego, CA; Baltimore, MD; and, on January 20-February 11, 1914, at Pensacola, FL. The entries contain data on flights undertaken, modifications and tests run on aircraft, weather conditions, and activities at the naval aviation camps. These rough logs were presented to the Office of Naval Records and Library in 1927 by the Commandant of the Naval Air Station, Pensacola, FL.

238. Station Orders, Memorandums, and Notices Issued at Naval Air Station, Key West, FL.
Jan. 1918-Aug.1919. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order.

The station orders gave instructions for the operation of airplanes and dirigibles, prescribed procedures for the use of the radio and telephone, and announced assignments of enlisted personnel and holidays to be observed at the station. Announcements concerning procedures for submitting requisitions for supplies and preparing reports are in the notices. Many of the memorandums were addressed to the heads of departments and students at the base, and they usually concern the course of instruction.

239. Training Flight Reports, U.S. Naval Air Detachment, Lake Bolsena, Italy.
Feb. 24, 1918-Dec. 16, 1918. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically in a binder.

There are reports for both American and Italian students, which include names of students and instructors, flight numbers, times out and in, flight times, and summary information.

240. Balloon Flight Training Records, U.S. Naval Air Detachment, Akron, OH.
Apr. 1918-Feb. 1919. 1 ft.

Arranged in 11 binders for the most part by class or company and thereunder alphabetically by name of student.

There are reports for individual spherical balloon training flights and final reports on training.

241 Beach Logs of Flights Conducted by Ensigns of the Naval Reserve Force, Naval Air Station, Bay Shore, NY.
June-Sept. 1918. 6 vols. 6 in.

Arranged by squadron and division and thereunder chronologically. Most of the volumes were kept on alternate days with two volumes in use at a time, but there are many missing volumes.

Log entries include name of pilot, time out and time in for each flight, number of machine (aircraft) used, a description of the type of flight taken, and the name of the passenger, if any.

242. Registers of Communications Sent and Received by the U.S. Naval Air Station at Brest, France.
Dec. 1918-July 1920. 2 vols. 4 in.

One volume records messages sent; the other, messages received. Entries in both volumes are arranged chronologically.

Entries include the name of the sender or addressee, the date of the message, a brief abstract of its contents, and the number assigned to the communication. Some of these communications are part of entry 231.

European Operations

For a glossary of abbreviations used in communications sent and received by U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, see Appendix E.

243. Register of Letters Sent.
Aug. 30, 1917-Oct. 21, 1919. 8 vols. 1 ft.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Register entries include date of letter, addressee, serial number (316-96496), names or initials of person who prepared the letter, name of person who signed the letter, and, beginning in October 1917, an abstract of the contents. Lists of initials that identify officers who prepared and signed letters are pasted in the inside front covers of the volumes. Some of the letters registered are among those described in entry 231, but much of the commander's correspondence is in the Area and Subject Files (entries 517 and 520).

244. Register of Letters Received.
Aug. 30-Dec. 10, 1917. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged chronologically.

Entries include date of receipt, correspondent's name or office, file number used by correspondent's office, office or officer to whom referred, and, beginning in October, the subject. Some of the letters registered are among those described in entry 231, but much of the commander's correspondence is in the Area and Subject Files (entries 517 and 520).

245. Messages ("DISPATCHES") Sent and Received by the Commander, U.S. Naval Forces in France ("COMFRAN").<
1918-20. 23 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by abbreviation of command or office and thereunder chronologically.

These messages cover many subjects including transfers of enlisted men and other personnel actions, supplies, mail, baggage, accounts, Liberty Bond drives, transport of troops, arrivals and departures and other vessel movements, and other administrative matters.

For a glossary of the abbreviations used for addressees and senders, see Appendix E.

U.S. Atlantic Fleet

246. Correspondence of the Commander, Battleship Force One.
Apr.-Dec. 1917. 1 binder 1 in.

Arranged in general chronological order.

Included are memorandums, lists, and transmittal letters sent and received by the commander pertaining primarily to enlisted personnel who were provided engineering training on training ships of Battleship Force One squadrons and divisions. Also included are lists of officer vacancies on vessels of Force One and routine weekly reports of vessel employment.

247. Orders and Bulletins of the Cruiser and Transport Force.
Aug. 1917-July 1919. 6 in.

Arranged in four binders by type of issuance and thereunder numerically. There are indexes to the special orders and information bulletins and a list of the force bulletins.

There are general orders (1-280), August 1917-September 1918; special orders (1-78), August 1917-September 1918; information bulletins (1-101), September 1917-October 1918; and force bulletins (2-211), November 1918-July 1919. The orders and bulletins concern such subjects as vessel complements, operating procedures, drills, sanitary measures, equipment, distribution of supplies, accommodations for naval personnel aboard transports, icebergs and other obstructions to navigation, courts-martial, and the use of the franking privilege.

248. Secret and Confidential Letters Sent by Cruiser and Transport Force.
Dec. 31, 1917-Nov. 6, 1918. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged numerically 1-94. Numbers 92 and 94 are listed as "special orders."

The letters were sent by Albert Gleaves, commander, Cruiser and Transport Force. The subjects cover such topics as embarkation of troops, communications with U.S. Destroyers in European waters, confidential radio calls, running lists, and special requirements for ships entering convoy.

249. Subject Index to Correspondence of the Commander, Mine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
1918-19. 6 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by subject.

The entries on 3- by 5-inch sheets include, when appropriate, subject of document, words or phrases under which indexed, writer, addressee, date of receipt, file reference of sender, date of document, organizations to which copies were referred, and file number. Some of the correspondence indexed is in entry 250.

250. Correspondence of the Commander, Mine Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet.
1918-19. 15 ft.

Arranged according to a subject-numeric scheme and thereunder chronologically. Partial subject index is in entry 249.

Included are letters, telegrams and other messages, memorandums, and reports sent to or received from the Commander of Mine Squadron One, the Commander in Chief of U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters, the commanding officers of the minesweeping detachment, divisions, and vessels, and the British Admiralty. They relate to organization of the staff; establishment and disbandment of units; equipment tests, inspections, and experiments; plans for the North Sea mine barrage; personnel matters; and many other subjects.

War Plans Division

251. "Confidential" Letters and Reports Received Concerning Tactical Exercises of Submarines and Torpedo Vessels.
Aug. 4, 1909-Apr. 15, 1910. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Press copies of reports on operations and exercises of the Atlantic Submarine Fleet with a battleship fleet in Cape Cod Bay during July and August 1909, summary of reports of a practice attack by torpedo boats, and a memorandum with endorsements concerning a system of tactics for torpedo vessels.

252. Records Concerning Naval District Coastal Defenses and Other Subjects.
Jan. 1916-Apr. 1917. 3 in.

Arranged in rough order by subject. There are some records dated 1915.

In this series are letters, memorandums, reports, circulars, orders, and other records, for the most part copies or drafts, relating in large part to measures for coastal defense in case of war, particularly at the naval district level. Specific subjects covered include naval district defense forces, civilian training cruises, Boy Scout coast guard program, motor boat patrols, use of merchant vessels for coastal defense, minesweeping, and assignment of submarines for local defense. This was probably a reference file, perhaps collected by Capt. George R. Marvell, who was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations during the period covered by the records.

253. Confidential Ship Characteristics Reports ("CARDS").
1920-41. 6 in.

Arranged in binders in vessel categories: old destroyers; old submarines ex-naval auxiliary vessels; and decommissioned battleships, cruisers, destroyers, and mine layers. Thereunder for the most part arranged alphabetically by name of vessel, except that the reports for destroyers are first divided into those that were sold and scrapped and those that were transferred to the British in 1941, and the reports for decommissioned vessels are first arranged by type of vessel.

These reports, apparently for vessels that were decommissioned and disposed of by the Navy, were usually prepared on a form (NOP-12-1), but the form was revised several times. They include such information as name of vessel, type, builder, classification, date launched, assignment, home navy yard, dimensions, speed, fuel capacity, capacity for food and water and ammunition, and number and type of boilers, engines, radio transmitters and receivers, and other special equipment. The dates on which the vessel was sold, scrapped, or removed from the Navy Register are noted frequently.

Records of the Historical Section, 1917-26

War Diaries and Related Records

254. War Diaries.
Apr. 1917-Mar. 1927. 100 ft.

Arranged in 777 binders. First are diaries of vessels arranged for the most part alphabetically by name, followed by diaries for commands arranged by designation. For a list of diaries, see Appendixes F and G.

In April 1917 orders were issued by fleet commanders to subordinate units to submit war diaries either weekly or daily to the immediate superior in command. The diaries eventually were forwarded to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. Most vessels and commands discontinued keeping diaries after March 1919. At approximately the same time, the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations turned over the war diaries in its possession to the Office of Naval Intelligence, which later transferred them to the Historical Section of the Office of Naval Records and Library. War diaries continued to be kept by vessels and commands still engaged in active operations following March 1919. These later came into the custody of the Historical Section of the Office of Naval Records and Library.

The war diaries of vessels contain information on movements, positions, operations, exercises, drills, personnel actions involving officers, weather conditions, vessels sighted and collided with, and other events. The number of officers, crew, and marines aboard ship is included in most diaries; some diaries consist only of rosters, muster rolls, and/or crew lists. The amounts of coal, oil, ammunition, and other supplies on hand is also recorded frequently. Ships' histories and issuances accompany some diaries. War diaries kept by commands usually contain data on important events occurring on the station and sometimes are accompanied by copies of diary entries of attached vessels and commands and by orders, instructions, and other issuances. The diaries kept following World War I by forces, squadrons, divisions, and detachments in the eastern Mediterranean, particularly off Greece and Turkey, often contain long reports on local political, economic, and military conditions and photographs of incidents.

The diaries for many vessels and commands are incomplete. Most war diaries are in the Subject File (see entry 520) among the files for individual ships or stations.

255. Memorandums and Lists Relating to War Diaries.
Apr. 9, 1917-Jan. 1921. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are memorandums exchanged by commanders of forces and divisions, the officers serving under them, and the Office of Naval Intelligence concerning proper procedures for preparing and submitting war diaries. Lists containing names of vessels and commands from which diaries were received or not received and information concerning the status of vessels from which diaries had not been received. The war diaries themselves are described in entry 254 and listed in Appendix G.

256. Chronology of Events Described in War Diaries and Other Navy Department Records for the Period May 1917-March 1919.
n.d. 15 ft.

Arranged by day and thereunder for the most part alphabetically by name of reporting vessel or unit.

Each 5- by 8-inch card entry provides the date, a description of the event, and sometimes the source of the information. Descriptions of events were taken from war diaries, armed guard reports, fleet commanders' reports, and correspondence files in Navy Department offices.

Carded Reference Compilations

257. Lists of U.S. and Foreign Naval Vessels Lost, August 1914-May 1919.
n.d. 2 ft.

Two lists. One, for foreign vessels lost by destruction or capture, from August 1914 to May 1919, is arranged chronologically by date of incident. The second, for both U.S. and foreign vessels, August 1914-November 1918, is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

Each of these 3- by 5-inch cards includes date of incident; name, class, nationality, and tonnage of vessel; note on or brief description of how the vessel was lost; and the source of the information or file reference.

258. Summary Reports of Movements of U.S. Naval Vessels, 1915-19.
n.d. 3 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder chronologically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards provide name and type of vessel, and dates o arrivals at and departures from U.S. and foreign ports. Some cards give tonnage, armament, and organizational affiliation of the vessel. Cards are included for submarine chasers, battleships, cruisers, destroyers, minesweepers, barges, fleet colliers, Army transports, barges, merchant vessels, tugs, and other types of vessels.

259. Reports of Movements of Foreign Vessels During the Years 1915-19.
n.d. 3 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of country of registry and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel, except that Great Britain is at the end and there is a section for unknown vessels.

Information on the 3- by 5-inch cards includes name of vessel and sometimes its type, name of country of registry, arrival and departure dates, and sometimes hours, source of the report, and other information. There are no entries for Germany.

260. Summary Reports of Movements of Foreign Vessels, 1915-19.
n.d. 5 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of port or locality visited and thereunder chronologically.

The 3- by 5-inch cards give name of port or other geographic place, nation, names and nationalities of ships, and dates of arrivals and departures.

261. List of Sinkings and Other Incidents Involving U.S. Naval Craft, 1915-19.
1921. 4 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel except that at the end there are cards for dirigibles, seaplanes, submarines, and submarine chasers arranged by type of craft and thereunder by numerical or alphanumerical designation.

These 3- by 5-inch cards usually provide name of vessel, type, gross tonnage, deadweight, normal displacement, date of commission and date placed out of commission, brief description of incident, date and time that it occurred, names and locations of other vessels involved, number of casualties, and sources of information. Sometimes more detailed information is given. In addition to sinkings, incidents recorded included submarine attacks, collisions, fires, explosions, and mine accidents.

262. List of Vessels Assigned to Naval Districts.
1917-18. 8 in.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries provide full vessel identification and the vessel type.

263. List of Sinkings and Other Incidents Involving Foreign Vessels, 1917-19.
n.d. 4 ft.

Arranged by country in which ship was registered and thereunder alphabetically by name of vessel with unregistered vessels at the end.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide date of sinking or other incident, nature of incident, names of other vessels involved, and sources. The incidents recorded are similar to those on the cards described in entry 261. There are no entries for German vessels. Principal sources were Lloyd's List Weekly Summary, the Nautical Gazette, other periodicals, naval attachés, consuls, and other officials.

264. List of Merchant and Supply Vessels Armed, 1917-19.
n.d. 3 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

These 3- by 5-inch cards provide some or all of the following information: name of vessel, type, gross tonnage, name of owner, and name of repair port.

265. List of Vessels Placed Out of Commission, 1917-19.
n.d. 6 in.

Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel.

These 3- by 8-inch cards provide name and type of vessel; date and place of decommissioning or return to former owner; and the force, fleet, squadron, or division to which it had been assigned. Many of the vessels were returned to the U.S. Shipping Board ("S.-." on the cards). Some cards have no indication of the decommissioning of the vessel.

266. List of Officers and Enlisted Men of the Regular Navy and the Naval Reserve Force Who Were Reported Dead or Missing During the Period 1917-19.
n.d. 1 ft.

The first list is of officers, and the other is of enlisted men. Both are arranged alphabetically by surname of officer or enlistee.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries include the name and rank of the officer or enlisted man, the date and cause of death, or the date reported missing. Sometimes the source of the report on which the entry was based and the name of the next of kin are given.

267. Index to Data Collected by the Historical Section in 1917 and 1918.
n.d. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically by subject, name of ship, type of aircraft, or name of place.

The date of the event of the subject is usually copied on the 5- by 8-inch card entries. Most of the entries in the list under "A" are for the subject "aviation." The dates provided may be useful for using the U.S. Navy Area File, 1910-27.

268. List of U.S. Naval Vessels On November 1, 1918.
1919. 2 ft.

Arranged alphabetically.

These 5 x 8 inch cards provide the name of the vessel, its class, the service to which assigned, the name of the commanding officer on November 1, 1918, and sometimes its gross tonnage. Also noted is whether a war diary, log book, or both were received for the vessel. The data was obtained from the November 1, 1918, editions of Navy Directory and Ship's Data, U.S. Naval Vessels.

269. Record of U.S. Vessels Sunk or Damaged by German U-Boats During Atlantic Coast Raids of 1918.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged by submarine (U-151, U-140, U-117, U-155, U-152, U-156 and the raider Triumph) and thereunder chronologically by date of attack. At the end of the series there are a few cards for vessels sunk or damaged by mines laid down by the submarines.

These 3- by 5-inch cards include name of U.S. vessel, date and brief description of the attack, and the source of the report containing the information. Not included are reports for boats, shore patrol vessels, submarines, and submarine chasers, which are included on the cards described in entry 261.

270. List of Mines Sighted During 1918.
n.d. 2 in.

Arranged alphabetically for the most part by location at which sighting was made or by name of vessel making sighting.

The 3- by 5-inch card entries give the time of the sighting and the circumstances under which it was made. There are some entries for sightings of suspicious vessels and other objects.

271. List of U.S. Prisoners of War Taken During World War I.
n.d. 8 in.

The first list is arranged in three parts according to whether the prisoner was a member of the Navy, a civilian, or a merchant seaman and is thereunder arranged alphabetically by surname of prisoner. The second list is arranged alphabetically by name of vessel and thereunder alphabetically by surname of prisoner.

Each 3- by 5-inch card entry includes the name, rank, date of capture, name and location of vessel at time of capture, place of internment, and sometimes source of the report and the name of the prisoner's next of kin.

Histories

272. Histories of Components of the Headquarters Staff of U.S. Naval Forces Operating in European Waters.
1918-20. 6 in.

Arranged by subject in three binders.

These carbon copies of histories of units, bases, and sections were compiled in response to requests received in 1918 and 1919 from the Force Commander at London Headquarters for data to be used in the preparation of an official history of the U.S. Navy in World War I. Included are histories of naval air stations in Ireland and France; Coast Guard service with the Navy; patrol squadrons on Gibraltar; Mine Squadron One; convoy and routing offices of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service; the Telegraph and Cable Division of the Communication Section; and the Anti-Submarine, Planning, and Ordnance Sections of the Staff of the Force Commander. There are also a memorandum of the Chief of Naval Operations, November 15, 1918, on the subject "General Character of the Operations of our Naval Forces During Present War"; several memorandums prepared in 1918 by various naval officers concerning the establishment, organization, and functions of the proposed Historical Section at London Headquarters; and reports of similar Allied offices.

273. Financial Records Relating to Settlement of World War I Claims With Great Britain.
1918-26. 4 ft.

Arranged generally by claim.

These records appear to have been brought together after World War I by the Historical Section in order to provide information necessary for the settlement of claims both in favor of the British Government against the U.S. Navy and in favor of the U.S. Navy against the British Government. The claims grew out of contracts for coal, oil, spruce, hydroplanes, and shipping. Some were also made to obtain payments for losses resulting from collisions of vessels and expenditures in connection with the demobilization of U.S. naval forces in Europe. Some of these records appear to have been copied from the files of the Secretary of the Navy and other Navy Department offices and bureaus.

274. List of Persons and Organizations to Whom Publications and Historical Data Were Sent.
1920-24. 1 ft. Arranged alphabetically.

These 3- by 5-inch card entries provide the name and address of the person or firm making the request, the publications requested, the reason for the request, and the publications furnished and date on which sent.

Records of the Office of Naval Intelligence, 1887-1927

Until 1914 it was usually the practice of the Office of Naval Intelligence to accredit naval attachés, except the attaché at London, to more than one country. The attachés forwarded to the office from London, Paris, Berlin, St. Petersburg, Rome, Vienna, and other foreign capitals publications and reports containing information pertaining to foreign ships, armament, and naval organization and operations, obtained primarily by exchange of information of equal importance concerning the U.S. Navy.

Directors of Naval Intelligence
T.B.M. Mason June 15, 1882-Apr. 2, 1885
Raymond P. Rodgers Apr. 2, 1885-July 22, 1889
Charles H. Davis Sept. 16, 1889-Aug. 21, 1892
French E. Chadwick Sept. 2, 1892-July 30, 1893
Frederick Singer June 30, 1893-Apr. 4, 1896
Richard Wainwright Apr. 4, 1896-Nov. 15, 1897
Richardson Clover Nov. 15, 1897-May 1, 1898
John R. Barlett May 1-Oct. 15, 1898
Richardson Clover Oct. 15, 1898-Feb. 1, 1900
Charles D. Sigsbee Feb. 1, 1900-Apr. 30, 1903
Seaton Schroeder May 1, 1903-Apr. 18, 1906
Raymond P. Rodgers Apr. 18, 1906-May 11, 1909
Charles E. Vreeland May 11-Dec. 17, 1909
Templin M. Potts Dec. 17, 1909-Jan. 25, 1912
Thomas S. Rodgers Jan. 25, 1912-Dec. 15, 1913
Henry F. Bryan Dec. 15, 1913-Jan. 20, 1914
James H. Oliver Jan. 20, 1914-Mar. 18, 1917
Roger Wells Apr. 16, 1917-Jan. 31, 1919

Naval Attachés, Oct. 28, 1882-Jan. 1, 1915

DOD - Denotes date of death
* Denotes that incumbent remained in office beyond cutoff date of Jan. 1, 1915.

London, England
Lt. Comdr. French E. Chadwick Oct. 28, 1882-Apr. 13, 1889
Lt. Comdr. William H. Emory Dec. 23, 1889-Feb. 24, 1893
Lt. Comdr. William S. Cowles Jan. 4, 1893-Apr. 5, 1897
Lt. John C. Colwell Apr. 21, 1897-June 5, 1900
Comdr. Richardson Clover Apr. 2, 1900-June 2, 1903
Capt. Charles Herbert Stockton May 29, 1903-Dec. 30, 1905
Lt. Comdr. John Henry Gibbons Dec. 23, 1905-July 21, 1909
Comdr. Edward Simpson May 28, 1909-Nov. 10, 1912
Comdr. Powers Symington Sept. 14, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. John H. Towers Aug. 29, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Maj. (USMC) Thomas Conrad Tredwell June 19, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Naval Constructor Lewis Bowen McBride Oct. 2, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Paris, France
Lt. Benjamin H. Buckingham Nov. 11, 1885-Mar. 30, 1889
Lt. Aaron Ward Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Raymond P. Rodgers Oct. 1, 1892-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Apr. 30, 1897-May 1900
Comdr. Giles Bates Harber June 1, 1900-Oct. 23, 1903
Lt. Comdr. Roy Campbell Smith Aug. 5, 1903-Nov. 12, 1906
Capt. John Charles Freemont Aug. 22, 1906-Feb. 11, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Lincoln Chapin Jan. 13, 1908-Apr. 3, 1911
Comdr. Henry Hughes Hough Jan. 20, 1911-May 5, 1914
Lt. Comdr. William Franklin Bricker Oct. 17, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. William Randall Sayles, Jr. Dec. 2, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. John Campbell Latham Oct. 3, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
1st Lt. (USMC) Bernard Lewis Smith Sept. 1, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Rome, Italy
Lt. Nathan Sargent Nov. 20, 1888-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-6
Comdr. John Baptist Bernadou Dec. 12, 1906-Oct. 2, 1908 (DOD)
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap 1908-9
Comdr. Andrew Theodore Long Sep. 2, 1909-Oct. 31, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Richard Drace White Aug. 4, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Charles Russell Train May 30, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Vienna, Austria
Lt. Nathan Sargent Nov. 20, 1888-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-6
Comdr. John Baptiste Bernadou Dec. 12, 1906-Oct. 2, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap 1908-9
Comdr. Andrew Theodore Long Sept. 2, 1909-Oct. 31, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Richard D. White Aug. 4, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Comdr. Stephen V. Graham May 30, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Berlin, Germany
Lt. Aaron Ward Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Nathan Sargent Aug. 1892-June 10, 1893
Lt. Charles E. Vreeland June 10, 1893-Dec. 31, 1896
Lt. Albert Parker Niblack Nov. 20, 1896-May 21, 1898
Dec. 30, 1911-Dec. 1, 1913
Comdr. (Ret.) Francis M. Barber 1897-99
Lt. Comdr. William Henry Beehler Feb. 21, 1899-Dec. 10, 1902
Lt. Comdr. Templin Morris Potts Oct. 1, 1902-Dec. 30, 1904
Comdr. William Lauriston Howard Oct. 1, 1904-Mar. 23, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Reginald Rowan Belknap Nov. 30, 1907-Oct. 30, 1910
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Augustus Traut Sept. 4, 1910-Oct. 18, 1911
Lt. Jonathan Stuart Dowell, Jr. Jan. 17, 1912-Nov. 15, 1913
Lt. Arthur LeRoy Bristol, Jr. Jan. 17, 1912-Sept. 19, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Walter Rockwell Gherardi June 10, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. Victor Daniel Herbster Sept 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Surgeon Karl Ohnesorg Aug. 24, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
St. Petersburg, Russia
(became Petrograd in 1914 and Leningrad in 1924)
Lt. Aaron War Mar. 1, 1889-Nov. 2, 1892
Lt. Raymond P. Rodgers Oct. 1, 1892-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Apr. 30, 1897-May 1900
Comdr. Giles Bates Harber June 1, 1900-Oct. 23, 1903
Lt. Comdr. Roy Campbell Smith Aug. 5, 1903-Nov. 12, 1906
Capt. John Charles Freemont Aug. 22, 1906-Feb. 11, 1908
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Lincoln Chapin Jan. 13, 1908-Apr. 3, 1911
Comdr. Henry Hughes Hough Jan. 20, 1911-May 5, 1914
Capt. Newton Alexander McCully Aug. 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Madrid, Spain
Lt. Comdr. Raymond P. Rodgers 1895-June 16, 1897
Lt. William S. Sims Feb. 16-Aug. 10, 1897
Lt. George L. Dyer July 1, 1897-July 1, 1898
 
The Hague, Netherlands
Capt. Albert Parker Niblack Dec. 30, 1911-Dec. 1, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Walter Rockwell Gherardi June 10, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. j.g. Victor Daniel Herbster Sept. 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915
Surgeon Karl Ohnesorg Aug. 24, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Korea
Lt. j.g. George C. Foulk Nov. 1, 1883-June 15, 1887
 
Tokyo, Japan
Comdr. Francis M. Barber Feb. 4-Dec. 28, 1895
Lt. Albert Lenoir Key Nov. 8, 1898-Sept. 28, 1901
Lt. Comdr. Charles Carlton Marsh Nov. 30, 1901-Jan. 1, 1905
Lt. Irvin Van Gorder Gillis Dec. 31, 1904-June 3, 1905
Apr. 23, 1911-June 30, 1914
Lt. Frank Marble Apr. 1, 1905-Apr. 11, 1907
Comdr. John Allen Dougherty Apr. 10, 1907-Dec. 9, 1908
Comdr. James Hamilton Sears Dec. 9, 1908-June 30, 1910
Capt. John Harry Shipley June 11, 1910-Dec. 13, 1911 (DOD)
Ensign George Ernest Lake Apr. 12, 1910-July 15, 1913
Ensign Fred Fremont Rogers Apr. 11, 1910-July 28, 1913
1st Lt. (USMC) William Thomas Hoadley Sept. 24, 1910-Dec. 10, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Frank Brooks Upham Aug. 11, 1911-Feb. 21, 1912
1st Lt. (USMC) Ralph Stover Keyser Jan. 1, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Lyman Atkinson Cotten Feb. 12, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Frederick Joseph Horne Dec. 11, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Peking, China
Comdr. Francis M. Barber Feb. 4-Dec. 28, 1895
Lt. Albert Lenoir Key Nov. 8, 1898-Sept. 28, 1901
Lt. Comdr. Charles Carlton Marsh Nov. 30, 1901-Jan. 1, 1905
Lt. Irvin Van Gorder Gillis Dec. 31, 1904-June 3, 1905
Sept. 16, 1907-Aug. 21, 1908
Apr. 23, 1911-June 30, 1914
Lt. Frank Marble Apr. 1, 1905-Apr. 11, 1907
Capt. (USMC) Henry Leonard June 1, 1905-Nov. 9, 1907
Comdr. James Hamilton Sears Dec. 9, 1908-June 30, 1910
Capt. John Harry Shipley June 11, 1910-Dec. 13, 1911 (DOD)
Capt. (USMC) Thomas Holcomb, Jr. July 28, 1910-Oct. 12, 1914
1st Lt. (USMC) Epaminodas Lawrence Bigler June 27, 1910- Sept. 22, 1913
Lt. Comdr. Frank Brooks Upham Aug. 11, 1911-Feb. 21, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Lyman Atkinson Cotten Feb. 12, 1912-Jan. 1, 1915*
Lt. Comdr. Charles Thomas Hutchins, Jr. Sept. 5, 1914-Jan. 1, 1915*
Capt. (USMC) Louis McCarty Little Aug. 21, 1913-Jan. 1, 1915*
 
Caracas, Venezuela
Lt. Marbury Johnston Jan. 8-Sept. 20, 1903
 
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
Lt. Comdr. Robert Whitehead McNeely June 20, 1911-Dec. 17, 1912
Lt. Guy Whitlock Apr. 21-Oct. 5, 1914
 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
 
Santiago, Chile
Comdr. Albert Parker Niblack July 1, 1910-Nov. 24, 1911
Lt. Comdr. Robert Whitehead McNeely June 20, 1911-Dec. 17, 1912
Lt. Comdr. Alfred Wilkinson Johnson May 9, 1912-Jan. 1, 1914

Correspondence and Records of Naval Attachés

275. Register of and Index to Communications Sent by Lt. Nathan Sargent.
Jan. 2, 1889-Aug. 23, 1893. 1 vol. 1 in.

Entries in the register are arranged chronologically and assigned numbers in order (1-802). Index entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of subject.

Register and index entries give date of communication, number, subject, and volume and page where it has been copied.

276. Communications Sent by Lt. Nathan Sargent, Naval Attaché at Rome, Vienna, and Berlin.
Jan. 2, 1889-Aug. 23, 1893. 12 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are partial name indexes to some volumes. Communications are registered and indexed in entry 275.

The press copies of letters, reports, and other communications were sent by Sargent, who was naval attaché to the U.S. legations at both Rome and Vienna from November 1888 until June 1893 and also to Berlin starting in August 1892. There are communications to the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the Chief Intelligence Officer, U.S. consular officials, other U.S. Navy officers, foreign government officials (especially naval officers), and foreign merchants. The principal subjects are foreign technological developments in weaponry and vessels in comparison with those of the United States, foreign naval operations and coastal defenses in Germany, Austria, and Italy. There are also many communications concerning expenses incurred by Sargent in performing his duties.

277. Letters Received by Lt. Nathan Sargent, Naval Attaché at Rome, Vienna, and Berlin.
Nov. 1888-Oct. 1893. 9 vols 2 ft.

Arranged by time period. The volumes are divided into letters from the Navy Department and other letters and thereunder are arranged chronologically.

Most of the letters are from the Office of Naval Intelligence acknowledging receipt of Sargent's communications; giving instructions; requesting information about foreign naval vessels, ordnance, publications, and personnel; announcing visits of naval officers or officials; and transmitting copies of naval publications and issuances, contracts, navigational charts, and acts of Congress. Some of the letters are personal in nature. Also included are letters from foreign merchants concerning Sargent's accounts and letters from foreign government officials, most of which are written in Italian or German.

278. Letters, Reports, and Other Communications Sent by the Naval Attaché in London.
Apr. 4, 1889-Sept. 22, 1914. 40 vols 5 ft.

Arranged in part chronologically, but most of the time letters to the Navy Department were recorded in separate volumes from the other letters. There are indexes to surnames of addressees in some of the volumes. There are no letters for the years 1890-92.

The communications consist of press copies of letters and other communications to the Chief Intelligence Officer (later Director of the Office of Naval Intelligence) and other Navy Department officials; the British Admiralty; and British publishers, shipbuilding firms, universities, and professional societies. They relate to British naval maneuvers, ordnance, and armor; the number of new ships being built in Britain for the British Navy and foreign navies; frequency of repair of British vessels, visits of U.S. naval vessels; purchases from foreign merchants, accounts with British banks and many other subjects. There are translations of telegrams and reports, particularly in 1898 from Madrid when there was no attaché there, and there are some personal letters.

279. Accounts of the Naval Attaché in London.
1893-1914. 3 vols. 5 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no records for July 1896-September 1899.

For the most part the volumes contain press copies of abstracts of expenditures for such purposes as pay, entertainment, travel, commutation of quarters, fuel, rent of office, stationery, postage, cablegrams and telegrams, newspapers, periodicals, and books. There are also receipts from the Chief Intelligence Officer for property received from the attaché.

280. Letters Sent by Lt. Albert P. Niblack, Naval Attaché at Berlin, Rome, and Vienna.
Sept. 21, 1896-May 3, 1898. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

In his letters to the Chief Intelligence Officer, Niblack describes a visit to the Kaiser's palace and his presentation to the King and Queen of Italy. Also noted are meetings with high-ranking civil and military officials of the countries to which he was assigned and information gained therefrom. His letters to the Austrian, German, and Italian naval officers most frequently concern the exchange of information regarding their respective navies. Letters concerning such subjects as naval armor and protective devices, naval ordnance, arsenals, torpedo boats and torpedoes, target practice in the German Navy, and signaling systems are included in this series along with a few cablegrams to the Secretary's office, some of which are in cipher code.

281. Letters and Endorsements Received from Lt. John C. Colwell, Naval Attaché at London.
Apr. 22, 1897-June 30, 1898. 1 vol. 4 in.

Arranged chronologically. The letters are numbered in yearly sequences.

The volume consists largely of letters transmitting publications, documents, contracts, specifications, photographs, and other items concerning foreign (mainly British) naval vessels, ordnance and supplies to the Office of Naval Intelligence and letters acknowledging the receipt of similar information as well as orders. Cross-reference cards or file references have often been added to indicate the location of the publications and artifacts received among the records of the Office of Naval Intelligence.

The series does include some letters describing Colwell's activities and others requesting information concerning the U.S. Navy for the British Government.

Correspondence Concerning Disturbances in Foreign Countries

282. Correspondence Concerning the Panamanian Revolt of November 1903.
Oct. 15, 1903-Apr. 26, 1904. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are name indexes in the volumes.

The volumes contain press copies of letters and messages exchanged between the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy and the Commanders of the Pacific, South Atlantic, and Caribbean Squadrons; correspondence of these commanders with their subordinates; and correspondence between squadron commanders and other officers, U.S. consular officials, and Colombian and Panamanian officials. The correspondence concerns measures to protect U.S. citizens, to ensure order and free transit at Panama, and to establish contacts with the new Republic of Panama. There are also naval intelligence reports relating to Colombian military installations and troop movements along the Rio Atrato, the Gulf of Darien, and the coast from Cartagena to Barranquilla; relations between native Indians and the U.S. troops; and British offers of assistance.

283. Messages concerning the Russo-Japanese War.
Feb. 6, 1904-July 19, 1905. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a name index with brief descriptions of the individual letters.

These press copies are for the most part of translations of cipher messages to and from officers of the Asiatic Fleet. Few of these messages appear to have been copied in the volumes described in entry 60. They concern actions taken by the British and German Fleets prior to and during the outbreak of hostilities between the Russian and Japanese Navies, Japanese and Russian efforts to close the channel at Port Arthur, the surrender of Port Arthur to the Japanese, movements of Japanese vessels in and out of Chefoo, and conditions at Cavite, Philippine Islands.

284. Correspondence Concerning the Dominican Customs Receivership.
Mar. 9, 1904-Jan. 26, 1907. 10 vols. 1 ft.

Divided into press copies and carbon copies and thereunder arranged for the most part chronologically. For the carbon copies there are overlapping and partially duplicating volumes for 1905 and 1906. The press copies are partially indexed by names and subjects.

The series consists of letters and deciphered messages exchanged among the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the commanders of the Caribbean Squadron, the 2d and 3d Squadrons of the North Atlantic Fleet, the U.S. Naval Forces in Dominican waters, other naval officers, the Secretary of State, U.S. diplomatic and consular officials, and Dominican governmental and political leaders. The communications relate to political conditions in the Dominican Republic, revolutionary movements, the occupation and operation of customhouses, and military and naval operations. The Records of the Dominican Customs Receivership, Record Group 139, are described in Preliminary Inventory No. 148.

285. Correspondence Relating to the Cuban Revolution of 1906.
Sept. 8-Nov. 9, 1906. 2 vols. 3 in.

One volume is identified as containing documents received from the Bureau of Navigation; the documents in the other volume are presumed to have been received from the Office of the Secretary of the Navy. The documents in each volume are arranged chronologically. There is a name index in the Bureau of Navigation volume.

The records consist of carbon copies of letters, telegrams, cablegrams, and reports sent to and received from the President, the Secretary and Assistant Secretary of the Navy, Chief of the Bureau of Navigation, naval and Marine officers commanding troops on shore and vessels off the coast of Cuba, managers of large American-owned sugar plantations, owners of stores and smaller agricultural holdings in Cuba, and leaders of the revolt. They relate to efforts of the Navy to protect American lives and property on the island, the dispatch of vessels and Marine Corps units to Cuba and the landing of U.S. Marines on shore, seizure of dynamite and detonators from U.S. citizens by revolutionaries, and meetings of Government and revolutionary leaders to negotiate peace.

286. Communications Concerning the January 14, 1907, Earthquake at Kingston, Jamaica.
Jan. 15-Feb. 18, 1907. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically.

The volume contains chiefly letters, cablegrams, memorandums, reports, and other communications received by the Secretary of the Navy from, but including some sent to, the Commander in Chief of the Atlantic Fleet, the Division Commander of its 1st Squadron, and other naval officers concerning the damage done by the earthquake and the fire that followed and the measures taken by the Navy to assist the victims of the disaster and to repair the damage.

287. Correspondence Concerning the Nicaraguan Revolution of 1909-10.
Oct. 26, 1901-Oct. 1, 1910. 1 vol. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part these are carbon copies of translated messages sent in cipher to the Secretary of the Navy by naval officers commanding vessels off the coast of Nicaragua. They concern such matters as political conditions in the country and the activities of the revolutionary leaders, reports of the Nicaraguan Expeditionary Squadron on military activities undertaken to protect American lives and property, orders of the Secretary of the Navy to naval and Marine officers, and the Secretary's correspondence with the Secretary of State and with consular officers in Nicaragua. There are also copies of letters received from revolutionary leaders and Nicaraguan Government officials.

288. Correspondence Relating to the Bonilla Revolt in Honduras.
Oct. 7, 1910-June 21, 1911. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are carbon copies of letters, telegrams, reports, and other records, some of which appear to have originally been written in cipher, concerning the Navy's role during the successful revolt led by Gen. Manuel Bonilla against the incumbent Davila government. Most of the correspondence was exchanged between the Secretary and Acting Secretary of the Navy and the naval officers assigned to the coasts of Honduras and Guatemala to protect U.S. interests during the early stages of the revolution. These officers were Comdr. Charles H. Hayes, commanding the Princeton; Comdr. Edwin A. Anderson, commanding the Yorktown; Comdr. Archibald F. Davis, commanding the Tacoma; and Comdr. G. F. Cooper, commanding the Marietta. There is also correspondence of these officers with General Bonilla (later Provisional President), officials of the overthrown Davila government, and U.S. consular officials concerning an armistice agreement.

289. Correspondence Relating to Political Disturbances in the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Cuba.
Feb. 16, 1911-July 30, 1912. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically in three parts.

The first part consists of letters, reports, and memorandums, February 16-May 31, 1911, concerning measures taken in response to allegations that ex-President Carlos Morales planned to lead a revolution against the Government of the Dominican Republic. Included are reports received by the Secretary of the Navy from the commanding officer of the Petrel, the naval vessel that had been ordered to Santo Domingo City to prevent the landing of rebel forces, and from the commanding officer of the Chester after the departure of the Petrel. Also included is correspondence between the Secretaries of State, War, and the Navy regarding conditions in the Dominican Republic and the withdrawal of the Chester.

The second part includes messages, January 2-April 5, 1912, exchanged between the Secretary of the Navy and the commanding officer of the Yorktown relating to the protection of American and British interests in Ecuador during the disturbances then taking place in that country.

The third part contains telegrams, reports, and other communications, May 22-July 30, 1912, concerning naval intervention in Cuba to protect American interests there. Included are messages to navy yards and naval stations along the Atlantic coast and to the naval stations at Caimanera and Guantanamo, Cuba, regarding the preparation of vessels for Cuban service and arrangements for the landing of U.S. Marines. Most of the correspondence for June and July consists of reports received from the commanding officer of the 4th Division, Atlantic Fleet, at Guantanamo Bay.

290. Correspondence Relating to the Mexican Revolution of 1911.
Mar. 6-Mar. 30, 1911. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Most of the correspondence in this series concerns the dispatch of U.S. Navy vessels carrying marines to points along the Mexican coast. Included are many confidential telegrams sent by the Acting Secretary and Secretary of the Navy containing instructions for the Naval Station at Key West, the navy yards at Mare Island and Brooklyn, and the Fifth Division, Atlantic Fleet. Also included are reports of conditions in Mexico from officers assigned to naval vessels stopping at Mexican ports.

291. Messages Relating to Disturbances in Mexico.
Apr. 5, 1912-Mar. 31, 1914. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Many of these translated messages contain orders and instructions from the Secretary of the Navy to naval officers commanding U.S. vessels off the coast of Mexico and reports from these officers to the Secretary on the location, force, and destination of Federal and revolutionary troops in that country. Other messages concern the ordering of U.S. battleships to Vera Cruz in 1913 to offer protection to American and foreign oil interests and the taking on board of refugees from Tuxpam, Tampico, and Vera Cruz in 1913.

292. Correspondence Relating to the Chinese Revolution of 1911-12.
Sept. 8, 1911-June 12, 1912. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

For the most part the series consists of deciphered messages received by the Secretary of the Navy from the Commander in Chief of the Asiatic Fleet at Shanghai. He reported the seizure of ports along the Yangtze River by revolutionary forces; the fall of Shanghai to the rebels; developments in Manchuria; the presence off the China coast of British, German, and Japanese gunboats; the positioning of U.S. naval forces in Chinese ports to protect American citizens, and relations with the newly formed government of President Sun Yat-sen. There is a small number of letters and other communications from the State Department transmitting information concerning conditions in China and advising the Secretary of the Navy on policy matters.

Miscellaneous Records Primarily Relating to Foreign Nations

293. Scheme for the Classification of Information.
Oct. 9, 1896. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

A printed copy of the 1887 Office of Naval Intelligence scheme annotated in 1896 to show revisions. "Scheme" was intended to guide office clerks in properly filing information.

294. French and German Proclamations, Speeches, and Orders.
1892-1919. 6 in.

Unarranged.

These proclamations and orders are in the form of broadsides. These were collected by the Office of Naval Records and Library and include French military orders and proclamations, August 15, 1914-March 10, 1919; speeches, April 9, 1892-October 18, 1919; and German military orders, 1914-18. Seven of the German items are in the Russian language, and 18 have English translations made in 1942.

295. Descriptive Charts of Japanese Naval Vessels.
Mar.-June 1900. 2 in.

Arranged by class of vessel.

These are 15 charts, 13 by 17 1/2 inches, which describe in some detail the general characteristics (such as hull protection, engines, and armament) of various classes of vessels of the Imperial Japanese Navy, give overall descriptions of individual vessels in each class, and include sketches and photographs of one or more vessels of each class. The charts also give the name of the builder and dates on which the keel was laid and the vessel was launched. Also included are serial and register numbers that appear to have been assigned by the Office of Naval Intelligence.

296. Logs, Journals, and Navigation Books of German and Dutch Commercial and Naval Vessels.
1902-18. 39 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by name of vessel.

There are records for the German commercial vessels Grier, Libengels, Oldenwald, and Prinz Eiter Friedrich; the Dutch commercial vessel Midjrecht; and the Imperial German Navy surveying vessels Planet, Condor, Mowe, and Cormoran. There are also an account book and a journal of two unnamed Russian vessels manned by Germans. The records are in German and Dutch and contain information similar to that in logs and journals of U.S. Navy vessels (entry 608). For the log of the German ship Nicaria, see entry 601. For the log for the German submarine U-20 that sank SS Lusitania on May 7, 1915, see entry 602.

297. English Translations of German Newspaper Articles Pertaining to the European War.
Aug.-Oct. 1914. 1/2 in.

Scrapbook with no discernible arrangement. There are lists of article titles.

The articles, with some clippings taken from the Berliner Tageblatt, Vorwarts, Der Tag, and other German dailies, and a few letters deal with aerial and naval aspects of the war, including the movements of the British Fleet in the Mediterranean, the activities of the German air fleet, air raids over Paris, the effectiveness of the "Mine Belt" on the British coast, and Japanese aviation efforts. The German sources of the articles are not always given.

298. German Newspaper Articles Concerning the Naval War in Europe.
Aug. 1914-Jan. 1917. 4 ft.

Arranged chronologically in 69 scrapbooks. Lists of the English title of the articles are in the inside front covers of most of the scrapbooks.

Clipped from a variety of newspapers, most of which were published in Berlin, the articles concern such subjects as operations of German U-boats, the attack on the Lusitania, American press reaction to German naval victories, zeppelin attacks, English vessel losses and blockade policy, naval actions in the Dardanelles, activities of the Russian fleet in the Black Sea and the Turkish fleet in the Mediterranean, and the war situation in the Balkans. The scrapbooks probably were received from the naval attaché in Berlin. They were stamped with the date they were received in the Office of Naval Intelligence.

299. Intelligence Reports and Memorandums.
1917-18. 7 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There are some records dated as early as 1909 and as late as 1920.

For the most part these are carbon copies of memorandums and reports, many stamped as received by the Director or Assistant Director, from naval attachés stationed in Great Britain, France, Sweden, Italy, and other parts of Europe; U.S. diplomatic officials; the British War Office; and the General Board. Sources are not always identified. Among the many subjects covered are the military and naval situations and political, economic, and social conditions in Germany, Italy, France, Austria, China, Jutland, and Japan; German operations against Russia; the German intelligence and espionage services; losses of German manpower; the Swiss struggle against German economic penetration; relations between the United States and Japan; relations between the United States and China; U.S. Army deserters; and interned French prisoners in Switzerland. Included are some intercepted press releases and transcripts of intercepted radio communications. There is some correspondence of Adm. Albert W. Grant in various capacities; Grant probably gave these records to the Office of Naval Intelligence about 1931.

300. Record of Enemy Positions During 1918.
n.d. 3 in.

Arranged numerically by latitude and longitude reading.

These 3 x 5 inch card entries describe sightings of mines and enemy craft by American and foreign merchant ships, lighthouse keepers and U.S. Navy ships. The cards include "S.O.S." messages received from U.S. vessels under attack by the German Navy or in the process of sinking. The source of the information (naval district, lighthouse, naval office, or ship) is shown.

Other Records, 1945

301. Surrender Documents of Japanese Forces on Pacific Islands and in China.
Aug.-Oct. 1945. 5 in.

Arranged by title of document.

These documents of unconditional surrender of Japanese military, naval, air, home guard, and civilian forces in the areas listed below were signed on behalf of the Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Fleet, by Navy and Marine Corps officers and by a representative of the Australian Military Forces.

  1. Truk Atoll and all islands under the command of Lt. Gen. Mugikara, Imperial Japanese Army and Vice Admiral Hara of the Imperial Japanese Navy. Signed by Vice Adm. G. D. Murray, September 2, 1945.

  2. Japanese-held islands under the command of the senior Japanese Imperial forces based on Sonsoral, Fana, Merir, and Tobi Islands, Caroline Islands. Signed by Brig. Gen. F. O. Rogers, U.S. Marine Corps, October 6, 1945.


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21 June 2005