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DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY -- NAVAL HISTORICAL CENTER
805 KIDDER BREESE SE -- WASHINGTON NAVY YARD
WASHINGTON DC 20374-5060

Inventory of the Naval Records Collection of the Office of Naval Records and Library, in Record Group 45.
All of these documents are located at the National Archives and Records Administration, 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20408, and all inquiries about these records should be made to them.

Records of Bureaus, 1823-1933

Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair

The Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, one of the five original bureaus established on August 31, 1842, was for administrative purposes treated as two separate bureaus headed by a single chief. The construction and repair responsibilities included the building and repair of all naval vessels and the procurement of materials and labor needed for such activities. The equipment to be obtained by the bureau included sails, anchors, cables, cordage, fuel, furniture for vessels, lights, and signals.

The bureau reorganization of July 5, 1862, removed the responsibility for procuring equipment for the Navy to the newly formed Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting.

Some of the records of the bureau in this record group were inherited from the Board of Navy Commissioners. Other records of the bureau are with Records of the Bureau of Ships, Record Group 19.

386. Letters Sent to Navy Agents.
Dec. 2, 1850-Dec. 30, 1858. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged chronologically. Entries in a register, arranged by location of agency and thereunder by name of agent, give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its content. The volume is labeled as "No. 2," but no other volume has been found.

These are primarily letters requesting that the agents have contracts signed and that they procure items needed at the navy yards. Some letters were sent to notify the agents of the approval of their requisitions, to inform them of amounts available under certain appropriations, and occasionally to reprimand them.

387. Letters Received From the Engineer-in-Chief.
Oct. 3, 1844-Apr. 22, 1856. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are letters from the periods October 3, 1844-November 14, 1850, and October 4, 1853-April 22, 1856. There is a name and subject index in the volume.

These letters apparently are copies made in the bureau. They are similar in content to the original letters described in entry 46, and there is some duplication between the two series. Most of the letters for 1844-50 are addressed to the bureau and are signed by Engineer-in-Chief Charles H. Haswell. The later letters are addressed to the Secretary and are signed by Engineer-in-Chief Daniel B. Martin.

388. Receipts for Signal Books and Telegraphic Dictionaries.
Aug. 2, 1824-Oct. 28, 1848. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. For August 1824-November 1845, there is a register in which entries give number, date, name of recipient, person from whom received, name of vessel, and page number.

Most of the receipts are from commanders of vessels. Included are a list of lantern signals for use at night and a list of "private signals" of the Navy.

389. Cost Accounts for Building, Repairing, and Equipping Vessels.
Jan. 1828-Aug. 1853. 2 vols. 1 in.

Arranged by name of vessel.

The first volume, January 1825-August 1853, includes accounts for the USS Franklin, Fulton, John Hancock, Michigan, Saranac, and Susquehannah; the U.S. schooners Flirt, Grampus, Phoenix, and Wave; the U.S. sloops of war Fairfield, Falmouth, and Levant; and the U.S. storeship John P. Kennedy. It has costs under various headings for months or other periods of time. It also has lists of orders received relating to each vessel. The second volume, May 1832-June 1842, includes the USS Lexington, Naragansett, Congress, and Savannah and the U.S. brigs Bainbridge, Somers, and Truxton. It itemizes costs under various headings.

390. Contract Ledgers.
1833-57. 2 vols. 6 in.

The first volume, which appears to have been maintained by the Board of Navy Commissioners, covers roughly 1833-42, and the second volume, 1843-57, but there is some overlapping for individual transactions. The first volume is arranged by navy yard, thereunder by account of individual contractor and thereunder in rough chronological order by date of opening of account. Accounts in the second volume are arranged in rough chronological order by date of opening. There are registers of contractors arranged alphabetically, by initial letter of surname.

Most ledger entries include appropriation under which contract was drawn, navy yard at which contracted item was to be delivered, beginning and ending dates of the contract, articles contracted for, estimated costs, dates and quantities of deliveries, and amounts paid. Among the items contracted were timber, canvas, anchor iron, and hemp. For earlier contracts, see entry 336.

391. Reports Received From Chief Engineers.
Nov. 20, 1844-July 17, 1849. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order.

Included are reports concerning inspections and repairs of engines; safety apparatus attached to engines, boilers, and pipes; comparative values of various types of coal; and recommendations for vessel improvements and for building iron steamers. There are some abstracts of reports and logs of vessels and reports from persons other than chief engineers.

392. Reports of the Sailing Qualities of Naval Vessels, 1826-48.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged in rough chronological order. There is an index to names of vessels.

The volume contains copies of reports submitted to the bureau, the Board of Navy Commissioners, the Secretary of the Navy, and other officials, for the most part by commanding officers of vessels. They relate to such matters as the construction of the vessels; their draft, speed, and capacity for carrying water and supplies; and the condition of their sails. Suggestions for alterations are included.
Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography

The Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography was established by an act of August 31, 1842 (5 Stat. 579), with cognizance over ordnance supplies and equipment and hydrographic equipment. For administrative purposes the hydrographic and ordnance functions of the bureau were separate. The Depot of Charts and Instruments, established under the Board of Navy Commissioners in 1830, was transferred to the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography, and in 1850 the U.S. Naval Academy was also placed under the bureau. The U.S. Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office were established in 1854 within the bureau.

In 1862 the ordnance and hydrographic functions were separated and placed under different bureaus, the Bureau of Ordnance and the Hydrographic Office within the Bureau of Navigation.

Other records of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography are in Records of the Bureau of Ordnance, Record Group 74; Records of the Hydrographic Office, Record Group 37; and Records of the U.S. Naval Observatory, Record Group 78.

393. Report of J. N. Reynolds on the Preparations for a South Pacific Expedition.
Sept. 24, 1828. 1 vol. 1/2 in.

Reynolds traveled to several New England ports to interview whaling captains and owners of whaling ships and to examine log books, journals, and charts for geographical, navigational, and topographical information for the use of an exploring expedition. Much of the report pertains to longitude and latitude of certain islands and reefs. There are also extracts from log books and journals and introductory remarks by Reynolds concerning his research and the whaling industry.

Reynolds was later secretary to Capt. Thomas Ap Catesby Jones during the first part of the Pacific exploring expedition, 1837-42 (see entry 40). Instructions from the Secretary of the Navy to Mr. Reynolds are in entry 6.

394. Reports on Ordnance Experiments Conducted by Capt. Matthew C. Perry.
Oct. 12, 1839-Jan. 4, 1841. 1 vol. 1 in.

These are reports of October 12, 1839, and January 4, 1841, and a letter of January 25, 1840, concerning experiments ("gun practice") conducted at Sandy Hook Bay, NJ. The experiments involved several types of guns (including the bomb gun), gun locks, fuses, shells, targets, and ranges. Captain Perry was Inspector of Ordnance for the Navy. Accompanying the reports are tables detailing the results of gun firings and sketches of gun parts and targets. For related records, see entry 319.

395. Letters Received Relating to Hydrography.
Aug. 1842-July 1862. 19 vols. 2 ft.

Arranged by category of correspondent and thereunder chronologically. The categories are as follows: Secretary of the Navy, September 1842-September 1853 and June 1856-July 1862, four volumes with one volume missing (many of the letters were received by the Secretary and referred by him to the bureau); commandants of navy yards, August 1842-December 1858, with gaps, six volumes; Superintendent of the Naval Observatory and the Hydrographic Office, September 1842-January 1844, January 1846-June 1851, and June 1856-June 1858, three volumes; U.S. Naval Academy with some letters from the Secretary of the Navy relating to the academy, November 1860-May 1862, one volume; and miscellaneous letters, September 1842-April 1862, with gaps, four volumes. There are registers in the volumes that give date of letter, number, name of office of writer and subject.

The letters relate mainly to hydrographical and meteorological observations and to the purchase and distribution of instruments equipment, charts, maps, logs, and books relating to hydrography.

396. Abstract of Bills Approved for the Naval Observatory and Hydrographic Office.
July 1852-Nov. 1862. 1 in. 1 vol.

Arranged by appropriation on which drawn, such as wages, equipment, instruments, printing, and grounds, and thereunder for the most part chronologically.

The entries include date, name of individual or company paid, service or item for which payment was made, place of payment, and amount. The abstract shows the names and pay of "calculators" and other scientists employed at the Naval Observatory and cartographers at the Hydrographic Office.

397. Journals of the North Pacific Exploring Expedition Under the Command of Comdrs. Cadwallader Ringgold and John Rodgers.
Mar. 1853-July 1856. 12 vols. 10 in.

Arranged by author of the journal(s) and thereunder chronologically.

The following journals were kept in obedience to an order of Comdr. Cadwallader Ringgold "to keep careful and minute journals during the cruise":

Journals of Lt. Henry K. Stevens, commanding the USS Fenimore Cooper, March 1853-January 1854 and June-August 1854, and the USS John Hancock, August 1854-July 1855. (3 vols.) The last volume of the three includes some sketches of islands and other landmarks.

Journal of Lt. Henry Rolando commanding the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, May-September 1853, and the U.S. Brig Porpoise, March-August 1854. (1 vol.) The journal includes a letter sent by Rolando to Lieutenant Rodgers on July 10, 1857, and a letter sent by Rodgers in response on July 14, 1857. Both letters relate to several pages of the journal that were removed by Rolando upon his relinquishment of the command of the Porpoise in 1854 and their return by Rolando to Rodgers in 1857.

Journal of William R. Baker, Assistant Draughtsman on board the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, June-September 1853. (1 vol.) The volume also includes a copy of the receipt received by Baker when he turned the journal over to Fleet Surgeon W. Grier and Purser W. Brenton Boggs, October 5, 1853.

Journal of Acting Master Edwin Osgood Carnes on board the U.S. Brig Porpoise, June-July 1853, December 1853-March 1854, and September-November 1854, and the USS John Hancock, March-April 1855. (1 vol.) The volume also includes a sketch of Cone Island of Killen Harbor and a map showing the route taken during a cruise between Norfolk, VA, and the Madeira Islands.

Journal of Fleet Surgeon William Grier on board the U.S. Flag Ship Vincennes, June 1853-July 1856. (1 vol.)

Journal of Acting Lt. Jonathan H. Carter on board the U.S. Survey and Store Ship John P. Kennedy, commanded by Lt. N. Collins, June 1853-July 1854. (1 vol.)

Journal of Acting Lt. and Assistant Astronomer John M. Brooke on board the U.S. FlagshipVincennes, June 1853-January 1854. (1 vol.)

Journal of Lewis M. Squires on board the USS John Hancock, commanded by Lt. Henry K. Stevens, June 1854-May 1855. (1 vol.) Apparently this volume is a continuation of an unlocated earlier volume.

Journal of Captain's Clerk F. H. Bierbower on board the U.S. Flagship Vincennes, commanded by Lt. John Rodgers, April-May 1855. (1 vol.) A note on the front flyleaf states that the journal is "composed of extracts taken from my private lettersónoted down without corrections or revisions--I had not leisure to copy in this book all that I have written concerning our cruise."

Journal of Second Hydrographer Arthur Witzleben on board the USSVincennes, February-July 1856. (1 vol.) The journal was written in German.

The journals include information about the flora, fauna, geography, and hydrography of the areas involved and observations regarding the manners, morals, customs, and modes of expression of the peoples visited.

The first 11 volumes were transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library by the Hydrographic Office in July 1939. The last volume, the journal of Arthur Witzleben, was presented to the Hydrographic Office, April 1941 and then transferred to the Office of Naval Records and Library. All of these journals have been microfilmed as part of NARA Microfilm Publication M88, Records Relating to the United States Surveying Expedition to the North Pacific Ocean, 1852-1863.

Other journals kept by officers on the expedition are found in entry 608.

398. Contract Proposals and Testimonials Concerning Wells and Gowen Underwater Diving Equipment.
Ca. 1862. 1 vol. 1/4 in.

Documents submitted by Thomas F. Wells, of Boston, MA, who continued business of the firm of Wells and Gowen after the departure of J. E. Gowen in 1857 for Russia. Wells apparently hoped to receive a contract with the Navy for the use of his diving equipment for underwater salvage and ship repair. The documents include a brief history of the company, a description of the "submarine armor" it manufactured and its adaptations for naval service, testimonials dated from March to September 1851, and a newspaper clipping from the Baltimore Sun about the armor, dated November 15, 1861.

Bureau of Yards and Docks

A Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks was established by an act of August 31, 1842 (55 Stat. 579), with authority over navy yards at Portsmouth, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Norfolk, and Pensacola and naval stations at Baltimore, New Orleans, Charleston, Sackett's Harbor, and Lake Erie. Yards, docks, buildings, vessels in ordinary, equipment, and personnel all came under the supervision of the newly formed bureau. Civil engineers acted as the bureau's agents at the yards.

In April 1845 vessels at navy yards were transferred to the custody of the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repairs. In that same month responsibility for controlling naval timber reservations and overseeing the activities of timber agencies was transferred from the Office of the Secretary of the Navy to the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks. By an act of March 1, 1817 (3 Stat. 347), the Secretary of the Navy received authorization to explore live-oak and red cedar tracts on vacant and unappropriated lands with a view to reserving the timber for naval purposes. He was also authorized to appoint agents and surveyors to explore the tracts and was left the discretionary power to accept or reject their recommendations. Subsequent acts expanded the provisions of the 1817 act to include lands containing other kinds of timber considered valuable for naval purposes and also provided for the imposition of penalties for cutting, destroying, or carrying away live-oak, red cedar, or other timber from reservations in Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi.

In 1862 the Bureau of Navy Yards and Docks became the Bureau of Yards and Docks; the functions of the bureau remained relatively unchanged.

The records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks and its predecessor in this record group relate primarily to the selection and control of oak, red cedar, and other timber reservations. Most of the records of the bureau are in Record Group 71, Records of the Bureau of Yards and Docks (described in Preliminary Inventory No. 10).
Timber Reservations
Letters Sent

399. Letters Sent Concerning the Preservation of Timber.
Apr. 24, 1845-Apr. 20, 1861. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are registers arranged alphabetically by surname, position, or by location; entries give date and page number of letter and a brief summary of its content. There are some letters as early as March 16, 1840, from the Secretary notifying persons of their appointment as timber agents.

Most of the letters are addressed to timber agents, but there are many to the Secretary of the Navy and some to the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Quartermaster General of the Army, Treasury Department officials, Members of Congress, and others. They relate to such subjects as reservation of timber lands, trespassers, seizures by agents of timber believed to have been cut from reservations, rights of settlers in East Florida to cut public timber under the Armed Occupation Act of 1842 (5 Stat. 502), appointments and dismissal of timber agents, their rates of compensation and leaves of absence.
Letters Received

400. Registers of Letters Received From Timber Agents.
Apr. 1845-Jan. 1861. 2 vols. 1 in.

The volumes cover overlapping time periods, caused by carrying entries for an individual to the second volume whenever space was exhausted in the first volume. Within volumes, entries are arranged by surname or office of correspondent and thereunder chronologically. There are name indexes.

Entries include date of letter and a brief summary of its content. The registers are primarily for the letters described in entry 401, but there are some entries for letters described in entries 404, 405, and 407.

401. Letters Received From Timber Agents.
Jan 1, 1828-Dec. 31, 1859. 15 vols. 3 ft.

Arranged chronologically. There are indexes to names of writers. There are few letters for the period April 1835-June 1839.

Included are letters reporting depredations on timber reservations, the arrest and prosecution of suspects (including cases in admiralty courts), and information from customs agents concerning shipments of timber. There are some letters from other persons, particularly before the series of miscellaneous letters received described in entry 404 was started. For registers see entry 400.

402. Letters and Reports Received From Charles Haire and Thomas F. Cornell, Agents for Surveying Public Lands in Florida.
June 18-Oct. 24, 1828. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged chronologically.

These are copies of original reports and letters, including tables and map enclosures, to the Secretary of the Navy and the Board of Navy Commissioners. They relate principally to the quantity and quality of live-oak timber that Haire and Cornell discovered. Included are copies of correspondence between the two agents and owners of timber lands in West Florida. The originals of these letters and reports and of later ones from Haire and Cornell are among the records described in entry 401.

403. Extracts of Letters Received Concerning Live-oak Lands in Florida and Louisiana.
Apr. 1831-Apr. 1835. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by live-oak district and thereunder chronologically. There is a partial name index.

The extracts of letters from agents, naval officers, and others primarily concern the location of live-oak tracts and the results of examinations to determine the suitability of the timber for shipbuilding. In the front of the volume are a list describing the boundaries of each live-oak district and a list of names of district agents. The originals of most of the letters are among those described in entries 401 and 407.

404. Miscellaneous Letters Received Concerning Timber Reserves.
Sept. 2, 1843-May 7, 1855. 3 vols. 6 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are indexes to names of writers.

Letters are from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, registers of district land offices, U.S. district attorneys, customs inspectors, private citizens, and others and concern such subjects as disputed land titles, complaints against timber agents, depredations on reservations and prosecution of accused persons, sale of exhausted timber lands, and applications for appointment as timber agents. Some of the letters are registered in the volumes described in entry 400.

405. Letters Received From the Secretary of the Navy Concerning Timber Reservations.
Apr. 16, 1845-Mar. 9, 1855. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is an index to names of Secretaries of the Navy that gives a brief summary of the content of each letter.

The series contains the letter transferring responsibility for timber agencies to the Bureau of Yards and Docks and other letters concerning such matters as opinions of the Attorney General on the rights of settlers on Government timber reservations, cases involving timber cut from the reservations, appointments of timber agents, and the discontinuance or the consolidation of certain agencies.

Other Timber Reservation Records

406. Copies of Correspondence of the General Land Office Concerning Naval Timber Lands, March 19, 1825-May 18, 1844.
n.d. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. Most of the records are for 1831-33; there are very few for 1834-43. There is a name and subject index with a brief description of the content of each letter.

This correspondence, copied by the General Land Office for the use of the Navy Department, is with the President; the Chairmen of the Naval Committee and the Committee on Private Land Claims of the House of Representatives; the Secretaries of the Treasury, the Navy, and War; naval timber agents; and registers and receivers of district land offices and the surveyors general of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Mississippi. The letters relate to policies adopted concerning the selection of timber lands and public reservations and the detection and arrest of trespassers.

407. Records Relating to Live-Oak and Red Cedar Timber Reservations.
Oct. 1, 1829-Apr. 15, 1861. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically. Entries in a name and subject index include a brief description of the contents of each document.

Included are letters, reports, tables, schedules, lists, and other records, many of which are enclosures to letters received from the Commissioner of the General Land Office, the Secretary of the Navy, U.S. marshals, private citizens, and other sources. Many of the records relate to explorations for unappropriated live-oak and red cedar timber lands.

408. Annotated Plats of Timber Reservations.
ca. 1831-ca. 1857. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged by state (Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana) and thereunder by range and township. There is a list of the plats.

The land survey plats are annotated to show location and acreage of reservations and sometimes of private land claims.

409. Records of Purser William F. Lynch Relating to a Cruise to Protect Timber Reservations.
Mar. 1840-Oct. 1848. 2 in.

Arranged in rough order by type of record and thereunder chronologically.

Most of the records are for the period of Lynch's service as commanding officer and acting purser of the U.S. steamer Colonel Harney while cruising between Norfolk and New Orleans. Included are letters sent, October 1844 and November 1845; letters received from the Fourth Auditor, Treasury Department, relating to pay, October 1844-July 1845, and from the Bureau of Construction, Equipment, and Repair, February 1845; invoices relating to charts and instruments, small stores, and clothing, February-August, 1845; receipts, March 1840-September 1848 with gaps; orders relating to personnel and accounts, October 1844; and an article of agreement relating to the schooner Maid of Orleans, February 1845. There are also some records of Lynch's Dead Sea Expedition.

410. Ledger for Expenses of Timber Agents.
1845-1860. 1 vol. 3/4 in.

Arranged by name of timber agent. There is a name index.

Entries give only dollar figures for each agent carried (most often quarterly) from the account books described in entry 411.

411. Accounts of Timber Agents Approved for Payment ("Live-Oak Bill Book").
Mar. 1845-Apr. 1861. 2 vols. 3 in.

Arranged for the most part chronologically. There are indexes to names of agents.

Most of the accounts are for quarters of a year. They usually give date of account or quarter covered; purposes (salary, horse hire, boat hire, postage, etc.), amounts, and voucher numbers for expenditures; and date of approval and signature of bureau chief. Sometimes particular vouchers were disapproved. In the front of the first volume is a list of timber agents in Alabama, California, Florida, and Mississippi in 1845.

412. Reports of Experiments by Timber Inspector James Jarvis on the Preservation of Timber.
Jan. 15, 1850-Jan 24, 1855. 1 vol. 2 in.

Arranged chronologically.

These are narrative descriptions and tabular statements of the experiments conducted and their results. The experiments were conducted by Jarvis at the Gosport Navy Yard to determine the proper time at which timber should be cut, causes of dry rot, and measures to be taken to prevent the decay of naval vessels constructed of live-oak, white oak, yellow pine, and other types of timber.
Other Records

413. History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1797-1874.
June 30, 1875. 3 vols. 5 in.

This is apparently the handwritten original work submitted by Como. George H. Preble. It consists of a preface and introduction, a chronological history, a number of appendixes, and an index. It is illustrated with photographs of buildings, maps, drawings showing the layout of the yard at various times, and newspaper clippings. The history has been reproduced as NARA Microfilm Publication M118, History of the Boston Navy Yard, 1797-1874, by Commodore George Henry Preble, U.S.N., 1875.

414. Report of Naval Constructor Theodore D. Wilson on British Dockyards.
Nov. 16, 1870. 1 vol. 2 in.

Report of Assistant Naval Constructor Theodore D. Wilson of a tour during the summer of 1870 of government and private dockyards in Great Britain where he viewed vessels completed and under construction. He also visited shipbuilding yards and armor plate rolling mills. As enclosures there are copies of reports of British naval officers, tables, charts, drawings, and photographs.
Bureau of Equipment
A Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting was established in the Navy Department on July 5, 1862. The recruiting function of the bureau was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation on June 25, 1889. The Bureau of Equipment was left with many responsibilities relating to the equipment of vessels including the purchase of coal, hemp, iron, wire, and other materials; procurement of foreign and local pilotage and towage for naval vessels; repair of ship's equipment; and installation and maintenance of electric lights, lanterns and lamps, signal communications, equipment, and sounding devices.

The records of the Bureau of Equipment in Record Group 45 are quite incomplete, the majority being found in the Records of the Bureau of Ships, Record Group 19.

415. Press Copies of Letters Sent by Lt. Albert Grant, Resident Inspector at the Union Iron Works at San Francisco.
Dec. 14, 1888-Sept. 22, 1890. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically. There is a chronologically arranged register of letters sent providing the date and page number of the letter and a brief summary of its content.

Many of the letters are addressed to the Naval Inspector of Electric Lighting concerning estimates of material needed for installation of dynamos, lamps, and other electrical equipment on board naval vessels and concerning the progress of work being performed.

416. Correspondence and Reports on Experimental Cruises of Vessels of the U.S. Pacific Fleet Towing Torpedo Boat Destroyers.
May 27, 1908-Nov.8,1908. 1 vol. 1 in.

Arranged chronologically.

Included are letters exchanged between the Secretary of the Navy and the chief of the bureau concerning the time, cost, and amount of work involved in the towing operations; detailed reports submitted to the bureau by naval officers conducting the experiments; and memorandums containing instructions to officers taking part in the experiments. These are copies of enclosures to correspondence received by the Bureau of Equipment in 1909.

417. Reports on the Installation of Wireless Telegraph Systems at Puget Sound Navy Yard and San Juan Station.
1907. 2 vols. 2 in.

Arranged by subject of report. The first volume contains the report for Puget Sound and the second the report for San Juan. Partial subject index in volume containing report for Puget Sound.

In addition to narrative descriptions of the systems and their operation, the volumes also contain photographs and blueprints. Both reports were apparently submitted to the Bureau of Equipment as enclosures to correspondence.

Bureau of Navigation

The Bureau of Navigation, established by an act of July 5, 1862 (12 Stat. 510), was responsible for overseeing all matters related to the navigation of naval vessels. Included under the bureau were the Hydrographic Office, Signal Office, Naval Observatory, Nautical Almanac Office, and Office of Detail. The latter office was originally established in the Office of the Secretary of the Navy in March 1861 for the purpose of issuing duty orders to officers but was transferred to the Bureau of Navigation in April 1865. Many of the records of the Office of Detail are described with the personnel records in this record group; other records of the office are with Records of the Bureau of Naval Personnel, Record Group 24, where other records of the Bureau of Navigation are located.

418. Registers of Arrivals and Departures of Vessels.
May 1866-May 1874. 2 vols. 1 in.

Entries are arranged in rough chronological order. There are records for May 1866-December 1868 and January 1871-May 1874.

Entries give date of arrival and departure, name of ship, port, and often destination or port from which sailed. There are some entries for commissioning and other actions and a number of memorandums relating to vessels, schedules, disposition of vessels, postal guides, and navy yards.

419. Register of U.S. Naval Vessels, 1846-92.
n.d. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged for the most part alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. At the end are entries that probably were added after the alphabetical sequence had been completed. There is an index to names of vessels.

The entries are for vessels that served during the Civil War, and there is information concerning actions from 1846 to 1892. Entries usually include name of vessel; description of it, rate, dimensions, tonnage, statement as to how acquired and; date and method of disposition. Newspaper clippings relating to the vessels are inserted in the volume, which also has several lists of vessels. Registers for the period 1797-1845 are described in entry 206.

420. Register of U.S. Naval Vessels.
Apr. 1875-June 1880. 1 vol. 2 in.

Entries are arranged alphabetically by initial letter of name of vessel. There is an index to names of vessels.

Entries show name, rate, armament, stations and voyages, and dates of voyages and other events.

421. Compiled Cruising Reports of Vessels.
July 1895-July 1897. 1 vol. 2 in. Arranged alphabetically by name of vessel. There is also an index to names of vessels. The volume is identified as No. 2, but no earlier one has been found.

The reports are on printed forms that show the name of the vessel; dates commissioned and docked for repairs; type of construction; information relating to fuel consumption and speed; complement of crew, officers, and marines; names of ports and stations visited with dates; abstracts of instructions or orders received; and name of commanding officer.

422. Announcements of Orders Issued to Officers.
Mar. 9, 1910-Jan. 19, 1912. 3 vols. 3 in.

Arranged chronologically. There are no announcements for July-December 1910.

Included are announcements of orders assigning officers to duty, detaching them from duty, and placing them on the retired list. Also announced are commissions, appointments, resignations, desertions, dismissals, deaths, and revocations of previously issued orders. Later announcements are part of the daily reports of movements of vessels (see entry 216).


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21 June 2005